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How to get profitable or fail fast with AdWords

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(Originally posted on the inside here.)

How To Get Profitable Or Fail Fast With AdWords

Here's how I often determine whether a project, niche, seed, or keyword has legs, or needs a bullet.

Note1: I use blanket bid prices throughout the steps below, meaning the bid price within a campaign for each ad group or keyword is identical. I can then judge how much supply/competition there is based on the average position.

Note2: When I say "higher ad position", I mean higher on the page. A "lower ad position" is a worse ad position on the page e.g. position 3 is higher than position 7.


Step 1) Buy Impression Data First

I build campaigns to count impressions first. This minimises ad spend, and also minimises time to market since you don't need to create anything other than a simple landing page to start with (and you could just point ads to the Yellow Pages if you don't want to create a page).

Your initial goal isn't really to get clicks, but to find out how often your ads are triggered, and then divide by your impression share to determine the total available number of searches in the given time period. (Note that you will need to have some spend with Google by way of clicks, or the campaign will eventually just die off - you see the impression share falling until these campaigns eventually stop running.)

You can often do this stage with minimal spend.

An example is me loading the "solicitors" seed in the UK, plus 40k locations. It ran the next day with a budget of £10. The ads were scheduled to run from 8am, and the budget was hit by 9am. The lowest reporting granularity in AdWords is an hour, so we didn't know whether the spend was within 10 minutes, or within 50-60 minutes. Anyway, in that time period and for our £10 spend, we bought 13 clicks, 700 impressions, and knew there were 4,000 searches we could have shown for (Impressions divided by Impression Share). Since we were bidding in +solicitors +location, and were one keyword per ad group, I was able to determine these metrics per location.


Step 2) Then Buy Click Data

If there is potential, I'll build new campaigns and run with higher bids to then start buying clicks. I'm then interested in the CPCs, average positions, and CTR and daily volumes at these higher ad positions. I'll also monitor impression share to see whether it's steady, or falling off a cliff again.

You don't get to see impression shares until a couple of days afterwards... which is annoying. You used to see it an hour afterwards, and you could often see new campaigns just dying within a few hours.

Your impression share should naturally be higher when you bid more, since you'll end up in a higher ad position where there are less advertisers able or willing to compete against you. There's usually only a few players competing for position 1, and a lot more players competing for position 6.

You might get some conversions at this stage, although I treat these as icing on the cake and "fluke" unless you hit a rich vein of conversions.

Something to note is that conversion rates can be higher at the start of a campaign and then drop off. My theory is that your ad is new, and appearing in front of people who've been looking for a while and are more frustrated than the people who will likely see your ad the week later. It's just a theory though, but I've seen this a few times so don't get carried away if you get a great conversion rate at the start.

You can push bids a little for selective hours or something, and determine what the CPCs and CTRs are for different ad positions. It's just indicative, since they will be different when your campaigns have been running for a while without change. I do this if my clients want to come up with some "what-if" scenarios... what if we had $1.00 CPC? What volume of clicks would we get for that CPC? What if we then doubled CPCs? What would our volume be for $2.00 CPC?


Step 3) Then Buy Conversion Data

Ok, so we've determined there are enough searches, and what clicks we can get for ballpark CPCs.

Now we want to find out our actual conversion rates, and our cost-per-lead or cost-per-sale. I'll just call these the cost-per-acquisition (CPA) for now.

This typically involves bidding to get a consistent stream of visitors through your funnel. Depending on your budget, and timescales, you can bid higher, or stay in a lower position. This will often depend on what you estimate your conversion rate and CPA will be. For lead-gen, I expect a 5% to 10% click-to-lead-conversion-rate if the funnels are tight enough (ST-AD-LP).. out of the box. If it's lower, then I'm a bit concerned and might tighten targeting (keywords etc).

I will often select a few of the search terms with the highest volume from step 2, so that the traffic is more consistent, and so that spend is not as spread across keywords. If you have budget constraints, then this is sensible. Also, it's always 80/20 anyway (often 99/1)... and a lot of your keywords aren't getting many impressions or clicks. Most won't be getting any impressions. Over a year they might pick some up, or get "activated" if there is an event that causes more searches to suddenly occur. So pick search terms/keywords with potential, and now use these.

You're now trying to get profitable. You need to determine daily and weekly (and maybe hourly):
  1. Costs
  2. Clicks
  3. Conversions
  4. Revenue (Earnings)
From this you can calculate your profit, margin, ROI, CPC, EPC, conversion rate, etc.

