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GOLD! WordPress Site Speed, Perfected—Ask Me Anything

bytecode

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Let's Make Your Site Perform At It's Peak

Ok, so many of you probably bring in business through your website. So obviously, you want to make your site as effective and efficient as possible.

After all, a better website means a better business.

One of the easiest and most effective ways to make sure your website performs at its best is to make it fast.

How fast? Or should we ask, how fast is fast enough? 5 seconds? 3 seconds? 1 second? Well, the answer is that unless your website feels instantaneous, it's not fast enough for your users.

You can test your site with Google:


Even if your site is already "fast" (3 seconds), just a 1 second increase can mean a $73,960 annual increase in revenue!*

*10,000 monthly page views, 3% conversion rate, $300 average order value

Basically, you want your site to be as fast as possible! Anything slower is hurting your business.

Much of what you know about site speed is probably wrong

I've spent hundreds of hours testing and dissecting how to make websites actually fast, not just scoring high on popular tools.

So in this thread, we're going to look at how to speed up your business's website. Though all the ideas and concepts are going to work with most sites, we're going to go into detail with WordPress sites. Partly because that's my specialty, and partly because that's what most sites use.

This thread is NOT for you if:
  • You own an offline business
  • You have no control over your site's mechanics
  • You don't care about growing your business
  • You aren't willing to take the time to learn
  • You believe your site is fast enough (and ignoring all the research)
  • You haven't started a business yet (take action!)
  • You've spent hundreds of hours rigorously testing for site speed
However, this thread is for you if:
  • Your site is built on WordPress
  • You're a business owner who wants to grow their business
  • You're a web designer that wants better sites for your clients
  • Your site is slow, duh!
  • You run a Google Ads campaign (don't waste paid clicks!)
  • You've spent time/money on SEO
  • You run an ecommerce site
  • You run a digital marketing agency
Because you can either hire someone like me for only a couple hundred dollars to speed up your site, or you can learn to do it yourself. Especially if your business involves site development, learning to do it yourself can have some advantages.

Technical knowledge is not required.

Sure, we will go over how to do things without plugins or technical knowledge, but there will always be ways to get your site as fast without all the technical knowledge that many developers will have.

Of course, if you are a developer, we'll also dive into how to do pretty much everything you'll need without plugins.

So, without further ado, let's get started!

Table of Contents:
And of course, questions are always welcome.

Note to mods: yes, most of these posts are taken from the blog on my website, but they are reposted here with the intent to help everyone here on the forum, not necessarily as a marketing strategy.
 

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bytecode

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If there’s only one thing you do…

…for your website, add caching.

There are a lot of myths about how to speed up your WordPress site. Many of them involve making sure you have the fewest plugins necessary, a lightweight theme, deleting unused posts/images, cleaning your database, or even deleting past post revisions. And all of those “suggestions” are garbage if you have a great caching system setup. The easiest way to do that is through a plugin.

In short, caching makes your site a lot faster.

How much faster? We’ll see below.

But not all caching plugins are created equal. Some are easier to use than others. Some are faster than others. And some are more flexible than others.

So let’s find out which is the best solution for you (spoiler alert: I use Cache Enabler). But first, what exactly is caching?

Caching Explained

In essence, every time a visitor visits your website, a lot of code runs. The more feature-rich your site, the more code that will run.

Code takes time to run.

But what if we already know the output will always be the same? Couldn’t we just save the output and not run the code?

That’s what caching does! That’s the key to making your site faster.

Now there are four kinds of caching:
  • Server Cache
  • Page Cache
  • CDN Cache
  • Browser Cache
All four types of caching are crucial for a really fast site. But we’re going to focus on page caching, as that has the largest impact of the four. It alone could speed up your site by 0.5 – 8.0 seconds! (It depends on your site, though)

So the first time a visitor views your website, your host will run all the scripts and plugins to create the page the visitor sees. And it saves the output. Then, for every visitor after that, it just sends the saved output.

That’s page caching!

Let’s Find the Best Page Caching Plugin

So for this test, I found every caching plugin I could find and tested the speed for each of them to see which was the fastest. Here’s what we’re looking for:
  • Speed
  • Consistency
  • Ease of use
  • Flexibility
  • Works with NGINX
Ok, you may not know what NGINX is, but it’s the fastest configuration for your host. A proper host will have NGINX configured, but not all do.

Of the 15 caching plugins I found, only 11 worked on NGINX out of the box:
  • WP Rocket
  • Cache Enabler
  • W3 Total Cache
  • WP Fastest Cache
  • WP Super Cache
  • Cachify
  • Simple Cache
  • WP Optimize
  • Hummingbird
  • Breeze
  • Powered Cache
Not even some popular plugins like Comet Cache worked on my NGINX setup by default. To fix it, you’d have to dive into the server configuration. Not good if you don’t know what you’re doing, and not the easiest thing even if you do.

Others, like Litespeed Cache don’t work on NGINX at all, so they’re out of the picture.

The Setup

Ok, so there are many ways to test the speed for each of these caching plugins, but I wanted to isolate all variables possible to leave nothing up to chance.

So I hosted the site locally on my computer to eliminate all network variances. I chose a decently large and complex site which allowed us to see a difference from caching. And before running the tests, I did no other optimizations to the site and made sure that the plugin was in its fastest possible configuration.

For the tests themselves, I looked specifically at the time to first byte (TTFB). Which, in this setup, is only affected by page caching. I did 10 tests, took the average to find the speed, and took the standard deviation to find the consistency of the speed.

Finally, so you can see how much the caching made a difference, I had a control that had no caching whatsoever.

The Results
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Lower is better for both graphs

Looks like the 3 fastest caching plugins are, Simple Cache, Powered Cache, and Cache Enabler. So let’s look at each of these in more detail because all of these are really close in terms of speed. So we have to take into account the consistency, ease of use, and flexibility to really determine which one is the best.

Simple Cache
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Obviously, Simple cache is the fastest plugin I tested, but not by much. It’s only 3 milliseconds faster than Powered Cache and 4 milliseconds faster than Cache enabler.

But by far, it’s the easiest to use. Let’s look into more detail:
  • Just activate it to get ridiculous speed
  • No complicated features
  • Allows you to also set the cache expiry and GZIP compression
  • No possibility to exclude urls or anything similar
  • Incredibly consistent, tied with Cache Enabler for the best consistency
  • Not a wide adoption (meaning updates aren’t as guaranteed)
  • If you want to speed up your website a lot in less than two minutes without sorting through a ton of settings, then this is the plugin for you. Stop reading and install it right now!
To help you out, here are the settings I’d recommend.
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If you know you won’t update your site often, you can choose a longer expire time. Just make sure it’s about how often your site will be updated.

Powered Cache

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This one is just slightly slower than Simple Cache, but has a lot more options. Of these three fast ones, it is by far the most flexible. However, if you don’t what you’re doing, it’s by far the most intimidating of the three.
  • Not as consistent
  • Allows every option you could use for a page caching plugin
  • CDN integration
  • CloudFlare integration
  • Premium version
  • Quite complicated
  • Exact setup will depend on your site
  • Not a 2 minute setup
  • Could take a while to find the best options
  • Not a wide adoption (meaning updates aren’t as guaranteed)
Ok, so if you’re a power user, have sped up many sites before, or are extremely proficient with the technical caching lingo, then this could be the plugin for you. And the fact that you can exclude certain urls from caching is a plus with Ecommerce sites.

Though with this plugin, every site will need different configurations, here’s what I’d recommend as a starting point.

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For the rest of the settings, you’ll have to decide what works for you. And again, for the cache timeout, put that to how often your site will update.

Cache Enabler
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The third fastest plugin is Cache Enabler. It’s just as consistent as Simple Cache, and is a good middle ground between the flexibility of Powered Cache and easiness of Simple Cache.
  • Still really fast
  • Can setup in two minutes
  • No complicated features necessary
  • Allows for regex for exclusions
  • CDN integration
  • Automatic GZIP compression
  • Wide adoption with over 70,000 active installs
  • Multi-site support
  • Custom post type support
  • Supports responsive images
  • Works flawlessly with Autoptimize
  • Works on pretty much every site
Personally, I use Cache Enabler because it gets me the speed of a fast website, works on every site I’ve worked on since I adopted it, and gives me the flexibility I need when I need it.

Here are the settings I use as a default:

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Again, change the cache expiry to however often you update your site.

What About Paid Caching Plugins?

Simply put, why spend money for only a possibility of a maximum of 25 milliseconds faster loading time? It doesn’t make sense!

After all, out of everything I’ve tested, free was the fastest.

Most of the time, premium versions don’t make the cache any faster. They just give you more features.

So why pay money for a slower site?

What About WP Rocket?

Whenever I tell people that I use cache enabler, every time they ask my thoughts on WP Rocket.

Because let’s face it, Cache Enabler isn’t a fair comparison to WP Rocket. Sure, the caching may be twice as fast, but WP Rocket has many more features. It’s not comparing apples to apples, it’s comparing apples to fruit salad.

The sort answer is that, well, it’s too slow for me overall.

For one site I worked on recently, I tried both WP Rocket and the equivalent version of my default setup. And I only replicated the same features that WP Rocket has. End result, my setup was twice as fast as the fastest WP Rocket configuration I could get… and it’s more flexible for doing advanced configurations. It was 2.9 seconds vs. 1.4 seconds.

That's just one recent instance, I've tried it many times in the past as well. Because I want it to be the best solution. It would make my job 10x easier.

Sure, if you have a slow website, WP Rocket can make it much faster. But even at 3 seconds to visually complete, you’re leaving a lot of money on the table. As we saw above, that can mean 5-6 figures lost revenue each year (or more)

It would be far better use of your time to either hire someone who knows what they’re doing or to stay tuned so you can make your site faster than WP Rocket yourself.

Because next time, we're going to look at what WP Rocket does, and how we can replicate everything it does…

…but better.
 

Napoolion

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i have one client who has tons of plugins on that Wordpress. Also some kind of system what gets new real estate object every hour in thousands. What advice would you have for that? Site is 50gb :O
 
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LittleWolfie

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Even if your site is already "fast" (3 seconds), just a 1 second increase can mean a $73,960 annual increase in revenue!*
3 Seconds fast? That is longer than a round trip to the moon and back, apollo 11 radio conversation are noticably slow.

100 milliseconds cost amazon Billions (1% of sales)

What are your sites? How fast are they? Are you caching in multiple geo-regions? What about minifying javascript, reducing image and video size? Moving to static sites?
 

LittleWolfie

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Fantastic write-up @LittleWolfie
Thanks, you can hear just how annoying and confusing this was for ground control here. That is about 2.5 seconds.

Fir the real estate system, I'd say go headless with a database perhaps on Amazon or Google with a restful API. Consider publishing static page per listing and just alter the search page/table of content and delte pages as appropriate.

Use next gen images and CDN in multiple regions, if there are a lot of mobile users, investigate pushing video/pictures to a proxy on the 3g edge.
 

ApparentHorizon

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Thanks, you can hear just how annoying and confusing this was for ground control here. That is about 2.5 seconds.

Fir the real estate system, I'd say go headless with a database perhaps on Amazon or Google with a restful API. Consider publishing static page per listing and just alter the search page/table of content and delte pages as appropriate.

Use next gen images and CDN in multiple regions, if there are a lot of mobile users, investigate pushing video/pictures to a proxy on the 3g edge.
What experience do you have with headless wp?

I'm getting 1-3s load times on a 5k SKU ecomm site, with just indexing and caching.

edit: Also thanks for the write up @bytecode. Major brain fart on that last post on my part.
 

LittleWolfie

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@ApparentHorizon darn it I thought my copy was getting better.

What experience do you have with headless wp?

I'm getting 1-3s load times on a 5k SKU ecomm site, with just indexing and caching.

edit: Also thanks for the write up @bytecode. Major brain fart on that last post on my part.
Oh, I would never use wordpress for a headless site. Last time I just did the SQL and Apache/PHP directly. Nowadays I'd proably go with sql and json.
 
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bytecode

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i have one client who has tons of plugins on that Wordpress. Also some kind of system what gets new real estate object every hour in thousands. What advice would you have for that? Site is 50gb :O
When you're dealing with lots of data like that, everything you want to do falls in two categories:
  1. Make the server as fast as possible
  2. Take as much load off the server as possible
Definitely do what @ApparentHorizon and @LittleWolfie said, and if you can, make the new real estate objects as small as possible. That way, it's just less data to deal with.

I don't know the specifics of the setup, but make sure that the server is optimized. If you're on a shared host, get off it. The only good shared hosting I know of is Siteground. And that may or may not be enough. If you're looking at VPS or dedicated servers, definitely look at the RAM as well as the storage size. Also, not all VPS or dedicated servers are created equally. PHP 7.3 is a must. Along with OpCache. If the site serves static content, make sure it's NGINX.

Also, are all the plugins necessary? Duplicate plugins will slow things down. Even duplicate plugins that are supposed to speed up the site. If you have good caching and a CDN setup, the plugins may not effect the speed at that size, but it will definitely slow down getting the new objects. Also, even if your site has to update regularly, offload as much as possible to a CDN. That can greatly reduce how much the server has to deal with. My personal favorite is StackPath because it's easy and faster than any other CDN I've tried (including CloudFlare).

Of course, I'm kind of just guessing since I don't know what you've already tried or where the bottleneck is.
 
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bytecode

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3 Seconds fast? That is longer than a round trip to the moon and back, apollo 11 radio conversation are noticably slow.

100 milliseconds cost amazon Billions (1% of sales)

What are your sites? How fast are they? Are you caching in multiple geo-regions? What about minifying javascript, reducing image and video size? Moving to static sites?
Completely agree, 3 seconds is not fast. Neither is 2. However, not all website owners think that way.

Personally, my goal is always under 1 second to visually complete. Half a second is ideal (though not always possible). And yes, I do everything you mentioned and more.
 

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bytecode

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@bytecode LiteSpeed Cache is looking interesting these days. Have you had a chance to give it a whirl? I'm going to try it out on a new site in the next 1-2 months.
I haven't yet. It looks like you can only use LiteSpeed Cache on LiteSpeed servers. I would be interested in how it goes for you.

Right now, my favorite is still using an NGINX proxy on top of Apache, though the LiteSpeed servers look promising.
 

Dominik_M

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Great article!
It should be added that a Content Delivery Network (CDN) is not only a nice improvement but worth gold if you have users across the globe.
Speed of light is the limit for data signaling.
A request from Frankfurt, Germany to Adelaide, Australia will take longer than 300ms to complete - no payload transferred yet!
 

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Solid stuff , thanks for taking the time
 

softwareRules

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What an awesome thread; I've been running a Wordpress site on HostGator and just started running another one on SiteGround and I can't help but feel there's a speed issue thanks to Jetpack and pixel.wp.com and with whatever default caches are installed. Your post has shown me that my hunch was correct, that there are better Wordpress caching plugins!
 

ApparentHorizon

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@ApparentHorizon darn it I thought my copy was getting better.


Oh, I would never use wordpress for a headless site. Last time I just did the SQL and Apache/PHP directly. Nowadays I'd proably go with sql and json.
Lol your copy is still better than mine :p

Too much work imo, unless his client adds some 0s to that check. You can put together a 1s WP site like that in 1-2 weeks.

I haven't yet. It looks like you can only use LiteSpeed Cache on LiteSpeed servers. I would be interested in how it goes for you.

Right now, my favorite is still using an NGINX proxy on top of Apache, though the LiteSpeed servers look promising.
Seems to work on NGINX with some config.

But that's what caught my eye as well. Their QUIC support to shave off another 100-300 ms.
 

LittleWolfie

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Lol your copy is still better than mine :p
Thanks, yet to reach selllable copy levels

Too much work imo, unless his client adds some 0s to that check. You can put together a 1s WP site like that in 1-2 weeks.
Good point, there is a tendency to over-complicate things and client smight value quick delivery over a better site.
 

cryptocasper

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In some sites for clients I use Nginx fastcgi cache which caches site + I make some other mods so in your region for example if you live in US and site hosted in US it will open under 1s all time.

Same if you live in EU and site hosted in EU - Opening times always under 1s - in average most client sites open in 450-770ms.

It requires lot of effort but speeding also impacts a lot search engines which can give additional traffic.
 
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bytecode

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Great article!
It should be added that a Content Delivery Network (CDN) is not only a nice improvement but worth gold if you have users across the globe.
Speed of light is the limit for data signaling.
A request from Frankfurt, Germany to Adelaide, Australia will take longer than 300ms to complete - no payload transferred yet!
Completely! A write-up on CDNs is coming sometime along on this thread.
 
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bytecode

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What an awesome thread; I've been running a Wordpress site on HostGator and just started running another one on SiteGround and I can't help but feel there's a speed issue thanks to Jetpack and pixel.wp.com and with whatever default caches are installed. Your post has shown me that my hunch was correct, that there are better Wordpress caching plugins!
Yeah, personally I'm not a fan of Jetpack or the pixel CDN mainly because they seem like a lot of overhead. It's Occam's razor, simpler is often better. With that said, not everything is that simple.

Do keep in mind that these TTFB times I recorded don't factor in network delays or the physical time it takes to send the data from the host to the browser. I did these tests on a local host.

It's also worth noting that multiple caching plugins slow down your site. Just one will do. Multiple just means you're doing twice the work for the same results.

And from my experience, SiteGround has always been better than HostGator in terms of speed. It's a bit more expensive (until you get to VPSs), but well worth the money.
 

Tourmaline

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How much of this can be applied to shopify?

Curious if there's a reason you like wordpress so much? Although you're addressing my biggest gripe with wordpress...it being so slow typically!
 
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bytecode

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Seems to work on NGINX with some config.

But that's what caught my eye as well. Their QUIC support to shave off another 100-300 ms.
Yes, definitely. QUIC is definitely the upcoming standard for speed (even though Google has been using it for 5 years now and is not adopted everywhere).

It is worth mentioning that if you use a CDN, it may not matter if the host uses the QUIC protocol or not. It really depends on your CDN setup, though. Though I haven't really used LiteSpeed Cache, I would be interested in a A/B test even with the CDN. Perhaps my intuition about CDNs and QUIC is off.
 
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bytecode

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How much of this can be applied to shopify?

Curious if there's a reason you like wordpress so much? Although you're addressing my biggest gripe with wordpress...it being so slow typically!
Having never worked with Shopify before, I can't really say how much applies.

What I can say is that every single technique I'm posting up here applies to site speed on all websites. There might be different ways to do everything on Shopify in particular.

I like WordPress mainly because it's incredibly flexible, like 34% of websites use it (citation needed), and since it's slow, there's a good market for speeding it up.
 

LightHouse

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@bytecode this is an excellent thread and very comprehensive so far on the pieces you have posted. Great work.

I think a lot of people do neglect how much sitespeed can really effect things these days. In the era of mobile computing and spotty performance married with instant gratification and anything-on-demand culture if your site takes too long to load, you are definitely losing money and/or trust with customers.

I look forward to the additional sections you are planning on adding, this can be a great resource for the forum.

@GlobalWealth was just talking about this on the phone, and I think I had a conversation with @therealmark recently as well.
 

softwareRules

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@bytecode this is an excellent thread and very comprehensive so far on the pieces you have posted. Great work.

I think a lot of people do neglect how much sitespeed can really effect things these days. In the era of mobile computing and spotty performance married with instant gratification and anything-on-demand culture if your site takes too long to load, you are definitely losing money and/or trust with customers.

I look forward to the additional sections you are planning on adding, this can be a great resource for the forum.

@GlobalWealth was just talking about this on the phone, and I think I had a conversation with @therealmark recently as well.
I updated my caching plugins on my wordpress sites after reading this post. The desktop loading is much improved (using better PNG compression helped too). But on mobile, there's a weird delay before the initial loading of the page. I'm not sure if it's a DNS issue or something else

I'm going to try and use the remote debugging tools to figure out what's going on: Get Started with Remote Debugging Android Devices | Tools for Web Developers | Google Developers
 

Xeon

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How much of this can be applied to shopify?
Un-optimized Shopify sites with 22 MB file size (for home page) actually loads as fast as a heavily optimized WP site, if not faster. I'm still trying to dig out what type of tech stack they're using.
 

LightHouse

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I updated my caching plugins on my wordpress sites after reading this post. The desktop loading is much improved (using better PNG compression helped too). But on mobile, there's a weird delay before the initial loading of the page. I'm not sure if it's a DNS issue or something else

I'm going to try and use the remote debugging tools to figure out what's going on: Get Started with Remote Debugging Android Devices | Tools for Web Developers | Google Developers
On most modern browsers you can emulate a mobile phone, try using pagespeed plugin in emulation and see if you can replicate. There are a variety of ways to get to the bottom of it, but you have to rule out your phone/service first.

I am sure @bytecode has some good suggestions as well.
 

ApparentHorizon

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Un-optimized Shopify sites with 22 MB file size (for home page) actually loads as fast as a heavily optimized WP site, if not faster. I'm still trying to dig out what type of tech stack they're using.
 

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