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One Trick Pony

WJK

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Found this thread at the perfect time.

The ideas found in this thread hit me differently. I recently (within the last few months) learned a new skill. It’s been proven successful. I’m confident I can continue to build revenue if I focus on getting it in front of the right people.

It’s still early on in my business. I’m thinking about pivoting it a little differently to help people with a very specific problem.

Part of me wants to stick with what’s proven to work. The other part wants to dedicate some time to this new pivot.

What I’ve gleaned from your post is what you said to MTF a couple years ago:

No!!!! That is the right thing to do. Build off of what you know.

You would still be working within your field of expertise.

I should clarify as well that there is nothing wrong with making changes and adjustments. Especially early on while trying to find a niche

If you are going to sell information, then understand the market and go after it


You also said:

“My contention is not to stick with an unsuccessful path. It is to find one with potential, build your skills, and capitalize on it.”

Thank you for clarifying this point.

This helps:

You must have a solid base -- financial/business -- BEFORE you diversify. And then you must take good care of that base while you dally with other ideas and business pursuits.

Many people shoot themselves in the foot by diluting their resources and efforts by chasing other ideas and side issues too early in the process. Creating a business takes everything a person has to give. It's a 24/7 quest.

Or they become a success and feel that they no longer need to take care of their businesses. They are too busy spending the money and showing off. That's when they throw away their spouse and marry the office bimbo. Or buy a huge boat or a plane. I've watched a bunch of them lose everything and go broke. Then it's start-over time.
 
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SteveO

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Found this thread at the perfect time.

The ideas found in this thread hit me differently. I recently (within the last few months) learned a new skill. It’s been proven successful. I’m confident I can continue to build revenue if I focus on getting it in front of the right people.

It’s still early on in my business. I’m thinking about pivoting it a little differently to help people with a very specific problem.

Part of me wants to stick with what’s proven to work. The other part wants to dedicate some time to this new pivot.

What I’ve gleaned from your post is what you said to MTF a couple years ago:

No!!!! That is the right thing to do. Build off of what you know.

You would still be working within your field of expertise.

I should clarify as well that there is nothing wrong with making changes and adjustments. Especially early on while trying to find a niche

If you are going to sell information, then understand the market and go after it


You also said:

“My contention is not to stick with an unsuccessful path. It is to find one with potential, build your skills, and capitalize on it.”

Thank you for clarifying this point.

This helps:

Thanks.

I feel that the concept is very simple. The difficulty comes in when you have that shiny object syndrome.

Finding the initial path is the hard part. It will be different for everyone. Some people already possess skills in an area that they want to focus on. Others need to develop them.

I did not have much for skills in the path that I chose. I put a lot of effort into learning. Jumping in with both feet was scary at first but I got over that.
 

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Thanks.

I feel that the concept is very simple. The difficulty comes in when you have that shiny object syndrome.

Finding the initial path is the hard part. It will be different for everyone. Some people already possess skills in an area that they want to focus on. Others need to develop them.

I did not have much for skills in the path that I chose. I put a lot of effort into learning. Jumping in with both feet was scary at first but I got over that.
Me too. I’m pivoting into incorporating what I learned with what I already know.
 

WJK

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Me too. I’m pivoting into incorporating what I learned with what I already know.
I've tried a bunch of different ideas over the last few years for side gigs and pie-in-the-sky-investments. What are pie-in-sky-investments? I take a small percentage of my income and/or assets and play long shot business ideas and investments. The investment must be small enough that I can lose it without it hurting too bad. The upside must be big enough to make the risk worth it. I know that I'm going to lose my whole nut most of the time.

I bought an oil/gas lease from my State a few years ago. It was up against a working gas field. And I bought 4 surface lots so we could develop it. Then I partnered with an oil company and they did the seismic work on the site. We found out that my lease had no prospectus, so I gave up the lease and accepted my loses. Oh well. It would have made millions if it had come in. I learned a lot about that business. But, I'm not going to bid on another lease like that again. But I do a small investment in 3 oil wells that are going to be drilled soon...

I made jewelry in my espresso bar/office for a few years. I've quit that. It was a fun idea, but it was too labor-intensive and not very profitable. I'll use that creativity for my other business ventures.

I was going to start a used car lot. I funded buying a few vehicles. My partner, the auto mechanic, and the son of a close friend, got a wide hair. He suddenly moved to Arizona. This happened early this spring before the virus really reared its nasty head. I was glad that he ran off before I invested more money. I got a nice pickup out of it and there's still a box truck out in my yard that I need to sell... We would have made a lot of money between our to skill sets. Oh well. Next.

I wrote and illustrated some kids' books. That's a brutal business. But, I had fun doing it. I love the idea that authors can now self-publish so they can make money at it. The gatekeepers have been retired.

And that's just a few of the ideas I've tried out. Each time I have learned a bunch of stuff from every venture. A lot of the learned skills can be used for the next business. Right now, I'm using a business plan and techniques for some investments. It has the same elements as I used 40+ years ago when I was a young pup. Yes, it still works. Amazing. Education is never wasted! I can think of piles of new business ideas. My challenge is to vet them to make sure they will fit into the time and money slots I have available. Oh, and they must have the right upside IF they're successful.

In the meantime, I'm taking care of my core businesses and investments every day.
 
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HabitsCampaigner

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Wow! I am so grateful to have found this thread today. Thanks SteveO and the many who have contributed.

I love realizing that after 25 years online, I'm not starting from scratch; I'm putting my skills (creative exploring/inventing, backend programming and web dev, email marketing, etc.) to a new use.

What a long and useful contribution!

I am inspired by these ideas. Today's the day to decide and focus.
 
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Antifragile

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Awesome thread @SteveO

here is a book I liked a lot that’s saying the same thing - exactly. Interesting fact, author made it big in RE.

 

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I've threatened to write a book. Don't feel that I would be able to sit and focus though. Besides the fact that I am a poor communicator. :)

My wife has a joke that she pulls out now and then. When I'm having difficulty getting my point across she will chime in with "let me translate... I speak Steve..."
 

Antifragile

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I've threatened to write a book. Don't feel that I would be able to sit and focus though. Besides the fact that I am a poor communicator. :)

My wife has a joke that she pulls out now and then. When I'm having difficulty getting my point across she will chime in with "let me translate... I speak Steve..."
There is now Jarvis.ai that can write for you. Just get @MTF to help ;)

Your wife can just collect royalties! Haha
 
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Antifragile

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I have a question, which may seen dump, but ask it though.


I got in that thread by looking for ideas for a focus, as I have several directions, in which I look. To many.

So I have a question: I want to get the path of sourcing and selling something in a bigger style.

Is trading in general a narrow path? Or only focus on one thing to trade with?

In special : I m looking for good with a big margin. When I have one and start trading it, should I focus on getting the next thing and so on or focus on trading that single thing?
What exactly does it mean th focus on one thing?

Is „one thing“ the trading itself or trading a special thing?

btw. A great thread!
@Ing any update on your decisions after this post?
I am curious to hear your perspective as some time has now passed.

@WJK we are often taught not to put all the eggs in one basket, to diversify etc. And I think that's applicable when you have a certain net worth and only to the extent that you are "taking money off the table" as insurance for the future. When you are in startup and have nothing, I'd argue go all in on whatever you do. Get good on the "one thing", then get great at it and keep going.

@SteveO took a global perspective in this thread, as in "stick to one business and don't jump at every new shiny rock", and I'd like to add that same logic applies on a daily basis:
- When you start a task, finish it. Get the one thing done and only then move on.
- Know your priorities, there is never enough time to do everything but there is always plenty of time to do the most important thing (one!). What is it for you?
- Skills or lack of much needed skills can be developed the same way. Focus on the one thing you need most and get to "usable level of skills" quickly. Do you suck at accounting? Great, go take a course and focus, get the basics done. Marketing is new? Great, finish accounting course before you take the marketing one. Take notes, apply immediately and then revisit the notes one week, again one months from the date of finish. Don't know how to read legal documents or structure GP/LP partnerships? Well don't learn 15% of accounting, 20% of marketing and 5% of legal. At these levels knowledge is not applicable yet and useless. Back to "one thing" - get one done and move on to the next. Apply what you learned right away in your business.
- Workouts, meditation, food choices - this same principle applies.

To summarize:
  1. Never multitask. This kills the ability to do good quality work and takes 4x longer than if you focus on one task alone.
  2. Eat that frog
    :frog:
    . Some say that if you had to eat a frog (disgusting, I know) then it’s best to do it first thing and get it over with, the rest of the day will go better! Similarly, pick the task that is the nastiest and needs doing and get it done first thing in the morning.
  3. There is no such thing as “priorities”, plural implies that there can be a few or many. If you have more than one priority, you are multitasking. Each day you should have just THE ONE THING that must get done. And then a ranking list of things that you wish/should get done. The 1st thing is a priority, the rest is not. Pick your priority.
 

WJK

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@Ing any update on your decisions after this post?
I am curious to hear your perspective as some time has now passed.

@WJK we are often taught not to put all the eggs in one basket, to diversify etc. And I think that's applicable when you have a certain net worth and only to the extent that you are "taking money off the table" as insurance for the future. When you are in startup and have nothing, I'd argue go all in on whatever you do. Get good on the "one thing", then get great at it and keep going.

@SteveO took a global perspective in this thread, as in "stick to one business and don't jump at every new shiny rock", and I'd like to add that same logic applies on a daily basis:
- When you start a task, finish it. Get the one thing done and only then move on.
- Know your priorities, there is never enough time to do everything but there is always plenty of time to do the most important thing (one!). What is it for you?
- Skills or lack of much needed skills can be developed the same way. Focus on the one thing you need most and get to "usable level of skills" quickly. Do you suck at accounting? Great, go take a course and focus, get the basics done. Marketing is new? Great, finish accounting course before you take the marketing one. Take notes, apply immediately and then revisit the notes one week, again one months from the date of finish. Don't know how to read legal documents or structure GP/LP partnerships? Well don't learn 15% of accounting, 20% of marketing and 5% of legal. At these levels knowledge is not applicable yet and useless. Back to "one thing" - get one done and move on to the next. Apply what you learned right away in your business.
- Workouts, meditation, food choices - this same principle applies.

To summarize:
  1. Never multitask. This kills the ability to do good quality work and takes 4x longer than if you focus on one task alone.
  2. Eat that frog
    :frog:
    . Some say that if you had to eat a frog (disgusting, I know) then it’s best to do it first thing and get it over with, the rest of the day will go better! Similarly, pick the task that is the nastiest and needs doing and get it done first thing in the morning.
  3. There is no such thing as “priorities”, plural implies that there can be a few or many. If you have more than one priority, you are multitasking. Each day you should have just THE ONE THING that must get done. And then a ranking list of things that you wish/should get done. The 1st thing is a priority, the rest is not. Pick your priority.
You're right. My core business is doing fine. I have built a Productocity. I can only try some other stuff because of that base. I look for things that take very limited up-front cash and have a huge up-side. And they can't take up too much time front my core business. Yes, most of them violate the "control" rule, since I'm limiting my financial and time exposure. I know that these investments are always a long shot. A lot of times, if I'm being an angel investor, I can add some mentoring -- which adds some more control to the situation. I use to being the boss, so it pretty hair raising for me to NOT be in charge.
 

HabitsCampaigner

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I've threatened to write a book. Don't feel that I would be able to sit and focus though. Besides the fact that I am a poor communicator. :)
@SteveO You are an excellent communicator!

But I recall some guy once advised to watch out for distractions and only do that next thing if it's an extension of your same business and skills. :)

No you are a GREAT communicator... and humble too.
 
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Ing

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@Ing any update on your decisions after this post?
I am curious to hear your perspective as some time
@Ing any update on your decisions after this post?
I am curious to hear your perspective as some time has now passed.

@WJK we are often taught not to put all the eggs in one basket, to diversify etc. And I think that's applicable when you have a certain net worth and only to the extent that you are "taking money off the table" as insurance for the future. When you are in startup and have nothing, I'd argue go all in on whatever you do. Get good on the "one thing", then get great at it and keep going.

@SteveO took a global perspective in this thread, as in "stick to one business and don't jump at every new shiny rock", and I'd like to add that same logic applies on a daily basis:
- When you start a task, finish it. Get the one thing done and only then move on.
- Know your priorities, there is never enough time to do everything but there is always plenty of time to do the most important thing (one!). What is it for you?
- Skills or lack of much needed skills can be developed the same way. Focus on the one thing you need most and get to "usable level of skills" quickly. Do you suck at accounting? Great, go take a course and focus, get the basics done. Marketing is new? Great, finish accounting course before you take the marketing one. Take notes, apply immediately and then revisit the notes one week, again one months from the date of finish. Don't know how to read legal documents or structure GP/LP partnerships? Well don't learn 15% of accounting, 20% of marketing and 5% of legal. At these levels knowledge is not applicable yet and useless. Back to "one thing" - get one done and move on to the next. Apply what you learned right away in your business.
- Workouts, meditation, food choices - this same principle applies.

To summarize:
  1. Never multitask. This kills the ability to do good quality work and takes 4x longer than if you focus on one task alone.
  2. Eat that frog
    :frog:
    . Some say that if you had to eat a frog (disgusting, I know) then it’s best to do it first thing and get it over with, the rest of the day will go better! Similarly, pick the task that is the nastiest and needs doing and get it done first thing in the morning.
  3. There is no such thing as “priorities”, plural implies that there can be a few or many. If you have more than one priority, you are multitasking. Each day you should have just THE ONE THING that must get done. And then a ranking list of things that you wish/should get done. The 1st thing is a priority, the rest is not. Pick your priority.
I recogniced trading is not my thing at the moment.
to be honest, I dont know „my“ thing yet.
My opinion is, that trading in every facettes can be the one pony to go.
 

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I looked over my notes from the book:

The ONE Thing​

Gary Keller, Jay Papasan​


Some good nuggets for you all:

  • When everything feels urgent and important, everything seems equal. We become active and busy, but this doesn’t actually move us any closer to success. Activity is often unrelated to productivity, and busyness rarely takes care of business.
  • It’s not that we have too little time to do all the things we need to do, it’s that we feel the need to do too many things in the time we have.
  • Success is actually a short race—a sprint fueled by discipline just long enough for habit to kick in and take over.
  • When you ask yourself, “What’s the ONE Thing I can do in my life that would mean the most to me and the world, such that by doing it everything else would be easier or unnecessary?” you’re using the power of The ONE Thing to bring purpose to your life.
  • The Focusing Question collapses all possible questions into one: “What’s the ONE Thing I can do / such that by doing it / everything else will be easier or unnecessary?”
 

otek

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Love this thread. Currently having many balls, many ideas in the air. So good to have importance of focus pounded to your head.

Park business. Idea of building AI firm, preferrably some product, not consultancy. RE business. Dream of building zero emission houses. Still holding job at a data-analytics as a service company, children's book idea, publishing company idea, my investment company (or basically TSLA investment company - this actually adheres with the focusing point very well!) food company idea etc...

Have idea to combine some of these ideas to one.

"The one thing" -book is very good. Forces you to actually think of what concrete action would be useful to do today. Tomorrow, and so on. Not just action faking.
 
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WJK

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Love this thread. Currently having many balls, many ideas in the air. So good to have importance of focus pounded to your head.

Park business. Idea of building AI firm, preferrably some product, not consultancy. RE business. Dream of building zero emission houses. Still holding job at a data-analytics as a service company, children's book idea, publishing company idea, my investment company (or basically TSLA investment company - this actually adheres with the focusing point very well!) food company idea etc...

Have idea to combine some of these ideas to one.

"The one thing" -book is very good. Forces you to actually think of what concrete action would be useful to do today. Tomorrow, and so on. Not just action faking.
Dream on. Be an idea factory. Then take a couple of ideas and blend them into one direction -- that one idea you can run with...
 

Angler

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I remember reading this thread a few months back Steve, and I was reminded of this thread again today. This passage from a book reminded me of you:

"You can’t throw 15 things at a wall and hope one sticks, you throw one thing at the wall as
many times as you need until it sticks. Entrepreneurship requires focus, focus can only be
achieved on one thing at a given time. It’s not even worth trying to multi-task until you are
earning dough from your one thing."

Thank You Steve, your thread, THIS THREAD, inspires me. The fact that this thread is the first thing that came to mind when I read the except from somewhere else says it all. A few months back, your writing made me ask a lot of questions about myself, what I wanted, and how I should go about doing things if I want to speed my process. Or at least not do the same things expecting different results. These inspired questions helped me hone in my focus, which in turn helped me get closer to knowing myself. Your writing has become a piece of me and inspire change, and to that thank you Steve. I know it will to anyone reading this thread too.
 

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Bump.
1. Because this thread is awesome.
2. Seems some people could use this now.
 
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Sometimes I wonder if people are looking too many directions to try and figure out a path to take. Not that it isn't important to evaluate the options but, at some point the direction needs to narrow down.

It did not take long for me to get into the fastlane once I had decided to invest in apartments. I focused all my effort and research on defining how I could maximize my returns and continued to refine this process as I went along.

Where I ran into difficulties was when I thought the grass might be greener and went in different directions. The problem was not that there was no money in the other options, it was just a distraction that took me away from my original plan.

I tried my hand at development a few years ago. Property was purchased across the street from a site where a new hospital was going to be developed. It was zoned for medical office (and general as well). I teamed up with a CCIM from the area and we worked with a builder on the project. We thought we could finish the buildings in 4 months and lease them up. It took 1.5 years with delays from the city all along the way. I had to carry the loan during the entire process.

Money was still made on this deal but the amount of time and other resources that went into this were a major distraction for me.

I also thought that rehabbing apartments might be a good thing to try. There were some rundown units in Palm Springs, CA. that were in the foreclosure process. They had many violations on them that were in need of correction. Again, money was made but the amount of time that was absorbed by this was unreal. I could not afford to pay contractor prices so my partners and I did most of the work. Pouring concrete diveways in 105 degrees was not fun either. :smxD:

If I had stayed on this path, I would have had to drop down to a slower lane. :fastlane:

Fortunately, these just solidified the fact that my original plan was working. When I went back to refining the original plan, the speed picked back up. :driving:

My point is that finding a workable plan to move ahead at a fast rate of speed is important. Development and Rehab are both very lucrative. I am not suggesting that there is less money in doing either one of those. The problem was with the distractions and chasing something without a fully understood plan of attack. Had I initially targeted development, the effort that I had put into it would have been different and the amount of time and path forward would have been very different.

Make your plans to move forward based on a carefully thought out plan that will take you where you want to go. If it isn't working... adjust... If it works... refine and move forward.
Glad I found this thread! Haven't seen many about the importance of planning yet, thanks @SteveO

(anyone can answer this btw, not only a question for Steve)

It took me 2 years to realize the importance of making a plan before doing something because I thought it was all about taking action immediately, some of the most frustrating times of my life.. wasted SO much time it's unbelievable. Still not perfect to this day..

I have a few questions about creating plans that actually make stuff happen:

1. When you get a new concept for something that is just an idea, how much of it should you write out so that there is actually a clear path to execution? One problem I've had with plans is that I go on hour long typing-sprees, feeling great about all of this amazingness pouring out of my finger-tips.. But all of a sudden when I finish, it's almost like I don't know where to start when it all seemed so doable while I was writing the plan, and it ends up never happening.

2. Should you have a plan before you do anything related to business? I'm asking because some of the days where I feel stuck in the desert of desertion seem to have no plan of action and it feels like the world is crashing down.

3. I've heard that a strategy is more important than a plan. What's the difference and why?

Thanks!
 

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Glad I found this thread! Haven't seen many about the importance of planning yet, thanks @SteveO

(anyone can answer this btw, not only a question for Steve)

It took me 2 years to realize the importance of making a plan before doing something because I thought it was all about taking action immediately, some of the most frustrating times of my life.. wasted SO much time it's unbelievable. Still not perfect to this day..

I have a few questions about creating plans that actually make stuff happen:

1. When you get a new concept for something that is just an idea, how much of it should you write out so that there is actually a clear path to execution? One problem I've had with plans is that I go on hour long typing-sprees, feeling great about all of this amazingness pouring out of my finger-tips.. But all of a sudden when I finish, it's almost like I don't know where to start when it all seemed so doable while I was writing the plan, and it ends up never happening.

2. Should you have a plan before you do anything related to business? I'm asking because some of the days where I feel stuck in the desert of desertion seem to have no plan of action and it feels like the world is crashing down.

3. I've heard that a strategy is more important than a plan. What's the difference and why?

Thanks!
I feel that the implementation starts with the plan. Every business will be different though so it's difficult to answer your question.

Some people plan too much. I simply begin and adjust the strategy and plan with time and discoveries.

Spending too much time planning is action faking.

Starting a business in an orderly fashion takes less planning as you build experience. You build experience by taking action.

I'd rather try a couple times without success as long as the end result is successful.

The most important part in planning and strategies lies in proving the viability of the product. Will it sell?

The process of proving this out is building experience.

Not knowing where to start is normal. Lay out a few lines and then just start. Make adjustments along the way.
 
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WJK

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Glad I found this thread! Haven't seen many about the importance of planning yet, thanks @SteveO

(anyone can answer this btw, not only a question for Steve)

It took me 2 years to realize the importance of making a plan before doing something because I thought it was all about taking action immediately, some of the most frustrating times of my life.. wasted SO much time it's unbelievable. Still not perfect to this day..

I have a few questions about creating plans that actually make stuff happen:

1. When you get a new concept for something that is just an idea, how much of it should you write out so that there is actually a clear path to execution? One problem I've had with plans is that I go on hour long typing-sprees, feeling great about all of this amazingness pouring out of my finger-tips.. But all of a sudden when I finish, it's almost like I don't know where to start when it all seemed so doable while I was writing the plan, and it ends up never happening.

2. Should you have a plan before you do anything related to business? I'm asking because some of the days where I feel stuck in the desert of desertion seem to have no plan of action and it feels like the world is crashing down.

3. I've heard that a strategy is more important than a plan. What's the difference and why?

Thanks!
You must just plan the first tiny step. Nothing more nor nothing less. When you get that one little milestone done, look up, adjust your glasses, and plan the second step. Long journeys are completed one baby step at a time. And each of these tiny achievements takes a lot of adjustments, thinking, and a sense of wonder. Things are NEVER going to work out the way you planned them. You don't know what you are going to need until you confront the real situation. You don't know how you will feel until you are actually standing there in that moment. You have no idea what monsters and problems you will face out there. Commit to the journey and then take your first step into that trek. Just relentlessly continue to move forward one inch at a time. Remember the story of the tortoise and the hare? That arrogant hare ran a fool's race. His hubris nature made him fail. The tortoise just kept going and he won in the end. But, don't be surprised when you end up miles from where you thought you would be. Many of us never dreamed of where our baby steps would take us.
 
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You must just plan the first tiny step. Nothing more nor nothing less. When you get that one little milestone done, look up, adjust your glasses, and plan the second step. Long journeys are completed one baby step at a time. And each of these tiny achievements takes a lot of adjustments, thinking, and a sense of wonder. Things are NEVER going to work out the way you planned them. You don't know what you are going to need until you confront the real situation. You don't know how you will feel until you are actually standing there in that moment. You have no idea what monsters and problems you will face out there. Commit to the journey and then take your first step into that trek. Just relentlessly continue to move forward one inch at a time. Remember the story of the tortoise and the hare? That arrogant hare ran a fool's race. His hubris nature made him fail. The tortoise just kept going and he won in the end. But, don't be surprised when you end up miles from where you thought you would be. Many of us never dreamed of where our baby steps would take us.
Thank you.

The thing I get so caught up in is the big picture. I end up wondering how the hell I'm going to conquer that big picture, and a lot of times I forget to zoom out and see what the next step is.
 

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Thank you.

The thing I get so caught up in is the big picture. I end up wondering how the hell I'm going to conquer that big picture, and a lot of times I forget to zoom out and see what the next step is.
The Big picture is a concept. The obstacles and challenges along the way are learning points. This is where experience builds.

As you move along and conquer one step at a time, you begin to realize what needs to be done.

I don't believe there are too many people that simply decide a path and finish it without an incredible amount of thrashing. Unless they have experience...
 
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WJK

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Thank you.

The thing I get so caught up in is the big picture. I end up wondering how the hell I'm going to conquer that big picture, and a lot of times I forget to zoom out and see what the next step is.
You don't have to "conquer" the big picture. Break it down into baby steps. This is my question I ask myself continuously as I go, "What can do at this moment to move toward my goal of _______?" Sometimes there is a concrete action I can take. Other times it is simply to think through my next step. I make benchmarks along the way. There are a lot of minor accomplishments within those big goals. The big ones tend to be overwhelming and make us freeze like deer caught in the headlights. Where do you start? How can you feel any sense of forwarding motion when there is so far to go? But, I can take a baby step and celebrate when it is completed.

Here's another thought for you. I finished a goal a couple of years ago that I had at the top of my to-do list for 35 years. I thought balloons were going to fall on me from the ceiling. I thought everyone was going to throw confetti on me as I walked by. Do you know what happened? Nothing. I got up every morning and went to work at my office and my businesses. Life went on as it always had. It was a totally flat experience. BUT, the last 6 months have been stellar for me. It took two years for me to see the differences that completing the goal has made in my life.
 
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The Big picture is a concept. The obstacles and challenges along the way are learning points. This is where experience builds.

As you move along and conquer one step at a time, you begin to realize what needs to be done.

I don't believe there are too many people that simply decide a path and finish it without an incredible amount of thrashing. Unless they have experience...
You don't have to "conquer" the big picture. Break it down into baby steps. This is my question I ask myself continuously as I go, "What can do at this moment to move toward my goal of _______?" Sometimes there is a concrete action I can take. Other times it is simply to think through my next step. I make benchmarks along the way. There are a lot of minor accomplishments within those big goals. The big ones tend to be overwhelming and make us freeze like deer caught in the headlights. Where do you start? How can you feel any sense of forwarding motion when there is so far to go? But, I can take a baby step and celebrate when it is completed.

Here's another thought for you. I finished a goal a couple of years ago that I had at the top of my to-do list for 35 years. I thought balloons were going to fall on me from the ceiling. I thought everyone was going to throw confetti on me as I walked by. Do you know what happened? Nothing. I got up every morning and went to work at my office and my businesses. Life went on as it always had. It was a totally flat experience. BUT, the last 6 months have been stellar for me. It took two years for me to see the differences that completing the goal has made in my life.
Thank you guys this really helps.

I've heard advice like this before never took it to heart.

but what you guys made me realize is one thing:

If I'm overwhelmed, it's always because I'm focusing on too many things at once that are too far into the future.
 

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Thank you guys this really helps.

I've heard advice like this before never took it to heart.

but what you guys made me realize is one thing:

If I'm overwhelmed, it's always because I'm focusing on too many things at once that are too far into the future.
It really helps if you can have fun in the process.

You can have fun washing dishes in the right frame of mind.
 

MakeItHappen

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Thank you guys this really helps.

I've heard advice like this before never took it to heart.

but what you guys made me realize is one thing:

If I'm overwhelmed, it's always because I'm focusing on too many things at once that are too far into the future.
What really helps with this is if you have a goal-setting system that works for you.

My goal-setting system has two kinds of goals.
1. long-term goals that might take 5-25 years to achieve (more like visions)
2. short-term goals based on the long-term goals and the knowledge I have right now (I don't know the entire plan of my 5-year goal but I can figure out what I could do in the next 30 or 90 days to get closer to that goal and once I finished this short-term goal I will have more experience and knowledge that makes it easy to plan the next short-term goals)
 
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WJK

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What really helps with this is if you have a goal-setting system that works for you.

My goal-setting system has two kinds of goals.
1. long-term goals that might take 5-25 years to achieve (more like visions)
2. short-term goals based on the long-term goals and the knowledge I have right now (I don't know the entire plan of my 5-year goal but I can figure out what I could do in the next 30 or 90 days to get closer to that goal and once I finished this short-term goal I will have more experience and knowledge that makes it easy to plan the next short-term goals)
That's a very classic way of treating and looking at goals.

For me now, it's more basic than that. Getting older has humbled me. I've achieved several huge goals over my lifetime. The moment of "arriving" has
Thank you.

The thing I get so caught up in is the big picture. I end up wondering how the hell I'm going to conquer that big picture, and a lot of times I forget to zoom out and see what the next step is.
You don't have to "conquer" the big picture. Break it down into baby steps. This is my question I ask myself continuously as I go, "What can do at this moment to move toward my goal of _______?" Sometimes there is a concrete action I can take. Other times it is simply to think through my next step. I make benchmarks along the way. There are a lot of minor accomplishments within those big goals. The big ones tend to be overwhelming and make us freeze like deer caught in the headlights. Where do you start? How can you feel any sense of forwarding motion when there is so far to go? But, I can take a baby step and celebrate when it is completed.

Here's another thought for you. I finished a goal a couple of years ago that I had at the top of my to-do list for 35 years. I thought balloons were going to fall on me from the ceiling. I thought everyone was going to throw confetti on me as I walked by. Do you know what happened? Nothing. I got up every morning and went to work at my office and my businesses. Life went on as it always had. It was a totally flat experience. BUT, the last 6 months have been stellar for me. It took two years for me to see the differences that completing the goal has made in my life.an be a very flat experience -- even depressing at times. It brings up the old question as to IF it was all worth the struggle and the sacrifices along the way. Yes, most of those journeys were worth it. But, the earth looks very different from what I thought it would be.
What really helps with this is if you have a goal-setting system that works for you.

My goal-setting system has two kinds of goals.
1. long-term goals that might take 5-25 years to achieve (more like visions)
2. short-term goals based on the long-term goals and the knowledge I have right now (I don't know the entire plan of my 5-year goal but I can figure out what I could do in the next 30 or 90 days to get closer to that goal and once I finished this short-term goal I will have more experience and knowledge that makes it easy to plan the next short-term goals)
That is a very classic approach to goal setting.

Growing older has humbled me on the subject. I have found that the earth looks very different on the journey than it does when you finally arrive. The shiny objects that I once pursued lost their luster. The factor of wanting something is a lot more powerful than the reality of finally owning that possession. I have people around me who walk up and say, "When I have $_______, I will do this and I won't do that." I just smile at them and nod. They are clueless about how they would feel and the decisions they would make. The journey to get there changes you in countless ways.
 

mikecarlooch

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That's a very classic way of treating and looking at goals.

For me now, it's more basic than that. Getting older has humbled me. I've achieved several huge goals over my lifetime. The moment of "arriving" has

You don't have to "conquer" the big picture. Break it down into baby steps. This is my question I ask myself continuously as I go, "What can do at this moment to move toward my goal of _______?" Sometimes there is a concrete action I can take. Other times it is simply to think through my next step. I make benchmarks along the way. There are a lot of minor accomplishments within those big goals. The big ones tend to be overwhelming and make us freeze like deer caught in the headlights. Where do you start? How can you feel any sense of forwarding motion when there is so far to go? But, I can take a baby step and celebrate when it is completed.
Thank you @WJK ! This reminds me of something that I actually just thought of.

When I was younger, I was a gamer. I LOVED playing XBox.

Looking back, the creators of these games structure them like life, with tasks, and checkpoints.

It's pretty eye opening thinking about it, I'm not sure why I ever felt bad for myself for being so far away from where I want to be.

My character in games I played always started out with nothing and through the process of baby steps and small tasks, always won in the end.

Maybe structuring life exactly like a video game is something to look into..
Here's another thought for you. I finished a goal a couple of years ago that I had at the top of my to-do list for 35 years. I thought balloons were going to fall on me from the ceiling. I thought everyone was going to throw confetti on me as I walked by. Do you know what happened? Nothing. I got up every morning and went to work at my office and my businesses. Life went on as it always had. It was a totally flat experience. BUT, the last 6 months have been stellar for me. It took two years for me to see the differences that completing the goal has made in my life.an be a very flat experience -- even depressing at times. It brings up the old question as to IF it was all worth the struggle and the sacrifices along the way. Yes, most of those journeys were worth it. But, the earth looks very different from what I thought it would be.
Growing older has humbled me on the subject. I have found that the earth looks very different on the journey than it does when you finally arrive. The shiny objects that I once pursued lost their luster. The factor of wanting something is a lot more powerful than the reality of finally owning that possession. I have people around me who walk up and say, "When I have $_______, I will do this and I won't do that." I just smile at them and nod. They are clueless about how they would feel and the decisions they would make. The journey to get there changes you in countless ways.
I've heard this a lot and not going to lie, I've got those massive material dreams.

I have a feeling regardless of how much money I accumulate, I'll have the same realization you've had eventually.

But as of right now I use those goals as fuel and motivation. Maybe I won't care much for the houses and cars life in 20 years, but all those material possessions along with a drive to make a difference in the world motivate me right now.

I feel like without wanting those things the fire wouldn't be as big as it is right now inside, so I use it to my advantage
 

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