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Media Magicians, Word Trick Wands, and Mass Hypnosis

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Lex DeVille

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As Decepticon Spreads... the headline reads.

Watch out for the word "As" when used by media outlets.
  • As the fires rage...
  • As the wind picks up...
  • As the waters rise...
  • As the death toll surges...
This is a tool of hypnosis applied to those who are already locked in a trance. Media outlets use it to guide attention and direct mental stories to increase fear or to trigger fear to grab attention.

The word "as" brings an event into the now, as in, this is happening right now, therefore, it is an immediate threat. When something is an immediate threat, it demands attention and triggers a fear response. Kind of like what happens when you're hiking and you're confronted with a dangerous mountain lion. It's happening now. It demands your attention. It triggers a fear response and you cannot think about anything else in that moment.

It's so obvious, and yet very effective.

As = This is happening now.
Decepticon = Bad thing your attention should be on.
Spreads = It's getting worse, therefore fear is triggered, fear is necessary, and fear can increase alongside the bad thing that is also increasing according to the media.

It works best on the people who are already entranced by the media. As you start to pay attention for that word (as), you can notice it in news stories from now on, (all media outlets use this tool) and maybe you can spot your own trances and escape them.
 
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As Decepticon Spreads... the headline reads.

Watch out for the word "As" when used by media outlets.
  • As the fires rage...
  • As the wind picks up...
  • As the waters rise...
  • As the death toll surges...
This is a tool of hypnosis applied to those who are already locked in a trance. Media outlets use it to guide attention and direct mental stories to increase fear or to trigger fear to grab attention.

The word "as" brings an event into the now, as in, this is happening right now, therefore, it is an immediate threat. When something is an immediate threat, it demands attention and triggers a fear response. Kind of like what happens when you're hiking and you're confronted with a dangerous mountain lion. It's happening now. It demands your attention. It triggers a fear response and you cannot think about anything else in that moment.

It's so obvious, and yet very effective.

As = This is happening now.
Decepticon = Bad thing your attention should be on.
Spreads = It's getting worse, therefore fear is triggered, and fear can increase alongside the bad thing that is also increasing according to the media.

It works best on the people who are already entranced by the media. As you start to pay attention for that word, you can notice it in news stories from now on, regardless of where you get your news from, and maybe you can spot your own trances and escape them.
Hold on… That gem is going to be lost in this chat thread.
 

Lex DeVille

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Hold on… That gem is going to be lost in this chat thread.
Maybe I should start a thread to share the different linguistic tricks I see used every day. It's fascinating for me as someone who uses those same tools, especially to see people using them on national television for the purpose of creating a mass hypnosis.
 

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Maybe I should start a thread to share the different linguistic tricks I see used every day. It's fascinating for me as someone who uses those same tools, especially to see people using them on national television for the purpose of creating a mass hypnosis.
Yes please! I love language and words, and how slight changes make all the difference. (“Yes, but” vs “Yes, and” etc.).
 
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Lex DeVille

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Over the past several years more people have awakened to the fear-mongering and biased slants of major news media (entertainment news). Even my own parents seem aware that something is happening, but they can't always put their finger on it and they only really notice when it's done by the other side. But the media's tricks are never limited to the other side. All news media use the same linguistic tools to induce trance, fan the flames of fear, and draw attention to their stories.

Last night I posted one of those tricks in this thread...

As Decepticon Spreads... the headline reads.

Watch out for the word "As" when used by media outlets.
  • As the fires rage...
  • As the wind picks up...
  • As the waters rise...
  • As the death toll surges...
This is a tool of hypnosis applied to those who are already locked in a trance. Media outlets use it to guide attention and direct mental stories to increase fear or to trigger fear to grab attention.

The word "as" brings an event into the now, as in, this is happening right now, therefore, it is an immediate threat. When something is an immediate threat, it demands attention and triggers a fear response. Kind of like what happens when you're hiking and you're confronted with a dangerous mountain lion. It's happening now. It demands your attention. It triggers a fear response and you cannot think about anything else in that moment.

It's so obvious, and yet very effective.

As = This is happening now.
Decepticon = Bad thing your attention should be on.
Spreads = It's getting worse, therefore fear is triggered, fear is necessary, and fear can increase alongside the bad thing that is also increasing according to the media.

It works best on the people who are already entranced by the media. As you start to pay attention for that word (as), you can notice it in news stories from now on, (all media outlets use this tool) and maybe you can spot your own trances and escape them.


...and that prompted a new thread where we can dive deeper into the linguistic tactics that are used against you and upon you and upon everyone around you to create a mass hypnosis that serves the all-mighty corporation. The purpose of this thread is not only to reveal the tricks and how they work but to help you become aware of them so you can begin to notice them and choose not to participate in the silly mind games as often.

That said, nobody is immune. Some of you believe you are. Some of you think you see through all of the tricks and tactics and that you cannot be influenced. You are wrong. Everyone is influenced. Everyone falls for the tricks. I fall for the tricks every day and so do you. You cannot avoid them because some are so subtle that it is impossible to recognize what is being used against you until it has already been done. You cannot avoid them, but you can learn to get better at recognizing them. That's what I hope to accomplish here by revealing these secret tactics.

First, let's start with a few definitions to set the stage. This will be very important going forward.

Trance occurs anytime attention is focused (usually focused inward). You go into a trance when you write a forum post, or when you go for an 8-mile jog. You go into a trance when you binge-watch Netflix and when you scroll through TikTok. You go into a trance when someone cuts you off in traffic or says something mean in a social comment. You go into a trance when your drive is routine and you don't remember the trip. You go into a trance when your groceries are checked and you run your card through the processor. You go into a trance when you listen to a podcast or read a good book or daydream. You go into a trance when you watch or read a news story that you agree with or that you disagree with, and as you are still reading this, you are probably in a trance right now.

Hypnosis happens when attention is purposely guided while in a trance state.

Direct Suggestion Hypnosis: This is the hypnosis that most people are familiar with. Like when a pocket watch dangles from the hand of an outstretched arm. As the pocket watch begins to move back and forth, the eyes follow it left, right, and back to the left. As the swing increases, and as the watch carves an invisible half-moon path through the air in one direction and then another, the words "you are getting sleepy" can be heard. Next thing you know, you're clucking around a stage as the chicken you've become. This form of hypnosis is not very effective (except under certain contexts) which is why you won't find news media applying it.

Indirect Suggestion Hypnosis: This version is much more sinister because it can be used on anyone at any time and almost nobody expects or notices it. Indirect suggestion hypnosis is conversational, meaning it can be applied in everyday communications. No pocket watch is necessary because it leverages the natural trance states that people enter into all of the time.

