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TheVoyager

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Thanks for asking! Alas, I've got nothing terribly interesting to report except that I'm soooooo burned out on writing romance, and it's starting to show word-count wise.

If I didn't have a backlist of like 20 romance novels, I'd almost certainly switch genres to something totally different, like zombie apocalypse books. I might be kidding, but I'm not even sure.

A big challenge (other than being burned out) continues to be that advertising has gotten so darn expensive, and Amazon is almost all pay-to-play these days. Even as a reader, I find it incredibly frustrating that their recommendation system is all based on sponsored ads rather than organic "also boughts."

As far as advertising is concerned, I've offset some of the costs by going to a rapid release production schedule, where I write books and bank them to be released in quickish succession, but with my word count bordering on the pathetic, this might be an even bigger challenge if I don't find a way to get my writing mojo back.

In a way, I'm feeling a little trapped. If I had no backlist, I'd almost certainly switch to a less crowded genre. But if I did, sales of my previously published romance titles would drop to nearly nothing. And, in a new genre, I'd have no backlist to boost my earnings. All this to say, I'd have to take a few steps backward in hopes of moving forward in a different genre. I'm not sure it would be worth it, so it's a real catch-22.

You have to be very careful concerning that burn out. Amazons system is urging you to an awful release schedule to stay visible or to give them a lot of money to stay in the game. It won't get better as there are still new authors coming to that overcrowded market, eager to spend advertizing buck$ to push their careers. And I'm sure amazon is looking for new ways to milk our purses.
What once was a promising opportunity for a new business has been changed by that company and the huge amount of competition to a new form of slavery. Better start thinking about some kind of exit strategy as it really will not get better. As scaling has it's limits (you can't raise the max numbers of books you are writing) and the entry barriers are low, this amazon-only novel writing business is no fastlane anymore but just self employment with dwindling salary.
 
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Note: in this post, I will contradict what I wrote a few months ago and what I used to complain about a lot. I changed my opinion on this.

A big challenge (other than being burned out) continues to be that advertising has gotten so darn expensive, and Amazon is almost all pay-to-play these days. Even as a reader, I find it incredibly frustrating that their recommendation system is all based on sponsored ads rather than organic "also boughts."

As a reader, I never buy books from sponsored ads. I never even use Amazon's search engine for books because it usually produces some keyword-optimized crap and not the quality I'm looking for.

I find new books to read by:
  • Buying whatever my favorite authors publish. Loyalty is incredibly powerful in this industry but particularly in a smaller niche where there are fewer releases. For example, compare small town romance with epic dark fantasy. The readers of the latter tend to be more loyal because there are much fewer good epic dark fantasy books to read than there is small town romance.
  • Browsing bestseller lists/also boughts/sometimes Goodreads. This is sort of a hobby of mine to understand the current state of the market but it also helps me discover new authors.
  • Googling what interests me. Usually it's checking on Reddit threads like "If I like Brandon Sanderson's books, what else will I enjoy?" I think it can be very helpful to position yourself as someone just like that big author BUT with something different/better. For example, Joe Abercrombie is sort of like George R. R. Martin but he's much darker, more cynical, and also more humorous.
  • Word of mouth, the holy grail of marketing and the thing that makes authors like Stephen King and Dean Koontz keep killing it for decades.
Do some people buy through ads? Of course they do. Can you no longer find a book on Amazon through any other way than an ad? Of course you still can. While it's true that Amazon now pushes authors to use their advertising platform, it doesn't mean that you can't sell books without it.

As for advertising in general, I'd say that the main focus should be on building a list and not on making a profit on any single book. Ultimately, it's better to get a new super loyal fan who will buy all your future books and tell everyone else about them than merely get a book sale.

In a way, I'm feeling a little trapped. If I had no backlist, I'd almost certainly switch to a less crowded genre. But if I did, sales of my previously published romance titles would drop to nearly nothing. And, in a new genre, I'd have no backlist to boost my earnings. All this to say, I'd have to take a few steps backward in hopes of moving forward in a different genre. I'm not sure it would be worth it, so it's a real catch-22.

We're in a similar boat. Not the same one because non-fiction keeps selling even if you don't publish new books but it's similar nonetheless in that we've both reached a ceiling in our niches and need to adapt. It's not a ceiling of income but it's a ceiling of our potential in a given niche. There are authors who make millions in romance and there are authors who make millions in my non-fiction niche. But for me, and I assume for you as well, I've hit my limit. I can't sufficiently stand out in my crowded niche and while it sucks to not be able to continue using my assets (list, brand, backlist), it's time to switch to a different niche. I was also burned out in my niche anyway.

I'd encourage you to explore other opportunities, even if not for the business but just for yourself. You've written a lot and I guess you still love writing. I think it would be theraupetic for you to write in a genre you'd love to write and see what happens. Perhaps don't try with something that takes tons of time like epic fantasy. The aforementioned post-apocalyptic zombie genre could work. Give yourself a few weeks to write something, publish it, promote it as best as you could and compare it to the performance of your main pen name.

One thing I continue to eye is foreign translations. As part of this, I'm working on a trilogy of shorter books for release around Christmas. Instead of 90K novels, they'll be 35-50K novellas, which means that if they succeed in the USA, they'll be decent contenders for foreign translations (because they'll be shorter and thus, cheaper to have this done). But even this is iffy at the moment.

It's an interesting experiment. Another option you could consider is to look for an agent who will sell the rights to your translations. If this person could reach publishers in big, hard to DIY markets like China or Japan, it could be very helpful.

You have to be very careful concerning that burn out. Amazons system is urging you to an awful release schedule to stay visible or to give them a lot of money to stay in the game. It won't get better as there are still new authors coming to that overcrowded market, eager to spend advertizing buck$ to push their careers. And I'm sure amazon is looking for new ways to milk our purses.
What once was a promising opportunity for a new business has been changed by that company and the huge amount of competition to a new form of slavery. Better start thinking about some kind of exit strategy as it really will not get better. As scaling has it's limits (you can't raise the max numbers of books you are writing) and the entry barriers are low, this amazon-only novel writing business is no fastlane anymore but just self employment with dwindling salary.

I used to believe that as well but I've changed my mind. Maybe getting away from the industry for a few months only to realize how much harder other businesses are does that to you lol.

There are more authors than ever, that's for sure. But are there that many more good authors?

Of course there are overcrowded niches full of skillful players where you chances of success are close to zero. I'd never try writing a thriller because I wouldn't be able to compete with all the big names. Same for romance and historical fiction (which is, to make things worse, extremely difficult to write).

There is more competition. But there are also WAY more TV shows and movies being created based on books. There are other opportunities to explore, too: video games, board games, translations, comics, NFTs, etc. Scaling yourself does have its limits but scaling your assets and your marketing doesn't.

Also, if Amazon ever makes the market so difficult or unprofitable for authors that they won't be able to prosper in it, a new competitor will emerge. Remember that it's not just self-published authors, it's also huge traditional publishers who will oppose any changes on Amazon that harm them (as they've already done in the past). And since there's so much money in this industry, there's always a chance that one of the new shiny startups will decide to face Amazon and, for example, create a much better alternative to Kindle.

Those with a nice backlist, who kept going when others assumed it was the end of book publishing (a very old industry unlikely to die anytime soon) will benefit when a new player lets them sell their work to a new audience, in a new format, or on better terms than Amazon.

By the way, that's also one of the reasons why I'm wide. I want the freedom to work with other platforms and also to support them as they're competing with Amazon.

@ChickenHawk have you tried to go wide with your books? Or at least with paperback, if you are in KU (Sorry if I missed this in your thread). If not, why not?

