The Entrepreneur Forum | Startups | Entrepreneurship | Starting a Business | Motivation | Success

How to validate ideas as a software dev?

Accelerate wealth. Build a business that pays freedom. Join more than 70,000 entrepreneurs and register for the Fastlane Entrepreneur forum. Remove ads? Join the INSIDERS.

bambz

New Contributor
Sep 11, 2021
8
14
13
Hi, I'm a software dev with a rather big knowledge, but I have zero experience in marketing, sales, and generally in business.
I have a few questions. Recently I've started blogging and in some time after gaining some community I'd like to create some courses or even books.
Additionally, I have a few ideas for web/mobile apps, but I'm not sure if should I prepare MVP or rather interactive mock-ups in Figma?
Or maybe shouldn't I be focused on both things and choose to blog or creating apps?

Probably I need to read some books about marketing, sale, market analysis, writing a blog, and probably something else. Do I forget about something? Tonight I probably will finish "The Fastlane MIlionaire" and will be looking for the next book.

Best regards.
 

Mainstream7

Beauty is Truth
Speedway Pass
Jan 1, 2015
487
585
259
31
Hi, I'm a software dev with a rather big knowledge, but I have zero experience in marketing, sales, and generally in business.
I have a few questions. Recently I've started blogging and in some time after gaining some community I'd like to create some courses or even books.
Additionally, I have a few ideas for web/mobile apps, but I'm not sure if should I prepare MVP or rather interactive mock-ups in Figma?
Or maybe shouldn't I be focused on both things and choose to blog or creating apps?

Probably I need to read some books about marketing, sale, market analysis, writing a blog, and probably something else. Do I forget about something? Tonight I probably will finish "The Fastlane MIlionaire" and will be looking for the next book.

Best regards.

Forge your own path and follow your intuition is what I would say.
There is a saying:
Those who can code, code.
Those who can't, blog.
 

bambz

New Contributor
Sep 11, 2021
8
14
13
Forge your own path and follow your intuition is what I would say.
There is a saying:
Those who can code, code.
Those who can't, blog.
But coding for another company is just using my time. I'm a great dev and I'm earning well but you know... I'd like to create passive income and scalable businesses.

My intuition says me that I should merge blogging and creating my own apps.

Do u know what books should I read?
 

Andy Black

Co-host of LetsChatSales.com
Staff member
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
May 20, 2014
12,483
49,105
4,306
Ireland

bambz

New Contributor
Sep 11, 2021
8
14
13
@eliquid has some great threads and advice about starting a SaaS. If I recall correctly, become an authority in your space first?

If you’re a techie and want to get better at sales then these might help:
Thank you very much!

"If I recall correctly, become an authority in your space first?" - is it a question to me?

Yea, currently I'm blogging about good programming style, clean code, clean architecture generally good practices which aren't common in most of the books about programming. A lot of devs had read max three books and then stopped improve their skills. They write ugly code and as result, it's hard to add new features and fix bugs. I could help them. I could help also beginner devs how to be different from others, standard ones, and get the first job because it isn't so easy currently.
 

Andy Black

Co-host of LetsChatSales.com
Staff member
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
May 20, 2014
12,483
49,105
4,306
Ireland
Thank you very much!

"If I recall correctly, become an authority in your space first?" - is it a question to me?
Yea, currently I'm blogging about good programming style, clean code, clean architecture generally good practices which aren't common in most of the books about programming. A lot of devs had read max three books and then stopped improve their skills. They write ugly code and as result, it's hard to add new features and fix bugs. I could help them. I could help also beginner devs how to be different from other, standard ones and get the first job which currently is not so easy.
It was a question to @eliquid, and I believe he recommends becoming an authority and known for XYZ. Then when you bring out a course, SaaS, service, product that helps people with XYZ then you’ve an audience that already knows, likes, and trusts you.

I think you’re on the right tracks. However, I’d help people in communities before creating a blog.
 

bambz

New Contributor
Sep 11, 2021
8
14
13
It was a question to @eliquid, and I believe he recommends becoming an authority and known for XYZ. Then when you bring out a course, SaaS, service, product that helps people with XYZ then you’ve an audience that already knows, likes, and trusts you.