Years ago, when I first began to study hypnosis, I worked for a grocery store. After patrons received their price at checkout, they would reach for their debit card. I noticed their eyes would glaze over, and if I spoke to them mid-swipe, they would often miss what I'd said. One day, the store was promoting almond butter. A co-cashier challenged me to see who could sell the most and I accepted the challenge. When customers arrived at the counter, I'd check their groceries and share a price. One by one they would grab their debit card, and I could see the trance in their eyes, and when they would reach up to swipe, I would interrupt them by pointing to the fresh ground almond butter over there and make a comment about how delicious it would taste spread over one of these chocolate bars here.

Like a clock that's batteries ran out, customers would stop in place, arm outstretched, card in hand (this is called catalepsy). They would look over at the almond butter, mentally having the experience I'd spoken into their thoughts. Then they would agree with me, grab the almond butter and a chocolate bar, and finish checkout. I won that challenge by a large margin and learned a valuable lesson about how easy it is to guide attention during trance states. Also learned that I didn't need to directly ask for a sale to trigger a purchase, although I could combine the approach with a call-to-action to be more effective.

This is how the news media operates.
  • Set the context.
  • Control the frame.
  • Focus attention.
  • Guide the narrative.
  • Bypass reason.
The media understands that the entire world is in and out of trance states. They understand how to leverage the trust they've built with the people on their side, and how to manipulate the other side through anger. Those behind the scenes who write the stories understand how to trigger the trance state with nothing but words, and how to craft their scripts using the techniques of conversational hypnosis. Reporters are trained to emphasize words at the exact right moment, to pause an extra millisecond before giving a direct suggestion that doubles as a command, and to play with the pitch, tone, and inflections of the voice to mesmerize, hypnotize, and baptize the public in their narrative and to guide thoughts, beliefs, and actions in directions that suit their purpose.

In the posts that follow, I will do my best to lift the veil on these tactics and how I see them used in the news, in articles, by politicians, and by other people of power to create a mass hypnosis that everybody suspects is happening even if they don't know how. These are many of the same techniques and tactics that I have applied in copywriting since the beginning, and they will continue to be applied to influence the world for the foreseeable future.

FYI, I have posted this in the Speedway forums since I intend to embed YouTube videos of news stories to highlight examples of how and when these tactics are being used so readers can learn to spot them.

To see how deep the rabbit hole goes, make sure you follow this thread. I will teach you how to read the Matrix code so you can begin to free your mind. ;)
 
Last edited:

Andy Black

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Over the past several years more people have awakened to the fear-mongering and biased slants of major news media (entertainment news). Even my own parents seem aware that something is happening, but they can't always put their finger on it and they only really notice when it's done by the other side. But the media's tricks are never limited to the other side. All news media use the same linguistic tools to induce trance, fan the flames of fear, and draw attention to their stories.

Last night I posted one of those tricks in this thread...




...and that prompted a new thread where we can dive deeper into the linguistic tactics that are used against you and upon you and upon everyone around you to create a mass hypnosis that serves the all-mighty corporation. The purpose of this thread is not only to reveal the tricks and how they work but to help you become aware of them so you can begin to notice them and choose not to participate in the silly mind games as often.

That said, nobody is immune. Some of you believe you are. Some of you think you see through all of the tricks and tactics and that you cannot be influenced. You are wrong. Everyone is influenced. Everyone falls for the tricks. I fall for the tricks every day and so do you. You cannot avoid them because some are so subtle that it is impossible to recognize what is being used against you until it has already been done. You cannot avoid them, but you can learn to get better at recognizing them. That's what I hope to accomplish here by revealing these secret tactics.

First, let's start with a few definitions to set the stage. This will be very important going forward.

Trance occurs anytime attention is focused (usually focused inward). You go into a trance when you write a forum post, or when you go for an 8-mile jog. You go into a trance when you binge-watch Netflix and when you scroll through TikTok. You go into a trance when someone cuts you off in traffic or says something mean in a social comment. You go into a trance when your drive is routine and you don't remember the trip. You go into a trance when your groceries are checked and you run your card through the processor. You go into a trance when you listen to a podcast or read a good book or daydream. You go into a trance when you watch or read a news story that you agree with or that you disagree with, and as you are still reading this, you are probably in a trance right now.

Hypnosis happens when attention is purposely guided while in a trance state.

Direct Suggestion Hypnosis: This is the hypnosis that most people are familiar with. Like when a pocket watch dangles from the hand of an outstretched arm. As the pocket watch begins to move back and forth, the eyes follow it left, right, and back to the left. As the swing increases, and as the watch carves an invisible half-moon path through the air in one direction and then another, the words "you are getting sleepy" can be heard. Next thing you know, you're clucking around a stage as the chicken you've become. This form of hypnosis is not very effective (except under certain contexts) which is why you won't find news media applying it.

Indirect Suggestion Hypnosis: This version is much more sinister because it can be used on anyone at any time and almost nobody expects or notices it. Indirect suggestion hypnosis is conversational, meaning it can be applied in everyday communications. No pocket watch is necessary because it leverages the natural trance states that people enter into all of the time.

Years ago, when I first began to study hypnosis, I worked for a grocery store. After patrons received their price at checkout, they would reach for their debit card. I noticed their eyes would glaze over, and if I spoke to them mid-swipe, they would often miss what I'd said. One day, the store was promoting almond butter. A co-cashier challenged me to see who could sell the most and I accepted the challenge. When customers arrived at the counter, I'd check their groceries and share a price. One by one they would grab their debit card, and I could see the trance in their eyes, and when they would reach up to swipe, I would interrupt them by pointing to the fresh ground almond butter over there and make a comment about how delicious it would taste spread over one of these chocolate bars here.

Like a clock that's batteries ran out, customers would stop in place, arm outstretched, card in hand (this is called catalepsy). They would look over at the almond butter, mentally having the experience I'd spoken into their thoughts. Then they would agree with me, grab the almond butter and a chocolate bar, and finish checkout. I won that challenge by a large margin and learned a valuable lesson about how easy it is to guide attention during trance states. Also learned that I didn't need to directly ask for a sale to trigger a purchase, although I could combine the approach with a call-to-action to be more effective.

This is how the news media operates.
  • Set the context.
  • Control the frame.
  • Focus attention.
  • Guide the narrative.
  • Bypass reason.
The media understands that the entire world is in and out of trance states. They understand how to leverage the trust they've built with the people on their side, and how to manipulate the other side through anger. Those behind the scenes who write the stories understand how to trigger the trance state with nothing but words, and how to craft their scripts using the techniques of conversational hypnosis. Reporters are trained to emphasize words at the exact right moment, to pause an extra millisecond before giving a direct suggestion that doubles as a command, and to play with the pitch, tone, and inflections of the voice to mesmerize, hypnotize, and baptize the public in their narrative and to guide thoughts, beliefs, and actions in directions that suit their purpose.

In the posts that follow, I will do my best to lift the veil on these tactics and how I see them used in the news, in articles, by politicians, and by other people of power to create a mass hypnosis that everybody suspects is happening even if they don't know how. These are many of the same techniques and tactics that I have applied in copywriting since the beginning, and they will continue to be applied to influence the world for the foreseeable future.

FYI, I have posted this in the Speedway forums since I intend to embed YouTube videos of news stories to highlight examples of how and when these tactics are being used so readers can learn to spot them.

To see how deep the rabbit hole goes, make sure you follow this thread. I will teach you how to read the Matrix code so you can begin to free your mind. ;)
Thanks for doing this Lex. I can picture me at the checkout between taking my card out and tapping it on the card reader. Yeah, that’s a weird in between state.

Following.
 

MJ DeMarco

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I'm sorry I moved (and combined) this into a new thread (and out of the Speedway) and didn't realize another one was already created. I don't remember the original title so please feel free to mention it here if you feel it is a better one.

On the subject of this topic, one linguistic trick I can't stand is the framing of polls, or surveys....

41% of millennials think communism is a great idea!

This headline is framed to make you think that more people believe in the premise of the headline, to make the minority opinion to appear more mainstream, and more adoptable.

The actual real headline should be...


59% of millennials think communism is a bad idea.
 
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I am SO watching this. Thanks Lex!
 

Lex DeVille

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To kick things off, I grabbed the most recent YouTube video by Fox News. Their political leanings are irrelevant. News media is a big deception from the ground up as far as I can tell. For this one, I'll only focus on the opening statement so you can see just how much bullshit is pumped into every single sentence. While it is a YouTube video, this clip comes from their regular newscast. Also, please note that I am not for the left or the right. I just chose to start with Fox.


Here is the opening statement.

Talk about a blue state exodus. Red states like Florida, Texas, and Arizona are all welcoming a surge in population over the last year while residents in fled blue states like California, New York, and Illinois, including our next guest who moved his entire business to Texas, Rex, Founder and CEO, Peter Rex is here to explain... Rex thanks so much for joining me today. Why did you decide to move?

Listen to the video. Draw your attention to the first sentence. I'm about to blow your mind.

Talk about a blue state exodus.

The script opens in action (as all good short stories do). It presents an idea that sounds like a fact. The idea is that people are leaving blue states in mass, yet that isn't what the anchor said. The anchor has not presented a fact, only a slight-of-mouth trick. A mass exodus is not a fact here, it is an opinion about a fact. The fact is that some people are leaving blue states just as some people are leaving red states. This happens every day, but the anchor has framed however many people are leaving blue states as an "exodus." Could be 10, could be 10,000. In any case, he has NOT stated anything necessarily false or true, only a scripted opinion.

Now, watch the video again. Pay closer attention this time. There is a brief pause at the beginning and then, Talk about a blue state exodus. It isn't a fact. It isn't just an opinion about a fact. There is an emphasis on the words Talk about. The anchor very slightly elongates them because this is a call-to-action, a command, to talk about a blue state exodus. It is a command hidden in plain sight that virtually no viewer will realize even when they are talking about a blue state exodus on Facebook, Twitter, and even at work.

Before we move on, there's one last thing to notice about this sentence. The role of the VERY carefully chosen word, exodus. What is an exodus? It is a departure of large numbers of people. But what is exodus in the context of Fox News? It is the second book of the bible. And what is that book about? Here's what Wikipedia says:

It narrates how the Israelites leave slavery in Biblical Egypt through the strength of Yahweh, the god who has chosen them as his people.

Fox's viewership is largely made up of conservative republicans. Many are religious. So the word exodus becomes a multi-meaning metaphor describing (through suggestion) blue states as slave states, and red states as free states, while implying that those who are fleeing the blue states must be "Reds" and those Reds, all Reds, are gods chosen people. In other words, Reds are good. Blues are bad. Good and evil. Light and dark. God and Satan. Us vs. Them.

Red states like Florida, Texas, and Arizona are all welcoming a surge in population...

Moving into the second part of the opening statement, the anchor transitions into "Red states" without pause and makes another slight-of-mouth comment of non-fact about a surge in population, emphasis on "surge," while at the same time, making an identity statement about the Reds. Red states are all welcoming a SURGE in population. This is the surface-level statement of apparent fact. The hidden suggestion is that Red states (or Reds) are all welcoming. In other words, you red people... you are good people, welcoming people, gods people. Feel good. Keep watching.

Watch closely and you will see the anchor's entire facial expression change the moment he emphasizes all welcoming.

over the last year while residents in fled blue states like California, New York, and Illinois,

The second part of this sentence targets a specific time frame - the last year. In other words, the viewer's attention is directed toward Biden's presidency. Biden blue. Biden bad. The anchor pauses (maybe stumbles) on the words "fled blue states." Probably didn't make sense when he first read it. That's an obvious dig on the left.

Red states like Florida, Texas, and Arizona are all welcoming a surge in population over the last year while residents in fled blue states like California, New York, and Illinois, including our next guest who moved his entire business to Texas, Rex, Founder and CEO, Peter Rex is here to explain...


As the sentence continues, things sound like they make sense, but then something subtle and sneaky happens. The sentence starts by talking about one thing, and then transitions into an open loop.

Red states like Florida, Texas, and Arizona are all welcoming a surge in population over the last year while residents in fled blue states like California, New York, and Illinois...
UNFINISHED STATEMENT (opens the loop) ... including our next guest (here is where you would expect the loop to be closed but it is not) who moved his enter business to Texas, Rex, Founder and CEO, Peter Rex is here to explain...

It takes several views to catch all of this, but the words, "while residents in fled blue states" are the beginning of a confusion statement - a trance induction technique. Confusion is one of the most effective ways to trigger and/or deepen a trance. While residents in fled blue states... It doesn't really make sense, so you have to stop and mentally process it, and by the time you catch up, you've already been hit with an open-loop, another highly effective trance trigger.

The next thing to notice is the slight emphasis on the words who moved his entire business to Texas. Listen carefully. If you pay close attention, these words change the sentence from a statement "including our next guest who moved his entire business to Texas" into a question... including our next guest (slight pause before emphasized tone) WHO MOVED HIS ENTIRE BUSINESS TO TEXAS? Who did this? Biden did this. Biden blue. Blue bad. The words are not presented as a question, but the pause, the slight increase in the volume, and the pre-primed mental associations all present it to the subconscious this way.

who moved his enter business to Texas, Rex, Founder and CEO, Peter Rex is here to explain...


