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Andy Black

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Good for you putting yourself out there @sierraxluz.

Also, I'd like to start my own business, which means I need money
You don’t need money to start a business. It’s the other way round - if you get paid your in business (and if you don’t it’s a hobby).
 

Paladin

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Hey Lex,

In some of your videos you talk about different personality types and body types. I can see how this affects the language in your communication with clients.

Can you point me in the direction of where you are basing the personality types for your structure? I read through this and the previous thread as well as watching some of your videos, but if you already explained and I missed it, I apologize.

While I do try to mirror the language of clients who reach out to me for projects, I haven't ever been structure enough to analyze their personality type and be strategic.

It's interesting to see how methodical your approach is. So many people think that finding work online is luck/magic/serendipity, but it's great that your showing it's about following logical steps.

While I get most of my client work through my network of contacts, it's simply a different strategic approach and still involves creating a powerful portfolio and messaging each client to demonstrate that I know what they want.

And I think that's the best lesson here. If you can figure out what your client needs before anyone else, it's so easy to get hired.

I can't tell you how many times I've hired someone on UpWork who told me what I needed rather than what I wanted. That's the critical piece of gold here that I think will help so many people.
 

Lex DeVille

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Hey Lex,

In some of your videos you talk about different personality types and body types. I can see how this affects the language in your communication with clients.

Can you point me in the direction of where you are basing the personality types for your structure? I read through this and the previous thread as well as watching some of your videos, but if you already explained and I missed it, I apologize.

While I do try to mirror the language of clients who reach out to me for projects, I haven't ever been structure enough to analyze their personality type and be strategic.

It's interesting to see how methodical your approach is. So many people think that finding work online is luck/magic/serendipity, but it's great that your showing it's about following logical steps.

While I get most of my client work through my network of contacts, it's simply a different strategic approach and still involves creating a powerful portfolio and messaging each client to demonstrate that I know what they want.

And I think that's the best lesson here. If you can figure out what your client needs before anyone else, it's so easy to get hired.

I can't tell you how many times I've hired someone on UpWork who told me what I needed rather than what I wanted. That's the critical piece of gold here that I think will help so many people.
The system is called the Enneagram. The best (most comprehensive) book I've read on it is called The Wisdom of the Enneagram.

Having said that, I don't use the Enneagram approach for freelance proposals anymore. I have a policy of using what works to get the results I want, and I've found better results by NOT trying to type people only by the extremely limited info in their job posts.

The problem with using the Enneagram for proposals is that if you mis-type the client, then you end up so far off base that you're more likely to piss them off than get their attention. The other problem is that you spend way too much time thinking about their words and trying to decipher meaning.

What I've found much more useful is paying attention to the following:

- Are they speaking in very vague or very specific words?
- Are they speaking in a casual voice or more formal?
- Do they use creative language or is it bland?
- Do they post a lot of info or only very little?

Usually mimicking those aspects of language patterns is enough for the purposes of "liking."

Beyond that it's more important to spend time establishing YOU Focus and showing you can help, followed by establishing your credibility, followed by a good call to action.

The Enneagram in sales and marketing works best when you either A) have unlimited info about the other person, or B) are using it to craft writing for a specific segment of the larger population.

Also, Enneagram typing is vastly more accurate the longer you know the other person and have been around them. To put this in perspective, I mis-typed my own wife for like the first 6 or 7 years we were together. The less time you've spent around the other person, the less likely you are to type them correctly.
 

juicemania

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Just wanted chime in and say @Lex DeVille has given some really awesome advice!

I've been using UpWork for about 3-4 years now (full stack dev) for various dev related side jobs. When I first started out I chose a skill level similar to where I thought I was, as Lex mentioned, but quickly raised both my hourly and skill level to expert after I got a few good reviews.

What worked for me to land jobs in the beginning was to record a short video, using something like screencast-o-matic, introducing myself and going over a few details about the job and why I'm a good fit. I'd do a PiP video with the job description page in the background. Then I'd throw it on Youtube (unlisted) and drop a link in the cover letter. These videos were no longer than 1-2 minutes and was a good way to stand out. After you do a few of these you can crank them out pretty quick.

