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Argument for Doing A Passion-Based Business?

MoreValue

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I know the general view on this forum is to not choose passion because passion does not mean having a market need. In a sense, choosing a passion based business is selfish.

But I have been thinking a lot about this and actually think passion is 100% necessary.

Everyone knows that when you start a business many things go wrong or unexpected. This is a given. You have to go through these obstacles to build the business. Most people give up on some ventures because of the obstacles.

But I realized they are considered obstacles only to a person that is NOT passionate.

Obstacle in business shows up
Non-passionate business person: “Ughhh...just gotta get through this. This sucks. Another problem another day.”
Passionate business person: “I would keep doing this even if I didn’t get paid. It is like I’m not even working. I am getting paid to do my hobby.”

The passionate person doesn’t even register these as problems, but part of his/her hobby. What I realize is that the non passionate person eventually gives up because these obstacles happen daily before they even make cash.

This is where I have had a change of thought, passion is mandatory for business contrary to popular belief of this forum

Money-Chasing is a Symptom Of No Passion in Business.
In my early days of entrepreneurship, I was a money-chaser. Could not stop thinking about it. When I looked to this forum, people kept blaming my mindset. But there was actually no hard reason why? It was just arbitrary advice “Change your mindset, your mindset sucks, etc.” I finally realize now. If you are money chasing, it is because you are running a business without passion. If money chasing causes 100% failure and is caused by lack of passion. It means passion is necessary for business.

Re Analysis of Dog Sh*t Story
The story about a guy making money with a business surrounding dog sh*t. The previous analysis of this story was that passion follows AFTER. That once someone starts winning, passion follows. I find this to be a false analysis. To the normal person a dog sh*t is very unappealing. They assume that no right person would ever be passionate about such an unattractive business model. That’s where they are wrong. My analysis is that the business owner is actually highly passionate about dog sh*t and that is how they became successful. Lots of weird people out there passionate about crazy stuff. Like I said above, although business comes with numerous obstacles and that is how they go through.

Reanalysis of the guy that got his dream job of driving super cars and then hated his passion.
Another past thread about why not to follow your passion. Guy gets his dream job and then later hated his passion later. It was driving super cars. He apparently now hates it. The conclusion made in this story was to not follow your passion, because it will contaminate your passion. This is a false analysis. The guy did not lose his passion because he followed it, but because he was FORCED to do it against his WILL. Force is the problem, not following passion. Only choose passion when you are going to work for yourself.

TLDR;
1) Running a business without passion gives you the money chasing symptom which will cause you to ultimately fail.
2)Being forced to do your passion destroys passion, simply following passion does not.
3) You are on your way to success if you can say “I would still be doing this, even if I didn’t get paid. It is like I’m not even working”

Note: It was these false analysis of stories that contributed to my failures all these years. I have been denying my passion in every previous business and hating it.

Garyvee is a huge advocate for choosing happiness. His intuition is very high, but that doesn’t mean he is always right.

Suggestion: Add a “P” to CENTS.

EDIT: Just had this new thought. It is not Chicken and Egg with passion and need. Both are required to be there when starting a business. Most say to only focus on market need, but like I explained that will also doom you to failure.
 
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Yzn

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TLDR;
1) Running a business without passion gives you the money chasing symptom which will cause you to ultimately fail.
2)Being forced to do your passion destroys passion, simply following passion does not.
3) You are on your way to success if you can say “I would still be doing this, even if I didn’t get paid. It is like I’m not even working”
1) As MJ says if the business idea has market need and also includes your passion, then that's even more amazing. But the focus on having the passion factor as well as market need will cause a lot of problems in finding a business idea that will generate profit. In many cases.

2) Fair enough. But also from personal experience "follwing your passion" without any financial return (obviously if that's the main cause of your business) will make you eventually hate your passion.

If you don't care about money and have enough money to live whilst "working on passionate business" then that isn't really a business path that is viable to 99% of the world.

3) Again, if you need the money to provide food, you don't give a crap about doing anything you love until you bring food to the table for yourself and loved ones.


I would just like to ask you and to other members who are 25 years and older:
Are you still passionate about the same topics 10 years ago? 20 years ago? 40 years ago?
Most people's "passionate topics" changes as they grow older. So what will you do if you stop becoming passionate about cars in 5 years and find yourself "passionate" more about computers?

If you make your passion maybe a more general one like Time & Money Freedom, I don't see how you can have that passion changed as you grow older.
 