For the final part of the statement, the anchor keeps the flow moving so you don't even think about the open-loop you were left with. Rhyme, similar-sounding words, and repetition are literary devices used in hypnotherapy to keep the mind gliding along.

- business and Texas = similar ending
- Tex
and Rex = Rhyme
- Peter Rex = Repetition


The sentence closes with "is here to explain" which doesn't fit the original sentence at all, but it doesn't matter at this point because by the time you give this even the slightest thought, the conversation has already switched speakers, and you'll miss what the next person has said if you focus on anything other than what is being said right now.

Rex thanks so much for joining me today. Why did you decide to move?


In a final transitioning statement, the anchor thanks Rex for joining him, but really, he's thanking the viewer. Rex is one of the people who moved from a blue state, and we already established earlier that the people moving from blue states must be Reds. Rex is a Red. Reds are the viewers. Thank you viewer, for joining me today. You are good. Feel good.

Why did you DECIDE to move?

The very last question is another hidden suggestion. Again, watch the anchor's face change when he reaches the word decide. Pay attention for the way he elongates his expression of the word as well. Decide to move.

SPECIAL NOTE

Undoubtedly, some of this is not meant to guide you in a particular direction. Some of it could be me reading too much into it. The problem is we can never be certain what is fiction and what is not when it comes to modern media, so we have to be skeptical of all of it.

Maybe the anchor emphasized the word "decide" because of his natural language patterns, but national news anchors are trained to control their speech very carefully. They are not infallible. They make mistakes. But they also did not get into their position through luck.

It would be impossible to determine if my breakdown was 100% correct today. So your primary takeaway should be to learn the techniques described, and how they can be deployed in your favor or against you.
 

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To kick things off, I grabbed the most recent YouTube video by Fox News. Their political leanings are irrelevant. News media is a big deception from the ground up as far as I can tell. For this one, I'll only focus on the opening statement so you can see just how much bullshit is pumped into every single sentence. While it is a YouTube video, this clip comes from their regular newscast. Also, please note that I am not for the left or the right. I just chose to start with Fox.


Here is the opening statement.



Listen to the video. Draw your attention to the first sentence. I'm about to blow your mind.

Talk about a blue state exodus.

The script opens in action (as all good short stories do). It presents an idea that sounds like a fact. The idea is that people are leaving blue states in mass, yet that isn't what the anchor said. The anchor has not presented a fact, only a slight-of-mouth trick. A mass exodus is not a fact here, it is an opinion about a fact. The fact is that some people are leaving blue states just as some people are leaving red states. This happens every day, but the anchor has framed however many people are leaving blue states as an "exodus." Could be 10, could be 10,000. In any case, he has NOT stated anything necessarily false or true, only a scripted opinion.

Now, watch the video again. Pay closer attention this time. There is a brief pause at the beginning and then, Talk about a blue state exodus. It isn't a fact. It isn't just an opinion about a fact. There is an emphasis on the words Talk about. The anchor very slightly elongates them because this is a call-to-action, a command, to talk about a blue state exodus. It is a command hidden in plain sight that virtually no viewer will realize even when they are talking about a blue state exodus on Facebook, Twitter, and even at work.

Before we move on, there's one last thing to notice about this sentence. The role of the VERY carefully chosen word, exodus. What is an exodus? It is a departure of large numbers of people. But what is exodus in the context of Fox News? It is the second book of the bible. And what is that book about? Here's what Wikipedia says:



Fox's viewership is largely made up of conservative republicans. Many are religious. So the word exodus becomes a multi-meaning metaphor describing (through suggestion) blue states as slave states, and red states as free states, while implying that those who are fleeing the blue states must be "Reds" and those Reds, all Reds, are gods chosen people. In other words, Reds are good. Blues are bad. Good and evil. Light and dark. God and Satan. Us vs. Them.



Moving into the second part of the opening statement, the anchor transitions into "Red states" without pause and makes another slight-of-mouth comment of non-fact about a surge in population, emphasis on "surge," while at the same time, making an identity statement about the Reds. Red states are all welcoming a SURGE in population. This is the surface-level statement of apparent fact. The hidden suggestion is that Red states (or Reds) are all welcoming. In other words, you red people... you are good people, welcoming people, gods people. Feel good. Keep watching.

Watch closely and you will see the anchor's entire facial expression change the moment he emphasizes all welcoming.



The second part of this sentence targets a specific time frame - the last year. In other words, the viewer's attention is directed toward Biden's presidency. Biden blue. Biden bad. The anchor pauses (maybe stumbles) on the words "fled blue states." Probably didn't make sense when he first read it. That's an obvious dig on the left.



As the sentence continues, things sound like they make sense, but then something subtle and sneaky happens. The sentence starts by talking about one thing, and then transitions into an open loop.

Red states like Florida, Texas, and Arizona are all welcoming a surge in population over the last year while residents in fled blue states like California, New York, and Illinois...
UNFINISHED STATEMENT (opens the loop) ... including our next guest (here is where you would expect the loop to be closed but it is not) who moved his enter business to Texas, Rex, Founder and CEO, Peter Rex is here to explain...

It takes several views to catch all of this, but the words, "while residents in fled blue states" are the beginning of a confusion statement - a trance induction technique. Confusion is one of the most effective ways to trigger and/or deepen a trance. While residents in fled blue states... It doesn't really make sense, so you have to stop and mentally process it, and by the time you catch up, you've already been hit with an open-loop, another highly effective trance trigger.

The next thing to notice is the slight emphasis on the words who moved his entire business to Texas. Listen carefully. If you pay close attention, these words change the sentence from a statement "including our next guest who moved his entire business to Texas" into a question... including our next guest (slight pause before emphasized tone) WHO MOVED HIS ENTIRE BUSINESS TO TEXAS? Who did this? Biden did this. Biden blue. Blue bad. The words are not presented as a question, but the pause, the slight increase in the volume, and the pre-primed mental associations all present it to the subconscious this way.



For the final part of the statement, the anchor keeps the flow moving so you don't even think about the open-loop you were left with. Rhyme, similar-sounding words, and repetition are literary devices used in hypnotherapy to keep the mind gliding along.

- business and Texas = similar ending
- Tex
and Rex = Rhyme
- Peter Rex = Repetition


The sentence closes with "is here to explain" which doesn't fit the original sentence at all, but it doesn't matter at this point because by the time you give this even the slightest thought, the conversation has already switched speakers, and you'll miss what the next person has said if you focus on anything other than what is being said right now.