I think you’re on the right tracks. However, I’d help people in communities before creating a blog.
Yes, I have to find appropriate groups on Twitter and Facebook but why shouldn't I write posts just now? I think that I lost nothing. No readers at the beginning aren't a problem, isn't it?

Referring to SaaS I agree but some products (apps) could be developed for another group than my blog's readers. My father has a big company with cranes and I'd like to create the app to manage his company because they're using notes currently. And then I could try to sell it to other companies as SaaS. Do u agree?

And I have other ideas for apps and I don't know how to validate ideas - by interactive mock-ups or maybe by investing time to create the MVP?

I'm sure that I have to find some good books about marketing, sale and market analysis.
 

Devampre

Bronze Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Jan 6, 2016
225
257
168
26
Canada
In terms of actionable tactics for idea validation, I know two different methods off the top of my head. They are:
  • Make a landing page that appears to sell your software, but upon clicking a "buy now" CTA they'll be informed that it is currently under construction. You can also let them input there emails to be informed when it is released. Now to get people to visit your landing page you'll need to advertise the link in front of an appropriate audience.
  • If you know someone in your network (preferably not family) that also would likely be a potential customer for your idea. Show/tell them your idea and get some honest feedback. Now some people will say not to do it this direct. They'll say that you should ask more vague discovery questions that help you identify pain points within their work because your initial idea/assumption isn't as valuable to them and it may be something closely related that is the real need people are itching for. There's a book called The Mom Test that will likely explain this much better than I am right now.
There may be more and/or better ways. And I am all ears if anyone else has some actionable tactics. :smile2:
 

Mainstream7

Beauty is Truth
Speedway Pass
Jan 1, 2015
487
585
259
31
Referring to SaaS I agree but some products (apps) could be developed for another group than my blog's readers. My father has a big company with cranes and I'd like to create the app to manage his company because they're using notes currently. And then I could try to sell it to other companies as SaaS. Do u agree?

And I have other ideas for apps and I don't know how to validate ideas - by interactive mock-ups or maybe by investing time to create the MVP?

I'm sure that I have to find some good books about marketing, sale and market analysis.

Lol, you're literally sitting on a gold mine.
How long would it take to build a working MVP?
Build it, then let them use it in a test run, and if they see value in your software, you have your first sale. Once you have, you can call other crane companies to use your software. It's not that difficult!

You could do mock-ups to quickly iterate over the functionality of the app.

For sales, I recommend @Fox 's program.
 

Tourmaline

Gold Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Jun 4, 2019
904
1,061
362
Texas
Hi, I'm a software dev with a rather big knowledge, but I have zero experience in marketing, sales, and generally in business.
I have a few questions. Recently I've started blogging and in some time after gaining some community I'd like to create some courses or even books.
Additionally, I have a few ideas for web/mobile apps, but I'm not sure if should I prepare MVP or rather interactive mock-ups in Figma?
Or maybe shouldn't I be focused on both things and choose to blog or creating apps?

Probably I need to read some books about marketing, sale, market analysis, writing a blog, and probably something else. Do I forget about something? Tonight I probably will finish "The Fastlane MIlionaire" and will be looking for the next book.

Best regards.

Do you have a handful of people in the target market that you talk to?

If not, I'd work on that, and then ask them about the idea. Finding such people through Facebook groups and IG works well, but there are plenty of places each market congregrates/focuses their attention.
 

Andy Black

Co-host of LetsChatSales.com
Staff member
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
May 20, 2014
12,483
49,105
4,306
Ireland
why shouldn't I write posts just now? I think that I lost nothing. No readers at the beginning aren't a problem, isn't it?
If you’ve no readers then who is it helping? And how will you know it will help anyone?

I haven’t posted this to the forum in this format (yet?) so will link out. It’s the only blog post I currently have on a new blog. I’ve developed it by posting drafts a few times on Twitter and in a few Facebook groups.
 

Andy Black

Co-host of LetsChatSales.com
Staff member
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
May 20, 2014
12,483
49,105
4,306
Ireland
Lol, you're literally sitting on a gold mine.
How long would it take to build a working MVP?
Build it, then let them use it in a test run, and if they see value in your software, you have your first sale. Once you have, you can call other crane companies to use your software. It's not that difficult!
Exactly.

Start by seeing if you can help people who already know, like, and trust you.

See the Mother Theresa quote in my signature.
 

