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NOTABLE! How I made $4,000 in 3 months By Executing HARD

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ChaseFade

ChaseFade

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Wow, thank you for the clarification and more in depth ideas to commercial work! Really appreciate it.


I hope you didnt think we were actually arguing? haha I was just speaking my thoughts and reasoning behind potentially going into weddings full time. I apologize if it seemed like I wasnt listening to your experiences. Love hearing different perspectives.

3 bad apples out of 6 years of weddings? That's honestly not bad at all. I guess I would aim to set an expectation before shooting so they dont blow a gasket when we dont capture a certain moment.


Again I really appreciate all your inputs in this thread. Opened my eye to better avenues to explore.

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ChaseFade

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I really like the idea of creating a resellable training video for restaurants or shooting depositions. I can definitely see the scalability in selling training videos that save time and money and liability issues. Thank you for the insight. Looking into how to book my first client now

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I hope you didnt think we were actually arguing? haha I was just speaking my thoughts and reasoning behind potentially going into weddings full time.
Not one bit. I'm so glad to be of help. If I don't help you then all that I went through will be wasted. Passing things on to try to help someone makes my work worthwhile. It makes it mean something. So thank YOU for that opportunity.

And I must add that it is indeed rare to find someone like you that is going to do what it takes to be successful. It does my heart good to be of some kind of assistance to someone like you.

In the years that I did video work, I was, and still am today, surprised that nobody wanted to tap into my experience. What I wouldn't give for someone to talk to that already was doing that work and had things figured out. But no - nobody caught "the fire." Still, to this day, I know a lot about a few things that could be extremely valuable to someone - but, um, well, not today - kind of busy - I'll keep it in mind though. And on they go, dealing with their pitiful crappy job, wondering why they have a pitiful crappy life that barely pays the bills. Someone should write a book about that - hey MJ did! My point exactly!

So now you see how refreshing it is to ME to see someone like you taking this head on. Dreams never die, they just are added to as you go along. It's like video work is chapter 12 in the book of my life, and it is a privilege for me to relive that. I'm now in another chapter, but I am a sum of all my parts. Even though I don't do video at the moment, it is still a part of who I am. It has made me a better person. You will draw on the experience, skills, and confidence that you are building right now, for the rest of your life, even if you don't do video work in the future.

One more thing - I always included a customer survey when I delivered the videos. I still have all of those. They are among my most treasured possessions. It is so gratifying to have someone write that what I did really mattered, and I am very talented. You never get tired of that, and if they bash you, well now you know what to do to improve. You will not only use them for marketing, of course, but they will nourish your soul and tell you that you are doing something important. And you certainly are.
 
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ChaseFade

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Love it! Thank you for opening your Video Work chapter and reading it aloud for us here! Great insight and something I can start using immediately.

What made you move on from doing video production?



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Commercial stuff is MUCH easier and MUCH less time consuming than consumer video. And your customers will not be NEARLY as picky.
Yep! The clients have 9-5 day jobs and want to leave on time for supper!

So - replace the orientation process with a thorough, or a series of, very direct videos. With a quiz after each one - which is not to see how smart they are, but to PROVE that they watched the video.
Yep, I've seen those at most job orientations in the last decade. There are catalogs that have these videos in the $200 range. Not bad for two actors, one announcer, one cubicle farm set, one corner office or conference room set... write, shoot, and edit in a day.

Now do the same exact training/orientation videos for specific job duties. How to run a computer program - how to run a certain machine - how to fill out forms.
Yep. The same catalogs I've seen have $500, 20 minute videos on OSHA Compliant Asbestos Safety Training. Here's how to wear a face mask and gloves and not kill yourself if you have to handle asbestos. Here's the quiz. Production cost: one set of face mask and gloves, one announcer, three pages of OSHA guidelines.

McDonald's no longer has the thousand page franchise operations guide. It's all online video from a separate company. Cute little three minute storyline of the happy gal who feels like ordering by phone, then the happy gal at the counter happily punches up the MOBILE ORDER button [drop in the close-up here], then the little quiz for what button do you press when the customer says they have a mobile order?

As my background includes video, I'm going to get into these once my initial web marketing & copywriting service is underway.

Went to Youtube to pick one at random. I have no association with this video company.
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nzqGKvUnd3o
 
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Real Deal Denver

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What made you move on from doing video production?
I made good money - but I spent tons of money upgrading my equipment. I totally upgraded everything I used to a different format FOUR flippin times! FOUR! Damn, that was sucking up all my profit!

And the worst part was I still couldn't do as good of work as I wanted to. The equipment was so limited back then. I did, at the end, get into Hi-8 which was a digital format, but it was still recorded on tape, so it took an hour to transfer an hour of video to a computer. Once it was in the computer, I could really work with it.

