The Entrepreneur Forum | Startups | Entrepreneurship | Starting a Business | Motivation | Success

OFF-TOPIC Does anyone else get bored and hop from one idea to the other? Ffs...

fastlanedoll

Bronze Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Aug 21, 2019
357
326
168
shit, that's me.
I have no idea how to get out of this, cos I'm in the same boat.
I also have severe procrastination issues.
 

999michaelh

New Contributor
Mar 20, 2021
43
19
39
shit, that's me.
I have no idea how to get out of this, cos I'm in the same boat.
I also have severe procrastination issues.
Damn. Since we're in the same boat you want to consider forming a mastermind, accountability group(or whatever else you want to call it)? I've heard it can help. No shame in trying eh?

Lemme know
 

fastlanedoll

Bronze Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Aug 21, 2019
357
326
168
i'm in one. lemme ask if you can join in :p
 

CruxisKnight

Contributor
Jan 7, 2021
105
91
116
I'm very determined to succeed. I have a burning desire to make it.

But one really stupid problem that I have is I get really excited about an idea for a few weeks, then I want nothing to do with it afterwards.

I mean, the desire to succeed, win, thrive, be glorious, etc., is always there. But I just do NOT want to work on the same idea.

How does one(me) have a burning desire to succeed, yet have this weird tendency to not stick to an idea?

I used to have zero self-confidence, a mindset that everyone in the world was better than me and that I was incompetent, etc. I've managed to develop very good mental habits and way better character than before.

But this tendency to flit from one idea to the other is impeding me.

Boggles my mind. Does anyone have any advice? Thanks.
Yeah it is called Shiny Object Syndrome and it is well documented and people have proposed solutions to it you should google it
 

AveSatana

New Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
May 4, 2021
9
6
14
Yeah it is called Shiny Object Syndrome and it is well documented and people have proposed solutions to it you should google it
“So, what can you do to beat SOS?

  • Sit on ideas before launching them. Before you have your team begin work on that new project that’s going to “change everything,” take a moment. Do some more research on the idea and think about whether this is the best use of your company’s resources. Not every idea should be acted upon, and giving yourself this “buffer time” can spare you from an overly hasty decision.
  • Communicate with your team. When you have a new idea, talk to your team members about it. Ask them what they think, and listen to their perspectives, concerns and needs. They’ll be able to help you realize when you’re moving too fast, and if you do decide to go through with your decision, they’ll be happier that you came to them first.
  • Set both long- and short-term goals with each new project. Slow down when you start to shift gears. Set long-term goals for every project, including how long you anticipate the project will last. Set short-term goals to help you close that gap and keep the team focused.
  • Abandon projects only when necessary. Once your long-term goals are in place, don’t abandon the project until you get there. The only exceptions would be if your project starts costing you far more money than anticipated, or the landscape has changed significantly enough to undermine the project's effectiveness entirely.”

Seems pretty straightforward (make sure it’s a good idea before running with it and then set goals to track progress and stay on track), but like a lot of things the rub lies in actually doing it and doing it consistently.
 

CruxisKnight

Contributor
Jan 7, 2021
105
91
116
“So, what can you do to beat SOS?

  • Sit on ideas before launching them. Before you have your team begin work on that new project that’s going to “change everything,” take a moment. Do some more research on the idea and think about whether this is the best use of your company’s resources. Not every idea should be acted upon, and giving yourself this “buffer time” can spare you from an overly hasty decision.
  • Communicate with your team. When you have a new idea, talk to your team members about it. Ask them what they think, and listen to their perspectives, concerns and needs. They’ll be able to help you realize when you’re moving too fast, and if you do decide to go through with your decision, they’ll be happier that you came to them first.
  • Set both long- and short-term goals with each new project. Slow down when you start to shift gears. Set long-term goals for every project, including how long you anticipate the project will last. Set short-term goals to help you close that gap and keep the team focused.
  • Abandon projects only when necessary. Once your long-term goals are in place, don’t abandon the project until you get there. The only exceptions would be if your project starts costing you far more money than anticipated, or the landscape has changed significantly enough to undermine the project's effectiveness entirely.”

Seems pretty straightforward (make sure it’s a good idea before running with it and then set goals to track progress and stay on track), but like a lot of things the rub lies in actually doing it and doing it consistently.
This pretty much sums it up. It also helps to learn all the available money-making opportunities out there so you are not caught off guard that it is new to you and tempted to try it right away
 

Onakosa

"When I grow up I want to be ... "
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Oct 23, 2020
96
86
122
UK
Yup, shiny-object-syndrome 100% here. What cured mine was children. Realising, I suppose, that I had to stick with the thing that I knew had the potential to be profitable for their long term benefit.
 

Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum. Subscribe.

