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BrooklynHustle

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Just curios - how much funds did you have in the bank to cover your expenses during the transition?

Or did you work in the app while working. As MSFT?


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I started the app business on the side while still traditionally employed

That December was the first month things started to take off. By the end, my business' revenue for the month was just slightly more than double my before tax pay for the month.

I quit the following April, and my revenues only increased, giving me all the confidence I needed. Since I was already living below my means on the job salary, between that and the business income, during that 4-5 month period, I was able to bank more cash than I had ever had before, and continue to build on it after that.
 
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Philip Marlowe

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It's tough to leave a solid, consistent, and secure job...especially if you have a family to support.

Truth. I have yet to leave my six-figure slowlane job, but I'm on the path. And that's not because I dislike it (the exact opposite - great people/boss), but rather because it's fragile and my job is ultimately dependent on a handful of variables outside of my control, which is unacceptable.

Sorry I can't tell my story (yet), but I do know what it's like to have a well-paying job that supports the family while yearning for something more.

And I should add that one of the challenges in telling anybody is that you look a bit spoiled in your first world problem. In other words, I have an amazing job that I love that pays me insanely well....and yet I want something more. Hard to find anyone who can relate except here.
 

Jav100

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I started the app business on the side while still traditionally employed

That December was the first month things started to take off. By the end, my business' revenue for the month was just slightly more than double my before tax pay for the month.

I quit the following April, and my revenues only increased, giving me all the confidence I needed. Since I was already living below my means on the job salary, between that and the business income, during that 4-5 month period, I was able to bank more cash than I had ever had before, and continue to build on it after that.

Aww that's awesome to hear. I've got a good paying gig and am working on the side but struggle to make any fast progress given things move at a snails pace.

Staring at a computer for another few hours is tough after a full days worth doing it.

Are you outsourcing any activities? I try to do everything which I know is a bad move but I feel like outsourcing itself requires time.




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Jav100

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Jun 20, 2016
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Truth. I have yet to leave my six-figure slowlane job, but I'm on the path. And that's not because I dislike it (the exact opposite - great people/boss), but rather because it's fragile and my job is ultimately dependent on a handful of variables outside of my control, which is unacceptable.

Sorry I can't tell my story (yet), but I do know what it's like to have a well-paying job that supports the family while yearning for something more.

And I should add that one of the challenges in telling anybody is that you look a bit spoiled in your first world problem. In other words, I have an amazing job that I love that pays me insanely well....and yet I want something more. Hard to find anyone who can relate except here.

I don't have a family yet but the pressure is on to start one.

But I think I am scared to high hell of having a family and a normal slow lane job. I along with others (some of which are way smarter/skilled than me!) have been laid off for ridiculous reasons (company stock down, management changes their mind every three months, general economy, etc.)

I rather be the captain of my own ship - I truly think there's no security at a job - unless you live in Europe with those labor laws.

When you are in charge I think you have more security or at least have visibility to be road ahead.



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Philip Marlowe

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When you're in charge you have more control over your actions, but I'm not necessarily sure about security (I agree on visibility, or at least direction). I work with someone who owns a consulting business and while he has tremendous flexibility and can do the job in his sleep, clients can just up and leave him. He's relatively diversified, but it still hurts.

At a 9-5 you can get fired, sure, but most days you also just walk out the door at 5PM and wait on your paycheck without much thought for anything else behind the scenes.

It's good you have a burning desire for something more, but i don't begrudge anyone in the slow lane (we need them - they served me coffee in first class this morning on my way back from Dallas!)
 

Jav100

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Jun 20, 2016
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When you're in charge you have more control over your actions, but I'm not necessarily sure about security (I agree on visibility, or at least direction). I work with someone who owns a consulting business and while he has tremendous flexibility and can do the job in his sleep, clients can just up and leave him. He's relatively diversified, but it still hurts.

At a 9-5 you can get fired, sure, but most days you also just walk out the door at 5PM and wait on your paycheck without much thought for anything else behind the scenes.

It's good you have a burning desire for something more, but i don't begrudge anyone in the slow lane (we need them - they served me coffee in first class this morning on my way back from Dallas!)

Fair points. I guess having seen people work hard, do a good job and be talented - and still get canned because the stock price is down a few pennies or investors didn't make 20% gains did it for me. :)

Then again I've always worked in sales or marketing so it might be a bit more aggressive in these areas.
 

MCBoots

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I quasi made the leap a few months ago from a very lucrative but uninspiring corporate life. My previously planned exit (sale of company/employer) fell through. But the hallmark of large public companies, the periodic “restructuring” i.e. mass layoffs, reared it’s head and up my hand went once I knew I had a couple consulting clients lined up for post-exit.

Between the exit package, pre-existing savings, and the consulting work, I have a couple years of runway. But consulting long-term isn’t much different from a job so I consider that just a stop gap/cushion and don’t plan to spend more than half my time on it.

Have a few things in evaluation, all of which would require partners and outside capital or would entail joining another early venture with meaningful equity participation. We’ll see what strikes in the coming months. Exciting times!
 
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maverick

Aspice, officio fungeris sine spe honoris ampliori
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My path/journey has been:
- crap job
- analyst (decent pay, grunt work)
- strategy consultant (great pay, PPT/XLS, big toll on time, lots of travel = more hours; less pay)
- management job at global company (bureaucracy, office politics, lots of meetings)
- digital marketing freelancer / part-time entrepreneur

Next stop: full time entrepreneur. Working on SaaS startup and an ecomm venture.
 
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