All the while I was spending thousands in this never ending spiral, the average Joe was getting some cheap camcorder, and putting pressure on my prices. Even though I was 100 times better, the brides still had a budget to work with. Was Jimmy's video good "enough" so they could spend money on a better band? I still had a ton of customers, but they were the very high end customers. Read: picky. The better I became, the more they expected. I was doing A/B rolls and graphic overlays, which cost a fortune to do just that - and they yawned. Is that the best you can do? Well - I'm not Warner Brothers, and I don't have a production crew. So I got tired of being a marathon runner and then they expected me to be that PLUS a cliff diver. So I saw the writing on the wall - I just didn't like my customers anymore. The business was way too much work.

FF to today. Now I have an unlocked i-7 CPU liquid cooled RAID-10 beast sitting next to me - and 3 digital camcorders that record to SD cards. And perhaps the best software money can buy - at least the best for me. I like Sony. The most popular choice for professionals is Apple. I didn't want to pay $3 or $4K MORE for my already expensive rig just to get an Apple - so I use Sony. It's kick butt.

I'm getting back into video, but not to just do video alone. It will be a support product for my other business ventures. Instead of paying 1 or 2K for a well done video, I'll just do it myself. I'm in a high powered business, so I need impressive no holds barred videos. Nobody that I can afford would do the quality work that I want. And I don't want to pay the price for what I want. So - I guess I do it.

The power I have now is astounding. Unlimited video and audio tracks to edit. Frame by frame control. Just fantastic!

I am also going to make a movie. I'm picky about everything. Including movies. Too many movies today are just slapped together. No pride in their work. It's a job. I can do a lot better. That might be my ticket to the big time - we'll see. This forum has reignited so many other ideas I have, that now I am overwhelmed with things to do. I love having that problem.

Ok - I'll stop. If I say any more, you might fall asleep and smash your forehead into your monitor or something...

I look forward to back and forth for a long time. I know you will do very well - and I'll certainly try to throw in some hints if I can. :cool:
 
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ChaseFade

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Alright everybody, I finished it...its finally here...

After a full day of shooting, and 3 days straight of editing I finished my first wedding video!

Here it is:

View: https://youtu.be/g7xC5PDS5Dk



I really surprised myself with the quality! The bride and groom were completely blown away! The bride cried, my fiance watched it twice and cried both times, and the bride said she watched it 4 times in a row haha

My audio went completely nuts and I wasnt able to capture very much of the ceremony audio. Luckily the vows weren't very crucial to the film and there were no speeches or toasts to capture. Learned how to get better audio next time.

Also learned I need a second shooter with me. I was able to get great shots but i was using a very heavy camera rig so after 20 minutes of running around I could barely feel my wrist and was breaking out in a sweat haha

Captured all the big moments and focused on not getting stressed out. Took breaks when possible.

Upgraded to the DJI Mavic Air and was blown away by the quality! The event director for the venue also loved the pictures/video I took during sunset and gave me her card. Sent her an email and am going to try to get on their preferred vendors list.

I also shot some photos here and there to provide even more value and made a small trailer before we released it. I knew the photographer they hired would take a few weeks to edit all the photos so I took advantage by making the film quickly and sending over some great photos that they can post in the mean time until the photographer sends his over.

One thing I noticed is that videographers are the lowest priority out of all the vendors. We are not vital to the event taking place so it makes sense but I still believe we are an important role. You can never get that day back.


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Real Deal Denver

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Alright everybody, I finished it...its finally here...

After a full day of shooting, and 3 days straight of editing I finished my first wedding video!

Here it is:

View: https://youtu.be/g7xC5PDS5Dk



I really surprised myself with the quality! The bride and groom were completely blown away! The bride cried, my fiance watched it twice and cried both times, and the bride said she watched it 4 times in a row haha

My audio went completely nuts and I wasnt able to capture very much of the ceremony audio. Luckily the vows weren't very crucial to the film and there were no speeches or toasts to capture. Learned how to get better audio next time.

Also learned I need a second shooter with me. I was able to get great shots but i was using a very heavy camera rig so after 20 minutes of running around I could barely feel my wrist and was breaking out in a sweat haha

Captured all the big moments and focused on not getting stressed out. Took breaks when possible.

Upgraded to the DJI Mavic Air and was blown away by the quality! The event director for the venue also loved the pictures/video I took during sunset and gave me her card. Sent her an email and am going to try to get on their preferred vendors list.