Also, in my cover letters I generally didn't start out with the whole "Hi my name is ...." line. I typically would begin the cover letter by asking specific questions related to the job or maybe some suggestion that could improve the project. Using that strategy worked pretty well for me. I think the quicker you can show value the better chance you'll have at landing the job.

I'll still do the video intros here and there if I think its a big job ($$) and I'm a good fit but I don't use the platform much any more.

Once you land a few good clients they will typically come back to you for more work and at that point I always handle invoicing and communication outside of UpWork.

Anyhow, just my 2 cents. Thanks for the great info @Lex DeVille !
 

Olumide

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Day 1: How to Get Approved on Upwork 2019

The best way to get approved on Upwork is to make it happen on your first try. That isn't to say all hope is lost if you don't get it on your first try. Only that your first try is the best chance you've got. After that your chances drop.

Today's guide is based on it being your first try. The idea is to give you the best possible chance to get approved. Do NOT try to get approved before reading this post or watching the video.

To get approved on Upwork you have to give them what they want.

Here's all the stuff NOT to do:

  • Do NOT list more than one skill in your title
  • Do NOT pick unrelated skill tags
  • Do NOT use a YOU Focused bio
  • Do NOT leave your education and work history blank
  • Do NOT leave any area blank
  • Do NOT price yourself outside of Upwork's suggested ranges
  • Do NOT submit your profile before you spell check it
Those are the main things that I've seen get people rejected.

Now let's talk about what you SHOULD do.

  • Add a clear, smiling, front-facing head shot image
  • Pick ONE skill and build your profile around that skill
  • Pick a NICHE of that skill to show you're a professional
  • Write your bio to support your abilities with that skill
  • Write your education to support your abilities with that skill
  • Write your employment history to support your abilities with that skill

Basically you want to build your entire profile around a single niche skill. It doesn't matter what industry it is in. It could be copywriting, web design, article writing, customer service, whatever.

Your title should reflect that one skill.

Bad Title: Copywriting, blog writer, ebook writer, social media expert

Good Title: Conversion Copywriter

Your overview should back up your ability to do that skill.

Bad Bio:


Hi there! You need a conversion copywriter who can help you get results. You need someone with fast turnaround and quik response. You want to get better goals and get to the next level and that's what I can help you do.

Good Bio:

Hi there!

I'm a conversion copywriter with a B.A. in Psychology and four years experience. I've worked with companies like Eggland's Best, and Circuit City. As a copywriter I've helped clients grow their profits from the thousands into the millions.

I've trained as a copywriter in several courses and online workshops, and I work with clients who need direct-response copywriting that gets results. My goal is to help clients improve conversions by working closely together with them and creating value.

If any of that is what you need, message me!

Kind Regards,
Lex DeVille


OVERVIEW TEMPLATE:

Hi there!

I’m a [what are you] with a [degree or diploma] and [years of experience]. I’ve worked with [who can you name?]. As a [skill you do] I’ve helped [who you have helped] [how you have helped them].

I have [special training you have] and I work with [who you help]. My goal is to help [describe how you will help clients on Upwork].

If any of that is what you need, contact me!

Kind Regards,
[Your Name]

---

Your bio should be ME Focused. DO talk about your skills and education. Do talk about past clients you've worked with and how you've helped. You want to show Upwork that you are a credible freelancer who can get the job done right.

Be sure to spell check your overview. Check it for grammar as well. Spelling mistakes are a quick way to get rejected.

Don't talk about what you want. Don't use a YOU Focused overview either because that isn't what Upwork wants from you. They want you to look like a traditional employee and a hard worker.

---

Education and Work History

Add something to each of these sections, even if it's a high school diploma or even a GED. Add something to your work history even if you worked at McDonalds. First write it in the title, then give yourself a relevant title.

