The Entrepreneur Forum | Startups | Entrepreneurship | Starting a Business | Motivation | Success

BOOK The 10x Rule by Grant Cardone - Crazy or Brilliant?

Remove ads while supporting the Unscripted philosophy...become an INSIDER.

Hyperion

Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
May 28, 2019
25
25
17
I recently finished listening to The 10x Rule by Grant Cardone audio book. I like his passion and drive, but his advice almost seems reckless to me. He suggests to just take action and worry about the details later. While I agree that taking action is a good thing, it seems like lack of some amount of planning could be a complete detriment. He gives a couple of examples where he took action on a opportunity not knowing what he was doing with the intention of figuring it out along the way. He then proceeds to explain how it all worked out in a way that makes it sound more like luck than skill. It seems like someone with less experience could potentially burn a lot of bridges by making commitments that they can't figure out how to make work and eventually lose credibility, or worse, going bankrupt.

On the other hand, if one were to take the level of action that he is describing, they probably could figure it out along the way. Maybe my thinking is just so far south from what he's describing that I can't wrap my head around it.

What are your guys' thoughts on this? I'd really like to hear from those that have some real successes under their belt (MJ) on whether you think this guys approach is crazy, genius, or somewhere in between.
 

Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum. Subscribe.

JScott

Legendary Contributor
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
Speedway Pass
Aug 24, 2007
4,541
9,831
2,201
I know people who have been following Cardone for years, and they're in the exact same (or worse) position that they were in when they started following him. I know other people who have been following him for years and have achieved a LOT.

Long story short, I personally believe that all the motivational stuff is pretty much crap. Those who have the intelligence, discipline, drive and resources to succeed are going to succeed regardless of what motivational gurus they listen to or don't listen to. Those who don't have the intelligence, discipline, drive and resources to succeed are not going to succeed, despite what motivational gurus they listen to.

For 10 years, I've talked with literally thousands of people who are looking to start a successful business (many real estate, but many outside of real estate). I've been very good at figuring out -- in the first 10 minutes -- whether someone is going to be successful or not. And what motivational gurus they choose to listen to or not plays no factor in that determination (though I do know people who credit some motivational guru or another for their success).

Listen to him or don't. But, for most people, it's not likely to be a determining factor in their long-term success.

Just my $.02...
 

SeePetey

Highly Trained Ape
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Mar 8, 2012
60
126
135
Elsewhere
I've been very good at figuring out -- in the first 10 minutes -- whether someone is going to be successful or not.
What are some success/not-so-success flags that you tend to notice?

I'm not very good at reading people, so it's always interesting to hear this stuff from folks who are.
 

Matt Hunt

Bronze Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
May 9, 2019
91
168
138
I followed Cardone for a while, but he quickly got annoying to me. I think there is a fine line between taking action and obtaining knowledge. You do need some knowledge, but you don't want to get analysis paralysis. Likewise, you don't want to take action if you're clueless.
 

Kyle T

Marketing Entrepreneur
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Aug 22, 2018
203
796
290
Utah
I recently finished listening to The 10x Rule by Grant Cardone audio book. I like his passion and drive, but his advice almost seems reckless to me. He suggests to just take action and worry about the details later. While I agree that taking action is a good thing, it seems like lack of some amount of planning could be a complete detriment. He gives a couple of examples where he took action on a opportunity not knowing what he was doing with the intention of figuring it out along the way. He then proceeds to explain how it all worked out in a way that makes it sound more like luck than skill. It seems like someone with less experience could potentially burn a lot of bridges by making commitments that they can't figure out how to make work and eventually lose credibility, or worse, going bankrupt.

On the other hand, if one were to take the level of action that he is describing, they probably could figure it out along the way. Maybe my thinking is just so far south from what he's describing that I can't wrap my head around it.

What are your guys' thoughts on this? I'd really like to hear from those that have some real successes under their belt (MJ) on whether you think this guys approach is crazy, genius, or somewhere in between.
I don't think it is recommended to go in without any planning. The idea is that you need to set insane goals and then plan the massive amounts of actions that are required to reach those insane goals.

If you do that and put in those insane amounts of work then you are going to be alright.

"Shoot for the stars, and you might land on the clouds."
 

JScott

Legendary Contributor
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
Speedway Pass
Aug 24, 2007
4,541
9,831
2,201
What are some success/not-so-success flags that you tend to notice?

I'm not very good at reading people, so it's always interesting to hear this stuff from folks who are.
I'm not sure if I can do a good job of quantifying it here, but I'll try (kinda like the fact that I played professional poker for a long time, but it's really tough to explain how I pick up tells from other players)...

Some things I tend to see:

- How much work they've put in before they come to me. If someone wants me to hold their hand starting from the day they decide to try a new endeavor, they probably won't be successful. There are LOTS of resources out there to help you learn the basics of starting and growing a business, investing, real estate or whatever it is you want to do. If you don't have the initiative to learn everything you can on your own before you ask for help, you're probably either too lazy or too undisciplined to make it as an entrepreneur. Those who spend a few months learning absolutely everything they can and only come to me when they hit an insurmountable roadblock are the ones that will often make it.

- The questions they tend to ask. The depth of questions is a big tell in how someone thinks. If someone asks me to lunch and asks a question like, "What's the best tip you have for a new investor?" or "What do you wish you would have known when you started?" I know that this person is unlikely to take much action. If they ask pointed, detailed questions that are actionable and help them overcome issues they're facing, they are much more likely to have the personality where they are willing and able to solve hard problems, and that's an indicator for success.

- How they treat me. If it's all about them, and they are happy to use me for however I can help them, they aren't going to be successful. They'll attempt to use other people as well. If they are more concerned about providing me value than they are about me providing them value, they are more likely to have the mentality of offering value to others, which goes a long way towards entrepreneurial success. It's amazing the number of people who practically beg me to have lunch or coffee with them, and then expect me to drive to where they are or to split the cost of the meal. And no, it's not about the money.

- Their level of empathy. This is a weird one, but I've noticed a tremendous correlation between those who are empathetic (can put themselves in other people's shoes and can understand the thoughts and feelings of others) and those who go on to be successful entrepreneurs. Maybe it's confirmation bias on my part, but in my opinion, this is one of the best predictors of business success.

- Their previous success and dedication. With anything. I like to ask people about their past jobs, hobbies and what they do in their spare time. If someone has had a successful career or has played an instrument for a long time or is a skilled woodworker or has collected stamps for 20 years -- those are traits of someone who has the ability to dedicate themselves to something. Many people just jump from thing to thing and don't have the ability to dedicate themselves to anything. Those are the ones who will do the same with a business or their investments -- they'll abandon ship as soon as a little bit of work is required.

Those are the big things I can quantify. Obviously, there are a lot of things we can glean from people that is harder to quantify -- confidence, intelligence, drive, etc. -- and those things play a huge factor as well.
 
Last edited:

The Abundant Man

Gold Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Jul 3, 2018
1,432
2,055
555
The whole "10x" thing is just a motivational tool. "You need to 10x your goals, 10x your sales, 10x your life.

It's like a platoon leader giving some gung-ho rah-rah motivation before going out on a mission and at the end all the marines yell out "OOO-RAH!"

Now Grant Cardone has turned "10x" into a brand. It's become a fantastic marketing tool for him.

I'd also say it's far better to take action and worry about the details later then to get stuck in analysis paralysis and action fake.
 

Andy Black

Dad, husband, entrepreneur.
Staff member
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
May 20, 2014
10,655
43,599
4,306
Ireland
I'm not sure if I can do a good job of quantifying it here, but I'll try (kinda like the fact that I played professional poker for a long time, but it's really tough to explain how I pick up tells from other players)...

Some things I tend to see:

- How much work they've put in before they come to me. If someone wants me to hold their hand starting from the day they decide to try a new endeavor, they probably won't be successful. There are LOTS of resources out there to help you learn the basics of starting and growing a business, investing, real estate or whatever it is you want to do. If you don't have the initiative to learn everything you can on your own before you ask for help, you're probably either too lazy or too undisciplined to make it as an entrepreneur. Those who spend a few months learning absolutely everything they can and only come to me when they hit an insurmountable roadblock are the ones that will often make it.

