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O/T: HEALTH Why are you vegetarian/ vegan?

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Would you consider insect protein vegetarian/ vegan?

  • Yes

    Votes: 5 35.7%
  • No

    Votes: 9 64.3%
  • I don't know

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    14
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arl

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I'm not personally vegetarian nor vegan. But it's something I've been giving some though to lately.
I'd like to know what's the trigger for most people? Why did you become vegetarian / vegan?

If I'm honest with myself I don't really care about the suffering of the animals. I see it as a natural thing for some animals (us) to eat other animals. However, I can admit that the meat industry is kind of out of control. We consume way more meat than it's healthy and all the meat production has severe environmental repercussions (gas emissions, water consuption, etc).

I don't see myself quitting meat for good anytime soon, but I'm trying to have a more responsible consumption. I had always heard that insects had a lot of protein. And in my research I've found out that they are actually making cricket flour these days. Apparently is very efficient to produce (compared to meat).

Now my question... Even if crickets and other insects are animals, do you give a crap about them? Would you consider eating them if you are vegetarian / vegan?
I don't think that insect protein will substitute meat, but I don't think it's a novelty either.

I'd love to know what your stand is in this topic.
 

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peterb0yd

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As someone who has been eating a strict vegan diet for the past two years, I care mostly about sustainability and health benefits.

Insect farming is vastly more sustainable than livestock, so I think it's a fine solution. Not everyone will eat products made with insects, but as long as the market exists, it will be beneficial for the ecosystem.

In terms of health considerations, I'm not sure if insects are particularly healthy. I honestly don't know enough. I imagine they are healthier than animal products, but that doesn't say much ;)

Personally, the idea of eating insects grosses me out even if it's made into a flour or put into an indiscernible product. I'd stick to protein products made from beans, peas, brown rice or chickpeas.
 
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arl

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Personally, the idea of eating insects grosses me out even if it's made into a flour or put into an indiscernible product. I'd stick to protein products made from beans, peas, brown rice or chickpeas.
For sure the gross factor would be huge when dealing with something like this. But mentalities change over time. Lobster was once seen as a poor man's meal and now it's a delicacy
 
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lowtek

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As someone who has been eating a strict vegan diet for the past two years, I care mostly about sustainability and health benefits.

Insect farming is vastly more sustainable than livestock, so I think it's a fine solution. Not everyone will eat products made with insects, but as long as the market exists, it will be beneficial for the ecosystem.

In terms of health considerations, I'm not sure if insects are particularly healthy. I honestly don't know enough. I imagine they are healthier than animal products, but that doesn't say much ;)

Personally, the idea of eating insects grosses me out even if it's made into a flour or put into an indiscernible product. I'd stick to protein products made from beans, peas, brown rice or chickpeas.
I have zero problems with people eating vegan or vegetarian, for whatever reasons they choose. I don't understand how some folks get bent out of shape over people going vegan. Rob Zombie caught quite a bit of flack on Facebook for it.

That said, there is no universe in which I am eating insects as a staple of my diet. The idea of pushing eating bugs as somehow sustainable for the environment has to be some sort of sick joke.
 

elusive97

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Not vegetarian and vegan, but why put labels on everything? :) Many people do meat free Mondays or just reduce portion size of their meats rather than cutting them out completely if they're not against it morally. Health wise, it doesn't really make sense:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uf8k4NOBsXY
 
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FinanceStudent

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I'm not vegetarian or vegan, but I've found myself getting closer and closer to that point.

For some reason, meat has been starting to gross me out more and more. Finding a tough bit in my food or something like that has always turned me off.

Recently I've been doing a lot of cooking. I've made several dishes that I would expect to really lack without meat in it, such as burrito bowls, hearty quesadillas, and chili.

I've found that if the right ingredients are used, meat is actually a detriment to the meal. The burrito bowls and chili that I've been making are so heavy and filling without any meat! I don't miss it at all in these cases and it would probably ruin the meal if I added it.

That being said, I still find myself enjoying it. I really like burgers, chicken alfredo, meat sticks, etc. It's not something I feel the need to give up.

In terms of insects being used as a replacement to animal protein... What makes them any different than other animals? If the reason for this replacement is because of the suffering of the animal, does this imply that insects would not experience the same suffering? Are insects not affected by living in large numbers in confined areas? Does it seem okay because of their small size and large numbers?

As other people have said, I would also feel very uneasy about using insect-based food products even if it wasn't noticeable. But I also think that this mentality could easily change (just takes time).
 

peterb0yd

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For sure the gross factor would be huge when dealing with something like this. But mentalities change over time. Lobster was once seen as a poor man's meal and now it's a delicacy
Ha! Lobster, crabs and shrimp are ocean insects. We just don't think of them that way because they're larger than land insects.