I also shot some photos here and there to provide even more value and made a small trailer before we released it. I knew the photographer they hired would take a few weeks to edit all the photos so I took advantage by making the film quickly and sending over some great photos that they can post in the mean time until the photographer sends his over.

One thing I noticed is that videographers are the lowest priority out of all the vendors. We are not vital to the event taking place so it makes sense but I still believe we are an important role. You can never get that day back.


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You're not going to like my comments. But I throw them out there for your benefit.

First of all - is that music licensed? Even if it's their friend's songs, you have to have something signed for use in the video. You also need to credit the music at the end. Used under license - used by permission - written by - performed by - etc. If you are pulling music off of itunes, some attorney is going to have your butt for lunch.

Second - it's great. It's not a wedding video though. It's a music video. Or it could be a trailer. But it's not a wedding video.

This video is about 7 minutes long. No voices. Think what they will want to see on their tenth anniversary. Not a music video. Think what their kids would want to see when they get old enough to know what a marriage is. Not a music video.

Okay whiny boy - what DO they want then?

I made my videos - heavily edited - usually from 1.5 to 2 hours long. With wireless mics I got the quivering in their voices as they said their vows. I got them wiping a tear while they knelt at the alter. I got their whisper of "I love you" during the ceremony. I got the loving gazes from the parents in the front rows as the wedding progressed. I got EVERY groomsman and EVERY bridesmaid wishing them the best and telling them how happy they were for them. I got moments. And voices to go with each moment. Think documentary with style - not music video with NO voices.

If this was what I would have received for a wedding video, I'd be furious. As an add on "trailer" - that's a different story. For something I could provide to my friends and family that don't want the lonnnnng version, this is perfect.

For what it is - it's well done and fun to watch.

But - three days of editing? Whoa. And you're using digital technology. That's at LEAST two days too much. Probably two and a half days too much. In the linear days, I was forced to edit at the real speed of video. Two hours took two hours. With digital - you are not constrained in the least bit.

Hope this helps. Hate to rain on your parade - but I think it is MUCH better you hear this from me rather than a livid customer. If they know EXACTLY what you are going to deliver - fine. As for me, this would not even be close to what I would want.
 

I AM THE SENATE

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Nice wedding video. I mean sure you could do the vows and get mics, but if your clients are happy and the check clears, worry about that later. Weddings should be a means to an end though. The last shop I worked in, we did weddings as supplementary income. At our peak we did 40 in a year with two shooters occasionally working different events on the same day, but we scaled back when we had other sources of income.

The bulk of our work was from corporate and government work, tv shows, tv commercials and also conferences. Recording and live streaming conferences was very good to us. Of course there's a considerable amount of cost and it's not a one man operation. But that's how you scale a video business. You have several shooters and editors, you market yourself well and if you don't know how to sell you find someone who can.

Right now I'm the Creative Services Director for a local tv station. I make my budget on corporate videos and government work and I shit out local commercials to keep the air time and digital dollars rolling in.

Here's a tip for a freelancer like you. Ad Agencies. Get in front of them and keep showing them your work. They have multiple clients who may need a variety of services. Also business associations/chamber of commerce. Get in good with organizations like that and don't be afraid to charge them money.

Here's another tip. - Niche down. I've seen people do very well by drilling down and finding a niche market. Most of them will do what ever pays the bills, but eventually they find something that they are really good at. I know a music video guy who started off doing $300 videos where he did everything himself, who now commands 5K to direct. and requires a crew and a budget. I know a couple who are wedding videographers and they are booked all year round. I know a few old guys who have corporate and government clients by the dozen , the work isn't flashy but they live in nice homes. I have a friend who does boudoir videos and photoshoots. I know a guy who just does nature and outdoor videos and shoots a lot of things for the state tourism and the forestry commission. Fish around and see what brings you the best joy/profit ratio and be the best in your niche.

Here's another one - Beware of burnout. I spent the last year and a half as a department of one. We lost some people and corporate instituted a hiring freeze so I spent my days and nights trying to make sure we met budget. I got to the point where I didn't want to work on my short films or family projects any more. I was working 14 hour days nearly every day and working on Sunday evening. That's part of the reason why I'm here. I'm burned out and bit depressed. I did 13 hours yesterday just so I could meet deadlines. I want to do something else. I'm tired of the corporate life, the ever shrinking deadlines, fighting with sales and business owners who want their kids or dogs in the commercial. Trust me, burnout is real and a lot of people who complain about how crappy a video production career is, are probably really burned out. It can become a grind. A grind where people still expect you to be fresh and creative.