For education, write a description that supports your ability to do the skill you choose. For example:

B.A. Psychology
As a student of Psychology I have learned to craft conversion-optimized copy infused with psychological techniques and tactics. This helps me move people to action and get them to make decisions fast which helps my clients earn money and get results.

McDonalds Customer Communications Specialist
Working at McDonalds taught me the power of clarity in human communications. Over the last four years I've used what I learned while working at McDonalds to transition into the field of conversion copywriting where I applied the same techniques used to sell McGriddles and Apple Turnovers to get my clients results.

---

Rates
The next part is your rates. Set your rates within the guidelines provided by Upwork. They will tell you the range you should be within. For instance, the rates for an Intermediate level freelancer are suggested as between:

$28.00 and $65.50

So pick something within that range. Something like $35.50.

---

Skill Tags
Be sure all of your skill tags support your skill. If I listed "Conversion Copywriter" then I would want to pick 3-5 skill tags such as:

Bad: Copywriter, SEO, Social Media, Customer Service
Good: Copywriter, Conversion Copywriter, Sales Copywriter, Creative Copywriter

---

Other Notes:

Your main goal is to create a WHOLE PERSON concept for Upwork. When Upwork's algorithms or employees see your profile, it should scream I AM A COMPETENT PROFESSIONAL IN THIS SPECIFIC SKILL!

Upwork isn't looking for Jacks-of-all-trades.

They want people who will get in, get work, get 'er done, and get paid. Because people who can't get work and don't get paid are just freeloaders taking up space on their platform. Remember, Upwork needs you to make money so they make money.

So your job is to show them that you are the kind of person who can do one specific skill, and to prove you can do that skill well.

Beyond that, just be honest. Don't try to lie or fake your account. Don't use fake information. Upwork may ask you to verify your identity or other info later on.

If you do shady things, you will likely get rejected. So just be honest, do your best to give them what they want, and if you have questions, reach out.

If you get rejected...

Don't immediately try again. Wait a few days. Give it some time. You don't want to appear to be a spammer. So give it one or two days, and then try again with a new profile, a new skill, a new overview etc.

HOMEWORK
Your homework today is to create your Upwork account following the guidance in this post. Create your account and submit it for approval. Then report back and let us know how it went or if you have any trouble. Do this now!
Hello @Lex DeVille, I followed your step-by-step instructions on getting approved on Upwork. I opened an account, fill in the necessary details, used the templates you recommended for bio and as much as possible made it look professional but after 24hrs I got the response that I wasn't approved.

Here's a link to my profile: Olumide O.. I would appreciate a review and feedback of my profile from you (or anyone) who has gotten approved on upwork to know what should be worked on and be done better.

Thank you.
 

karnn

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Jul 23, 2018
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Thank you so much for this post. I am doing this for the reasons you mentioned: Earning enough money so that I don't have to find a real job but work from home. My goal is to make at least 3000 euros/month on a regular basis. From there I would like to build a business around my competences and use my clientlist from upwork to build an online following for my business. If I fail, I'll be letting myself down and my family.
 

Mario_fastlaner

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DAY 3 - How to Write Your Profile Title and Tags

Once you get approved on Upwork, one of the first things you want to do is update your title and tags, unless you plan to perform the skill you got approved with. So that's what today is about.

Your Title - Keep It Short and Don't Get Cute...

Do a quick search for most skills and you'll find endless lists of freelancers who either use some cutesy, long-winded title, or who list every skill under the sun because they're afraid to miss any opportunity.

The thing is, your title is your first chance to let people know your area of specialty. While you might get work in a variety of areas with a title that lists 20 skills, you won't get paid highly for any of them, and you won't get found for the highest-paying skills in search results.

When it comes to titles avoid:

- Cute, clever, and creative titles.
- Listing a bunch of skills

Your goal if you want to make high pay for less work is to look like a specialist, an expert. Experts get paid well. But what does an expert look like?

- They do a single skill very well
- They show up when people search for them

How clients search...

Client's don't search for "Web Design Ninja Wordpress Elite Plugin Maester."