The game now is to keep your CPC lower than your EPC, while still getting traffic.
You don't have to lose money now. You drop your CPCs until you're profitable. The only problem is if you drop them so far that you get no traffic anymore, and are no longer buying any data. Depending on your budget and timescales, you might push bids and knowingly lose money to buy data faster.

.......

You should now also watch this video.


EXAMPLE

You're spending $100 a day for 100 clicks, and making $50 revenue from 2 sales.

Metrics:
Cost = $100
Clicks = 100
Sales = 2
Revenue (Earnings) = $50

Calculated metrics:
Profit = -$50

cost-per-sale = $50
revenue-per-sale = $25

Or another way:
cost-per-click (CPC) = $1.00
earning-per-click (EPC) = $0.50

You're losing money. So drop bids until your CPC is $0.50. Then you're running breakeven. (This assumes that the traffic quality remains constant and doesn't get worse.)

You'll lose ad position, and your Impression Share and ad CTR will both drop.

I'd guess you'd end up with a quarter to an eighth the volume of inbound clicks. So about 12 to 25 clicks.

So you're breakeven, but have lost volume.

Now get into a continuous cycle of fixing leaks in your funnel, and increasing visitor life-time-value (LTV) so that your EPC increases. Each time you do that, you can increase your bids and drive more volume.

Apart from the initial budget to buy data and determine your EPC, there really is no reason to lose any money.

You just keep dropping bids till you're breakeven or are profitable.

You may have to drop them so low you get no volume... in which case you get no clicks, and therefore have no costs anyway.
 

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I'm going through this process for a new client.

I've loaded a few campaigns, each targeting services the client provides, and the top 250 cities and locations in the UK.

Traffic is just being sent to the homepage. We'll prioritise which landing pages to create based on the data we're buying.

For just over £100 spend, we've gathered the following data from 17-Dec-2015 to 21-Dec-2015:

 

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This post is so helpful... thanks!
Curious though:
1. Why 40,000 locations in the original post and only 250 for the 'new client'?
2. I could probably come up with the list of 250 - how/where did you get the list of 40,000?
 
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This post is so helpful... thanks!
Curious though:
1. Why 40,000 locations in the original post and only 250 for the 'new client'?
2. I could probably come up with the list of 250 - how/where did you get the list of 40,000?
1. Speed.

2. Wikipedia I think.
 
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fhs8

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For some competitive keywords to get any decent traffic you have to lose money first in order to make it thanks to recurring customers and competitors' campaigns/websites that are already optimized.

Here's what I think. You should bid to get the highest profit or least amount of loss with decent traffic. To do this you need to know the ICC (Incremental cost per click) and conversion rate for keywords. Now simply make a table inputting your CPA with the bid and ICC and find the highest profit to determine what your bid should be at. Getting data at first is difficult because at first your negative keyword lists are small and website/campaign isn't optimized. You don't know exactly what broad keywords will trigger what queries. Be prepared to spend a couple thousand to get some data.

Conversion rates are not higher at the start of a campaign. I would attribute it to randomness. Advertising another website to get an impression count isn't a good idea. If you spend X amount you can already get it for keywords using the keyword planner.
 
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For some competitive keywords to get any decent traffic you have to lose money first in order to make it thanks to recurring customers and competitors' campaigns/websites that are already optimized.

Here's what I think. You should bid to get the highest profit or least amount of loss with decent traffic. To do this you need to know the ICC (Incremental cost per click) and conversion rate for keywords. Now simply make a table inputting your CPA with the bid and ICC and find the highest profit to determine what your bid should be at. Getting data at first is difficult because at first your negative keyword lists are small and website/campaign isn't optimized. You don't know exactly what broad keywords will trigger what queries. Be prepared to spend a couple thousand to get some data.

Conversion rates are not higher at the start of a campaign. I would attribute it to randomness. Advertising another website to get an impression count isn't a good idea. If you spend X amount you can already get it for keywords using the keyword planner.
Thanks for your reply @fhs8



I would suggest not starting with broad match. I very rarely use broad match in "live" campaigns anyway.



You can learn on a whiff of spend, so pointing to another site can be a quick way to determine if ads can even run on those keywords, and to count impressions.

I've bought enough data with £10 spend to justify building more elaborate campaigns.



You don't get all the data you need from the Keyword Planner.

It doesn't tell you what Impression Share you'll get for particular bids and particular positions.

It also doesn't go as granular (long tail) as you can build campaigns and get data.


Conversion rates could be higher at the start due to the people who've been searching for a few weeks suddenly seeing a new offering in the market. I've seen it a few times, although numbers have always been low so not statistically significant.
 

ExcelGuy

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(Originally posted on the inside here.)
This typically involves bidding to get a consistent stream of visitors through your funnel. Depending on your budget, and timescales, you can bid higher, or stay in a lower position. This will often depend on what you estimate your conversion rate and CPA will be. For lead-gen, I expect a 5% to 10% click-to-lead-conversion-rate if the funnels are tight enough (ST-AD-LP).. out of the box. If it's lower, then I'm a bit concerned and might tighten targeting (keywords etc).
Hi Andy,
Egad there's so much to learn! What's ST-AD-LP for the funnel? I have a rough idea about funnels, but don't really want to be creating one of those landing pages with fake time limits and fake sale prices, and I'm not upselling my emailing list to other products.
Let's say I'm starting local by doing computer training (providing a service). Can I just have my local targetted ads point to a landing page with my contact info and some details? Ok... and maybe a mailing list signup form.

I'm trying to go through all your Adwords stuff.
 
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Hi Andy,
Egad there's so much to learn! What's ST-AD-LP for the funnel? I have a rough idea about funnels, but don't really want to be creating one of those landing pages with fake time limits and fake sale prices, and I'm not upselling my emailing list to other products.
Let's say I'm starting local by doing computer training (providing a service). Can I just have my local targetted ads point to a landing page with my contact info and some details? Ok... and maybe a mailing list signup form.

I'm trying to go through all your Adwords stuff.
Haha. First time I've ever seen/heard "egad" used in anger. I like it.



ST-AD-LP is "Search Term - Ad - Landing Page". I call it the The Holy Trinity of Paid Search.

I don't do fake time limits or fake sales prices, for me or for my clients.


EXAMPLE:

Let's say you're going to do Excel Training locally in Durham.

Search Term:
excel training durham
(Keyword: +excel +training +durham)​

Ad:
Durham Excel Training - Contact Us Now​

Landing Page:
Looking for Excel Training in Durham?
- We do Excel Training.
- We cover Durham.
- We're really good.
<Call us now on 123456 >
<Contact us by email>

(Other stuff below.)

PS: The best people at AdWords are the ones with the best Excel skillz.



EDIT: Here's an example landing page for a client:
 
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Running another test. Took 30 mins to post up to AdWords from AdWords Editor...

upload_2017-8-2_11-58-51.png
 

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ExcelGuy

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I'm looking forward to trying to some of this out. A few failed Adwords attempts in the past. And lost too much money using Ads on Facebook incorrectly. Had read a Reddit post about not really needing to target too much because FB does that for you anyway, but then my ads for $20 tshirts were only viewed by people between the ages of 15 - 18 or something along those lines with little buying power... at least I think they have little buying power. Then there was that time I forgot to stop an ad running...
 

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Hey @Andy Black,

What's the goal of step 2 above (buying the Click Data: CPCs, average positions and CTRs)?

In step 1 you learn the search volumes for each keyword. You then work only with keywords that trigger often enough.

In step 3 you start a proper campaign and watch the conversion rates. Then adjust your bids to maximise profits or until your bids are so low your ads stop showing.

What do you need step 2 for?

Is it to learn how high the competition is for particular keywords (using the average positions for ballpark bids)?

Then, given some keywords are more competitive than others, what do you do with that information?

I've run some Google Ads campaigns before but always started at step 3. Your post got me thinking! Thanks for sharing that.
 
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0) Get the ads running (there’s many reasons they might not).

1) Count impressions. Keep bids and budget deliberately low so we “buy data on a whiff of spend”.

2) Get click data. Increase bids to find out what CPCs would be if you’re running the campaign for real. Do it for the keywords/campaigns you decided to target based on the data from 1).

3) Get conversions. The click data may tell you the CTR is too low and/or the CPCs are too high. If not then focus budget again on a few keywords and try to get profitable.

4) Scale it or fail it.
 

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Hey @Andy Black,

What's the goal of step 2 above (buying the Click Data: CPCs, average positions and CTRs)?

In step 1 you learn the search volumes for each keyword. You then work only with keywords that trigger often enough.

In step 3 you start a proper campaign and watch the conversion rates. Then adjust your bids to maximise profits or until your bids are so low your ads stop showing.

What do you need step 2 for?

Is it to learn how high the competition is for particular keywords (using the average positions for ballpark bids)?

Then, given some keywords are more competitive than others, what do you do with that information?