OleksiyRybakov

Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Aug 25, 2021
68
51
48
Germany
Forge your own path and follow your intuition is what I would say.
There is a saying:
Those who can code, code.
Those who can't, blog.
In my opinion, good code should not only be coded but also documented. The biggest reason why devs hate to document their code is because documentation requires some additional workload. That workload is not very useful if the code is great and, moreover, it is not paid very well. In my opinion, blogging is a way to earn thousands of additional dollars per month for documenting your code if you are great. I believe that blogging about the results of the finished work can revolutionize the way to work for millions of software developers.
 

mjbarlow

Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Aug 17, 2021
32
41
108
UK
I'm a coder myself. As devs we get caught up alot with the "following our passion" part of building a business. For us that is wanting to write great code, unit test it, refactor it, document it and make it beautiful. Then we get to market and no one wants what we have to sell. All that work is for nothing, now check out a guy that has been successful and followed a different approach.

If you want Saas inpiration look up: Reilly Chase


He found a niche (in a business he knew there was a need) and threw together some software based on what he could write, his stack was a hacked together word-press site with python. By his own admission it had zero testing and zero documentation and was not perfect code at all.

Thing is, it did what he needed it to do, and now he has made $1million + in revenue.

He has a podcast linked to on his site, where he talks about fastlane principles and his whole process for building hostifi. His site is linked on his twitter: https://twitter.com/_rchase_

His story really inspired me, and made me think, to get my own work done "enough" to do the job, rather then make it well written software.

Anyway, hope his success will inspire you!
 
Last edited:

OleksiyRybakov

Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Aug 25, 2021
68
51
48
Germany
I'm a coder myself. As devs we get caught up alot with the "following our passion" part of building a business. For us that is wanting to write great code, unit test it, refactor it, document it and make it beautiful. Then we get to market and no one wants what we have to sell. All that work is for nothing, now check out a guy that did has been successful and followed a different approach.
It looks like Reilly Chase implemented a small website so I completely understand that he did not have to test, refactor or write great code. Those requirements start to become important in large projects and especially when security becomes an issue. And those requirements are not only used because of a passion but to increase the speed of reading and writing software. But I agree that it is more important to get the job "done" and to fulfil the functional requirements than to make the code great. Code design is comparable with the design of the furniture as it is just another way to attract customers for the future and to make them support and thank you more. But if the wardrobe that you sell falls apart, it can be as well designed as possible, but it will still not be accepted by your customer.
 

jnadeau1

PARKED
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Aug 23, 2021
5
0
4
Are there freelancing websites where you can sign up as a business entity to do business C2C? I haven't been able to do that on upwork, toptal, or some of the other popular free lance sites.

I have a large and talented team of developers at my disposable and we can definitely crush some projects for companies and business owners. I'm just not sure where to advertise my services.
 

AceVentures

Gold Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Apr 16, 2019
506
1,705
466
Exactly.

Start by seeing if you can help people who already know, like, and trust you.

See the Mother Theresa quote in my signature.

Take note - this man is sharing a lot of wisdom. Thank you Andy for continuously helping people take complexity and reduce it to simplicity.

The more I read Andy's posts - the more optimistic I become about what's possible :clap::
 

eliquid

( Jason Brown )
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
May 29, 2013
1,692
8,587
1,946
Louisville - Kentucky
@eliquid has some great threads and advice about starting a SaaS. If I recall correctly, become an authority in your space first?

Thanks @Andy Black

For my big GOLD thread on SaaS, look at my sig below @bambz

I was able to speak at a prior summit here, and my presentation was about "the easiest way to make $10k a month with a SaaS". Basically, the easiest and fastest way to hit your first $10k a month with a SaaS business.

Here is what it comes down to... being an authority.

Being an authority is NOT:
1. The smartest person on the subject
2. The most degreed
3. The most sales/revenue/income person
4. The one that has done it longest
5. Etc

It's simply knowing more than the next layperson, which could be your mom, spouse, co-worker, etc.

Is Tiger Woods swing coach the best golfer in the world? No.

Is the boss at your company ( current or former ), the smartest business person in the world? Are they the best? No

But they know something about that XYZ more than you. Even if just a tiny bit. In essence, they are an authority, over you.

So if you are going to build a SaaS or app, what are you an authority of to do such a thing?