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If the progression goes:

Have list of hobbies -> pick one you enjoy doing -> start business in this area

There's probably a hundred other people doing the same thing (since you picked based off likely popular hobbies), and it's not driven by what the market wants (since you picked based off what you want). So immediately it fails Entry and Need.
 

MHP368

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I think the reason we poopoo on "chase your passion" is actually much more down to earth than you give credit for , and its already in the CENTS framework.

Need.

The world doesn't need us to be yoga instructors and guitarists and pro gamers and whatever else is your "passion" , what your passionate about probably doesn't add value to the world.

Changing an Alzheimer patients diaper adds value to the world, few would wake up and punch in just rearing to go on booty duty.

programming software to control traffic signs, great value for society, snooze fest for the programmer.

etc

Non-passionate business person: “Ughhh...just gotta get through this. This sucks. Another problem another day.”
Passionate business person: “I would keep doing this even if I didn’t get paid. It is like I’m not even working. I am getting paid to do my hobby.”
honestly from the big picture both of those people should get to the level where they aren't having to have an internal monologue every time some function of the business needs to get done, I know you were just using the quotation speech thing to frame your point but I think it does reveal something deeper. If you have to white knuckle it every day or give yourself a pep talk , the thing your having to do isn't the problem, you're the problem.


but from what i've read from succesful people it takes a whole lot of grinding it out and boring work (thats "the process") before you get the results ( not "the result" but start making money and getting positive feedback in other ways) , only then can you - on an intellectual level begin getting some fuel from the fact that you've done something of value.
 

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Passion is definitely needed in entrepreneurship, because entrepreneurship is hard. Passion keeps you from giving up.

Just don't start with passion.

Instead, start with serving an unfulfilled need. Serving the need will lead to positive feedback from those you serve (money, positive reviews, positive testimonials, positive emails, positive word-of-mouth).

That positive feedback will make you want to continue serving the need. That positive feedback loop will lead to a profitable passion.

For a much better description of what I just said, read Chapter 28 of Unscripted.
 
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MoreValue

MoreValue

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Prove it. Create a successful passion business.
Ok, you will need to talk to me in like 6 months or more to see if it pans out. In the meantime...

Entirely passion built business it seems. (Not affiliated with any of these guys). Does the world need another clothing brand? Answer: No
Kith Interview
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGWLlLP-TLs


Anti Social Social Club, was also just a personal passion project that wasn't even suppose to be a business based on my research.

Both clothing examples, but Kith is branching out into food (Kith Treats).


1) As MJ says if the business idea has market need and also includes your passion, then that's even more amazing. But the focus on having the passion factor as well as market need will cause a lot of problems in finding a business idea that will generate profit. In many cases.

2) Fair enough. But also from personal experience "follwing your passion" without any financial return (obviously if that's the main cause of your business) will make you eventually hate your passion.

If you don't care about money and have enough money to live whilst "working on passionate business" then that isn't really a business path that is viable to 99% of the world.

3) Again, if you need the money to provide food, you don't give a crap about doing anything you love until you bring food to the table for yourself and loved ones.


I would just like to ask you and to other members who are 25 years and older:
Are you still passionate about the same topics 10 years ago? 20 years ago? 40 years ago?
Most people's "passionate topics" changes as they grow older. So what will you do if you stop becoming passionate about cars in 5 years and find yourself "passionate" more about computers?

If you make your passion maybe a more general one like Time & Money Freedom, I don't see how you can have that passion changed as you grow older.
For your response on passion changing, many businesses create sub-brands of their main brands that do something different. Company is passionate about headphones, but then starts making other audio equipment like amps. Then other electronics that span into kitchen gadgets. All under the main brand.

If the progression goes:

Have list of hobbies -> pick one you enjoy doing -> start business in this area

There's probably a hundred other people doing the same thing (since you picked based off likely popular hobbies), and it's not driven by what the market wants (since you picked based off what you want). So immediately it fails Entry and Need.
That most likely happens, why is it that I see "new people" popping up all the time though in these saturated markets? A good example is fitness influencer. Many people are passionate about it and it doesn't get more saturated than this. Yet, I see a new influencer gaining traction every so often. I mean the Need is filled, but people are still making it.

I think the reason we poopoo on "chase your passion" is actually much more down to earth than you give credit for , and its already in the CENTS framework.

Need.

