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Which programming language do you use most?

Barry_M

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Elixir is its own language.

Phoenix is a library for Elixir. Postgres is its own database. Turbolinks, Stimulus, and React are all javacript libraries.

The libraries were outside of the scope of the original question, but felt like they were worth mentioning if anyone was interested
ah right cool. Ive seen postgres before but never really took much interest in it as with Ruby.
I write Javascript daily. Might get in to REACT but I dont know yet.
 

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404profound

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arnt these all sub Library of another language though?
Like Jquery is to Javascript and I suppose REACT is the Javascript as well
Vue is better than React in my opinion. But then again, opinions on JS frameworks are a dime a dozen. I've tried learning all three major frameworks and found Vue the most intuitive to work with and having the best docs.
 

Barry_M

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there are a few companies locally that are looking for react devs (lol JAVASCRIPT DEVS) specifying react knowledge though.. tbh im not looking to dive massively in to it but if its the next big thing i might need to learn some just to get by. my CMS will most likely never use it.
 
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László Károlyi

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I do a lot of web development. I've worked with lots of languages of the past 8 years. For the past two years I've been happily coding with Elixir.

Elixir is a weird mix of Ruby syntax on top of the Erlang VM. Looks hipster at first but...

I first got into Elixir actually through watching a youtube video on Erlang (a programming language written in the 80s for telecom companies). All of these engineers were listening to this presentation, and all of them had grey hair. Which got me thinking... Why are all these old guys so damn happy? The answer: the Erlang VM is just a fantastic platform to build stuff on.

Immutability by default, suuuper lightweight threads, "let it fail" mentality, and supervisors to turn stuff off and on when things go wrong. There's a lot more cool stuff in OTP, but I'll stay away from that for now. There's a lot of tools to make otherwise hard problems dead simple. It's a purpose built language with solid design principles.

The creator of Elixir was actually a core Ruby on Rails team member. When faced with concurrency issues in Ruby, he decided to make his own language, bringing a fresh coat of paint to an already highly concurrent, fault tolerant language.

The phoenix framework is written in Elixir and is a much less "magic" version of rails. I hate large frameworks because you spend more time figuring out the thought process behind the framework than focusing on the problem itself. Phoenix is really slim, comes with project generators, super easy to unit test, and can leverage a lot of cool stuff from OTP.

Elixir, Phoenix, Postgres, Turbolinks, Stimulus, and React for when I absolutely have to do something with Javascript.

It's a bit programmery, but well worth the time to learn.
I have my eyes on Elixir/Erlang. The hot module replace functionality is something that caught my eyes. I plan to try it out somewhen in the distant future, when Python and its ecosystem deteriorates. It's just too comfy working with it right now.

One of my buddies is working at a bank where they build stuff with erlang/elixir, and he sung odes about it.

Btw, wanna see somebody who's happy with Python and has gray hair?



His name is Raymond Hettinger.
 

awestbro

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I have my eyes on Elixir/Erlang. The hot module replace functionality is something that caught my eyes. I plan to try it out somewhen in the distant future, when Python and its ecosystem deteriorates. It's just too comfy working with it right now.

One of my buddies is working at a bank where they build stuff with erlang/elixir, and he sung odes about it.

Btw, wanna see somebody who's happy with Python and has gray hair?



His name is Raymond Hettinger.
Haha, I think python is here to stay for quite a while. And the best language is the one you know and are already productive in.

I think the biggest draw to learning Elixir/ Erlang is definitely soft realtime stuff. Chat applications, any sort of concurrent communication. Theres lots of battle tested libraries out there since Erlang was built for the telecom industry.

I haven't done much with the code reloading, since I don't have much need for it, but it does seem cool. The biggest feature like that for me is to attach to a remote running system in the repl and run my functions that I've already written. Suuuper useful for those one off production issues.

But yeah if you are ever looking to play around with something new, highly recommend it
 

sosa067

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I think it largely depends on what the application is going to do.

For example, I have a couple of projects in mind that relies heavily on web scraping & using third party API's. I really want to start using nodeJS, but the stack that makes sense for this type of application would be Python. So Django & React it is.
 

Reso

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Nobody mentioned Dart yet, so I'm going to do so. I build Flutter apps and I feel like Flutter for the web will be a game-changer once it's stable.
Backend is mostly Firebase, but I'm learning Aqueduct (Dart framework) although Node Electron Express is still more viable than this new Dart backend.
 
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404profound

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Nobody mentioned Dart yet, so I'm going to do so. I build Flutter apps and I feel like Flutter for the web will be a game-changer once it's stable.
Backend is mostly Firebase, but I'm learning Aqueduct (Dart framework) although Node Electron is still more viable than this new Dart backend.
Electron is a mess. I agree that Dart looks promising.
 

Reso

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Did I say Electron? Oh, I meant Express.js, but I agree that Flutter is much better than Electron, Ionic or basically anything that tries to take the web stack to desktop/mobile.
 

AntonelaG

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I use PHP and Java, I think they are the most important today, Phytom is important too.
 

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Usually I just script things in Ruby (no rails). But I've made projects in C, C++, Obj-C, Python, Lua, Javascript (esp. with mobile frameworks), and even (gasp) PHP when that was the task before me ;) Probably others I'm forgetting, and I've played with a lot of languages on the side. Ruby is my go-to favorite right now though. It's just fun to code with it.
 

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If I get to choose my prefered setup is React JS for frontend & Express JS backend, however currently working on React JS & Python backend, and for most of my client projects it's been PHP (mainly WordPress)
 

srodrigo

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I have my eyes on Elixir/Erlang. The hot module replace functionality is something that caught my eyes. I plan to try it out somewhen in the distant future, when Python and its ecosystem deteriorates
I'm curious about why you think Python will deteriorate. Python has a few problems compared to other languages, but there's one killer thing that's part of the future of programming and Python is probably the best language out there for it: Machine Learning. For this reason, I think Python will only improve, and I don't see it fading out any time soon. It's actually growing more and more on things like TIOBE, and the number of Python jobs is also raising.

In any case, there are lots of languages and tech stacks. It doesn't really matter which one you use, most of them get the job done.

For web/mobile development, I'd personally stick with JavaScript, unless I needed to dive into Machine Learning (in which case I'd go for Python without hesitating). There reason is that Progressive Web Apps might be enough to replace mobile apps that don't require much native interaction, and JS itself keeps growing. Dart/Flutter look promising, but not quite there yet, and again they might not be needed for simple apps (which are a very large percentage).

If I were to keep making video games, either C# (good balance between productivity and performance), or Rust if I needed really high performance (C++ looks like a mess to me).

EDIT: grammar.
 

404profound

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For web/mobile development, I'd personally stick with JavaScript, unless I needed to dive into Machine Learning (in which case I'd go for Python without hesitating). There reason is that Progressive Web Apps might be enough to replace mobile apps that don't require much native interaction, and JS itself keeps growing. Dart/Flutter look promising, but not quite there yet, and again they might not be needed for simple apps (which are a very large percentage).
I'm starting to wonder when WASM will kill off any other web language. Definitely gonna start learning it soon.
 

srodrigo

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I'm starting to wonder when WASM will kill off any other web language. Definitely gonna start learning it soon.
That might be the case (I would personally love that). But if you look back, C (over 50 years old) and C++ (over 30) are still there. JavaScript, as much of a mess as it is, it's still there and growing. Same thing for most of the remaining mainstream languages (Python, Java, C#, even PHP), that have not been replaced by new shinny languages even if sometimes those new languages look better than the old ones.

There's too much JS out there to be replaced, in my opinion (even to be fixed, as JS is a flawed language and can't be fixed without breaking the entire web). Legacy code is something that keeps old languages mainstream.
 

404profound

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That might be the case (I would personally love that). But if you look back, C (over 50 years old) and C++ (over 30) are still there. JavaScript, as much of a mess as it is, it's still there and growing. Same thing for most of the remaining mainstream languages (Python, Java, C#, even PHP), that have not been replaced by new shinny languages even if sometimes those new languages look better than the old ones.

There's too much JS out there to be replaced, in my opinion (even to be fixed, as JS is a flawed language and can't be fixed without breaking the entire web). Legacy code is something that keeps old languages mainstream.
Do you think TypeScript is a reasonable way to address JavaScript's flaws?
 

srodrigo

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Do you think TypeScript is a reasonable way to address JavaScript's flaws?
That's a good question. I haven't used it much, but looks to me like it just adds static typing. You can still use JavaScript inside TypeScript seamlessly, so I'm not sure it really fixes much.
 

404profound

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That's a good question. I haven't used it much, but looks to me like it just adds static typing. You can still use JavaScript inside TypeScript seamlessly, so I'm not sure it really fixes much.
I figured that half of JS's problems are the prevalence of runtime errors, which TS largely mitigates. I've just started digging into TS and think it's a big improvement so far.
 

Andy Black

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Ha... I still do a bit of korn shell scripting every now and then. Mixed with good old sed, grep, and awk.
 

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László Károlyi

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I'm curious about why you think Python will deteriorate. Python has a few problems compared to other languages, but there's one killer thing that's part of the future of programming and Python is probably the best language out there for it: Machine Learning. For this reason, I think Python will only improve, and I don't see it fading out any time soon. It's actually growing more and more on things like TIOBE, and the number of Python jobs is also raising.

In any case, there are lots of languages and tech stacks. It doesn't really matter which one you use, most of them get the job done.

For web/mobile development, I'd personally stick with JavaScript, unless I needed to dive into Machine Learning (in which case I'd go for Python without hesitating). There reason is that Progressive Web Apps might be enough to replace mobile apps that don't require much native interaction, and JS itself keeps growing. Dart/Flutter look promising, but not quite there yet, and again they might not be needed for simple apps (which are a very large percentage).

If I were to keep making video games, either C# (good balance between productivity and performance), or Rust if I needed really high performance (C++ looks like a mess to me).

EDIT: grammar.
Let me preface my comment with it being my opinion, and opinions are like assholes. You know the drill.

I work with python since 2002 and don't get me wrong, I still love every bit of it, despite of the hindrances it has. The problem lies not in the language, but in the people around it. It's more like a human behavioral tendency, not a language pitfall. If something gets picked up by lots of people, eventually the toxic people too will find their way into it, and this is when things start to deteriorate.

If I would need to mention an example:

If you start debates on semantics, this is what clearly signals decline to me. Unfortunately or not, I've been proven right a couple times before.

Also, I never really understood the 'Machine Learning' hype. All that is to me is a result of the above mentioned fact: because of its conciseness, Python has become massively popular. If any other language would have the same effectiveness, probably the machine learning/AI hype would be propped up in that language.
 

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