They search for, "Web Designer"

Or "Copywriter"

Or "Social Media Manager"

Or "Virtual Assistant"

And when that turns out to be too vague, they search a second time but this time they make it more niche so they find specialized experts. So now they search for:

"Wordpress Web Designer"

"Direct Response Copywriter"

"Instagram Manager"

"Financial Virtual Assistant"

So it starts with the high level industry, then it gets niche because it's hard to decipher who knows there shit in the industry itself. Since we know clients search this way, we can take advantage of it by crafting a title that speaks directly to those search results.

Also, the more niche you go, the less people there are to compete against for search rank.

Look at this screenshot from my latest title update:

View attachment 24000

It took a couple of days, but I'm ranking for NLP Copywriter. I'm not in the first position yet, but it doesn't matter, because based ONLY on my title, clients will skip the other people.

They searched for "NLP Copywriting" and my profile shows "NLP Copywriting."

It's crystal clear I'm the one...

In fact, it's so clear, clients won't even look at the other profiles even though they claim the #1 and #2 spots. It's like how I could tell you to find as many red items as you can in the room. You can easily look around and pick out red items from all the other colors.

Same thing with your profile.

If you have the exact title the client is searching for, then you will stand out, and you will get clicked, and that means you're one step closer to an interview.

By the way, this goes for proposals too. Clients will notice a freelancer's proposal over others when it very closely relates to the skill the client is asking for.

How to Pick Your Upwork Profile Title

  • Keep it 4 words or less
  • Mention the industry (copywriter, web designer, video producer, narrator)
  • Mention the niche (creative copywriter, wordpress web designer, YouTube Video Producer, Audiobook Narrator

Research Your Niche

Niching down will help you rise to the top of search results, but you'll want to do some research on your niche to make sure people are searching for it. What good is being at the top of search results if nobody is searching for the thing you offer?

Two Ways to Research Your Niche


1) Use Google's Keyword tool in Adwords to check out monthly search volume
2) Search for your title and see how many gigs are available (and the time between each gig's posting)

Both of these will help you get a feel for whether or not people want the skill you offer. If you find there's low volume, then consider another title.


Your Tags - Relevant/Related Not Scattered/Deflated

Your tags are under the SKILLS section.

Pick tags that are very closely related to your title. Make sure all of your tags are closely related to one another. This will make them relevant. The more relevant your tags are, the easier it is to rise in search results.

Even if you plan to offer more than one skill, ONLY target your tags to your title. Have a look at the tags I used to help rank my NLP Copywriter bio:

View attachment 24001

At first glance they might look separate, like they target unique skills. But all of the tags except one are related to COPYWRITING and the only one that is different is related to NLP. What this does is help Upwork's algorithms figure out what you do so they can put you in the right place.

So pick tags that are closely related and are relevant to your title.

That's it for today.

Tomorrow I'll show you how to write a basic bio that stands out from everyone else.

HOMEWORK
Your homework today is to determine your high level industry (copywriter, blogger, web designer) and then to research niches within that industry to find one that might be worth pursuing. Once you've done that, set your tags around the title you create and make sure the tags are closely related to one another.

P.S.

The video above talks about the same topic, but I also mentioned some stuff about specialized profiles and how they are affecting my results.
Hi Lex, i got approved on Upwork some days ago as an English-Italian translator. I tried to take some jobs but there are so many people that already do translations. In your opinion should I learn some new skills even I start from 0? For example, I noticed that there is a huge demand of web development/web designer, but to become a freelancer in these areas I should spend at least 2/3 months.
Thanks anyway for the post, it's really precious
 

Lex DeVille

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Hi Lex, i got approved on Upwork some days ago as an English-Italian translator. I tried to take some jobs but there are so many people that already do translations. In your opinion should I learn some new skills even I start from 0? For example, I noticed that there is a huge demand of web development/web designer, but to become a freelancer in these areas I should spend at least 2/3 months.
Thanks anyway for the post, it's really precious
Learning a new skill won't help you if you can't get work with the skills you already have. It doesn't matter how many people offer the skill. Only the person who knows how to sell him/herself and prove their value to the client will earn the gig.

This is in the training in this thread. Even if you learn web development you still won't earn clients until you can prove your value to those clients with your proposals, profile, and on interview calls.
 

Mario_fastlaner

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Learning a new skill won't help you if you can't get work with the skills you already have. It doesn't matter how many people offer the skill. Only the person who knows how to sell him/herself and prove their value to the client will earn the gig.

This is in the training in this thread. Even if you learn web development you still won't earn clients until you can prove your value to those clients with your proposals, profile, and on interview calls.
Got it. Thanks
 

Madame Peccato

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Hi Lex, i got approved on Upwork some days ago as an English-Italian translator. I tried to take some jobs but there are so many people that already do translations. In your opinion should I learn some new skills even I start from 0? For example, I noticed that there is a huge demand of web development/web designer, but to become a freelancer in these areas I should spend at least 2/3 months.
Thanks anyway for the post, it's really precious
I just got the top rated badge as a (mostly) English-Italian translator, it took me 4 months, but about half of my 1.2k USD earnings were in the last month alone. only 1/3rd of that came from writing articles, both in English and Italian. I wasn't too sure I'd be able to write articles in English as a native Italian speaker who has never really written any piece of content, but after the first 3 articles I realized I can actually do it pretty well, which is great. So if you feel like you can provide value in that area go for it.

My early days were also rough, but there is definitely enough work for many more people, it feels hard sometimes, and you will have to push through those jobs that pay 0.01$ per word (some people want to pay even less than that), mention you are going to work for 0.01$ / 0.02$ per source word, and follow everything else Lex has posted about proposals, and you will find someone willing to give you the job. What's good about those low paying jobs is that clients are usually perfectly happy to leave you a good review if you complete them correctly.

I myself haven't mastered the art of sending great proposals, I feel like I'm missing a key factor about them, but I'm getting better day by day at writing them, which is amazing. I can also feel how much better I am at talking to people in real life now that I have people valuing my skills online.

If you have any specific question just post in here or shoot me a PM and I'll try my best to help you.
 

karnn

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Jul 23, 2018
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Hi Lex, Thank you for your article on how to construct an attractive bio. So many things I was doing wrong here. Thanks for your modal, it really gives a good idea of how to make attractive bios.

My problem is my proposals never get accepted. I am new to upwork, and new to freelancing (so no experience in this domain). I am in academia and before that I had some industry experience for 3 years. I am an applied math researcher by training and have also programming experience.

Out of 4 I submitted (I know it is not a big number), only one got back saying they may contact me in the future.

My question is how do you approach building your profile if you don't have any freelancing experience? How can I get a client to trust me to finish their task? Is there something I can add to my profile to get people to pay attention?
 

Carmine Nuzzo

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  1. WHY ARE U DOING THIS? I can no longer accept the job I been choosing a long time ago, due to the circumstances that life had imposed on me. I really need to take this step before is going to be too late.
  2. DESCRIBE YOUR ENDGAMES IN SPECIFIC DETAILS: I need to succeed in this business because in one shot, can give me three way to moving forward from my actual situation, which is comfy but to tiny for me. The situations I been talking above are:
  • LEAVE MY JOB
  • MOVING FROM AUSTRIA
  • BOOST MY EARNINGS TO INVEST IN THE SELF-PUBLISHING BUSINESS
  1. HOW MUCH MONEY DO U NEED TO EARN TO MAKE THIS WORTH IT? Between 3/5000 euros to afford my lifestyle and save money to invest in the other business which is self-publishing.
  2. WHO IS FAILING IF YOU GIVE UP OR DON'T SUCCEED? Off course, my self, and in particular this fail can attach my mindset, and the step that I'm looking forward to achieving.
 

Lex DeVille

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Hi Lex, Thank you for your article on how to construct an attractive bio. So many things I was doing wrong here. Thanks for your modal, it really gives a good idea of how to make attractive bios.