The world doesn't need us to be yoga instructors and guitarists and pro gamers and whatever else is your "passion" , what your passionate about probably doesn't add value to the world.

Changing an Alzheimer patients diaper adds value to the world, few would wake up and punch in just rearing to go on booty duty.

programming software to control traffic signs, great value for society, snooze fest for the programmer.

etc



honestly from the big picture both of those people should get to the level where they aren't having to have an internal monologue every time some function of the business needs to get done, I know you were just using the quotation speech thing to frame your point but I think it does reveal something deeper. If you have to white knuckle it every day or give yourself a pep talk , the thing your having to do isn't the problem, you're the problem.


but from what i've read from succesful people it takes a whole lot of grinding it out and boring work (thats "the process") before you get the results ( not "the result" but start making money and getting positive feedback in other ways) , only then can you - on an intellectual level begin getting some fuel from the fact that you've done something of value.
Not all value has to be grunge work like changing diapers. Like I said, there are some people that actually would find meaning in changing diapers in Alzheimer because it helps others live better. But yeah, few would though.

Guitarist add value with the music they produce. Creating feel good mood.

To use your examples: yoga instructor adds value by well...instructing others in yoga. Pro gamers add comedic value and help other gamers out when they are stuck. Also showing new strategies.

When I say passion, the process is not boring. It is fun!

Another Pro to passion business is that a person that a passionate person always creates a better product in their select niche than anyone else, assuming they are provided the adequate resources. Higher probability of remarkability which in turns becomes higher probability in success.
 
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MoreValue

MoreValue

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Passion is definitely needed in entrepreneurship, because entrepreneurship is hard. Passion keeps you from giving up.

Just don't start with passion.

Instead, start with serving an unfulfilled need. Serving the need will lead to positive feedback from those you serve (money, positive reviews, positive testimonials, positive emails, positive word-of-mouth).

That positive feedback will make you want to continue serving the need. That positive feedback loop will lead to a profitable passion.

For a much better description of what I just said, read Chapter 28 of Unscripted.
If you don't start with passion, how do you get through the process before receiving all the positive feedback. You have to go through a lot of process before you receive positive feedback. That is what I'm getting at. The process is fun for the passionate person like I said. And the process is a pain in the a$$ for the non-passionate person. Passion is necessary at the start.
 

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If you’re passionate enough about being Unscripted then the process to get there won’t matter. Sounds like you haven’t had a FTE nor have a big enough “why”
 

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MHP368

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Yet, I see a new influencer gaining traction every so often
"Every so often" seems like a terrible star to hitch your wagon to, my buddy streams (hasn't "made it" but has enough followers and subscribers and stuff to get paid something) , now that its "work" its less fun for him , he's "lost" some of the passion.
would find meaning in changing diapers in Alzheimer because it helps others live better.
Well yeh obviously they do, I did, it doesnt mean I was passionate about it - it was just less soul sucking than working at a call center. I didn't jump up every morning raring to go "hell yeh, booty duty!"
Guitarist add value with the music they produce. Creating feel good mood.
Yeh, and the monetary value of that is almost zero, because so many people like music and can play music. If you see someone performing an action on the streets for tip money, probably not something thats going to allow you to retire. Have you read the books? i'm not being snooty here - I just feel like we're having a weird disconnect on some of these definitions.
a person that a passionate person always creates a better product in their select niche than anyone else, assuming they are provided the adequate resources. Higher probability of remarkability which in turns becomes higher probability in success.
I would like to see evidence of that! , someone whos focused on "adding value" and not chasing money, now we can find examples, but passion? no. Marketing and market research. The thing with passion - other than the fact that you'll lose lots of it once the thing you love doing is being done for money is that it gives you tunnel vision. You think since you love it and you're friends love it, all the other people who are interested will love it, so maybe you get sloppy with market research and demand, maybe you start making a product that meets your needs but completely misses what the market actually wants.

The person who's emotionally not invested and just sees the opportunity for what it is will make more rational choices during research and development and likely wind up with a superior product.
 

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As @MTEE1985 said, you definitely need an FTE.

Until the pain of your current life is larger than the pain of 'doing the work', you'll keep finding excuses such as "I haven't found my passion".

You'll find many passion-based businesses. Just like a broken clock is right twice a day.

But, most passion-based businesses fail. You just don't hear about them. Survivorship bias.

It's hard to engineer a passion-based business because customers buy solutions to their problems, not your passion.
 

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Ok, you will need to talk to me in like 6 months or more to see if it pans out.
Less talk. More action. You can do this. Get rolling.

Put a calendar item in your phone for 90 days from now. DM me how you are doing and where i can help you.
 
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MoreValue

MoreValue

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Instead, start with serving an unfulfilled need. Serving the need will lead to positive feedback from those you serve (money, positive reviews, positive testimonials, positive emails, positive word-of-mouth).

That positive feedback will make you want to continue serving the need. That positive feedback loop will lead to a profitable passion.
I would like to see evidence of that! , someone whos focused on "adding value" and not chasing money, now we can find examples, but passion? no. Marketing and market research. The thing with passion - other than the fact that you'll lose lots of it once the thing you love doing is being done for money is that it gives you tunnel vision. You think since you love it and you're friends love it, all the other people who are interested will love it, so maybe you get sloppy with market research and demand, maybe you start making a product that meets your needs but completely misses what the market actually wants.
Hmm...conflicting answers. Success in passion either pushes your further or give you "tunnel vision. " Because I am doing something I am passionate about, my ideas are endless in comparison to my other venture.

The person who's emotionally not invested and just sees the opportunity for what it is will make more rational choices during research and development and likely wind up with a superior product.
I guess I see being emotionally invested as a strength not a weakness. A person not emotionally invested "won't care." And just get through the product development. What happens if MJ wrote his books without passion? They wouldn't have come out as they are now.
 

MHP368

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Maybe. Perhaps were over analyzing this instead of doing work? ;)
 
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MoreValue

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If you’re passionate enough about being Unscripted then the process to get there won’t matter. Sounds like you haven’t had a FTE nor have a big enough “why”
As @MTEE1985 said, you definitely need an FTE.

Until the pain of your current life is larger than the pain of 'doing the work', you'll keep finding excuses such as "I haven't found my passion".

You'll find many passion-based businesses. Just like a broken clock is right twice a day.

But, most passion-based businesses fail. You just don't hear about them. Survivorship bias.

It's hard to engineer a passion-based business because customers buy solutions to their problems, not your passion.
Had my FTE years ago, but put me in a terrible mindset. The bad thing about FTE is that it causes escaping mentality which contributed to my early failures. The only thing I cared about was escaping the situation that caused the FTE. My job. I was trying every business or anything that could make money outside of my job. Miserable as hell. Pretty much got suicidal at that point. The only thing echoing in my head "How can I quit my job quick? I need more money?" Obviously process takes a loooooonnnggg time. Did not match my "I need to get out now" expectations. Unmatched expectations --> Depressed.

FTE do drive you to work hard, but in constant stress and negativity. Really, not sustainable. Not good at all. I was a frantic mess years ago.
 

MJ DeMarco

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Topic has been thoroughly discussed, and at ridiculous lengths.





The "passion" argument is becoming about as redundant as the "go to college" trope.

From a probabilistic standpoint, "following your passion" is a bad bet.

Yes, it can be done and those that do succeed at it receive huge survivor bias treatment as it attracts clicks and young fools looking for and easy path playing video games for $250K/year. The odds are better in following value skew and allowing passion to sprout from your effort via the feedback loop. Passion and its relationship (and its necessity) to the entrepreneurial process is clearly explained in Unscripted so I refuse to rewrite it here, namely because this person didn't read/comprehend the work, two, his argument is already premised in a strawman fallacy, and three, user has extensive history of excuse making which has failed to deliver any change.

What happens if MJ wrote his books without passion?
Gotcha: I didn't write them with passion. And now you've just caught yourself in your own false premise which turns into a false conclusion.

I am passionate about changing lives, seeing my concepts and their ideas finished to completion. I am passionate about my finished product and reading that product years later. I am passionate hearing about people who say their lives have changed, their eyes opened, and that their business is a game-changer.

The actual grind of writing? Meh.

While I thought I'd be passionate about that "process" the reality is not so much, at least in the non-fiction realm. (I feel much more "passion" writing stories and fiction stuff, all of which to this point, is unreleased.) So to your argument, my writing non-fiction is hardly a passionate endeavor, at least in totality.

With respect to the two books I've written, both started as a passionate endeavor. However much to my dislike, that passion fades in weeks, if not days.

Then the grind hits.
The struggle.
The draw on discipline.
The writer's block.