I've run some Google Ads campaigns before but always started at step 3. Your post got me thinking! Thanks for sharing that.
@Andy Black explained it well.

I like to think of it as a diagnosis. A doctor will start at step 1 and work his way up to a diagnosis based on symptoms and reactions to testing/meds.

Each step provides valuable info for the next. They build off of each other.
 

ProcessPro

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(Originally posted on the inside here.)

How To Get Profitable Or Fail Fast With AdWords

Here's how I often determine whether a project, niche, seed, or keyword has legs, or needs a bullet.

Note1: I use blanket bid prices throughout the steps below, meaning the bid price within a campaign for each ad group or keyword is identical. I can then judge how much supply/competition there is based on the average position.

Note2: When I say "higher ad position", I mean higher on the page. A "lower ad position" is a worse ad position on the page e.g. position 3 is higher than position 7.


Step 1) Buy Impression Data First

I build campaigns to count impressions first. This minimises ad spend, and also minimises time to market since you don't need to create anything other than a simple landing page to start with (and you could just point ads to the Yellow Pages if you don't want to create a page).

Your initial goal isn't really to get clicks, but to find out how often your ads are triggered, and then divide by your impression share to determine the total available number of searches in the given time period. (Note that you will need to have some spend with Google by way of clicks, or the campaign will eventually just die off - you see the impression share falling until these campaigns eventually stop running.)

You can often do this stage with minimal spend.

An example is me loading the "solicitors" seed in the UK, plus 40k locations. It ran the next day with a budget of £10. The ads were scheduled to run from 8am, and the budget was hit by 9am. The lowest reporting granularity in AdWords is an hour, so we didn't know whether the spend was within 10 minutes, or within 50-60 minutes. Anyway, in that time period and for our £10 spend, we bought 13 clicks, 700 impressions, and knew there were 4,000 searches we could have shown for (Impressions divided by Impression Share). Since we were bidding in +solicitors +location, and were one keyword per ad group, I was able to determine these metrics per location.


Step 2) Then Buy Click Data

If there is potential, I'll build new campaigns and run with higher bids to then start buying clicks. I'm then interested in the CPCs, average positions, and CTR and daily volumes at these higher ad positions. I'll also monitor impression share to see whether it's steady, or falling off a cliff again.

You don't get to see impression shares until a couple of days afterwards... which is annoying. You used to see it an hour afterwards, and you could often see new campaigns just dying within a few hours.

Your impression share should naturally be higher when you bid more, since you'll end up in a higher ad position where there are less advertisers able or willing to compete against you. There's usually only a few players competing for position 1, and a lot more players competing for position 6.

You might get some conversions at this stage, although I treat these as icing on the cake and "fluke" unless you hit a rich vein of conversions.

Something to note is that conversion rates can be higher at the start of a campaign and then drop off. My theory is that your ad is new, and appearing in front of people who've been looking for a while and are more frustrated than the people who will likely see your ad the week later. It's just a theory though, but I've seen this a few times so don't get carried away if you get a great conversion rate at the start.

You can push bids a little for selective hours or something, and determine what the CPCs and CTRs are for different ad positions. It's just indicative, since they will be different when your campaigns have been running for a while without change. I do this if my clients want to come up with some "what-if" scenarios... what if we had $1.00 CPC? What volume of clicks would we get for that CPC? What if we then doubled CPCs? What would our volume be for $2.00 CPC?


Step 3) Then Buy Conversion Data

Ok, so we've determined there are enough searches, and what clicks we can get for ballpark CPCs.

Now we want to find out our actual conversion rates, and our cost-per-lead or cost-per-sale. I'll just call these the cost-per-acquisition (CPA) for now.

This typically involves bidding to get a consistent stream of visitors through your funnel. Depending on your budget, and timescales, you can bid higher, or stay in a lower position. This will often depend on what you estimate your conversion rate and CPA will be. For lead-gen, I expect a 5% to 10% click-to-lead-conversion-rate if the funnels are tight enough (ST-AD-LP).. out of the box. If it's lower, then I'm a bit concerned and might tighten targeting (keywords etc).

I will often select a few of the search terms with the highest volume from step 2, so that the traffic is more consistent, and so that spend is not as spread across keywords. If you have budget constraints, then this is sensible. Also, it's always 80/20 anyway (often 99/1)... and a lot of your keywords aren't getting many impressions or clicks. Most won't be getting any impressions. Over a year they might pick some up, or get "activated" if there is an event that causes more searches to suddenly occur. So pick search terms/keywords with potential, and now use these.

You're now trying to get profitable. You need to determine daily and weekly (and maybe hourly):
  1. Costs
  2. Clicks
  3. Conversions
  4. Revenue (Earnings)
From this you can calculate your profit, margin, ROI, CPC, EPC, conversion rate, etc.

The game now is to keep your CPC lower than your EPC, while still getting traffic.
You don't have to lose money now. You drop your CPCs until you're profitable. The only problem is if you drop them so far that you get no traffic anymore, and are no longer buying any data. Depending on your budget and timescales, you might push bids and knowingly lose money to buy data faster.

.......

You should now also watch this video.


EXAMPLE

You're spending $100 a day for 100 clicks, and making $50 revenue from 2 sales.

Metrics:
Cost = $100
Clicks = 100
Sales = 2
Revenue (Earnings) = $50

Calculated metrics:
Profit = -$50

cost-per-sale = $50
revenue-per-sale = $25

Or another way:
cost-per-click (CPC) = $1.00
earning-per-click (EPC) = $0.50

You're losing money. So drop bids until your CPC is $0.50. Then you're running breakeven. (This assumes that the traffic quality remains constant and doesn't get worse.)

You'll lose ad position, and your Impression Share and ad CTR will both drop.

I'd guess you'd end up with a quarter to an eighth the volume of inbound clicks. So about 12 to 25 clicks.

So you're breakeven, but have lost volume.

Now get into a continuous cycle of fixing leaks in your funnel, and increasing visitor life-time-value (LTV) so that your EPC increases. Each time you do that, you can increase your bids and drive more volume.

Apart from the initial budget to buy data and determine your EPC, there really is no reason to lose any money.

You just keep dropping bids till you're breakeven or are profitable.

You may have to drop them so low you get no volume... in which case you get no clicks, and therefore have no costs anyway.
Love this!
 

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Hi @Andy Black , I'm at the stage of counting impressions. Some of my keywords have the status 'Below first page bid'. Do you suggest pushing my bids higher? Thanks!
 
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Hi @Andy Black , I'm at the stage of counting impressions. Some of my keywords have the status 'Below first page bid'. Do you suggest pushing my bids higher? Thanks!
Take that warning with a pinch of salt. We want to get an impression share over 10% to be able to come up with an estimate.
 

ProcessPro

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Take that warning with a pinch of salt. We want to get an impression share over 10% to be able to come up with an estimate.
@Andy Black , sorry to be a bother but I have a couple more questions.

My target location is small and the keywords I'm counting impressions for have really low volume in keyword planner (10-100). I've categorised them by product type and created exact match keywords out of each for the sake of counting impressions.

1) I sense that it would be better to use mod broad instead. Is that so?

2) If yes, do you suggest I transform all my target keywords from keyword planner (with buyers intent) into mod broad or should I build a my mod broad terms from the ground up (e.g. product type/product name plus buyer intent terms etc)?
 
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1) I sense that it would be better to use mod broad instead. Is that so?
Yes. You may get no volume with exact match.

2) If yes, do you suggest I transform all my target keywords from keyword planner (with buyers intent) into mod broad or should I build a my mod broad terms from the ground up (e.g. product type/product name plus buyer intent terms etc)?
The target keywords from the keyword planner could overlap each other, so I typically analyse them and create modified broad match keywords accordingly.

For example:

Search terms:
  • dublin blacksmiths
  • blacksmiths in dublin
  • best blacksmiths in dublin
... could all get picked up by keyword:
  • +blacksmiths +dublin
  • Along with negatives such as:
    "job"
    "jobs"
    "course"
    "courses"
    etc.
 

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I made a campaign for a friend. 30 miles Around his town. A business out of about 5 businesses. Don’t want to tell what, my boss would be angry, when he would ever read this.

As I didn’t know much about google ads, I let me lead through it by google ads . At the end I had someth I didn’t really understand.
A „smart“ campaign, doing what it wants, not me.
Its for direct telephony. On the second day, it was a Sunday ( I forgot to let it only run on work days) there was a call listed.
The good one : he got a his first assign this month.
The bad one: every click and call costs me 7€.
So the assignment maybe aprofit for him of 300€, and cost me 36€.
Well, as I don’t want to take money from him, I paused the campaign.
As I cannot change the campaign from smart to not smart, I will set up a new one and test this thread advice out.
Btw.: when I was the boss of the man, who programmed the google ads controll panel, I would have fired him!

Thanks Andy for bringing me to do the ads thing!
 

PizzaOnTheRoof

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Hey Andy, do you do any e-commerce with google ads?