Final Tip - Know your worth. - Video production has become fully democratized now. Everyone has 4k in their pocket and think they are a videographer/photographer now.Clients will try to use this to talk down your prices. Do not fall for that bait. I just turned down a side client today because he wanted me to do about 1200 worth of work for $500 because that's what the last guy charged. I told him he can come to my job and pay my employer full price. Plus the last guy's work doesn't look as good as mine which is why he's coming to me in the first place, so no, hard pass. You pay for my talent and expertise. Always remember, F*ck YOU, PAY ME.
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6h3RJhoqgK8
Good luck!
 
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ClaverCasley

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Not one bit. I'm so glad to be of help. If I don't help you then all that I went through will be wasted. Passing things on to try to help someone makes my work worthwhile. It makes it mean something. So thank YOU for that opportunity.

And I must add that it is indeed rare to find someone like you that is going to do what it takes to be successful. It does my heart good to be of some kind of assistance to someone like you.

In the years that I did video work, I was, and still am today, surprised that nobody wanted to tap into my experience. What I wouldn't give for someone to talk to that already was doing that work and had things figured out. But no - nobody caught "the fire." Still, to this day, I know a lot about a few things that could be extremely valuable to someone - but, um, well, not today - kind of busy - I'll keep it in mind though. And on they go, dealing with their pitiful crappy job, wondering why they have a pitiful crappy life that barely pays the bills. Someone should write a book about that - hey MJ did! My point exactly!

So now you see how refreshing it is to ME to see someone like you taking this head on. Dreams never die, they just are added to as you go along. It's like video work is chapter 12 in the book of my life, and it is a privilege for me to relive that. I'm now in another chapter, but I am a sum of all my parts. Even though I don't do video at the moment, it is still a part of who I am. It has made me a better person. You will draw on the experience, skills, and confidence that you are building right now, for the rest of your life, even if you don't do video work in the future.

One more thing - I always included a customer survey when I delivered the videos. I still have all of those. They are among my most treasured possessions. It is so gratifying to have someone write that what I did really mattered, and I am very talented. You never get tired of that, and if they bash you, well now you know what to do to improve. You will not only use them for marketing, of course, but they will nourish your soul and tell you that you are doing something important. And you certainly are.
Taking advantage of your massive experience, what do you say about producing promo clips for products/goods?

Some homework that I did.

Steve Jobs brags a lot on benefit-centric commercial in this legendary video.
Whereas Microsoft did the opposite. It's a product-centric commercials.

Regardless of product superiority, do you (and anyone viewing this thread) have anything to say?

PS:
1. I'm just clarifying what benefit-centric and product-centric is all about using Apple and Microsoft commercials. Bear in mind that, both companies uses those two elements in their commercials.
2. Apologies if my post doesn't expose the 'give and take' mentality.

Great job, ChaseFade, BTW.
 

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Real Deal Denver

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Taking advantage of your massive experience, what do you say about producing promo clips for products/goods?

Some homework that I did.

Steve Jobs brags a lot on benefit-centric commercial in this legendary video.
Whereas Microsoft did the opposite. It's a product-centric commercials.

Regardless of product superiority, do you (and anyone viewing this thread) have anything to say?

PS:
1. I'm just clarifying what benefit-centric and product-centric is all about using Apple and Microsoft commercials. Bear in mind that, both companies uses those two elements in their commercials.
2. Apologies if my post doesn't expose the 'give and take' mentality.

Great job, ChaseFade, BTW.
It's not a bad idea, but I think you should think bigger.

First of all, clips are intense. There is a lot that goes into a very short time span. That means there is grade A equipment and expertise behind creating them. If you can compete on that level, why not go for the big fish?

Think of a trailer for a movie. Pretty fast, and you don't want to blink because you might miss something. Every second is engineered to have impact.

One of the markets I would direct my attention to, if I could produce something on that level, would be the people that have to have a market edge, and that have money to spend on it. Car dealers, for one. Something more than an ad or clip that could run in their repair shop waiting room, would be a great example. There are usually people there every day waiting for repairs. That could branch out into a sales aid for their sales people. They are making an offer, sitting in a conference room. While the sales guy leaves, he puts on this 4 minute trailer explaining the options they have for an extended warranty, or whatever. The point is, they get a 4 minute dose of whatever the dealer wants them to know. The sales guy comes back and it's an add on to the purchase. That could be extremely profitable for them. But they need someone to make a polished presentation for them.

Any place they are selling something expensive could be a good customer for you. How about hotels? Switch to their "in house" channel and get a tour of everything the hotel has to offer. Of course I'm talking high end hotels here and/or resorts.

How about high end restaurants that have a waiting area for people to wait during their busy times? Show the chef cooking a steak over their flaming grill and seasoning it to perfection. Show a fancy drink being prepared by the bartender. Sell the SIZZLE, not the steak, as an old saying once said.