Then I hate writing. Then I want to quit.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8BasQqpQ5_k


Maybe. Perhaps were over analyzing this instead of doing work? ;)
Unfortunately, that's what he does. He needs to work on his head and we've tried for months. Everything parlays into an excuse into why A) It won't work or B) It ain't worth the effort. Then next week we get a new thread with a new idea about why it can't be done; no passion, no money, no resources, no this, no that. He's a classic example of the 80/20 principle when it comes to business; 80% of the game is in your HEAD which morphs to the 20% in the form of correct execution. I wish him the best but myself (and the other folks here trying to help) only have so much patience.
 
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MoreValue

MoreValue

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Topic has been thoroughly discussed, and at ridiculous lengths.





The "passion" argument is becoming about as redundant as the "go to college" trope.

From a probabilistic standpoint, "following your passion" is a bad bet.

Yes, it can be done and those that do succeed at it receive huge survivor bias treatment as it attracts clicks and young fools looking for and easy path playing video games for $250K/year. The odds are better in following value skew and allowing passion to sprout from your effort via the feedback loop. Passion and its relationship (and its necessity) to the entrepreneurial process is clearly explained in Unscripted so I refuse to rewrite it here, namely because this person didn't read/comprehend the work, two, his argument is already premised in a strawman fallacy, and three, user has extensive history of excuse making which has failed to deliver any change.

Gotcha: I didn't write them with passion. And now you've just caught yourself in your own false premise which turns into a false conclusion.

I am passionate about changing lives, seeing my concepts and their ideas finished to completion. I am passionate about my finished product and reading that product years later. I am passionate hearing about people who say their lives have changed, their eyes opened, and that their business is a game-changer.

The actual grind of writing? Meh.

While I thought I'd be passionate about that "process" the reality is not so much, at least in the non-fiction realm. (I feel much more "passion" writing stories and fiction stuff, all of which to this point, is unreleased.) So to your argument, my writing non-fiction is hardly a passionate endeavor, at least in totality.

With respect to the two books I've written, both started as a passionate endeavor. However much to my dislike, that passion fades in weeks, if not days.

Then the grind hits.
The struggle.
The draw on discipline.
The writer's block.

Then I hate writing. Then I want to quit.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8BasQqpQ5_k
Looked at the previous thread and it seems that when people follow their passion it is assumed there is #1 market need and #2 they are good at it. My argument was that passion is needed as #3 in addition to #1 and #2. Without passion, I hate process. With passion, I like it and can grind endlessly. Part of the passion is built through outcome of developing my product.

For most people, they assume if they follow #3 that #1 and #2 follow. What I am getting at is that since many people wrongly make this assumption, the forum disregards #3 altogether as a necessity.

My passion is not the typical gamer, sports player, singer, etc. I am getting the impression that people don't realize that people can in fact have odd/weird/gross passions. Hence the reanalysis of the dog sh*t story. I am one of those people. I would be a person that would enjoy welding to be honest (from Mike Rowe Video).

I guess I lucked out then: I got the trifecta. I don't see how I would ever have made through it just having #1 and #2. Passion is needed to be at the start of business just like #1 and #2.

Unfortunately, that's what he does. He needs to work on his head and we've tried for months. Everything parlays into an excuse into why A) It won't work or B) It ain't worth the effort. Then next week we get a new thread with a new idea about why it can't be done; no passion, no money, no resources, no this, no that. He's a classic example of the 80/20 principle when it comes to business; 80% of the game is in your HEAD which morphs to the 20% in the form of correct execution. I wish him the best but myself (and the other folks here trying to help) only have so much patience.
It doesn't help if you write everything off as "excuse." These threads are to find the mental problem, by looking at each variable. Because writing everything off as "excuse" gives no hard data or advice.

Edit: There is a broken car. You say "Something is wrong with the car." Which doesn't help at all. Hard advice: There is something wrong with the car because the the transmission doesn't work.
 
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MJ DeMarco

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Because writing everything off as "excuse" gives no hard data or advice.
But that's what you do! You have an rationalization for every situation, every answer, every truth. We live in the greatest time ever, unprecedented access to knowledge, information, resources (warm bed, computers, hot showers!) and it simply isn't enough.

There is something wrong with the car because the the transmission doesn't work.
You keep focusing on the car, your problem is as a driver.

Without passion, I hate process.
Bingo! You want six pack abs while eating pizza and ice cream. You want muscles while avoiding the gym.

Your struggle isn't with respect to the struggle, your struggle pertains to the everlasting search for the pain free and passionate shortcut.