I’ve been running campaigns and testing and getting lots of clicks but 0 conversions. I think my Holy trinity is broken lol

I’ve got an exact match with a 9% CTR on mobile but no sales. Frustrating.
 
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Andy Black

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Hey Andy, do you do any e-commerce with google ads?

I’ve been running campaigns and testing and getting lots of clicks but 0 conversions. I think my Holy trinity is broken lol

I’ve got an exact match with a 9% CTR on mobile but no sales. Frustrating.
I was trying to get away from eCommerce and focus on lead gen but never could. People would always trickle in asking for help with eCom. In this climate most prospects coming through are doing eCommerce or moving to it.

I’m not an expert at eCom but am figuring it out with clients.

You could of course get the search term -> ad -> landing page setup correctly for *relevance*, and still not get enquires, signups, or sales.

It could be that the visitors aren’t in buying mode but are comparison shopping (or info-seeking)?

And/or the offer isn’t clear, or attractive.

Look at your search terms. See what’s got the most volume, what ad they’re clicking, and what page they’re going to. Then type it in yourself and observe the other options on Google. How does your offer compare with the others the searcher will find?

Look at your Google Analytics and see what folks are doing on the site. Maybe put something like Hotjar on the site too and observe individual sessions.

Consider adding chat, your phone number, or popups to initiate contact rather than “just” go for an online purchase.

Is there any way you can get their contact details if they don’t buy? Or buy something cheaper to cover the cost of the ad spend?

Are you doing remarketing, especially of cart abandoners?

Depending on what you’re selling you might also look at reverse IP lookups and doing outbound to contact businesses that have visited your site, although with so many working from home now I don’t know if that will work as well.

If most (all) of your visitors are on mobile then what’s the mobile experience like?

What’s the site speed like too?

Lots of other things to work on too!
 

PizzaOnTheRoof

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I was trying to get away from eCommerce and focus on lead gen but never could. People would always trickle in asking for help with eCom. In this climate most prospects coming through are doing eCommerce or moving to it.

I’m not an expert at eCom but am figuring it out with clients.

You could of course get the search term -> ad -> landing page setup correctly for *relevance*, and still not get enquires, signups, or sales.

It could be that the visitors aren’t in buying mode but are comparison shopping (or info-seeking)?

And/or the offer isn’t clear, or attractive.

Look at your search terms. See what’s got the most volume, what ad they’re clicking, and what page they’re going to. Then type it in yourself and observe the other options on Google. How does your offer compare with the others the searcher will find?

Look at your Google Analytics and see what folks are doing on the site. Maybe put something like Hotjar on the site too and observe individual sessions.

Consider adding chat, your phone number, or popups to initiate contact rather than “just” go for an online purchase.

Is there any way you can get their contact details if they don’t buy? Or buy something cheaper to cover the cost of the ad spend?

Are you doing remarketing, especially of cart abandoners?

Depending on what you’re selling you might also look at reverse IP lookups and doing outbound to contact businesses that have visited your site, although with so many working from home now I don’t know if that will work as well.

If most (all) of your visitors are on mobile then what’s the mobile experience like?

What’s the site speed like too?

Lots of other things to work on too!
Thanks Andy!

It’s a single product, single page store. Basically just a landing page with a buy button.

I think there’s some disconnect between buyer expectations and my offer. I need to communicate exactly what to expect in the ad before they click.

Or could just be that nobody wants my dumb product!...

Thanks for the Hotjar tip. :)
 
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Thanks Andy!

It’s a single product, single page store. Basically just a landing page with a buy button.

I think there’s some disconnect between buyer expectations and my offer. I need to communicate exactly what to expect in the ad before they click.

Or could just be that nobody wants my dumb product!...

Thanks for the Hotjar tip. :)
What programs do you use ? Wp woo?
 

sonny_1080

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I'm going through this process for a new client.

I've loaded a few campaigns, each targeting services the client provides, and the top 250 cities and locations in the UK.

Traffic is just being sent to the homepage. We'll prioritise which landing pages to create based on the data we're buying.

For just over £100 spend, we've gathered the following data from 17-Dec-2015 to 21-Dec-2015:

These real-time examples are unbelievably helpful. Andy you're the best.
 

PizzaOnTheRoof

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What programs do you use ? Wp woo?
Using a WP landing page for the front end (I like the theme and customizability), and a Shopify checkout link. The only thing that sucks is I can't set up quantities or variations without a cumbersome setup.

Would be nice to at least validate the product with a sale!
 

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