Kinda funny when you think of it that way. Imagine people people paying $40 to each a giant steamed tarantula with a side of bread sticks!
 
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BellaPippin

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I see it as a natural thing for some animals (us) to eat other animals. However, I can admit that the meat industry is kind of out of control. We consume way more meat than it's healthy and all the meat production has severe environmental repercussions (gas emissions, water consuption, etc).
I have some of a similar stance. I think it's normal to eat animals, I just dislike the fact that the demand is so much that they have to go through cruel processes, which is something that I'm sure can be solved if we put our mind to it. If anything THAT should be regulated because switching everyone to vegetarian only so demand comes down is more of a feat than putting certain things in regulating the industry. Of course it's easier for lobbyists to cover that up. I would be fine with the price of meat going up as a trade off. If it's too expensive, you get substitutes. If you can afford it, you get a good steak, knowing the industry is regulated and they got treated humanly, at least. That would be MY ideal scenario. As I don't see that happening anytime soon, I cut my beef consumption (which is the animal that generates the most greenhouse gases) followed by some chicken (which I'm not crazy about anyway) and finally fish. That said, in my head it's much easier to kill a bunch of crickets quickly and painlessly than it is a bunch of cows.

Someone was on a Shark Tank episode with crickets for that purpose. IMO just like I don't like octopus because it looks like octopus but I can eat steak or chicken because it doesn't look like cow/ a chick, easily if you just take out the little legs and make look like a little peanut I feel it would be much more marketable as a substitute and/or people would be more willing to give it a go, as long as they are tasty.

Bonus: did you see these at PHX airport? NOPE NOPE NOPE

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Kak

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This was pretty interesting to me so I googled a bit. Wow... This might be an early adoption type of thing.


Not something I would eat, but interesting that people will and therefore pay for it. They don’t seem to be marketing to vegans though.

Our crickets are raised at our facility in Austin, Texas. They eat USDA certified organic feed and are processed in a gluten-free, certified organic kitchen. They’re roasted to bring out their warm, earthy, nutty flavor. Then they’re milled into a nutrient-packed cricket powder.

You can use Aketta the same way you would use chicken, fish, pork or beef. Sprinkle the roasted crickets on your salad or pizza. Use them as a taco filling. Mix them with your favorite herbs and spices and eat them as a snack. Add the cricket powder to your smoothie. Swap it out for 1/4 of the flour in your favorite baked goods. Stir it into soups and stews. Need more ideas? Check out our recipes below.
As far as meat grossing people out... Yeah cheap meat is disgusting to me. I only eat really good cuts of meat normally or hunted deer which is as organic and healthy as meat can typically be.
 
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Devilery

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I'm vegan for around 2 years. For me it's definitely the ethical aspect. I mean it's weird right, I ate meat my entire life and have said: "I will never be vegan".

I somewhat accidentally watched one of the documentaries (about meat and dairy industries), but even then I didn't go vegan right away.

I took several months where my mindset went like - "I wont be vegan" -> "It kind of makes sense why people are vegan" -> "I start to feel responsible for their suffering" -> "I should be vegan, I will" -> Watched another documentary and never (consciously) ate any animals products again.

I just couldn't live with knowing what real, live, conscious beings have to go through just because it's convenient for me to eat them.

Health benefits and contribution to environment are just additonal benefits. I don't particualry care about environment, but do appreciate my health gains!

Regarding the insect farming, I think it's a good thing. It takes way less resources to produce equivalent amount of food (e.g. same protein amount per 100g as meat). And while we could argue whether insects are animals, I'd much rather see insects grinded into burger patties than pigs, cows or any other traditional meat source. I personally wont eat insects, but in my mind, it's all about many people doing it imperfectly, not few doing perfectly perfect.
 

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DaRK9

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Insects are animals.

Edit: Not that I care as I eat meat but being a California native I can tell you my vegan friends wouldn't go for it. But to be honest there isn't a reason to classify such a diet. If you wanna eat bugs go for it. But vegans sure won't be calling you vegan.


This was pretty interesting to me so I googled a bit. Wow... This might be an early adoption type of thing.


Not something I would eat, but interesting that people will and therefore pay for it.

As far as meat grossing people out... Yeah cheap meat is disgusting to me. I only eat really good cuts of meat normally or hunted deer which is as organic and healthy as meat can typically be.
Been doing the same. I've been contemplating hunting this year for venison.
 