My problem is my proposals never get accepted. I am new to upwork, and new to freelancing (so no experience in this domain). I am in academia and before that I had some industry experience for 3 years. I am an applied math researcher by training and have also programming experience.

Out of 4 I submitted (I know it is not a big number), only one got back saying they may contact me in the future.

My question is how do you approach building your profile if you don't have any freelancing experience? How can I get a client to trust me to finish their task? Is there something I can add to my profile to get people to pay attention?
If you submitted four proposals and got one response then you have a one out of four response rate. That's hardly the same as "never" getting accepted. In fact, it's pretty good.

As for building your portfolio, I wrote an entire lesson on what to do on page 3 of this thread. I also posted a video showing what to do. Go back and re-read that. Plenty of info listed there.
 

Carmine Nuzzo

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Hy Lex all done I created my profile and now I`m waiting. I wanna be honest I never joined this platform and so I lied about my skills and wrote converting copywriting because between all the skills was there was for me the more obvious to pick up because I'm a professional waiter and for me is easy to talk to the customer and sell whatever I want. What do U think? And if they accept my application and I start to convert and get clients what can be the next step? Can u make this bright for me, because I`m very keen and dunno want to lose this opportunity. Thanks in advance for your great work.
 

ZF Lee

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Hy Lex all done I created my profile and now I`m waiting. I wanna be honest I never joined this platform and so I lied about my skills and wrote converting copywriting because between all the skills was there was for me the more obvious to pick up because I'm a professional waiter and for me is easy to talk to the customer and sell whatever I want. What do U think? And if they accept my application and I start to convert and get clients what can be the next step? Can u make this bright for me, because I`m very keen and dunno want to lose this opportunity. Thanks in advance for your great work.
Another 'lesser' form of copywriting would be article writing.
Online businesses might want to put up helpful content that convinces readers that they are the experts, and then they sign up for subsequent emails or products.

Of course you need to know some industry stuff (e.g. know some stuff about reptiles if you are writing an article on reptiles). But its somewhat like conversion copywriting in the sense that you have to write to SELL the concepts, break down objections, have a call to action for the reader to sign up and of course, put in keywords or search words that draw in the readers in the first place.

From my present Upwork gigs, I feel this is more lenient than your regular email copywriting gigs (especially when I've been on a freelancer team in full-hustle sessions to find winning angles).

See what you can write about, in a more attractive manner, actually RESEARCH the topics and NOT use the same tired phrases or statistics to support your facts, and you can make great articles.
 

Carmine Nuzzo

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Today I found an interesting job and I replay like this, what do u think?
Hy guys If u looking for an outstanding and dynamic copywriter, here I am. My name is Carmine and I'm from Italy, I had already experience in this industry and because of my previous experience in the Italian restaurants around the world I know how found information about products and selling to the customer. Great things from Vienna, sincerely Carmine
 

Lex DeVille

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Today I found an interesting job and I replay like this, what do u think?
Hy guys If u looking for an outstanding and dynamic copywriter, here I am. My name is Carmine and I'm from Italy, I had already experience in this industry and because of my previous experience in the Italian restaurants around the world I know how found information about products and selling to the customer. Great things from Vienna, sincerely Carmine
I think you're trolling us.
 

Carmine Nuzzo

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No mate 100% not but if I write that I have 0 experience who gonna give me a job?
Mate, I have 0 times to trolling you and I just want to learn as quick as I can, so If I push my limit I'm then obligated to take several actions, that´s while I lied on my presentation
 

Carmine Nuzzo

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And if U think that I'm trolling you tell me the reason why that at least I can perform better and get more opportunity to get a job for UP WORK
 

Lex DeVille

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lexdeville.com
If you're not trolling, then it means you didn't read and apply the training in this thread. Based on the proposal you wrote above, there is no possible way you read and applied what I taught here.

You cannot be an English copywriter if you can't write good English, unless you pay someone to edit your writing or learn to use tools like Grammarly to help you clean it up.