WJK

Platinum Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Speedway Pass
Oct 9, 2017
1,760
3,859
878
Alaska
This problem is also the main reason that start-up businesses fail when they become a full-fledged business that must be managed and maintained. And many times the owner of that start-up simply cannot make the transition to the day-to-day business management challenges. Half of that owner's time must be then allocated to administrative activities -- like bookkeeping and HR. Those management activities take a whole bunch of skill sets that have nothing to do with the core business. That means that he spends only half of his time on the actual work of the company. It's a whole set of growing pains.
 

CruxisKnight

Contributor
Jan 7, 2021
105
91
116
Yup, shiny-object-syndrome 100% here. What cured mine was children. Realising, I suppose, that I had to stick with the thing that I knew had the potential to be profitable for their long term benefit.
Haha when stuff really hits the fan that is when you get down and serious to produce results or else. That was mine as well, having a baby on the way cured mine
 

alexkuzmov

Silver Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Sep 20, 2019
678
862
308
Bulgaria
I'm very determined to succeed. I have a burning desire to make it.

But one really stupid problem that I have is I get really excited about an idea for a few weeks, then I want nothing to do with it afterwards.

I mean, the desire to succeed, win, thrive, be glorious, etc., is always there. But I just do NOT want to work on the same idea.

How does one(me) have a burning desire to succeed, yet have this weird tendency to not stick to an idea?

I used to have zero self-confidence, a mindset that everyone in the world was better than me and that I was incompetent, etc. I've managed to develop very good mental habits and way better character than before.

But this tendency to flit from one idea to the other is impeding me.

Boggles my mind. Does anyone have any advice? Thanks.
Have you tried breaking down bigger tasks into smaller tasks?
One of the reasons why you want to switch to something new maybe because you are stuck on what you are currently doing, you dont know whats next, how to proceed. You may be paralyzed and lost your way.

A good way to get out of something like this is to spend time to break down tasks to their smallest actions.
Example: Tidy up at home.
You know what this means, what it entails, but its a compound task which requires various actions all of which take time to perform.
So you break it down like so:

1. Vacuum the living room.
2. Vacuum the bedroom.
3. Vacuum the kitchen.
4. Mop the floors in the living room.
....
16. Dust the countertops.
17. Clean the drain pipes in the bathroom.
....
31. Take out the trash.
...
45. Put away the dishes in the drawers.
...
??. Finished

Offcourse each compound task must be part of a greater goal which is what is paralyzing you I think.
Your goal "determined to succeed" is way to vague to act upon.
If you transfor that to "determined to succeed, by making a business" its a liiiiitle closer.
Then "determined to succeed, by making a business selling autoparts" is closer. (again this is an example)
Keep drilling down your idea until you reach the lowest indivisble action that you need to take right now in order for that idea to become reality.
Until the goal "determined to succed" becomes something like "Call John to setup a meeting for monday before noon.", you keep going down.
Also dont think about how long that will take.
So long as you keep doing what you need to do, eventually you`ll reach the goal in one form or another..
Or you may find that you need to adjust the idea by learning new information, who knows.
 

CruxisKnight

Contributor
Jan 7, 2021
105
91
116
Have you tried breaking down bigger tasks into smaller tasks?
One of the reasons why you want to switch to something new maybe because you are stuck on what you are currently doing, you dont know whats next, how to proceed. You may be paralyzed and lost your way.

A good way to get out of something like this is to spend time to break down tasks to their smallest actions.
Example: Tidy up at home.
You know what this means, what it entails, but its a compound task which requires various actions all of which take time to perform.
So you break it down like so:

1. Vacuum the living room.
2. Vacuum the bedroom.
3. Vacuum the kitchen.
4. Mop the floors in the living room.
....
16. Dust the countertops.
17. Clean the drain pipes in the bathroom.
....
31. Take out the trash.
...
45. Put away the dishes in the drawers.
...
??. Finished

Offcourse each compound task must be part of a greater goal which is what is paralyzing you I think.
Your goal "determined to succeed" is way to vague to act upon.
If you transfor that to "determined to succeed, by making a business" its a liiiiitle closer.
Then "determined to succeed, by making a business selling autoparts" is closer. (again this is an example)
Keep drilling down your idea until you reach the lowest indivisble action that you need to take right now in order for that idea to become reality.
Until the goal "determined to succed" becomes something like "Call John to setup a meeting for monday before noon.", you keep going down.
Also dont think about how long that will take.
So long as you keep doing what you need to do, eventually you`ll reach the goal in one form or another..
Or you may find that you need to adjust the idea by learning new information, who knows.
I first learned this "chunking" technique from my college professor who said to do tasks in chunks so the overall project does not sound so intimidating which is a reason for procrastination
 

The-J

Dog Dad
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Aug 28, 2011
3,870
9,620
2,206
Ontario
The only reason people idea-hop is because they lack confidence in their current course of action.