SteveO

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I eat primarily vegetarian for health reasons. I have type 2 diabetes. It is common for people in my position to eat low carb/high protein diets. That does not help my blood sugar though.

I stick to a high nutrition diet of fresh veggies, nuts, seeds, and beans. I feel better, my weight stays under control, and my blood sugar stays in check without insulin. That is such a big deal to me as I was taking 28 units a day of insulin in the past.
 
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arl

arl

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The idea of pushing eating bugs as somehow sustainable for the environment has to be some sort of sick joke.
Lol. I don't think anyone is pushing anyone to eat bugs. Not yet at least.
I'm not completetly sold on the idea either. But it's just a perception thing. We are just not used to eating bugs. Plenty of other countries do and see it as normal. I'm pretty sure that if you stop to think about everything we eat there are for sure some weird shit.

For example in Spain we already eat barnacles (expensive as F*ck by the way) or snails. That probably sounds gross to most of you, but here it's a very normal thing. I just grew up being taught that those were food too, so it doesn't bother me at all.


Bugs ain't F*ckin vegan. If lobster ain't vegan, then neither is a bug.
In terms of insects being used as a replacement to animal protein... What makes them any different than other animals? If the reason for this replacement is because of the suffering of the animal, does this imply that insects would not experience the same suffering? Are insects not affected by living in large numbers in confined areas? Does it seem okay because of their small size and large numbers?
That's my stance too. They are animals. I was just wondering what other people thought. I lowkey think that some people claim to care about all animals but in truth they don't give a shit about insects or some other kind of animals.

Not vegetarian and vegan, but why put labels on everything? :) Many people do meat free Mondays or just reduce portion size of their meats rather than cutting them out completely if they're not against it morally.
Completely agree. I don't need to put labels on anything. I do me.

Someone was on a Shark Tank episode with crickets for that purpose. IMO just like I don't like octopus because it looks like octopus but I can eat steak or chicken because it doesn't look like cow/ a chick, easily if you just take out the little legs and make look like a little peanut I feel it would be much more marketable as a substitute and/or people would be more willing to give it a go, as long as they are tasty.
That's actually where I first heard about this kind of product. That was a few years ago but I never gave it much thought until now.

This was pretty interesting to me so I googled a bit. Wow... This might be an early adoption type of thing.
It's for sure still early in the game. But products like this have been around for a few years already. They haven't gotten that much traction though. But with more people each year concerned about the environmenal repercussions of the meat industry, could mean that the market is getting ready for something like this.
 

SeanODG

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I'm not Vegan, but I've thought about it for the energy boost. If it supplies an energy boost, then it's absolutely worth it!
 

MJ DeMarco

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To answer the OP's question, NO, I would not consider insects to be vegan.

Anyhoo, here's my story regarding the health effects I received, been vegan for 3 years.




Unfortunately this forum has proven over and over again (see posts above) that they cannot discuss veganism, just like religion and politics. People will defend their meat as much as they would defend their favorite socialist politician or their chosen God, evidence or facts be damned. Thread closed.
 

Walter Hay

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I somewhat accidentally watched one of the documentaries (about meat and dairy industries), but even then I didn't go vegan right away.

I just couldn't live with knowing what real, live, conscious beings have to go through just because it's convenient for me to eat them.
DISCLAIMER: For health reasons I eat very little meat. I also bred cattle on large grazing properties for over 30 years, more as a hobby than a business.

The sensationalist documentaries that I have seen invariably display exceptions rather than the rule. One day we might see documentaries about the filthy factory conditions in which vegetarian or vegan foods are prepared.:playful:
I am not saying that happens.

I have a number of relatives who have bred cattle and one who is one of the biggest dairy farmers in New Zealand.

Here's a fact worth remembering when you see the disgusting behavior on those documentaries: Every grazier or dairyman that I know treat their animals with great care. We get to know them, their personalities and their likes. We become very fond of them and give them a lot of TLC.

I have given mouth to mouth resuscitation to a calf that was not breathing after a difficult birth, and then carried it to the front so the mother could smell it and massage it to life with her tongue.

I found a calf that the cow had delivered in a breech birth, and a big fox had pulled on the calf's tail and chewed the tail off in the process. I put the calf around my neck and carried the poor creature, still covered in slimy afterbirth, close on a kilometer to the barn, followed by the cow. There I was able to administer first aid, and that calf grew big and healthy.

On a few occasions I had the sad duty of shooting a cow that was beyond veterinary help. As they trustingly gazed up at me I felt very emotional about pulling the trigger. At least I put them out of their misery instantly and painlessly. I always aimed at the spot used in decent abattoirs.

I have known many farmers with a similar outlook.

Walter
 
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