In a final transitioning statement, the anchor thanks Rex for joining him, but really, he's thanking the viewer. Rex is one of the people who moved from a blue state, and we already established earlier that the people moving from blue states must be Reds. Rex is a Red. Reds are the viewers. Thank you viewer, for joining me today. You are good. Feel good.

Why did you DECIDE to move?

The very last question is another hidden suggestion. Again, watch the anchor's face change when he reaches the word decide. Pay attention for the way he elongates his expression of the word as well. Decide to move.

SPECIAL NOTE

Undoubtedly, some of this is not meant to guide you in a particular direction. Some of it could be me reading too much into it. The problem is we can never be certain what is fiction and what is not when it comes to modern media, so we have to be skeptical of all of it.

Maybe the anchor emphasized the word "decide" because of his natural language patterns, but national news anchors are trained to control their speech very carefully. They are not infallible. They make mistakes. But they also did not get into their position through luck.

It would be impossible to determine if my breakdown was 100% correct today. So your primary takeaway should be to learn the techniques described, and how they can be deployed in your favor or against you.
What's interesting is that this particular story is a fairly innocuous one. So what if 150,000 net people a year move out of California? Its going to take quite a while to drain the population if that continues. But when you combine this with hundreds of other stories that build up a complete narrative, you turn large numbers of the right into non-thinking zombies. Just look through the comments section of foxnews.com and you'll see what that results in. The same thing is happening with the left.
 
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To kick things off, I grabbed the most recent YouTube video by Fox News. Their political leanings are irrelevant. News media is a big deception from the ground up as far as I can tell. For this one, I'll only focus on the opening statement so you can see just how much bullshit is pumped into every single sentence. While it is a YouTube video, this clip comes from their regular newscast. Also, please note that I am not for the left or the right. I just chose to start with Fox.


Here is the opening statement.



Listen to the video. Draw your attention to the first sentence. I'm about to blow your mind.

Talk about a blue state exodus.

The script opens in action (as all good short stories do). It presents an idea that sounds like a fact. The idea is that people are leaving blue states in mass, yet that isn't what the anchor said. The anchor has not presented a fact, only a slight-of-mouth trick. A mass exodus is not a fact here, it is an opinion about a fact. The fact is that some people are leaving blue states just as some people are leaving red states. This happens every day, but the anchor has framed however many people are leaving blue states as an "exodus." Could be 10, could be 10,000. In any case, he has NOT stated anything necessarily false or true, only a scripted opinion.

Now, watch the video again. Pay closer attention this time. There is a brief pause at the beginning and then, Talk about a blue state exodus. It isn't a fact. It isn't just an opinion about a fact. There is an emphasis on the words Talk about. The anchor very slightly elongates them because this is a call-to-action, a command, to talk about a blue state exodus. It is a command hidden in plain sight that virtually no viewer will realize even when they are talking about a blue state exodus on Facebook, Twitter, and even at work.

Before we move on, there's one last thing to notice about this sentence. The role of the VERY carefully chosen word, exodus. What is an exodus? It is a departure of large numbers of people. But what is exodus in the context of Fox News? It is the second book of the bible. And what is that book about? Here's what Wikipedia says:



Fox's viewership is largely made up of conservative republicans. Many are religious. So the word exodus becomes a multi-meaning metaphor describing (through suggestion) blue states as slave states, and red states as free states, while implying that those who are fleeing the blue states must be "Reds" and those Reds, all Reds, are gods chosen people. In other words, Reds are good. Blues are bad. Good and evil. Light and dark. God and Satan. Us vs. Them.



Moving into the second part of the opening statement, the anchor transitions into "Red states" without pause and makes another slight-of-mouth comment of non-fact about a surge in population, emphasis on "surge," while at the same time, making an identity statement about the Reds. Red states are all welcoming a SURGE in population. This is the surface-level statement of apparent fact. The hidden suggestion is that Red states (or Reds) are all welcoming. In other words, you red people... you are good people, welcoming people, gods people. Feel good. Keep watching.

Watch closely and you will see the anchor's entire facial expression change the moment he emphasizes all welcoming.



The second part of this sentence targets a specific time frame - the last year. In other words, the viewer's attention is directed toward Biden's presidency. Biden blue. Biden bad. The anchor pauses (maybe stumbles) on the words "fled blue states." Probably didn't make sense when he first read it. That's an obvious dig on the left.



As the sentence continues, things sound like they make sense, but then something subtle and sneaky happens. The sentence starts by talking about one thing, and then transitions into an open loop.

Red states like Florida, Texas, and Arizona are all welcoming a surge in population over the last year while residents in fled blue states like California, New York, and Illinois...
UNFINISHED STATEMENT (opens the loop) ... including our next guest (here is where you would expect the loop to be closed but it is not) who moved his enter business to Texas, Rex, Founder and CEO, Peter Rex is here to explain...

It takes several views to catch all of this, but the words, "while residents in fled blue states" are the beginning of a confusion statement - a trance induction technique. Confusion is one of the most effective ways to trigger and/or deepen a trance. While residents in fled blue states... It doesn't really make sense, so you have to stop and mentally process it, and by the time you catch up, you've already been hit with an open-loop, another highly effective trance trigger.

The next thing to notice is the slight emphasis on the words who moved his entire business to Texas. Listen carefully. If you pay close attention, these words change the sentence from a statement "including our next guest who moved his entire business to Texas" into a question... including our next guest (slight pause before emphasized tone) WHO MOVED HIS ENTIRE BUSINESS TO TEXAS? Who did this? Biden did this. Biden blue. Blue bad. The words are not presented as a question, but the pause, the slight increase in the volume, and the pre-primed mental associations all present it to the subconscious this way.



For the final part of the statement, the anchor keeps the flow moving so you don't even think about the open-loop you were left with. Rhyme, similar-sounding words, and repetition are literary devices used in hypnotherapy to keep the mind gliding along.

- business and Texas = similar ending
- Tex
and Rex = Rhyme
- Peter Rex = Repetition


The sentence closes with "is here to explain" which doesn't fit the original sentence at all, but it doesn't matter at this point because by the time you give this even the slightest thought, the conversation has already switched speakers, and you'll miss what the next person has said if you focus on anything other than what is being said right now.



In a final transitioning statement, the anchor thanks Rex for joining him, but really, he's thanking the viewer. Rex is one of the people who moved from a blue state, and we already established earlier that the people moving from blue states must be Reds. Rex is a Red. Reds are the viewers. Thank you viewer, for joining me today. You are good. Feel good.

Why did you DECIDE to move?

The very last question is another hidden suggestion. Again, watch the anchor's face change when he reaches the word decide. Pay attention for the way he elongates his expression of the word as well. Decide to move.

SPECIAL NOTE

Undoubtedly, some of this is not meant to guide you in a particular direction. Some of it could be me reading too much into it. The problem is we can never be certain what is fiction and what is not when it comes to modern media, so we have to be skeptical of all of it.

Maybe the anchor emphasized the word "decide" because of his natural language patterns, but national news anchors are trained to control their speech very carefully. They are not infallible. They make mistakes. But they also did not get into their position through luck.

It would be impossible to determine if my breakdown was 100% correct today. So your primary takeaway should be to learn the techniques described, and how they can be deployed in your favor or against you.
So would you say that Fox is doing a better job at using these NLP techniques since they have the most viewers or have less turnover over the other news stations and that’s why NPR is so boring because of the monotone reading ect? And the most successful companies and corporations are using NLP, Trance, Hypnosis to their advantage? I used to study NLP a lot. My friend used to mess with people as a car salesman and it would work like a charm.
 

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What's interesting is that this particular story is a fairly innocuous one. So what if 150,000 net people a year move out of California? Its going to take quite a while to drain the population if that continues. But when you combine this with hundreds of other stories that build up a complete narrative, you turn large numbers of the right into non-thinking zombies. Just look through the comments section of foxnews.com and you'll see what that results in. The same thing is happening with the left.
Yes, the comments sections are really eye-opening. I've looked at the comments on Fox, The Hill, Info Wars, and others and they turn into extremist hate rants within two to three messages. It's wild.

So would you say that Fox is doing a better job at using these NLP techniques since they have the most viewers or have less turnover over the other news stations and that’s why NPR is so boring because of the monotone reading ect? And the most successful companies and corporations are using NLP, Trance, Hypnosis to their advantage? I used to study NLP a lot. My friend used to mess with people as a car salesman and it would work like a charm.
Hard to say. I don't keep up with any of the media outlets except for the occasional story. They all use techniques of NLP. What I've seen from Fox is that they are good at staying on-brand, and they have great showmanship.

Fox is like reality television (think The Bachelor). They say outrageous things and overexaggerate their personal emotional investment and people can't get enough of it. Reminds me of the movie Anchorman when Ron Burgundy dominates the news by highlighting a police chase. They use a lot of conservative language, and mention "God" and "Christianity" for good measure, and also because those are words of personal belief.

Some of the biggest things I've noticed from the most successful media channels is that they:
  • Stay on-brand and pander to extremist thoughts

  • Command the viewer to "Look at this," "Look now!" "Listen!" rather than saying "You can't miss this!" or "Don't Turn the Channel" or "Don't Look Away." This works very well to grab attention.

  • Manage the speed/tone/pitch of their words (viewer heart rate can be increased or decreased this way, and dopamine is likely triggered as well. Think about what happens mentally when someone indicates that they like you, find you attractive, or think you are a good person. You feel different instantly.).

  • Use open-loops to keep you consuming for hours, even all day long because the longer you listen, the more susceptible you are to their messages (and the more ad revenue they generate).

  • Use a lot of repetition to direct your attention to specific thoughts over and over. This is like listening to a song on repeat to learn the words when you didn't have the lyrics. After a while, you know the song by heart.

  • Use a lot of "us vs. them" language to pull the viewer into the in-group and form identity.

  • Use vague language and slight-of-mouth tricks to avoid statements of fact.

  • Use specific, descriptive language to trigger certain emotions.
    - The border crisis = fear
    -
    The stolen election = anger
    (Fear and anger are the most common emotions the news toy with)

  • Ultimately lead you to feel helpless and exhausted both physically and mentally. A state of apathy seems to arise in those who watch too much news. "What's the point of anything? The world has gone to shit, and there is nothing I can do about it." - This part extends beyond the news though. I'm not sure what the endgame is, but the pattern is troubling.

There are many more tools and tactics being used. We can talk about those in another post soon.
 

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I'm curious what your thoughts are on the Wall Street Journal. So you read it? I subscribe to them because I want to support their kind of journalism. I'm wondering if I'm blind to their slant because I agree with it?
 
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I'm curious what your thoughts are on the Wall Street Journal. So you read it? I subscribe to them because I want to support their kind of journalism. I'm wondering if I'm blind to their slant because I agree with it?

I don't read it and don't have a subscription to it, but I skimmed through the headlines on their website now. So I'll share what my experience was and how it might shape my opinion:

1. A subscription is required to read articles. You mean I have to pay to read this content?? What is this, some sort of right-leaning capitalist pig website?

The first thing I see is a picture of the troops, front and center. On the upper left is a focus on U.S. companies thriving (good job capitalists) despite (lockdowns) or because of Covid (forcing business owners to find new ways forward).

Headlines 1.PNG
The next headline uses the word "Red-Hot" to create a picture of the color red and to turn up the heat. Red is, of course, the color of the right.

Beneath that is a headline talking about Europe fighting and looking to reopen. This isn't about them fighting C0VlD-19, but fighting government tyranny. That's why the focus is on reopening rather than the possibility of more closures.

The center headline poses a question... Who Won? ...and then brings up Afghanistan paired beneath US soldiers and then positions the soldiers as getting screwed over by private contractors. My understanding is that a lot of Veterans are pretty sour over the way the Afghanistan withdrawal went down under the current administration. This appears to take aim at the current administration.

Also, the weekend reads article on the right is an article about Football. Colors of gold and green (money). Not an article about a street performer with teal pink hair and a beard.

Continuing down...

The next article mentions the U.S. being on the sidelines (weakness) while describing China as winning (insight anger from right-leaning people). In the center, we see what appear to be the insides of two churches (god, religion, Christianity, Catholicism maybe) and we do not get the context yet.

Headlines 2.PNG
The next article on the left side talks about headaches and backlogs associated with taxes at a time when the left wants to increase taxes.

Below that is an article that mentions the words U.S. and an end to retirement. It also mentions teachers and judges (bringing the problem from a high-level concept down to the local level where teachers and judges are employed). This makes the story more real.

In the center, we see talks of Russia and death. That said, the article on the right does mention the words, "racial injustice" which is kind of surprising based on what I've seen so far, but I lack context at this point. Still, they positioned that article on the right.

Below that is an article talking about witches being pardoned. Religious people aren't usually fond of witches, and conservative republicans might be persuaded to see those on the left as witches and devils.

The final article specifically positions the word pandemic before the word left followed immediately by us less prepared. At a glance, this could come across more like: How This Pandemic Has LEFT [the] U.S. Less Prepared

Conclusion?


Based on what I see at a glance, I would assume this is a right-leaning, capitalist-supporting news media channel.

Also, I believe @Kak reads WSJ, so maybe I was biased all along and my analysis is complete bullshit. You decide :D
 
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I think you’re adding a lot to it, but still pretty accurate.

Do CNN, Huffpost, or MSN next please!

You’ll find the same “hate fueled rants” among those viewers, just directed towards different groups.
 
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I think you’re adding a lot to it, but still pretty accurate.

Do CNN, Huffpost, or MSN next please!

You’ll find the same “hate fueled rants” among those viewers, just directed towards different groups.
CNN is next on my list. :smile2:
 

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Today we dive into CNN. I picked one of the first videos that popped up on their YouTube channel. It's a bit longer than the Fox video, so I'm going to break down the introduction only for this one. I'll try to come up with a better way to share info on the videos later.


Introduction:
The first words spoken are Joining us.
- Focuses attention on joining "us" (CNN)


Next words spoken are "is Doctor Jonathan Rhiner, he is a CNN Medical Analyst and a Professor of Medicine at George Washington University.
- Establishes a lot of credibility. No need to look into this because an expert is about to do your thinking for you.
- The word "CNN" tells people he's on our side, therefore he is worth listening to.

Caption:
Coronavirus Pandemic
-
Attention on a bad thing. Prepare to be afraid (pre-suasion).

U.S. Rings in the New Year as Omicron Cases Spike
-
Rings = circles or loops. As in, we're going in circles because of... the unvaxinated.
- As Omicron Cases Spike = It's happening right now. Oh no! Fear this! Does not mention death rates.

The host wishes the doc a Happy New Year and then drops a bombshell of hypnotic language on the audience.


Right now we see millions of Americans ringing in the New Year last night while cases are at a record high. What are you worried about now in the weeks ahead.

Right now we see:
Context set in the present. Establishes a "we" (in-group identity) and tells you what we see. Since "we" are all one and the same, this tells you what to see rather than what you do see. Imagine you are grabbing something from the refrigerator with your back turned to the television. What you do see is the inside of the refrigerator, not millions of Americans in front of you. By the way, if you saw the inside of a refrigerator in your mind just now when I told you to, then you've directly experienced what I described above.

millions of Americans ringing in the New Year
You are told to see millions of Americans ringing (circling in loops) in the New Year (partying together when they should be social distancing, huddling around their televisions locked away inside of their houses).

last night there
This is where things get tricky. Right now last night there. Think about it. It's confusing. This is a confusion trance induction. First, your attention is directed to the present, then it is guided internally to mental pictures of millions of Americans, and now confusion is used so the mind gets caught up in a thought about how this can possibly happen right now last night, plus, where is "there"? The mind ponders the words not making sense and doesn't focus on the rest of what is being said. The mind becomes open in this state, and the host continues presenting information that you are no longer carefully filtering through.

while cases are at a record high
Just as the confusion induction is presented, the host uses the linking word "while" to connect the bad people who are presumably unvaxinated republicans with the idea of "cases" being at a record high. It is a subtle association. The unvaxinated are causing circles and spikes. Also, what are these "cases"? This is vague language. The mind fills in the blank with the missing information. Omicron cases? Covid cases? All cases of all diseases? The host has not specified, so no matter what she says, and no matter how incorrect it may or may not be, you cannot fault her or CNN for their statement. You hear what you want to hear. You see what you are told to see.

What are you worried about
Here the host presents a question that operates as a presupposition (an assumption) and plants a keyword. She asks the doctor what he is worried about. The keyword is "worried" and the hidden suggestion is planted by focusing your attention on a state of worrying. The assumption is that the doctor is worried about something, but she didn't state that the doctor was the subject of her sentence. She said, "what are you worried about." It is a question for you. It is a presupposition that you are worried about something, and because it is presented as a question, the mind ponders an answer. Where do answers come from? Inside. You answer her question mentally, reinforcing your own state of worry because you have justified it by mentally manifesting something to worry about.

now in the weeks ahead
Surely she is not such a terrible on-camera speaker that she would make this mistake twice, right? Now in the weeks ahead. It doesn't make sense. Is he worried now? Or is he worried in the weeks ahead? Where should my attention be? Confusion takes you deeper into trance. Instead of asking why this reporter is priming the doctor with words like "worried" you are thinking about the silly stuff she keeps saying.

If you need proof of such priming, just listen to the doctor's first words when he speaks...

Well, I'm worried about our hospitals.


While Fox might keep their viewers locked in fear over things like border crisis, loss of jobs, and loss of freedom, CNN keeps viewers locked in a fear trance over the pandemic, the unvaxinated, and a lack of supposed intelligence. Both sides have doctors and experts. Both sides promote the "us vs them" mentality. Both sides apply conversational trance and hypnotic techniques. Both sides promote anxiety, hate, fear, and frustration to keep you tuning in for more while wasting away in front of that screen.
 
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Excellent work @Lex DeVille this is phenomenal.

A freeing of the mind is priceless.

More than ever, I am holding strong to my opinion that playing politics is a horrendous return on investment of your time and energy.

We all have our views and will vote the way we vote… The likelihood of one of these “news” factories swaying us from our core beliefs is zero.

So people who watch this hot garbage to be “educated voters” it’s like they don’t realize that they matter no more at the polls than someone else.

The problem here is all of this is rooted in people seeking to improve their lives through politics. The CNN people think a communist will save them. The FOX people think a nationalist douche with slightly more guns and slightly lower taxes will save them. None of this ever improves their lives, because their voting, the only thing they get to do about it, matters so little to their life.

Neither of them understand that the 2-4 hours per day they spend on this shit with such a low return on their investment could have actually enriched their lives. A business, a hobby, a second job, volunteering… Anything is better than the utter waste on this news.

American politics is just a different “sports” league. They tune in to root their team on, and get nothing in return for their rabid support. I’m a massive capitalist and gun owner, but I hate sports and I hate both teams.
 
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Thank you for writing about this. It's quite interesting but I do think on some of it you're reading more into it than is really there. I'm no fan of CNN and I tend to like the people on FOX but I realize that both are manipulating to a certain extent. (CNN more so in my opinion).

That being said, I'd like to critique your dissection of the dialogue on the CNN video:
- Rings = circles or loops. As in, we're going in circles because of... the unvaxinated.
You may not know it but "ringing in the new year" is an old phrase from when they rang bells at midnight on New Year's Eve, hence the phrase. It's still in use today. I think it's a stretch to think that viewers would get a double meaning out of it.

now in the weeks ahead
There was no confusion in my mind when she used this language. It's just a way of speaking. "Now, I'd like to talk about the weeks ahead" might be less confusing for you?

I could go on but I'll leave it there. No doubt, some NLP and psychological manipulation is injected into newscasts but I think a lot of it is just people's personalities and the way that they speak.
 

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Over the past several years more people have awakened to the fear-mongering and biased slants of major news media (entertainment news). Even my own parents seem aware that something is happening, but they can't always put their finger on it and they only really notice when it's done by the other side. But the media's tricks are never limited to the other side. All news media use the same linguistic tools to induce trance, fan the flames of fear, and draw attention to their stories.

Last night I posted one of those tricks in this thread...




...and that prompted a new thread where we can dive deeper into the linguistic tactics that are used against you and upon you and upon everyone around you to create a mass hypnosis that serves the all-mighty corporation. The purpose of this thread is not only to reveal the tricks and how they work but to help you become aware of them so you can begin to notice them and choose not to participate in the silly mind games as often.

That said, nobody is immune. Some of you believe you are. Some of you think you see through all of the tricks and tactics and that you cannot be influenced. You are wrong. Everyone is influenced. Everyone falls for the tricks. I fall for the tricks every day and so do you. You cannot avoid them because some are so subtle that it is impossible to recognize what is being used against you until it has already been done. You cannot avoid them, but you can learn to get better at recognizing them. That's what I hope to accomplish here by revealing these secret tactics.

First, let's start with a few definitions to set the stage. This will be very important going forward.

Trance occurs anytime attention is focused (usually focused inward). You go into a trance when you write a forum post, or when you go for an 8-mile jog. You go into a trance when you binge-watch Netflix and when you scroll through TikTok. You go into a trance when someone cuts you off in traffic or says something mean in a social comment. You go into a trance when your drive is routine and you don't remember the trip. You go into a trance when your groceries are checked and you run your card through the processor. You go into a trance when you listen to a podcast or read a good book or daydream. You go into a trance when you watch or read a news story that you agree with or that you disagree with, and as you are still reading this, you are probably in a trance right now.

Hypnosis happens when attention is purposely guided while in a trance state.

Direct Suggestion Hypnosis: This is the hypnosis that most people are familiar with. Like when a pocket watch dangles from the hand of an outstretched arm. As the pocket watch begins to move back and forth, the eyes follow it left, right, and back to the left. As the swing increases, and as the watch carves an invisible half-moon path through the air in one direction and then another, the words "you are getting sleepy" can be heard. Next thing you know, you're clucking around a stage as the chicken you've become. This form of hypnosis is not very effective (except under certain contexts) which is why you won't find news media applying it.

Indirect Suggestion Hypnosis: This version is much more sinister because it can be used on anyone at any time and almost nobody expects or notices it. Indirect suggestion hypnosis is conversational, meaning it can be applied in everyday communications. No pocket watch is necessary because it leverages the natural trance states that people enter into all of the time.

Years ago, when I first began to study hypnosis, I worked for a grocery store. After patrons received their price at checkout, they would reach for their debit card. I noticed their eyes would glaze over, and if I spoke to them mid-swipe, they would often miss what I'd said. One day, the store was promoting almond butter. A co-cashier challenged me to see who could sell the most and I accepted the challenge. When customers arrived at the counter, I'd check their groceries and share a price. One by one they would grab their debit card, and I could see the trance in their eyes, and when they would reach up to swipe, I would interrupt them by pointing to the fresh ground almond butter over there and make a comment about how delicious it would taste spread over one of these chocolate bars here.

Like a clock that's batteries ran out, customers would stop in place, arm outstretched, card in hand (this is called catalepsy). They would look over at the almond butter, mentally having the experience I'd spoken into their thoughts. Then they would agree with me, grab the almond butter and a chocolate bar, and finish checkout. I won that challenge by a large margin and learned a valuable lesson about how easy it is to guide attention during trance states. Also learned that I didn't need to directly ask for a sale to trigger a purchase, although I could combine the approach with a call-to-action to be more effective.

This is how the news media operates.
  • Set the context.
  • Control the frame.
  • Focus attention.
  • Guide the narrative.
  • Bypass reason.
The media understands that the entire world is in and out of trance states. They understand how to leverage the trust they've built with the people on their side, and how to manipulate the other side through anger. Those behind the scenes who write the stories understand how to trigger the trance state with nothing but words, and how to craft their scripts using the techniques of conversational hypnosis. Reporters are trained to emphasize words at the exact right moment, to pause an extra millisecond before giving a direct suggestion that doubles as a command, and to play with the pitch, tone, and inflections of the voice to mesmerize, hypnotize, and baptize the public in their narrative and to guide thoughts, beliefs, and actions in directions that suit their purpose.

In the posts that follow, I will do my best to lift the veil on these tactics and how I see them used in the news, in articles, by politicians, and by other people of power to create a mass hypnosis that everybody suspects is happening even if they don't know how. These are many of the same techniques and tactics that I have applied in copywriting since the beginning, and they will continue to be applied to influence the world for the foreseeable future.

FYI, I have posted this in the Speedway forums since I intend to embed YouTube videos of news stories to highlight examples of how and when these tactics are being used so readers can learn to spot them.

To see how deep the rabbit hole goes, make sure you follow this thread. I will teach you how to read the Matrix code so you can begin to free your mind. ;)
Amazing knowledge sharing, thank you, I can see myself at the checkout doing the exact thing you say. Never thought I'd be in a trance state at that point, but it makes sense, since when you get the amount to be charged on your card I'd say that a whole lot of emotions get triggered at that moment, be it you mentally checking your bank account balance, or seeing if it's within your expected budget, or within your expected groceries total cost, etc.
Mind blowing!
 

Lex DeVille

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Thank you for writing about this. It's quite interesting but I do think on some of it you're reading more into it than is really there. I'm no fan of CNN and I tend to like the people on FOX but I realize that both are manipulating to a certain extent. (CNN more so in my opinion).

That being said, I'd like to critique your dissection of the dialogue on the CNN video:

You may not know it but "ringing in the new year" is an old phrase from when they rang bells at midnight on New Year's Eve, hence the phrase. It's still in use today. I think it's a stretch to think that viewers would get a double meaning out of it.


There was no confusion in my mind when she used this language. It's just a way of speaking. "Now, I'd like to talk about the weeks ahead" might be less confusing for you?

I could go on but I'll leave it there. No doubt, some NLP and psychological manipulation is injected into newscasts but I think a lot of it is just people's personalities and the way that they speak.

Maybe. Maybe not. I've been accused of reading too much into things many times. I'm also hired by companies to apply these techniques daily. For instance, one of my clients handles compliance for a company whose name starts with Pf and ends with zer. If they just needed a writer, they could've hired anybody. They hired me.
 
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