The list is endless. But this gives you an idea for projects a lot meatier than a clip, but not nearly as extensive as a movie; the "easy" in between market.

Video is exciting. To do something respectable is expensive. Go for that market and you can do well.
 
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ChaseFade

ChaseFade

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Nice wedding video. I mean sure you could do the vows and get mics, but if your clients are happy and the check clears, worry about that later. Weddings should be a means to an end though. The last shop I worked in, we did weddings as supplementary income. At our peak we did 40 in a year with two shooters occasionally working different events on the same day, but we scaled back when we had other sources of income.

The bulk of our work was from corporate and government work, tv shows, tv commercials and also conferences. Recording and live streaming conferences was very good to us. Of course there's a considerable amount of cost and it's not a one man operation. But that's how you scale a video business. You have several shooters and editors, you market yourself well and if you don't know how to sell you find someone who can.

Right now I'm the Creative Services Director for a local tv station. I make my budget on corporate videos and government work and I sh*t out local commercials to keep the air time and digital dollars rolling in.

Here's a tip for a freelancer like you. Ad Agencies. Get in front of them and keep showing them your work. They have multiple clients who may need a variety of services. Also business associations/chamber of commerce. Get in good with organizations like that and don't be afraid to charge them money.

Here's another tip. - Niche down. I've seen people do very well by drilling down and finding a niche market. Most of them will do what ever pays the bills, but eventually they find something that they are really good at. I know a music video guy who started off doing $300 videos where he did everything himself, who now commands 5K to direct. and requires a crew and a budget. I know a couple who are wedding videographers and they are booked all year round. I know a few old guys who have corporate and government clients by the dozen , the work isn't flashy but they live in nice homes. I have a friend who does boudoir videos and photoshoots. I know a guy who just does nature and outdoor videos and shoots a lot of things for the state tourism and the forestry commission. Fish around and see what brings you the best joy/profit ratio and be the best in your niche.

Here's another one - Beware of burnout. I spent the last year and a half as a department of one. We lost some people and corporate instituted a hiring freeze so I spent my days and nights trying to make sure we met budget. I got to the point where I didn't want to work on my short films or family projects any more. I was working 14 hour days nearly every day and working on Sunday evening. That's part of the reason why I'm here. I'm burned out and bit depressed. I did 13 hours yesterday just so I could meet deadlines. I want to do something else. I'm tired of the corporate life, the ever shrinking deadlines, fighting with sales and business owners who want their kids or dogs in the commercial. Trust me, burnout is real and a lot of people who complain about how crappy a video production career is, are probably really burned out. It can become a grind. A grind where people still expect you to be fresh and creative.

Final Tip - Know your worth. - Video production has become fully democratized now. Everyone has 4k in their pocket and think they are a videographer/photographer now.Clients will try to use this to talk down your prices. Do not fall for that bait. I just turned down a side client today because he wanted me to do about 1200 worth of work for $500 because that's what the last guy charged. I told him he can come to my job and pay my employer full price. Plus the last guy's work doesn't look as good as mine which is why he's coming to me in the first place, so no, hard pass. You pay for my talent and expertise. Always remember, f*ck YOU, PAY ME.
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6h3RJhoqgK8
Good luck!
Great advice! Thank you. I actually just stumbled on that video about a month ago! Really great.

I am definitely niching down here soon. Have a few more weddings coming up and have been taking any work I get in any niche but my niche is definitely music videos, concert recaps and weddings. Real estate is also nice and easy but not alot of demand here in Seattle since homes sell in a day with or without a video. A significant amount of my total income has come from music videos! I have recently partnered with two other videographers and we are solely focused on making the best music videos in order to get bigger clients with bigger budgets. First 1k video budget is in a few weeks! Also shot a free recap for a very big artist (and one of my favorites btw) and his manager loved the video and wants me to come and film his concert when hes in Seattle on tour next week! Hes also on tour with my favorite artists ever so to say I'm excited is an understatement.


Just tallied up my video income from the first 6 months and the gross is $10,000! Most went back into the business for equipment but im very happy and am on pace to exceed 20k for the year. Not a bad start. Way more than I made making music for 4 years combined.

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NicholasCato

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Wow! What an excellent example of selling shovels to gold miners!

You seem to have a great pace going for you. I’m also an artist looking to maximize my arts earning potential this thread has been an excellent read.

Good luck to you, and I look forward to following your journey :)
 

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I love this ! I'm currently at that point of burn out . I've lied to myself long enough . Ironically looking for inspiration on what I can do next and this has given me some ideas .
 

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