I think going wide is a good strategy long-term but it's unlikely to make a huge difference to @ChickenHawk's earnings. Roughly 10% of my revenue comes from other book retailers. I don't think it would be that different for her. The benefit is increased peace of mind, though, because even if your Amazon sales drop, they don't necessarily have to drop on other platforms. And it's always better to get your income from 5 different companies than just from one.
 

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Thanks for asking! Alas, I've got nothing terribly interesting to report except that I'm soooooo burned out on writing romance, and it's starting to show word-count wise.

If I didn't have a backlist of like 20 romance novels, I'd almost certainly switch genres to something totally different, like zombie apocalypse books. I might be kidding, but I'm not even sure.

A big challenge (other than being burned out) continues to be that advertising has gotten so darn expensive, and Amazon is almost all pay-to-play these days. Even as a reader, I find it incredibly frustrating that their recommendation system is all based on sponsored ads rather than organic "also boughts."

As far as advertising is concerned, I've offset some of the costs by going to a rapid release production schedule, where I write books and bank them to be released in quickish succession, but with my word count bordering on the pathetic, this might be an even bigger challenge if I don't find a way to get my writing mojo back.

In a way, I'm feeling a little trapped. If I had no backlist, I'd almost certainly switch to a less crowded genre. But if I did, sales of my previously published romance titles would drop to nearly nothing. And, in a new genre, I'd have no backlist to boost my earnings. All this to say, I'd have to take a few steps backward in hopes of moving forward in a different genre. I'm not sure it would be worth it, so it's a real catch-22.

One thing I continue to eye is foreign translations. As part of this, I'm working on a trilogy of shorter books for release around Christmas. Instead of 90K novels, they'll be 35-50K novellas, which means that if they succeed in the USA, they'll be decent contenders for foreign translations (because they'll be shorter and thus, cheaper to have this done). But even this is iffy at the moment.

If it sounds like I'm floundering, it's probably because I am. It will be interesting to see what this year brings, that's for sure!
I personally LOVE shorter romance novels. I'm in a few author groups where readers have mentioned that they too love the shorter ones.
So, perhaps your novellas will do exceedingly well!
 

ChickenHawk

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You have to be very careful concerning that burn out. .. What once was a promising opportunity for a new business has been changed by that company and the huge amount of competition to a new form of slavery. Better start thinking about some kind of exit strategy as it really will not get better. As scaling has it's limits (you can't raise the max numbers of books you are writing) and the entry barriers are low, this amazon-only novel writing business is no fastlane anymore but just self employment with dwindling salary.
It certainly feels like this on some days, and this may be true. To combat this dynamic, it seems that more and more romance authors are going the ghost-writing route or teaming up with other writers so they can release rapidly without burning themselves completely out. Stubbornly or not, I'll probably never pursue this, just because I'm determined that anything with my pen name on it will be written by me.

But I do see what you mean. I think it's part of the reason I'm in a writing slump. It's hard to be motivated sometimes when my share of the profits keeps getting smaller (due to the high cost of visibility). This feeling appears to be getting more widespread, which may lead to a consolidation of sorts. As more writers enter the field, others may drop off. Will more enter? Or more drop out? It will be interesting to see what trend wins over time.

Those with a nice backlist, who kept going when others assumed it was the end of book publishing (a very old industry unlikely to die anytime soon) will benefit when a new player lets them sell their work to a new audience, in a new format, or on better terms than Amazon.
Man, that would be nice. Amazon has gotten so huge that they're practically a monopoly. It's a shame, too, because if only Barnes & Noble (or Apple or GooglePlay) had upped their game five years ago, readers and authors would have a lot more choices today.