If you want to have results NOW, the ideas you choose and the actions you take are going to reflect that.

But if you have a PLAN and you're confident in that plan, then you're not going to hop from one thing to another. You're going to give everything you do its due time. Even if it takes years to get results, you'll stick with it because you are confident in what you are doing. You won't let FOMO or opportunity cost eat at you.

So how do you get confidence in your idea? Hate to say it but that bit is on you. Are you doing it for the right reason? Do you know WHY you're doing it? Without that WHY (yes, read Simon Sinek's "Start with WHY") you're going to continue idea hopping and you're gonna waste a lot of money and time.
 

999michaelh

New Contributor
Mar 20, 2021
43
19
39
Have you tried breaking down bigger tasks into smaller tasks?
One of the reasons why you want to switch to something new maybe because you are stuck on what you are currently doing, you dont know whats next, how to proceed. You may be paralyzed and lost your way.

A good way to get out of something like this is to spend time to break down tasks to their smallest actions.
Example: Tidy up at home.
You know what this means, what it entails, but its a compound task which requires various actions all of which take time to perform.
So you break it down like so:

1. Vacuum the living room.
2. Vacuum the bedroom.
3. Vacuum the kitchen.
4. Mop the floors in the living room.
....
16. Dust the countertops.
17. Clean the drain pipes in the bathroom.
....
31. Take out the trash.
...
45. Put away the dishes in the drawers.
...
??. Finished

Offcourse each compound task must be part of a greater goal which is what is paralyzing you I think.
Your goal "determined to succeed" is way to vague to act upon.
If you transfor that to "determined to succeed, by making a business" its a liiiiitle closer.
Then "determined to succeed, by making a business selling autoparts" is closer. (again this is an example)
Keep drilling down your idea until you reach the lowest indivisble action that you need to take right now in order for that idea to become reality.
Until the goal "determined to succed" becomes something like "Call John to setup a meeting for monday before noon.", you keep going down.
Also dont think about how long that will take.
So long as you keep doing what you need to do, eventually you`ll reach the goal in one form or another..
Or you may find that you need to adjust the idea by learning new information, who knows.
Yes I always try to plan and break down my tasks into small, clear steps that I can assign a time to(e.g. do cold outreach -> write a script, find 100 contacts & mass email).

I'm not sure it's a planning issue though. For my last idea I did all the necessary work, sent out a few hundred emails and bam lol I lost interest. I realized I didn't believe in my idea anymore...

Thanks for taking the time to respond.
 

999michaelh

New Contributor
Mar 20, 2021
43
19
39
I first learned this "chunking" technique from my college professor who said to do tasks in chunks so the overall project does not sound so intimidating which is a reason for procrastination
I've heard of that technique too. I don't really procrastinate though. I do all the work, but then at some point I lose faith in the idea and simultaneously get bored of working on it.

My plan is to get to profitability ASAP with my next idea so I don't lose interest lol. If there's $ being made, there will be no doubt :D
 

999michaelh

New Contributor
Mar 20, 2021
43
19
39
The only reason people idea-hop is because they lack confidence in their current course of action.

If you want to have results NOW, the ideas you choose and the actions you take are going to reflect that.

But if you have a PLAN and you're confident in that plan, then you're not going to hop from one thing to another. You're going to give everything you do its due time. Even if it takes years to get results, you'll stick with it because you are confident in what you are doing. You won't let FOMO or opportunity cost eat at you.

So how do you get confidence in your idea? Hate to say it but that bit is on you. Are you doing it for the right reason? Do you know WHY you're doing it? Without that WHY (yes, read Simon Sinek's "Start with WHY") you're going to continue idea hopping and you're gonna waste a lot of money and time.
You're right. I started off really excited about the idea but then as the weeks passed I just lost faith in it.

I believe I was not doing it for the right reason. I was chasing the money 'cause I want to make $2 millie ASAP. It was my primary objective, but I also DIDN'T MIND doing the idea.

My "why" is: Build a decent biz & sell it ASAP to get $2 millie(doing an idea I don't mind).

Thanks for the book recommendation. I have created a "plan" - it's a flowchart that helps me visualize the process from idea to first customers. Is that what you mean by "plan"?
 

CruxisKnight

Contributor
Jan 7, 2021
105
91
116
I've heard of that technique too. I don't really procrastinate though. I do all the work, but then at some point I lose faith in the idea and simultaneously get bored of working on it.

My plan is to get to profitability ASAP with my next idea so I don't lose interest lol. If there's $ being made, there will be no doubt :D
What idea are you testing now or planning to test?
 

Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum. Subscribe.

999michaelh

New Contributor
Mar 20, 2021
43
19
39
What idea are you testing now or planning to test?
Not sure. Hung out with fam yesterday and now I'm back to work. I'll do some research right now and pick a good idea that will make me profitable within 3 days maximum.

That should stop me from shiny object syndrome.
 

Lex DeVille

Sweeping Shadows from Dreams
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Jan 14, 2013
3,578
22,576
4,306
The Underground
That should stop me from shiny object syndrome.

It won't.

Whatever business you try to build is going to take a minimum of one year of committed action on your part. Maybe that is one year in 12 consecutive months or maybe it is one year broken into two six-month blocks or four three-month blocks or 12 one-month blocks and all of that may not happen within a single calendar year.

Even then, you will probably barely be at a full-time income. Some people do things faster. Grow bigger faster. But not most people.

I get bored with a lot of ideas so I start businesses that meet the following criteria:
  1. Can be launched fast
  2. Can be profitable fast
  3. Will be semi-passive once it's up and running
  4. Can survive in the background while I work on other things
You aren't going to change your physiology. You aren't going to stop getting bored. You need to learn how to capitalize on your strengths and make the most of your weaknesses. This is about becoming a resourceful person.

Pay attention to your cycles of interest.

I lose interest in things about 5-6 weeks in. Then I let those things sit on autopilot, sometimes for a whole year while I work on something else. Then, when my interest in the first thing picks up again, I get back to it.

Some things hold my interest a lot longer than others. But I know there's always a chance that they won't, so I am prepared to transition into another business at anytime that I was already working on.

I use the term "business" loosely because I think of all of the different ideas as semi-passive income streams that are all part of one big business, "my business" rather than a bunch of individual businesses.
 

999michaelh

New Contributor
Mar 20, 2021
43
19
39
It won't.

Whatever business you try to build is going to take a minimum of one year of committed action on your part. Maybe that is one year in 12 consecutive months or maybe it is one year broken into two six-month blocks or four three-month blocks or 12 one-month blocks and all of that may not happen within a single calendar year.

Even then, you will probably barely be at a full-time income. Some people do things faster. Grow bigger faster. But not most people.

I get bored with a lot of ideas so I start businesses that meet the following criteria:
  1. Can be launched fast
  2. Can be profitable fast
  3. Will be semi-passive once it's up and running
  4. Can survive in the background while I work on other things
You aren't going to change your physiology. You aren't going to stop getting bored. You need to learn how to capitalize on your strengths and make the most of your weaknesses. This is about becoming a resourceful person.

Pay attention to your cycles of interest.

I lose interest in things about 5-6 weeks in. Then I let those things sit on autopilot, sometimes for a whole year while I work on something else. Then, when my interest in the first thing picks up again, I get back to it.

Some things hold my interest a lot longer than others. But I know there's always a chance that they won't, so I am prepared to transition into another business at anytime that I was already working on.

I use the term "business" loosely because I think of all of the different ideas as semi-passive income streams that are all part of one big business, "my business" rather than a bunch of individual businesses.
Hey Lex, thanks for taking the time to respond.

My goal all along has been to build a business and then sell it for a few million so I'm not sure I'll be able to stop working on it for extended periods of time.

Isn't it possible to force yourself to work even when bored? I'd be willing to do so even if it feels miserable.

I'm probably naive, but I feel like a huge lump sum of cash would be more exciting than passive income.

But should my original plan fail, I'll keep in mind what you've said and cycle between several businesses. Interesting suggestions, thanks.
 

Lex DeVille

Sweeping Shadows from Dreams
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Jan 14, 2013
3,578
22,576
4,306
The Underground
Hey Lex, thanks for taking the time to respond.

My goal all along has been to build a business and then sell it for a few million so I'm not sure I'll be able to stop working on it for extended periods of time.

Isn't it possible to force yourself to work even when bored? I'd be willing to do so even if it feels miserable.

I'm probably naive, but I feel like a huge lump sum of cash would be more exciting than passive income.

But should my original plan fail, I'll keep in mind what you've said and cycle between several businesses. Interesting suggestions, thanks.

Anything is possible as far as I am concerned. Only you will ever know what is actually possible for you. I'm not one to tell you to go this way or that. Pick any direction and go that way and if you don't like that direction, go a different way. :)
 

alexkuzmov

Silver Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Sep 20, 2019
678
862
308
Bulgaria
Isn't it possible to force yourself to work even when bored?
It is.
Infact, how much boredom you can endure collerates directly to how much work you can do and how productive you can be in a unit of time.
Maybe you cant be bored for extended periods of time.
Everything gets boring after you do it enough times.
Question is, can you endure it until the profits start coming in?
 

999michaelh

New Contributor
Mar 20, 2021
43
19
39
It is.
Infact, how much boredom you can endure collerates directly to how much work you can do and how productive you can be in a unit of time.
Maybe you cant be bored for extended periods of time.
Everything gets boring after you do it enough times.
Question is, can you endure it until the profits start coming in?
I think... yes? