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Going Fastlane

Sebzmaniac

New Contributor
Nov 30, 2019
34
9
12
For sometime now, I've been studying Java. My dream is to create an Android game and make millions but I don't know if this is possible. I've been having doubts about this. I'm stuck between website creation and app creation. I could've done both but I'm obeying the rule in the millioniare fast lane that says: "Focus on one business. Dont cheat on ur business"

I'm in my second year of college but I'm scared about the future. Is the future really safe? Will I end up working at a job till I'm 60 or 70?.

But on the other hand, what if I finish studying Java and I can't code? What if I was just wasting my time? My greatest inspiration was the creator of temple run. She is a mother. She finished college and had a Bsc in chemistry, but she decided to pursue her dream. She started a game company with her husband and also found some people who shared her goals and worked with them.

So what should I really do? Should I go ahead and study Java or is creating a website more easier? Can I create a social media site and become the next Mark Zuckerberg? ( That's insane)

Can I create a social media site and sell it to Facebook for 1 billion dollars? (less insane). Look, I don't need billions of dollars. Just a few million. 10 million dollars or 5 million can be okay. My main point is, I want to buy my freedom and I want it now, not when I'm 60 or 70 and retire with 2 million dollars and buy a lambo which I'll be too old to drive. I don't want to sacrifice 5 days a week and rest on only 2 with a little pay. I want to be rich now so I have to never work again in my life.

So, I'm asking. Should I wait until I finish college and things don't really workout or should I start know? Even MJ DeMarco started his after finishing college. I need ur suggestions. Thanks. 28969
 

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Abrodos

Bronze Contributor
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Sep 25, 2019
52
105
119
30
Barcelona, Spain
from my experience I'd say, don't separate studying java from programming a game. Learn java as you program, find problems in the process, solve them, keep going. But don't use studying to evade yourself from actually creating and sharing your creation (even if it's not finished).
Welcome to the forum btw!
 
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Sebzmaniac

New Contributor
Nov 30, 2019
34
9
12
from my experience I'd say, don't separate studying java from programming a game. Learn java as you program, find problems in the process, solve them, keep going. But don't use studying to evade yourself from actually creating and sharing your creation (even if it's not finished).
Welcome to the forum btw!
Thanks a lot for ur support. But I'm totally new to this. I can't program while studying java. I have to finish studying Java first before I can actually program, right? If It is possible to program while studying, pls tell me how.
 

Abrodos

Bronze Contributor
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Sep 25, 2019
52
105
119
30
Barcelona, Spain
I don't know about coding myself, but I meant jumping straight into doing it. Taking action, leaving behind the "plans in a piece of paper" stage. I'm doing that with my youtube channel: the videos are not perfect but I'm learning a lot while creating them. and I'm making them better on the way.
 
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Sebzmaniac

New Contributor
Nov 30, 2019
34
9
12
I don't know about coding myself, but I meant jumping straight into doing it. Taking action, leaving behind the "plans in a piece of paper" stage. I'm doing that with my youtube channel: the videos are not perfect but I'm learning a lot while creating them. and I'm making them better on the way.
Ok, tnx
 

GonnaBe2020

New Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Dec 4, 2019
15
11
17
I can't program while studying java. I have to finish studying Java first before I can actually program, right? If It is possible to program while studying, pls tell me how.
I would not call it "studying" Java. Java is several things. First it's the programming language. Then there's the big "umbrella" that covers lots of libraries, frameworks, derivatives ( Android is basically Java for instance ), evolutions (Kotlin is an evolution of Java) and whatever else.

The first step would be to learn the Java language. This is the foundation to anything else. But you don't "study" it, you "learn" it. In my point of view "study" is more open-ended, while "learning" is more measurable, which is the case for a programming language like Java. Most importantly this won't take forever. You look at a Java learning book, you'll have like 30-50 chapters. Depending on your available time, it's just a matter of weeks/months until you'll know the basics of the Java language.

Of course until you're done with that, the things that you'll be able to code will be more or less simple things, in phase with your learning/practice advancement.

I'm stuck between website creation and app creation.
I guess you feel stuck because you're trying to make a choice that you actually cannot make at this point. What are you building, what kind of thing, of product ? Who are your users ? What do they need, a website, or an app ? You cannot make that choice in a vacuum, without knowing what your exact goal is. Both things are possible and you could make money through both of them, but this is the wrong question to ask at this moment.

Should I wait until I finish college and things don't really workout or should I start know?
Sounds like the wrong question as well :) It's not a matter of when you start, but what are you going to start ? If you know already the "what", you can already start working towards that little by little, while your programming skills improve over time. If you have some website/app ideas, you can already start imagining how it would look like, you don't have to code it immediately, you can just draw screens on paper while brainstorming and refining our idea.

I would suggest to do them in parallel (learning and planning your website/app). Learning Java will also make it clear for you if programming is something you would enjoy doing. But as I said, Java is also something that covers a lot of different things, you can build anything with it. Clarifying what is the thing that you want to build will show you which part of the Java ecosystem you need to learn once you master the basics.
 
OP
OP
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Sebzmaniac

New Contributor
Nov 30, 2019
34
9
12
I would not call it "studying" Java. Java is several things. First it's the programming language. Then there's the big "umbrella" that covers lots of libraries, frameworks, derivatives ( Android is basically Java for instance ), evolutions (Kotlin is an evolution of Java) and whatever else.

The first step would be to learn the Java language. This is the foundation to anything else. But you don't "study" it, you "learn" it. In my point of view "study" is more open-ended, while "learning" is more measurable, which is the case for a programming language like Java. Most importantly this won't take forever. You look at a Java learning book, you'll have like 30-50 chapters. Depending on your available time, it's just a matter of weeks/months until you'll know the basics of the Java language.

Of course until you're done with that, the things that you'll be able to code will be more or less simple things, in phase with your learning/practice advancement.


I guess you feel stuck because you're trying to make a choice that you actually cannot make at this point. What are you building, what kind of thing, of product ? Who are your users ? What do they need, a website, or an app ? You cannot make that choice in a vacuum, without knowing what your exact goal is. Both things are possible and you could make money through both of them, but this is the wrong question to ask at this moment.


Sounds like the wrong question as well :) It's not a matter of when you start, but what are you going to start ? If you know already the "what", you can already start working towards that little by little, while your programming skills improve over time. If you have some website/app ideas, you can already start imagining how it would look like, you don't have to code it immediately, you can just draw screens on paper while brainstorming and refining our idea.

I would suggest to do them in parallel (learning and planning your website/app). Learning Java will also make it clear for you if programming is something you would enjoy doing. But as I said, Java is also something that covers a lot of different things, you can build anything with it. Clarifying what is the thing that you want to build will show you which part of the Java ecosystem you need to learn once you master the basics.
Wow, that stuff u said about "drawing it on paper". The creators of Twitter did this. Thanks a lot, I'll do that. All u have told me has given my a deep insight about what I'm doing. Thanks again. U've changed the way I was thinking about this.
 

GonnaBe2020

New Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Dec 4, 2019
15
11
17
Wow, that stuff u said about "drawing it on paper". The creators of Twitter did this. Thanks a lot, I'll do that. All u have told me has given my a deep insight about what I'm doing. Thanks again. U've changed the way I was thinking about this.
Glad that I could help :thumbsup:

I'm very much into agile methodologies, which evolved from eXtreme Programming, and I find that many of the original principles of XP apply to more than just programming. One of the best ones says "Do The Simplest Thing That Could Possibly Work" ... for brainstorming and prototyping, paper would be the simplest thing, hence my suggestion :)

The second step, when you'd get to the point where you have something that you want to show to an audience, would be to draw some user interface mockups ( I used Balsamiq some years ago when it was free, I'm sure there are still free alternatives out there ) and get users feedback about your design, functionalities, etc.

This way I think you can get quite far without spending any money, up to this point there's no line of code that you would feel bad to throw away because you paid good money for it, no architecture/deployment decision that you need to revert, so changing your mind about anything is easy and simple. Only at step three you would start building your product, knowing reasonably well how it should look like.
 

dauntless

Contributor
Oct 26, 2019
25
37
17
Hey,
I took Java in college and I learned by writing code on paper, and designing calculators. No fun.
The greatest thing about programming is that it helps with developing ideas and the process to a good idea is the problem solving that comes with it. Because of this, think clearly about what type of apps/services you’d like to program. You want to program websites?, develop a game? Virtual reality?, perhaps big data with Python?...programming is way more fun when you place emphasis on something that you like. And, fortunately, there will always be programming jobs in the future. I personally I’m getting involved with virtual reality and augmented reality and it’s a lot of fun. But I’m also thinking of the importance of big data for finance in the upcoming future, and also take a look at brain-to-machine interfaces which is the next big thing.
For now, focus on understanding the theory and practice a lot because learning the syntaxes alone is impossible, there’s so many libraries and methodologies that your best bet is to have a wholistic understanding of the programming fundamentals to attain a comfort zone when you finally set yourself to program something on your own (using the internet for code research, of course).
Good luck.
 
OP
OP
S

Sebzmaniac

New Contributor
Nov 30, 2019
34
9
12
Hey,
I took Java in college and I learned by writing code on paper, and designing calculators. No fun.
The greatest thing about programming is that it helps with developing ideas and the process to a good idea is the problem solving that comes with it. Because of this, think clearly about what type of apps/services you’d like to program. You want to program websites?, develop a game? Virtual reality?, perhaps big data with Python?...programming is way more fun when you place emphasis on something that you like. And, fortunately, there will always be programming jobs in the future. I personally I’m getting involved with virtual reality and augmented reality and it’s a lot of fun. But I’m also thinking of the importance of big data for finance in the upcoming future, and also take a look at brain-to-machine interfaces which is the next big thing.
For now, focus on understanding the theory and practice a lot because learning the syntaxes alone is impossible, there’s so many libraries and methodologies that your best bet is to have a wholistic understanding of the programming fundamentals to attain a comfort zone when you finally set yourself to program something on your own (using the internet for code research, of course).
Good luck.
Tnx a lot dauntless
 
OP
OP
S

Sebzmaniac

New Contributor
Nov 30, 2019
34
9
12
Hey,
I took Java in college and I learned by writing code on paper, and designing calculators. No fun.
The greatest thing about programming is that it helps with developing ideas and the process to a good idea is the problem solving that comes with it. Because of this, think clearly about what type of apps/services you’d like to program. You want to program websites?, develop a game? Virtual reality?, perhaps big data with Python?...programming is way more fun when you place emphasis on something that you like. And, fortunately, there will always be programming jobs in the future. I personally I’m getting involved with virtual reality and augmented reality and it’s a lot of fun. But I’m also thinking of the importance of big data for finance in the upcoming future, and also take a look at brain-to-machine interfaces which is the next big thing.
For now, focus on understanding the theory and practice a lot because learning the syntaxes alone is impossible, there’s so many libraries and methodologies that your best bet is to have a wholistic understanding of the programming fundamentals to attain a comfort zone when you finally set yourself to program something on your own (using the internet for code research, of course).
Good luck.
Just out of curiosity, how long did it take for u to study Java and start coding? Hw many years/months?
 

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