@ChickenHawk have you tried to go wide with your books? Or at least with paperback, if you are in KU (Sorry if I missed this in your thread). If not, why not?
Thanks for the question! Yup, I've tried going wide and had reasonable success with it, but not enough to offset the other benefits and earnings from Kindle Unlimited. I do have paperbacks and audiobooks on other sites here and there, but paperback sales have dropped down to almost zero. Thanks to so many readers going digital, I don't make much money off paperbacks at all, and I'd probably eliminate them entirely if it wouldn't look bad to not have them.

I think going wide is a good strategy long-term but it's unlikely to make a huge difference to @ChickenHawk's earnings. Roughly 10% of my revenue comes from other book retailers. I don't think it would be that different for her. The benefit is increased peace of mind, though, because even if your Amazon sales drop, they don't necessarily have to drop on other platforms. And it's always better to get your income from 5 different companies than just from one.
Yup! All of this is very true.

As a reader, I never buy books from sponsored ads. I never even use Amazon's search engine for books because it usually produces some keyword-optimized crap and not the quality I'm looking for.
We think alike in this regard. I still use Amazon's search engine, but if the search brings up something interesting in a sponsored ad, I never click the ad. Instead, I'll open a new tab and key in the exact book or product name and then click on the non-sponsored listing so the author/seller doesn't have to pay for my click.

Regardless, there's always a lot of clutter to wade through. It's made the whole buying experience a lot less pleasant. But I'm guessing that Amazon makes so much money off the ads that they don't much care at this point. It would be nice if something (such as a new competitor) made them care.

I personally LOVE shorter romance novels. I'm in a few author groups where readers have mentioned that they too love the shorter ones. So, perhaps your novellas will do exceedingly well!
I like the way you think, and that's good to hear, so thanks for that!
 

diegorueda

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Hey ChickenHawk!

I don't have any publishing experience (although I have a publisher as a client but it's a different game, and also worked with a prolific author in the romance space), so excuse me if some of these ideas seem stupid. But I've loved your thread and I want to try to help.

Alas, I've got nothing terribly interesting to report except that I'm soooooo burned out on writing romance, and it's starting to show word-count wise.

If I didn't have a backlist of like 20 romance novels, I'd almost certainly switch genres to something totally different, like zombie apocalypse books. I might be kidding, but I'm not even sure.
Have you explored any other formats? I think MTF is suggesting industries that are feed by books (try to license for that), but I mean directly publishing on those formats.

For example, a friend of mine is writing narrated series for Storytel (not sure if it's available in the US). It's not the same as audiobooks, since the format is different (not sure if my translation of the concept is correct).

The consumption of audio format is growing every year. It's a convenient way to consume media on your commute, or on a walk. Plain audiobooks could work too (like authors-direct).

Could you sell other than books to your audience without alienating them?

I know that the help to the authors' industry is also crowded, but there's an inexhaustible source of wanna-be authors out there (my client is a self-publishing company and I help them get leads, i.e. authors, and they keep growing). I don't know if you like that route, but maybe there's something in your process that could help others.

Are there other sources of traffic that could work for you and your audience? (Twitter, Instagram, Idk if it's a total waste of time or could help)

Is there any radical idea that could work to do things differently? How could you zig when everyone else is zagging?

I like your idea of switching genres just to avoid burnout. You can reframe it like a small holiday. Maybe you can even explore a genre where you think a romance twist could work with that audience (to leverage your experience) and it's not overdone yet (the novelty twist could work).

Also, if Amazon ever makes the market so difficult or unprofitable for authors that they won't be able to prosper in it, a new competitor will emerge. Remember that it's not just self-published authors, it's also huge traditional publishers who will oppose any changes on Amazon that harm them (as they've already done in the past). And since there's so much money in this industry, there's always a chance that one of the new shiny startups will decide to face Amazon and, for example, create a much better alternative to Kindle.

That is what is happening with Nebula(dot)app. Some YouTube creators are transitioning over there. If so many people are discontent in this big industry, I'm sure that there are a lot of opportunities out there.
 

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Thanks for asking! Alas, I've got nothing terribly interesting to report except that I'm soooooo burned out on writing romance, and it's starting to show word-count wise.

If I didn't have a backlist of like 20 romance novels, I'd almost certainly switch genres to something totally different, like zombie apocalypse books. I might be kidding, but I'm not even sure.

A big challenge (other than being burned out) continues to be that advertising has gotten so darn expensive, and Amazon is almost all pay-to-play these days. Even as a reader, I find it incredibly frustrating that their recommendation system is all based on sponsored ads rather than organic "also boughts."

As far as advertising is concerned, I've offset some of the costs by going to a rapid release production schedule, where I write books and bank them to be released in quickish succession, but with my word count bordering on the pathetic, this might be an even bigger challenge if I don't find a way to get my writing mojo back.

In a way, I'm feeling a little trapped. If I had no backlist, I'd almost certainly switch to a less crowded genre. But if I did, sales of my previously published romance titles would drop to nearly nothing. And, in a new genre, I'd have no backlist to boost my earnings. All this to say, I'd have to take a few steps backward in hopes of moving forward in a different genre. I'm not sure it would be worth it, so it's a real catch-22.

One thing I continue to eye is foreign translations. As part of this, I'm working on a trilogy of shorter books for release around Christmas. Instead of 90K novels, they'll be 35-50K novellas, which means that if they succeed in the USA, they'll be decent contenders for foreign translations (because they'll be shorter and thus, cheaper to have this done). But even this is iffy at the moment.

If it sounds like I'm floundering, it's probably because I am. It will be interesting to see what this year brings, that's for sure!
So sorry to hear this!
 

ChickenHawk

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I don't have any publishing experience (although I have a publisher as a client but it's a different game, and also worked with a prolific author in the romance space), so excuse me if some of these ideas seem stupid. But I've loved your thread and I want to try to help.
Thanks so much for all of the input and ideas! None of them seem the least bit stupid, and I really appreciate you taking the time to list and explain them.

With some of them, such as selling other products, I've heard of other authors making some money that way, but I'm sorry to say that I don't think it would earn enough money to justify the time and effort, which would pull me away from writing (which alas I'm doing a terrible job of right now anyway, heh!). It's the same with adding more social media activity/outlets. I'm not sure the "juice would justify the squeeze" right now, but it IS always good to keep an eye out. When Facebook advertising became a thing, those who jumped in early did really well, me included, so this is a good reminder.

About audiobooks, I've recently started having them produced again. I went a while without producing audiobooks because Amazon had this all-inclusive romance package that made it hard to earn back production costs. But that godawful program has since gone away, which has me back in the audiobook game again, so that's good.

Is there any radical idea that could work to do things differently? How could you zig when everyone else is zagging?
I've definitely wondered this. A funny thing, stepbrother romances became really HUUUUGE a few years ago. The first author who did this made out like a bandit. And those who followed on the bandwagon quickly did really well too, and then the concept flamed out like so many other things. But it is really interesting to try to think what might be the next big thing, whether it's a new type of story or a totally new way of getting stories to readers. This is much food for thought!

Maybe you can even explore a genre where you think a romance twist could work with that audience (to leverage your experience) and it's not overdone yet (the novelty twist could work).
This is very thought provoking. I've jokingly said I could do a zombie book with a romance (not zombie lovin' though because a girl's gotta draw the line somewhere, LOL). But I do wonder if a "novelty twist" might strike me sometime that will just beg to be written. It will be interesting to see!

Thanks again for such a thought-provoking post. I really appreciate it!