As soon as you experience pain, or forecast pain, you're done.

As soon as your passionate endeavor finds extreme competition (because everyone else is doing it) and it's no longer fun (I can't compete because I hate marketing! I hate hiring! I hate this!) you're done.

You're the same as everyone else ...

Tell me how much pain you're willing to endure and I'll tell you how likely you are to succeed; which at this point, isn't very favorable.

Good luck sorting it out.
 

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I think passion is integral for process and not the "thing" itself so to speak.

So, if you're really into boats and you want to start a business around boats. You're going to have to find meaning doing some stuff that not everyone wants to do regarding boats. Maybe you start buying and selling used boats? Maybe you start a boat cleaning service? Maybe you drive some annoying tourists around on a boat? Whatever it is, there are going to be parts of that process that don't exactly feel like they are part of your passion.

Being passionate about giving others value is the best passion to aim for IMHO. It doesn't have to be much more complicated than that.
 

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Bingo! You want six pack abs while eating pizza and ice cream. You want muscles while avoiding the gym.

Your struggle isn't with respect to the struggle, your struggle pertains to the everlasting search for the pain free and passionate shortcut.

As soon as you experience pain, or forecast pain, you're done.

As soon as your passionate endeavor finds extreme competition (because everyone else is doing it) and it's no longer fun (I can't compete because I hate marketing! I hate hiring! I hate this!) you're done.
I don't know.. I mean I love what I do. I think there's a balance between doing what you love and doing what the market wants (see my post above.) If you can simultaneously do those things, I think you can find a winning combo.

There were some studies that found that if a child loves drawing, then you pay that child to draw, they stop loving it. But I haven't experienced that whatsoever, and I'm wondering if there were some issues with those studies and if they've been replicated.

Re: 6-pack abs.. sure you can't eat pizza and ice cream, but you can find a bunch of healthy foods that you really like, and I think that method had a better rate of success than someone who's just eating food that tastes like cardboard to gain abs. And I think that metaphor extends to business... finding something you like doing, that's profitable.

But you're never going to find something that's stress-free. You don't want it to be stress-free. Pulling out your hair trying to solve a problem is part of the fun.

But I dont think there's some hard and fast rule that says you can't do something you like doing. Steve Jobs loved making cool tech. Elon Musk loves being a mad scientist and solving the worlds issues. And that passion helped them get through tough times. But again, they're doing things that benefit the world, which is key. They're not following their passion for knitting Toy Story 4 blankets (although there may be a market for that.) I think it's about finding balance.
 

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PizzaOnTheRoof

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You can follow you passion AND be a business owner.

If I handed you the keys to a $1 million per year business I’m 100% positive you would become passionate about it.

Also, just because you’re passionate about playing the guitar doesn’t mean you have to be a musician.

Instead, you can start a business that’s COMPLEMENTARY to your passion:
  • Sell guitar strings instead of playing them
  • Create a marketplace connecting teachers and students
  • Sell custom guitar cases/picks
  • Start an online guitar repair biz
  • Etc...
Take your passion and get TECHNICAL with it. This is where needs are found.

Well I'm screwed. I'm passionate about business. :)
I think passion can be in finding something there is a need for.
There’s something to be said about being passionate about helping people.

@Andy Black
 

Andy Black

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You can follow you passion AND be a business owner.

If I handed you the keys to a $1 million per year business I’m 100% positive you would become passionate about it.

Also, just because you’re passionate about playing the guitar doesn’t mean you have to be a musician.

Instead, you can start a business that’s COMPLEMENTARY to your passion:
  • Sell guitar strings instead of playing them
  • Create a marketplace connecting teachers and students
  • Sell custom guitar cases/picks
  • Start an online guitar repair biz
  • Etc...
Take your passion and get TECHNICAL with it. This is where needs are found.


There’s something to be said about being passionate about helping people.

@Andy Black
Yes. I get a buzz when a new client tells me they’ve got their first phone call, email enquiry, new client, or new customer. It never gets old.
 
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cy-

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Anti Social Social Club, was also just a personal passion project that wasn't even suppose to be a business based on my research.
I'm in a Facebook entrepreneur group for entrepreneurs in my country.

I count on average 4 posts a day about people asking where they can get print on cloth for their new clothing brand.

Funnily enough I never hear about them again - and this has been going on for a few years.

So yes, Anti Social Social Club became a success, but how many others didn't?
 