For example, I'm not the best SEO person in the world.

I'm not the most well-known in SEO. Hell, I'm not known at all.

I don't have more SEO rankings than most people right now.

People have been doing SEO longer than me, maybe.


But I know more about SEO than most normal average people, and I more than likely know more about SEO than most business owners. AND I maybe know more than most entry-level SEO analysts.

And because of that, I'm still an authority for SEO.

So I built a SaaS around SEO. I own an SEO SaaS that has been copied by every major SEO platform now. I own an SEO SaaS that broke new ground in the industry, an industry that had been stagnating for over a decade. I'm not the best, smartest, or most well-known, but I knew my industry because I was in it and that made me an authority... and knowing my industry let me leapfrog many of my competitors.

This "authority" doesn't really help me gain customers ( although it can and does ), but it helps me know what to build and why and how. Questions that can't be answered when you follow other people's advice of "survey your market" and "ask business owners".

Since I know SEO and do SEO, I know what I want as a potential customer. That's already a huge win as a SaaS owner.

When the market shifts or pivots, I know where it is going more than likely since I am in the industry.

As I build new features, I know instantly how they will work and what they will impact, since I am a user of my product.

How are you going to do that, being in a market you know nothing about? Like the "crane" market your dad owns?

See, when you build in markets you know nothing about.. you rely on customers telling you the truth. And most customers don't know what they want. They will tell you they want XYZ, but they only pull out their wallet for ABC ( and you don't know about ABC ).

When things go bad, how are you going to pivot? By surveying again? LOL. By begging people to tell you what to pivot to?

By not working in the industry you build for, and not being an authority, you are also going to be blind to trends and reacting as they have passed, not proactively jumping in and out of them before they hit.

I could go on, but this may be enough for now.

The important thing now is, what are you an authority of that you can build to?
 
Last edited:

bambz

New Contributor
Sep 11, 2021
8
14
13
Thank everyone for the answers. It's very valuable to me.

Summing up we have generally two issues:
1. Blogging, gain the community, selling courses and books
2. Creating a SaaS (currently for my dad's company but probably others in the future)

Regarding the first point:

If you’ve no readers then who is it helping? And how will you know it will help anyone?

I haven’t posted this to the forum in this format (yet?) so will link out. It’s the only blog post I currently have on a new blog. I’ve developed it by posting drafts a few times on Twitter and in a few Facebook groups.

So at first, I have to find some community who will read my posts. I understand. And your (@Andy Black ) opinion is that firstly I should help people in some groups, forums, and so on? Should I register and just giving them answers to their questions about programming? And maybe send links to my posts as my answers to their problems? Well, it could take several months, am I right? Should I stop blogging now for this time until I will find 100 or 1000+ potential readers? I'm confused now.

I'm a coder myself. As devs we get caught up alot with the "following our passion" part of building a business. For us that is wanting to write great code, unit test it, refactor it, document it and make it beautiful. Then we get to market and no one wants what we have to sell. All that work is for nothing, now check out a guy that has been successful and followed a different approach.

If you want Saas inpiration look up: Reilly Chase


He found a niche (in a business he knew there was a need) and threw together some software based on what he could write, his stack was a hacked together word-press site with python. By his own admission it had zero testing and zero documentation and was not perfect code at all.

Thing is, it did what he needed it to do, and now he has made $1million + in revenue.

He has a podcast linked to on his site, where he talks about fastlane principles and his whole process for building hostifi. His site is linked on his twitter: https://twitter.com/_rchase_

His story really inspired me, and made me think, to get my own work done "enough" to do the job, rather then make it well written software.

Anyway, hope his success will inspire you!
@mjbarlow
So you focus rather on finishing your projects and the code quality is not so important, true?

Regarding the second point:
Lol, you're literally sitting on a gold mine.
How long would it take to build a working MVP?
Build it, then let them use it in a test run, and if they see value in your software, you have your first sale. Once you have, you can call other crane companies to use your software. It's not that difficult!

You could do mock-ups to quickly iterate over the functionality of the app.

For sales, I recommend @Fox 's program.
Thanks @Andy Black

For my big GOLD thread on SaaS, look at my sig below @bambz

I was able to speak at a prior summit here, and my presentation was about "the easiest way to make $10k a month with a SaaS". Basically, the easiest and fastest way to hit your first $10k a month with a SaaS business.

Here is what it comes down to... being an authority.

Being an authority is NOT:
1. The smartest person on the subject
2. The most degreed
3. The most sales/revenue/income person
4. The one that has done it longest
5. Etc

It's simply knowing more than the next layperson, which could be your mom, spouse, co-worker, etc.

Is Tiger Woods swing coach the best golfer in the world? No.

Is the boss at your company ( current or former ), the smartest business person in the world? Are they the best? No

But they know something about that XYZ more than you. Even if just a tiny bit. In essence, they are an authority, over you.

So if you are going to build a SaaS or app, what are you an authority of to do such a thing?

For example, I'm not the best SEO person in the world.

I'm not the most well-known in SEO. Hell, I'm not known at all.

I don't have more SEO rankings than most people right now.

People have been doing SEO longer than me, maybe.


But I know more about SEO than most normal average people, and I more than likely know more about SEO than most business owners. AND I maybe know more than most entry-level SEO analysts.

And because of that, I'm still an authority for SEO.

So I built a SaaS around SEO. I own an SEO SaaS that has been copied by every major SEO platform now. I own an SEO SaaS that broke new ground in the industry, an industry that had been stagnating for over a decade. I'm not the best, smartest, or most well-known, but I knew my industry because I was in it and that made me an authority... and knowing my industry let me leapfrog many of my competitors.

This "authority" doesn't really help me gain customers ( although it can and does ), but it helps me know what to build and why and how. Questions that can't be answered when you follow other people's advice of "survey your market" and "ask business owners".

Since I know SEO and do SEO, I know what I want as a potential customer. That's already a huge win as a SaaS owner.

When the market shifts or pivots, I know where it is going more than likely since I am in the industry.

As I build new features, I know instantly how they will work and what they will impact, since I am a user of my product.

How are you going to do that, being in a market you know nothing about? Like the "crane" market your dad owns?

See, when you build in markets you know nothing about.. you rely on customers telling you the truth. And most customers don't know what they want. They will tell you they want XYZ, but they only pull out their wallet for ABC ( and you don't know about ABC ).

When things go bad, how are you going to pivot? By surveying again? LOL. By begging people to tell you what to pivot to?

By not working in the industry you build for, and not being an authority, you are also going to be blind to trends and reacting as they have passed, not proactively jumping in and out of them before they hit.

I could go on, but this may be enough for now.

The important thing now is, what are you an authority of that you can build to?


The opposite opinions, meh ;p I'm able to create the MVP in two weeks and implement it in their company.

@eliquid

Congrats! A few SaaSes sound great.
And you're right I'm not an authority in the domain of "cranes", but my father and other workers are and I'm going to create this SaaS based on theirs needs and problems from iteration to iteration. Why do you think that they won't help me? What should I do instead according to you?
I'm the software dev - I'm not an authority in such topics as cranes, SEO, quantum physics, cars, medicine, and so on.

Should I choose some fields, join the community (groups, forums), find their problems, educate myself in that area, answer the questions, and finally create the solution and propose it on these groups/forums?

When it comes to cranes - there aren't rather groups and forums associating people ;p
 
Last edited:

mjbarlow

Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Aug 17, 2021
32
41
108
UK
So you focus rather on finishing your projects and the code quality is not so important, true

I'm saying it's fine to have technical debt and code that is functional rather than the best quality, if it means you can ship quicker. You can always go back and refactor at a later date.
 

eliquid

( Jason Brown )
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
May 29, 2013
1,692
8,587
1,946
Louisville - Kentucky
The opposite opinions, meh ;p I'm able to create the MVP in two weeks and implement it in their company.

@eliquid

Congrats! A few SaaSes sound great.
And you're right I'm not an authority in the domain of "cranes", but my father and other workers are and I'm going to create this SaaS based on theirs needs and problems from iteration to iteration. Why do you think that they won't help me? What should I do instead according to you?
I'm the software dev - I'm not an authority in such topics as cranes, SEO, quantum physics, cars, medicine, and so on.

Should I choose some fields, join the community (groups, forums), find their problems,
educate myself in that area, answer the questions, and finally create the solution and propose it on these groups/forums?

When it comes to cranes - there aren't rather groups and forums associating people ;p

You asked how to validate ideas for a SaaS.. so let's break this down.


And you're right I'm not an authority in the domain of "cranes", but my father and other workers are and I'm going to create this SaaS based on theirs needs and problems from iteration to iteration. Why do you think that they won't help me? What should I do instead according to you?

You wanted to validate ideas for a SaaS. So what is your idea here? I don't see one.

I see potentially what will be your fathers' idea and his co-workers' idea, but not yours. What idea of yours are you validating?

If all you are going to do is take your fathers needs and his co-workers needs and give them a solution, all you did was build a 1-off project as a dev, not build a SaaS and validate your idea. Since this is all you are doing, you could have went to UpWork or Fiverr and done the same. You are just building out what someone else wants, right?

And once you build what they want, based on their needs.. that won't be a SaaS. It will be an app that 1 specific customer needed ( your father ), based on their needs and wants. Not what the industry as a whole needs.

When you take this custom 1 off app to the industry, you will then need to change X Y and Z code for the 2nd customer, and then again for the 3rd customer too. You're going to rewrite basically the app X times before you find the "industry fit" as you move away from "customer fit". You can't realisticly think everything you father needs, is exactly the same needs as everyone else... right?

You're never validating anything when you ask the customer what they want, and then build it. You are just taking orders. Validation comes when someone breaks out the checkbook for what you already have. With the way you are building, you are 20+ customers and maybe 100+ revisions of your MVP away from that.

I'm the software dev - I'm not an authority in such topics as cranes, SEO, quantum physics, cars, medicine, and so on.

Exactly, and you will always be this way... with the way you are thinking and heading.

Your thinking right now is you're just a software dev. You need to take orders from others. This is not how you build a SaaS and validate ideas. Could you end up validating an idea and building a SaaS? Sure, but you are going the extremely long way.

There is something you are an authority of. There is no way you wake up at 6am and then go to bed at 11pm and only do software dev stuff. Do you skate? Do you put together model planes? Do you know a 2nd language? Do you know Crypto? Can you do magic tricks? etc. Surely you do something else with your time in the day or have in the past. That's where your authority is, somewhere.


When it comes to cranes - there aren't rather groups and forums associating people

Even more the reason why I tell people not to survey others or join groups to learn about a topic, but already be an authority and build to that authority. Sometimes you can't try to "brute force" what you want to know when you don't know it already because like you said, there is no place they hang out to learn.

People would rather fight tooth and nail and claim they can survey people and learn what they want from groups and forums about solutions in an industry they know 0 about personally than listen to the truth of building to what they are already an authority of. Mostly because people feel there is an easy button for this and that the dream is alive and well if you just survey people.

The cold reality is, those people are just building what the customer they surveyed wanted. Which is no different than a contractor on UpWork or Elance that just won a bid on a contract. It's not a SaaS and it's not validation to build what someone else told you they specifically already needed.

It is in no way validation for a SaaS that a whole industry wants and needs yet.

When you take that specific project away from the customer and try to get client #2 to sign up, they are going to ask for this and that, take away this and that, and now you have rewrote the code for client #2 to fit them and their needs as most of them aren't the same needs at your fathers.

This continues for 20 more clients and you end up with spaghetti code, lots of rewritten work, and potentially a GUI that no one can understand.

This is why I advocate building a SaaS in a topic/industry you know about yourself.

You build already knowing what the industry is like and asking for, something you can not know.. because you already said there are no groups or forums for "cranes". Since you have no way to know, all you are doing is building a 1 off app for a specific client that just happens to be your dad.

That's not validation for a SaaS, it's basically contracted work for what 1 client needs right now.

So when you ask me what you should do instead, I have to refer you to what I already wrote and possibly my entire thread on the subject below in my sig.
 
Last edited:

bambz

New Contributor
Sep 11, 2021
8
14
13
Ok, I've read your (@Andy Black and @eliquid ) answers several times to best understanding your message. Thank you very much.

@Andy Black
I've read your post about content marketing. It's awesome. So your suggestion is that I should firstly register on some groups where I find a lot of beginners dev, answering and helping them, improve my answers again and again and creating posts on my blog based on it, am I right? Then I should add links to my blog posts in the answers yes? The next step is creating a short course when somebody asks me about it.