So sorry to hear this!
Awww!!! Thanks!!! Even though a good chunk of my burnout is because the whole Amazon/advertising thing has gotten so out-of-hand, I think a lot of my problems could be solved if I'd just beat myself harder with a stick. This lack of motivation is pretty foreign to me, to be honest. I'm usually a bit of a workaholic, so this is a pretty big departure. But it does have an upside because I'm spending more time with friends and family, so that's good!
 

diegorueda

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It's the same with adding more social media activity/outlets. I'm not sure the "juice would justify the squeeze" right now, but it IS always good to keep an eye out. When Facebook advertising became a thing, those who jumped in early did really well, me included, so this is a good reminder.
@Andy Black is figuring out Twitter ads, Idk if that's a thing that could work with authors (or if anyone is doing them)

I think a lot of my problems could be solved if I'd just beat myself harder with a stick
50 Shades of the Romance Writer? XD

If you are having a hard time sticking to write, you can work on reframing your relationship with the work. Steve Pavlina has some good content about it:


This is very thought provoking. I've jokingly said I could do a zombie book with a romance (not zombie lovin' though because a girl's gotta draw the line somewhere, LOL). But I do wonder if a "novelty twist" might strike me sometime that will just beg to be written. It will be interesting to see!

Thanks again for such a thought-provoking post. I really appreciate it!
LOL. That zombie loving made me remember the end of Shaun of the Dead (it seems like it works with male friends haha)

Why not play a bit to find that twist instead of waiting for it? Idk, maybe making different lists of topics, tropes, subgenres, and play to combine them. Or some of those beginner's exercises for generating ideas (sometimes going back to the basics helps a lot.)

I've definitely wondered this. A funny thing, stepbrother romances became really HUUUUGE a few years ago. The first author who did this made out like a bandit. And those who followed on the bandwagon quickly did really well too, and then the concept flamed out like so many other things. But it is really interesting to try to think what might be the next big thing, whether it's a new type of story or a totally new way of getting stories to readers. This is much food for thought!
Funny that the stepbrother/stepsister trend is also been present in the porn industry in the last few years, along with the "Tinder date" (not that I know first hand, a friend told me XD).
 

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@Andy Black is figuring out Twitter ads, Idk if that's a thing that could work with authors (or if anyone is doing them)
I’m helping a friend who has a sales book. I suggested he tweet quoteables from the book, and somehow link to the book in his Twitter bio. Put ad spend behind those tweets and see how it goes.

Seems to me that authors could do well on Twitter as they’ve so much material.

Not sure how that translates to fiction books. I’ve not thought about it.
 

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I think a lot of my problems could be solved if I'd just beat myself harder with a stick. This lack of motivation is pretty foreign to me, to be honest. I'm usually a bit of a workaholic, so this is a pretty big departure.

I hate to straight-up contradict you, but this is almost never the answer. How would you treat a friend going through this? You would probably advise them that their burnout is trying to tell them something & if it's as uncharacteristic as you say (and I 100% believe you) then you also might suggest that they take a look at their health markers -things like thyroid health, hormone health, etc. There is most likely an underlying impetus here.

If you feel like crap, berating yourself & bashing yourself in order to spurn a zest for performing will 100% not work. I can tell you this from personal experience. Try to find out what might be the root cause of your professional lethargy might be & listen to it. The body is wise.
 

COSenior

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Awww!!! Thanks!!! Even though a good chunk of my burnout is because the whole Amazon/advertising thing has gotten so out-of-hand, I think a lot of my problems could be solved if I'd just beat myself harder with a stick. This lack of motivation is pretty foreign to me, to be honest. I'm usually a bit of a workaholic, so this is a pretty big departure. But it does have an upside because I'm spending more time with friends and family, so that's good!
I personally don't think beating yourself up or working harder is the way to go. Please tell me you have pursued and grown your email list. I don't like PPC advertising for books, precisely for the reason you mention. Or for putting all your eggs in one basket.

If you do have a bunch of raving fans' emails, why not poll them and ask if they'd like to see a new direction? Maybe it's just me, but I get bored reading the same genre or subgenre all the time. Come up with some ideas including zombie (that could actually be romcom if you worked it right) and offer the ideas to your fans. Let them tell you what to write next.

Also, have you looked into Vella?
 

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