You will never get hired if you can't legitimately help the client. Lying will not help you help the client. Poor English will not help a client who needs copywriting.

You need to work on:

1. A better mindset (read The Millionaire Fastlane and Unscripted)
2. Learning how to help people
3. Using skills that you are good at

Find a skill you can do well at. Something you can really help people with. Apply to jobs for that skill. Re-read this entire thread.
 

karnn

New Contributor
Jul 23, 2018
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If you submitted four proposals and got one response then you have a one out of four response rate. That's hardly the same as "never" getting accepted. In fact, it's pretty good.

As for building your portfolio, I wrote an entire lesson on what to do on page 3 of this thread. I also posted a video showing what to do. Go back and re-read that. Plenty of info listed there.
Yeah sorry about the redundant question; I actually hadn't got there when I replied. Lots of useful info there and I'm modifying my profile accordingly right now. What you've written is so valuable. Thank you!!
 

Isaac Oh

Bronze Contributor
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Quick question. The client's proposal is set on hourly and I suggested my fixed price. They agreed to it and asked "How do we move forward?"

Where do I go from here?

Do I have them write up another proposal with fixed prices?
Do I have to have them accept me as a client?
Totally lost lol.

Thank you!
P.S. Also, will update you guys with how I landed the client after I figure this out asap
 

Isaac Oh

Bronze Contributor
Speedway Pass
Jun 14, 2017
118
184
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Berkeley, CA
Quick question. The client's proposal is set on hourly and I suggested my fixed price. They agreed to it and asked "How do we move forward?"

Where do I go from here?

Do I have them write up another proposal with fixed prices?
Do I have to have them accept me as a client?
Totally lost lol.

Thank you!
P.S. Also, will update you guys with how I landed the client after I figure this out asap
So, I found out that it's up to the client to redo the proposal and resend it to me. So, I sent her this message.


Awesome [Name]!

Very excited to be working with you!

To get started, I believe you should change the terms to a fixed-price so that you're not paying my hourly rates.

While you do that, I can get started.

What I will need from you are the following:

  • Your Shopify login credentials
  • Payment information
  • Your AdWords Budget
What I'll begin doing for you immediately is setting up everything on your Shopify website (Analytics and conversion tracking) so that it's ready to run ads to.

To set up your account, I will need to enter your payment information, which I can upload into your AdWords campaign. If you would feel more comfortable setting that up yourself, I can notify you when the time comes.

Knowing your budget will help me set up the best campaign for you. Do you have a budget in mind?

That's really it! I can pull up much of the data about your past results from Shopify.

Don't hesitate to reach out if you have any other questions.
 

Isaac Oh

Bronze Contributor
Speedway Pass
Jun 14, 2017
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1. Getting my head straight and committing to action

Recently, I've noticed the results of all my action faking. Living in my parent's living room and eating for free. Feels great! jk...

Anyways, I decided that I would start taking responsibility for my financial life and start making some money.

I stumbled across this thread and began. This was 20 days ago.

First assignment:
  1. I want to be financially free from my Mom. I’ve been surviving off her allowance for the past 5+ years.
    I want to move out of my house and get a small place with my girlfriend. I want to have the finances to support our marriage and live with her.
    I want to get clients so that I can start growing my marketing business.
    I want financial stability in the future.
    I want to help people but I can’t even help myself yet.
    I want to be debt free.
    I want to stop worrying about finances all the time.
    I want to be independent.
    I want to make my parents proud.
    I want to show others that it’s possible to not go the traditional route.
    I want a nice car and house.
    These are the things that I want and are committed to obtaining.

  2. My endgame is to come out with at least 8 recurring clients who I’ve been servicing more for than three months.
    I will be netting about $10k/mo in profit.
    I will have $10k saved up.

  3. It’ll be worth it even if I make $1.5k

  4. If I give up or don’t succeed, I will be failing myself. My girlfriend. My parents. Those who’ve looked up to me. Those who I’ve worked with. Those who have taken their time to help me.
2. Getting on Upwork and Setting up my profile

I have experience in many aspects of digital marketing so I decided that I would choose the one with the highest pay. Google AdWords freelancers seemed to be averaging $70+ per hour so I signed up as an intermediate asking for $59.95/hr.

I followed Lex DeVille's guide to the T, many times copy and pasting what he wrote here.

I was approved within the day.

THE DAY OF, I literally received three offers. Declined one, interviewed for two and didn't get accepted. I was offering ridiculous quotes because I didn't know where to start. Then I began reducing my quotes gradually, like literally -90%, until I finally got my first.

3. Optimizing my profile and action faking

I have this horrible habit where I obsess preparation. I have to really whip myself into taking action.

Anyways, after my approval, I quickly updated my bio. Further, I took two certification exams and received Top 30% on both.

Then I began working on my portfolio. I uploaded 4 examples of clients. Taking Lex's advice, I also put up case studies of what I would have done with certain clients.

I also added free resources for my clients in my portfolio. Stuff like a list of negative keywords they could use and a quick guide to writing better Google Ads copy.

Then, I mentioned those resources in my bio!

A few days into my journey, I received the Rising Talent status. IDK how lol but I took it!

Then came the action faking. I kept working on my profile rather than actually going out and reaching out to clients.

4. Recommitting and my process

For the last three days, I've been submitting 5+ proposals per day. I submitted 10 the first two days. Before that? I sent maybe 5 TOTAL.

Putting myself out there was a stretch for me but what I realize is necessary for my success. It's also what I was neglecting to do for my business.

Keeping in mind that it's a numbers game helped. Also, the first couple of proposals were the hardest to write. The first one alone took me 2 hours.

After that, I developed sort of like a flexible template and I'd be able to submit those 10 proposals within 2 hours.

5. Conclusion

This thread was the single tipping point that got me towards taking action when it comes to getting clients.

I resorted to this because in my own desire to have an agency, I never reached out to anyone. Nada. Zilch.

20 days into this process and I am considered a Rising Talent, have two certifications to show that I'm top 30% in a marketing skill, and I received confirmation for my own potential with my first client.

W.T.F. @Lex DeVille
Why is this free again?

What I took away was more valuable than a client, it was the mindset shift towards putting myself out there.

Funny enough, while helping this client out, I'm gonna move away from UpWork and recommit to getting clients for my agency.
 

ZF Lee

Platinum Contributor
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Today I found an interesting job and I replay like this, what do u think?
Hy guys If u looking for an outstanding and dynamic copywriter, here I am. My name is Carmine and I'm from Italy, I had already experience in this industry and because of my previous experience in the Italian restaurants around the world I know how found information about products and selling to the customer. Great things from Vienna, sincerely Carmine
What KIND of information can you provide?

Detail some of it.

Were you a chef? A waiter? A bartender?

Since you said you are into copywriting, the areas relevant to the restaurant industry would be writing menus and B2B food supply vendors(thought about them in the sour of the moment).

For menus, you'd have to know how to describe food taste, sensation and looks, as well as how key ingredients work in certain cuisines (for your Italian background, that would include the wines, herbs and vegetables), specially to entice restaurant comers to make the order and give the restaurant the sale.

Here's what you could do to back up your claim of experience.

1. You can make a 'fiction menu' from scratch, take up any copywriting blog or book, and learn and write on the go to create a sample copywriting menu project.

or

2. You can find some Italian menu writings which are tasteless, and upgrade them with your copywriting knowledge.

You can ask yourself some of these questions when describing food:

- What are the people looking for to taste?
- Any specific ingredients that they love, or are very well-versed with?
- Where did the ingredients come from?
- Do the ingredients cater to any customers' health conditions (e.g. allergies, stomach upset)

One reason why the actual proposal should be short and apt (and grammatically correct) is that I feel the sample or portfolio work displays your actual skill and ability to be relevant to the client's needs. You can blow all the wind you want in a proposal, but if the wind doesn't push your boat to the harbour, it's nothing, really.
 

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