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But that's what you do! You have an rationalization for every situation, every answer, every truth. We live in the greatest time ever, unprecedented access to knowledge, information, resources (warm bed, computers, hot showers!) and it simply isn't enough.
I agree with everything you are saying here being unprecedented access. I would rather have the cost of living like crap to bootstrap than to pay interest on a loan. That’s how people really screw up.

You keep focusing on the car, your problem is as a driver.
That’s not what I mean by analogy. What I meant was that just saying “your mindset is the problem” doesn’t help at all due to how general it is. Like I said above. My symptom that is now gone was “money chasing.” The cause of the symptom was focusing on non passionate business.

If a doctor, just says “You are sick” just like you say “your mindset is broken” it doesn’t do anything. After I hear this, “why am I sick?” “What is causing the sickness?”

Bingo! You want six pack abs while eating pizza and ice cream. You want muscles while avoiding the gym.

Your struggle isn't with respect to the struggle, your struggle pertains to the everlasting search for the pain free and passionate shortcut.

As soon as you experience pain, or forecast pain, you're done.

As soon as your passionate endeavor finds extreme competition (because everyone else is doing it) and it's no longer fun (I can't compete because I hate marketing! I hate hiring! I hate this!) you're done.

You're the same as everyone else ...

Tell me how much pain you're willing to endure and I'll tell you how likely you are to succeed; which at this point, isn't very favorable.

Good luck sorting it out.
Well the gym example I can relate to 100%. I am a loyal gym goer. I like the so-called “pain.” The stretch and the squeeze of the muscle feels good. Which is why I have lasted in the gym for idk 7 years now and will probably never stop. A person that enjoys process gets through all of it. Technically they are going through pain and struggle, but enjoy it. Same with my business right now.

Guess how many times, things went wrong with the product development? Too many times, I couldn’t even count. But I kept going at it and will never stop. Like I said in posts above, I did not view these as obstacles due to passion. A typical person that is not passionate, would not do what I was doing and give up. But there were a few times I did get frustrated, but still carried on because I wanted to see a finished product.

Me looking forward to this business, there is going to be 10x the number of problems (Forecasting Pain), even though I don’t view it that way. But guess what? I am still going to do it.

I am very curious on what you opinion is on Gary Vee then? His view on entrepreneurship is completely opposite of yours.
 

ManlyMansNegator

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I'm in a Facebook entrepreneur group for entrepreneurs in my country.

I count on average 4 posts a day about people asking where they can get print on cloth for their new clothing brand.

Funnily enough I never hear about them again - and this has been going on for a few years.

So yes, Anti Social Social Club became a success, but how many others didn't?
A good way to capatilize on this is starting a T-shirt printing business, where you print T-shirts for people or create designs for them lol.
 

ManlyMansNegator

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I agree with everything you are saying here being unprecedented access. I would rather have the cost of living like crap to bootstrap than to pay interest on a loan. That’s how people really screw up.



That’s not what I mean by analogy. What I meant was that just saying “your mindset is the problem” doesn’t help at all due to how general it is. Like I said above. My symptom that is now gone was “money chasing.” The cause of the symptom was focusing on non passionate business.

If a doctor, just says “You are sick” just like you say “your mindset is broken” it doesn’t do anything. After I hear this, “why am I sick?” “What is causing the sickness?”



Well the gym example I can relate to 100%. I am a loyal gym goer. I like the so-called “pain.” The stretch and the squeeze of the muscle feels good. Which is why I have lasted in the gym for idk 7 years now and will probably never stop. A person that enjoys process gets through all of it. Technically they are going through pain and struggle, but enjoy it. Same with my business right now.

Guess how many times, things went wrong with the product development? Too many times, I couldn’t even count. But I kept going at it and will never stop. Like I said in posts above, I did not view these as obstacles due to passion. A typical person that is not passionate, would not do what I was doing and give up. But there were a few times I did get frustrated, but still carried on because I wanted to see a finished product.

Me looking forward to this business, there is going to be 10x the number of problems (Forecasting Pain), even though I don’t view it that way. But guess what? I am still going to do it.

I am very curious on what you opinion is on Gary Vee then? His view on entrepreneurship is completely opposite of yours.
Why not put your theory into test, create several businessess based on your passion. Then get a few other people and ask them to start a business based on their passion.

Also this thread is confusing , what is passion ? Is it just something you are seemingly obsessed with ?
 

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