- The questions they tend to ask. The depth of questions is a big tell in how something thinks. If someone asks me to lunch and asks a question like, "What's the best tip you have for a new investor?" or "What do you wish you would have known when you started?" I know that this person is unlikely to take much action. If they ask pointed, detailed questions that are actionable and help them overcome issues they're facing, they are much more likely to have the personality where they are willing and able to solve hard problems, and that's an indicator for success.

- How they treat me. If it's all about them, and they are happy to use me for however I can help them, they aren't going to be successful. They'll attempt to use other people as well. If they are more concerned about providing me value than they are about me providing them value, they are more likely to have the mentality of offering value to others, which goes a long way towards entrepreneurial success. It's amazing the number of people who practically beg me to have lunch or coffee with them, and then expect me to drive to where they are or to split the cost of the meal. And no, it's not about the money.

- Their level of empathy. This is a weird one, but I've noticed a tremendous correlation between those who are empathetic (can put themselves in other people's shoes and can understand the thoughts and feelings of others) and those who go on to be successful entrepreneurs. Maybe it's confirmation bias on my part, but in my opinion, this is one of the best predictors of business success.

- Their previous success and dedication. With anything. I like to ask people about their past jobs, hobbies and what they do in their spare time. If someone has had a successful career or has played an instrument for a long time or is a skilled woodworker or has collected stamps for 20 years -- those are traits of someone who has the ability to dedicate themselves to something. Many people just jump from thing to thing and don't have the ability to dedicate themselves to anything. Those are the ones who will do the same with a business or their investments -- they'll abandon ship as soon as a little bit of work is required.

Those are the big things I can quantify. Obviously, there are a lot of things we can glean from people that is harder to quantify -- confidence, intelligence, drive, etc. -- and those things play a huge factor as well.
Would Rep this but can’t find the button. I personally agree with Empathy being very important. How can you sell a solution to someone or create a win-win if you can’t put yourself in their shoes?
 

PinPointing

Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Jan 10, 2014
17
40
25
28
I've listened to a few of his audiobooks including 10x. He's super high energy and motivational but his content isn't something I've taken notes on. I remember him talking about how he wrote one of his books in 2 hours or something. Massive action but not much framework.
 

Mattie

Platinum Contributor
Speedway Pass
May 28, 2014
3,024
4,043
1,036
Netherlands
I think it works differently for everyone. I've often had to take a leap of faith without a plan, and it's life pushing you in this direct at times. While I try to make the best choices, other people always have a cause and effect in the process as well.

I am a bit more cautious, where some people don't think before they execute, and usually I'm the one on the other end of this with Sensors and Thinkers, I have no clue what personality type he has, but some personality types are designed to act fast and slice and dice with out worrying about the consequences and I watch people make a mess at times doing this. Fortunately, there's nothing you can do about this.

I can see both ends of it, but risks are always part of the process no matter what you do. Entrepreneurship pretty much is gambling and taking a risk, just probably not in the sense of a Casino game.

I have never notice anyone who isn't taking a risk in business or even dealing with other people. Some are more reckless than others.
 

Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum. Subscribe.

YoungPadawan

Miles to go before I sleep
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Nov 7, 2015
465
1,216
374
27
I know people who have been following Cardone for years, and they're in the exact same (or worse) position that they were in when they started following him. I know other people who have been following him for years and have achieved a LOT.

Long story short, I personally believe that all the motivational stuff is pretty much crap. Those who have the intelligence, discipline, drive and resources to succeed are going to succeed regardless of what motivational gurus they listen to or don't listen to. Those who don't have the intelligence, discipline, drive and resources to succeed are not going to succeed, despite what motivational gurus they listen to.

For 10 years, I've talked with literally thousands of people who are looking to start a successful business (many real estate, but many outside of real estate). I've been very good at figuring out -- in the first 10 minutes -- whether someone is going to be successful or not. And what motivational gurus they choose to listen to or not plays no factor in that determination (though I do know people who credit some motivational guru or another for their success).

Listen to him or don't. But, for most people, it's not likely to be a determining factor in their long-term success.

Just my $.02...
What does mostly determine if a person will be successful?

Edit: oops, nevermind. Just read your message further down the page.
 

0dysseus

Contributor
May 23, 2018
34
38
110
Berlin, Germany
I like the guy, but seems like he never says anything of substance. You can listen through 2 hours of cheerleading and you still may not hear even one practical advice.

It's kinda fun though. I've been hustling for 10+ hours in the last 4 years so I know motivation is not a problem for me, but it's still good to get a little pick-me-up out of someone's energy every once in a while.

That's the real value he provides for people, so he deserves everything he has.

But practical business advice? I've read better advice on this forum alone.
 

Primeperiwinkle

Platinum Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Nov 30, 2018
1,214
3,682
868
I'm not sure if I can do a good job of quantifying it here, but I'll try (kinda like the fact that I played professional poker for a long time, but it's really tough to explain how I pick up tells from other players)...

Some things I tend to see:

- How much work they've put in before they come to me. If someone wants me to hold their hand starting from the day they decide to try a new endeavor, they probably won't be successful. There are LOTS of resources out there to help you learn the basics of starting and growing a business, investing, real estate or whatever it is you want to do. If you don't have the initiative to learn everything you can on your own before you ask for help, you're probably either too lazy or too undisciplined to make it as an entrepreneur. Those who spend a few months learning absolutely everything they can and only come to me when they hit an insurmountable roadblock are the ones that will often make it.

- The questions they tend to ask. The depth of questions is a big tell in how someone thinks. If someone asks me to lunch and asks a question like, "What's the best tip you have for a new investor?" or "What do you wish you would have known when you started?" I know that this person is unlikely to take much action. If they ask pointed, detailed questions that are actionable and help them overcome issues they're facing, they are much more likely to have the personality where they are willing and able to solve hard problems, and that's an indicator for success.

- How they treat me. If it's all about them, and they are happy to use me for however I can help them, they aren't going to be successful. They'll attempt to use other people as well. If they are more concerned about providing me value than they are about me providing them value, they are more likely to have the mentality of offering value to others, which goes a long way towards entrepreneurial success. It's amazing the number of people who practically beg me to have lunch or coffee with them, and then expect me to drive to where they are or to split the cost of the meal. And no, it's not about the money.

- Their level of empathy. This is a weird one, but I've noticed a tremendous correlation between those who are empathetic (can put themselves in other people's shoes and can understand the thoughts and feelings of others) and those who go on to be successful entrepreneurs. Maybe it's confirmation bias on my part, but in my opinion, this is one of the best predictors of business success.

- Their previous success and dedication. With anything. I like to ask people about their past jobs, hobbies and what they do in their spare time. If someone has had a successful career or has played an instrument for a long time or is a skilled woodworker or has collected stamps for 20 years -- those are traits of someone who has the ability to dedicate themselves to something. Many people just jump from thing to thing and don't have the ability to dedicate themselves to anything. Those are the ones who will do the same with a business or their investments -- they'll abandon ship as soon as a little bit of work is required.

Those are the big things I can quantify. Obviously, there are a lot of things we can glean from people that is harder to quantify -- confidence, intelligence, drive, etc. -- and those things play a huge factor as well.
I really wanted to ask about your thoughts. I was glad to see someone else did. I was REALLY glad when I read your response.

Thank you for taking the time to put your feelings down. Much appreciated.
 

MHP368

Machine Learning Behavioral Driven Lead Gen
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Aug 17, 2016
695
1,082
376
34
Sahuarita AZ
I think "ready , shoot , aim" maybe lays it out a little more pragmatically but along the same line of thought.

The 10x principle though is solid thinking , if you keep shooting for the moon and landing on a hilltop then youd better put away rationality about what's "possible for me" and start shooting for the next solar system over.


What are the odds you do just enough on the next endeavor to accomplish what you set out to do? , Considering that if you're here reading this and haven't "made it yet" its because youve underperformed every attempt so far...


Say you want 3 million bucks exactly. Well what's going to start happening at 500k or 1 million? Complacency , excuses.


Noe if the goal was 30 million? You might just find a little extra grit inside to fly past those early numbers , now you're stumbling at maybe 15 or 20 million.
 

Sadik

Silver Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
Jan 26, 2017
179
530
248
36
Kolkata, India
I'm not sure if I can do a good job of quantifying it here, but I'll try (kinda like the fact that I played professional poker for a long time, but it's really tough to explain how I pick up tells from other players)...

Some things I tend to see:

- How much work they've put in before they come to me. If someone wants me to hold their hand starting from the day they decide to try a new endeavor, they probably won't be successful. There are LOTS of resources out there to help you learn the basics of starting and growing a business, investing, real estate or whatever it is you want to do. If you don't have the initiative to learn everything you can on your own before you ask for help, you're probably either too lazy or too undisciplined to make it as an entrepreneur. Those who spend a few months learning absolutely everything they can and only come to me when they hit an insurmountable roadblock are the ones that will often make it.

- The questions they tend to ask. The depth of questions is a big tell in how someone thinks. If someone asks me to lunch and asks a question like, "What's the best tip you have for a new investor?" or "What do you wish you would have known when you started?" I know that this person is unlikely to take much action. If they ask pointed, detailed questions that are actionable and help them overcome issues they're facing, they are much more likely to have the personality where they are willing and able to solve hard problems, and that's an indicator for success.

- How they treat me. If it's all about them, and they are happy to use me for however I can help them, they aren't going to be successful. They'll attempt to use other people as well. If they are more concerned about providing me value than they are about me providing them value, they are more likely to have the mentality of offering value to others, which goes a long way towards entrepreneurial success. It's amazing the number of people who practically beg me to have lunch or coffee with them, and then expect me to drive to where they are or to split the cost of the meal. And no, it's not about the money.

- Their level of empathy. This is a weird one, but I've noticed a tremendous correlation between those who are empathetic (can put themselves in other people's shoes and can understand the thoughts and feelings of others) and those who go on to be successful entrepreneurs. Maybe it's confirmation bias on my part, but in my opinion, this is one of the best predictors of business success.

- Their previous success and dedication. With anything. I like to ask people about their past jobs, hobbies and what they do in their spare time. If someone has had a successful career or has played an instrument for a long time or is a skilled woodworker or has collected stamps for 20 years -- those are traits of someone who has the ability to dedicate themselves to something. Many people just jump from thing to thing and don't have the ability to dedicate themselves to anything. Those are the ones who will do the same with a business or their investments -- they'll abandon ship as soon as a little bit of work is required.

Those are the big things I can quantify. Obviously, there are a lot of things we can glean from people that is harder to quantify -- confidence, intelligence, drive, etc. -- and those things play a huge factor as well.
This is very thoughtfully put and really should be the test before anyone puts their time / money into someone else. Thank you for putting in the time and effort into writing this. It shows that you really do care.
 

Bekit

Platinum Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Aug 13, 2018
707
3,330
749
Would Rep this but can’t find the button. I personally agree with Empathy being very important. How can you sell a solution to someone or create a win-win if you can’t put yourself in their shoes?
Wait a minute... there's no rep listed on users, either. @MJ DeMarco did the Rep+ $$$ go away from the site with the new update?
 

Thiago Machado

Gold Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
May 20, 2014
343
1,107
369
27
Honestly, I don't like it...

First off, it's common sense.

If you 10x your actions and the law of averages work in your favor - you'll get more results.

The problem with 10x though, is that I think it can make most people feel anxious and depressed.

Here's why...

When you're starting at the bottom and shooting for the moon - the first couple of weeks following his stuff might feel great!

"Yeah, I'm going to make $1,000,000 this year and buy a lamborghini!"

But after a while - you start noticing that you're not anywhere near your goal...

Suddenly that Lamborghini seems pretty far away and you're not on track to hit your target.

So you start to question yourself and whether you're really cut out for this whole "entrepreneurship thing"

In my opinion, Grant Cardone misses 2 very important aspects: clarity and creating good habits.

In terms of clarity - how can you possibly achieve a 10x goal if you don't know the actions needed to achieve it?

I forgot where I heard this, but someone said that every time you 3x your life - your business and belief system change.

And it makes sense...

If someone makes $3,000 per month suddenly makes $9,000 - they definitely went through some significant changes. Whether that's skillset, mindset, systems, process, whatever - they changed.

Now just imagine someone going from $0 to $10x?

We operate at best looking 3x in front of us.

We need something that's challenging - yet believable.

Because if it seems too far out and hard - it's easy to give into action faking.

Now, in terms of habits, after reading the book atomic habits - I became a big believer in starting small and working your way up.

It makes no sense trying to achieve a big goal if you haven't even covered the basics yet.

You need to take things one step at a time.

Finally, what really "grinds my gears" with Cardone is that his stuff resonates a lot with people who are new to sales and entrepreneurship. A lot of these people take everything he says literally and it can be detrimental to the wrong person.

If his "rah-rah" and "in your face attitude" isn't enough - in his videos, when someone challenges his 10x beliefs, he says things like "that's why you're broke dude!"

So yeah, that's why I tend to stay away from his stuff.

From my experience though, the books that I've gotten the best value out of personal development were:

  • The 12 week year

  • The End of procrastination
If anyone reads these 2 books they'll know exactly what to do.

Anyways, that's just my two cents, haha!
 

MJ DeMarco

Administrator
Staff member
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Jul 23, 2007
30,384
110,306
3,751
Fountain Hills, AZ
Wait a minute... there's no rep listed on users, either. @MJ DeMarco did the Rep+ $$$ go away from the site with the new update?
Yes it is gone for the moment, not sure if it will be temporary or permanent. Still a lot of tweaks going on...
 

Fox

Legendary Contributor
Staff member
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Forum Sponsor
Aug 19, 2015
2,492
18,258
3,746
Europe
I like the 10x rule even if it doesn’t make exact logical sense. It’s a great emotional book and one that is easy to keep in mind.

- set bigger goals for yourself
- expect to work harder than you thought
- don’t settle for less than you are capable of

A good application of the rule would be aiming for 1 million/y instead of the 100k/y most people initially go for. The one million goal is going to have you thinking in a much different way and on a different trajectory than going for 100k first and then a million.

That’s how I see the book - it’s not a logic rule that makes 100% sense but it’s a mindset tool of “you can do better if you aim higher and do the work”.

I think it’s useful if you don’t take it at face value. It’s also a very good example of taking a polarizing position to build an audience and a brand! He probably could have made a 3x rule to say the same thing but it never would have gotten the same cult status.
 

Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum. Subscribe.

FierceRacoon

Bronze Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Speedway Pass
Jun 1, 2019
155
224
153
What do you guys expect?

It's a BOOK. Even the Bible or the Bhagavad Gita cannot instantaneously change the lives of most people. This does not make it a bad book. In terms of whether the views are exactly correct --- no, it is impossible to communicate a decade of experience to a novice. All you can hope for is to show people the direction of the next step.
 
OP
OP
Hyperion

Hyperion

Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
May 28, 2019
25
25
17
Honestly, I don't like it...

First off, it's common sense.

If you 10x your actions and the law of averages work in your favor - you'll get more results.

The problem with 10x though, is that I think it can make most people feel anxious and depressed.

Here's why...

When you're starting at the bottom and shooting for the moon - the first couple of weeks following his stuff might feel great!

"Yeah, I'm going to make $1,000,000 this year and buy a lamborghini!"

But after a while - you start noticing that you're not anywhere near your goal...

Suddenly that Lamborghini seems pretty far away and you're not on track to hit your target.

So you start to question yourself and whether you're really cut out for this whole "entrepreneurship thing"

In my opinion, Grant Cardone misses 2 very important aspects: clarity and creating good habits.

In terms of clarity - how can you possibly achieve a 10x goal if you don't know the actions needed to achieve it?

I forgot where I heard this, but someone said that every time you 3x your life - your business and belief system change.

And it makes sense...

If someone makes $3,000 per month suddenly makes $9,000 - they definitely went through some significant changes. Whether that's skillset, mindset, systems, process, whatever - they changed.

Now just imagine someone going from $0 to $10x?

We operate at best looking 3x in front of us.

We need something that's challenging - yet believable.

Because if it seems too far out and hard - it's easy to give into action faking.

Now, in terms of habits, after reading the book atomic habits - I became a big believer in starting small and working your way up.

It makes no sense trying to achieve a big goal if you haven't even covered the basics yet.

You need to take things one step at a time.

Finally, what really "grinds my gears" with Cardone is that his stuff resonates a lot with people who are new to sales and entrepreneurship. A lot of these people take everything he says literally and it can be detrimental to the wrong person.

If his "rah-rah" and "in your face attitude" isn't enough - in his videos, when someone challenges his 10x beliefs, he says things like "that's why you're broke dude!"

So yeah, that's why I tend to stay away from his stuff.

From my experience though, the books that I've gotten the best value out of personal development were:

  • The 12 week year

  • The End of procrastination
If anyone reads these 2 books they'll know exactly what to do.

Anyways, that's just my two cents, haha!
Thanks for your insights. I kind of feel the same way about it. When I looked at my goals, and then 10x'd them it was extremely overwhelming and put my into mental paralysis. The idea of 3x or maybe even 2x seems more reasonable/sustainable. I think that if most people were to truly 10x everything in their life, they'd burn out pretty quick and lose all they worked for. I'm all for working my a$$ off, but I've also experienced burn out, and know how defeating it can be.

Thanks for the suggested reads as well.
 

Johnny boy

Platinum Contributor
Speedway Pass
May 9, 2017
684
3,278
757
23
Washington State
I recently finished listening to The 10x Rule by Grant Cardone audio book. I like his passion and drive, but his advice almost seems reckless to me. He suggests to just take action and worry about the details later. While I agree that taking action is a good thing, it seems like lack of some amount of planning could be a complete detriment. He gives a couple of examples where he took action on a opportunity not knowing what he was doing with the intention of figuring it out along the way. He then proceeds to explain how it all worked out in a way that makes it sound more like luck than skill. It seems like someone with less experience could potentially burn a lot of bridges by making commitments that they can't figure out how to make work and eventually lose credibility, or worse, going bankrupt.

On the other hand, if one were to take the level of action that he is describing, they probably could figure it out along the way. Maybe my thinking is just so far south from what he's describing that I can't wrap my head around it.

What are your guys' thoughts on this? I'd really like to hear from those that have some real successes under their belt (MJ) on whether you think this guys approach is crazy, genius, or somewhere in between.
Yes that’s exactly what you should do. Make promises you have no idea how to keep and then figure it out as you go along.

The only time I don’t recommend this is when someone’s physical safety is at stake. For example I would be a terrible doctor. But in business it’s perfect. Maybe you’ll piss off like 2 people, chalk it up to the cost of ambition and move along. It’ll work out better than you think.

Everyone thinks I’m an expert at lawn care and we sell our services at a premium price. Man, I’m up at night searching how to trim rose bushes and how to kill moss. I’m no expert. I just signed up the customers and said I’d figure it out later. Nobody has tried to cancel yet. One time in a hundred you’ll screw up but just don’t take it personal when you get yelled at. Just smile and move on and learn your lesson. It’ll take lots of lessons to become an expert but I’ll be damned if I’m gonna wait that long to make money. Go test things out on customers.

The biggest thing holding people back is they’re pussies. Period.
 

Kevin88660

Silver Contributor
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Feb 8, 2019
977
934
330
Singapore
I recently finished listening to The 10x Rule by Grant Cardone audio book. I like his passion and drive, but his advice almost seems reckless to me. He suggests to just take action and worry about the details later. While I agree that taking action is a good thing, it seems like lack of some amount of planning could be a complete detriment. He gives a couple of examples where he took action on a opportunity not knowing what he was doing with the intention of figuring it out along the way. He then proceeds to explain how it all worked out in a way that makes it sound more like luck than skill. It seems like someone with less experience could potentially burn a lot of bridges by making commitments that they can't figure out how to make work and eventually lose credibility, or worse, going bankrupt.

On the other hand, if one were to take the level of action that he is describing, they probably could figure it out along the way. Maybe my thinking is just so far south from what he's describing that I can't wrap my head around it.

What are your guys' thoughts on this? I'd really like to hear from those that have some real successes under their belt (MJ) on whether you think this guys approach is crazy, genius, or somewhere in between.
When it comes to business and sales in particular I find Jordan Belford’s teaching materials much more credible and practical.

A lots of Grants teaching is fluff and it boils down to “I am great, I work my a$$ off, worship me, pay me and hopefully you will be like me”.

His sales teaching boils down to keep harassing the customer until he buys.
 

Ramtin

New Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Oct 16, 2018
13
8
17
The Netherlands
From my experience though, the books that I've gotten the best value out of personal development were:

  • The 12 week year

  • The End of procrastination
If anyone reads these 2 books they'll know exactly what to do.

Anyways, that's just my two cents, haha!
Thanks man! Those were some good two cents! hahah. I agree with your points. Also thanks for the book advice! I was looking for some new titles to listen to during my drives. I will pick these up.
 

DustinH

Bronze Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
May 24, 2017
250
391
195
Nashville
I like Grant. I love the 10X Rule. I read at least 2x/year. He's a motivational speaker. He gets me motivated when I listened to him. Does his message have answers to my long-term problems? No. Does his high-level energy seep through my iphone into my ears and get me juiced for the day? Yes! Is it only temporary? Yes, but motivation is like bathing. That's why it's recommended on a daily basis.

I'll tell you why 10X Rule resonates with me. If "analysis paralysis" was a real diagnosable and treatable medical disease then I would be on the highest possible daily drug dosage to combat it. It's a real struggle for me. That's why the concept of "just take massive action and figure the rest out later" is what I need. The truth is that I've probably already done the prep work for a new major project or life change. So, taking massive action is the next step I need to take, and I can always adjust the course as needed.

Side Note: don't give Grant any money other than buying his books. Giving them money to invest in real estate is only going to make him more wealthy, not you. Buying his online sales courses won't give you much value. I don't think they're that great.

Sales Guru Question and Debate:
So, many "gurus" have a defining feature that says to "do as I say, not as I do." I would define Grant as a guru, but he has the elements of a "do as I do" guru. Think about it, he is on air on a daily basis and he is always selling. Some of his biggest products are his sales courses. He makes money by selling sales to salespeople (demonstrating the same tactics as he is selling?). So, if you're selling sales to salespeople then you would be teaching them tactics as they go through his sales funnel, right?

On the other hand, take a Brian Tracy. He has training on sales and general business practices but only makes money on speaking and writing books. Not necessarily owning a big business or doing a lot of selling.

Maybe I'm the only one who thinks its an interesting irony to watch play out.
 

ProcessPro

Bronze Contributor
Speedway Pass
Apr 26, 2018
225
271
168
What are some success/not-so-success flags that you tend to notice?

I'm not very good at reading people, so it's always interesting to hear this stuff from folks who are.
How about respectfully asking people what results have they achieved using *insert resource here, e.g. Guru, book, seminar etc*.

There's a resource I'm pretty excited about myself, so much so I want to create a thread to share it with the forum, but I'm putting it to the test first. Only when I get actual results, then I will share it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Roz

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.

Sponsored Offers

  • Sticky
MARKETPLACE Fox's Web Design Guide: Earn $100K this year (Yes, 2020!) and Go Fastlane
Do you mean it will be possible to join until the end of the year for a one year course? And...
  • Sticky
FEATURED! Introducing... WEALTH EXPO$ED, A Short Story By MJ DeMarco
Ah, I should've checked here to find out that it was free! Although, Amazon only charged $2 for...
  • Sticky
MARKETPLACE Lex DeVille's - Advanced Freelance Udemy Courses!
Pick the one you need most. Some just buy them all. :D Loving your email sequence.
  • Sticky
MARKETPLACE You Are One Call Away From Living Your Dream Life - LightHouse’s Accountability Program ⚡
Dropping a quick note in here to say... if you are on TFL, you are part of an elite group of...
  • Sticky
MARKETPLACE Kill Bigger Incubator
I joined @Kak's business incubator in the first week of May. During our daily chats we uncovered...


Visit A Forum Sponsor
sponsor

New Topics

Fastlane Insiders

View the forum AD FREE.
Private, unindexed content
Detailed process/execution threads
Monthly conference calls with doers
Ideas needing execution, more!

Join Fastlane Insiders.

Top Bottom
AdBlock Detected - Please Disable

Yes, ads can be annoying. But please...

...to support the Unscripted/Fastlane mission (and to respect the immense amount of time needed to manage this forum) please DISABLE your ad-block. Thank you.

I've Disabled AdBlock