But why shouldn't I currently blogging if I have an interesting topic and about 150 readers (probably thanks to my Linkedin, because I have 700+ contacts). Some people share even my posts.

I see that a lot of beginner devs have a big problem with finding their first job. Why? Because there are too many junior devs on the market currently. I've passed all of the job interviews. Probably because I stand out from the crowd thanks to my approach to coding. I knew something more than in basic books and courses. I helped my two friends to become devs. I know how to help the usual junior dev to get the first job. What do you think about it?

@eliquid
Ok, I understand your point of thinking. I agree that creating the app for my father is just like working for somebody, but why are you sure, that other companies wouldn't want to use it? If they will want additional features I just add them to the app and my father and other customers will gain from it. I won't change the code for each customers. I could figure out the common needs. Maybe I am wrong, so please fix my mindset :D

And maybe a better idea is to design interactive mock-ups in Figma, preparing a promo movie, and create a landing page with CTA and/or email newsletter, and then sending it to potential customers.

Back to your answer, I understand that I should merge three things: my hobby, my tech skills, and an idea for a product?

I love football, quantum physics, relativity theory, Harlan Coben books, automotive, and a lot more but my biggest passion is programming after all. Maybe I should look for something more? I wrote earlier in this post that I like to help beginner software devs - maybe this is the way?

Do you think that I should find some other hobbies, get the knowledge about it, find some groups, become an authority by answering and helping people and finally use my software skills to create an app or SaaS?

You know, I love the entire world, I'm interested in a lot of things, really. Currently, I'm looking for a good book about marketing.

Best regards.
 

Andy Black

Co-host of LetsChatSales.com
Staff member
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
May 20, 2014
12,483
49,105
4,306
Ireland
But why shouldn't I currently blogging if I have an interesting topic and about 150 readers (probably thanks to my Linkedin, because I have 700+ contacts). Some people share even my posts.
If you've got readers then great. Create content to help them. My bad... I thought you were going to blog into the vacuum.

I see that a lot of beginner devs have a big problem with finding their first job. Why? Because there are too many junior devs on the market currently. I've passed all of the job interviews. Probably because I stand out from the crowd thanks to my approach to coding. I knew something more than in basic books and courses. I helped my two friends to become devs. I know how to help the usual junior dev to get the first job. What do you think about it?
This is great too. I've helped people get IT and marketing jobs. There's a lot of people who want to get their first break, or move up the ladder.

Reminds me of this call:

Oh, and this thread:


EDIT: Oh, found a similar post:
 
Last edited:

OleksiyRybakov

Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Aug 25, 2021
68
51
48
Germany
I see that a lot of beginner devs have a big problem with finding their first job. Why? Because there are too many junior devs on the market currently. I've passed all of the job interviews. Probably because I stand out from the crowd thanks to my approach to coding. I knew something more than in basic books and courses. I helped my two friends to become devs. I know how to help the usual junior dev to get the first job. What do you think about it?
I think that teaching others is a great idea! How exactly did you educate yourself and your friends? Also, what does a job interview look like in your country?
 

Sponsored Offers

MARKETPLACE Fox Web School "Legend" Group Coaching Program 2021
Hi - I sent out some emails with the updates but I'll PM you now also, thanks. The issue is...
  • Sticky
MARKETPLACE NEW: The Best School for Going Fastlane (Now open for summer enrollment)
Read the free book, some excellent insights. I also did the website quiz and I did a visual on a...
MARKETPLACE Not sure how to start? This free book will teach you how to build a successful web design business
Hi Fox. Starting the book and got through the introduction. Had a conversation with Andy Black...
  • Sticky
MARKETPLACE You Are One Call Away From Living Your Dream Life - LightHouse’s Accountability Program ⚡
Chris is super sharp and is aware of many facets of entrepreneurship and can help get your...
Introducing MJ's Personal Unscripted Network, Join Now for FREE!
Any chance to make it available outside of US? It has been available outside of the US on...

Forum Sponsor

Learn Fastlane Business Skills & Get Profitable Within 30 Days...

Get Started Now

New Topics

Fastlane Insiders

View the forum AD FREE.
Private, unindexed content
Detailed process/execution threads
Ideas needing execution, more!

Join Fastlane Insiders.

Top Bottom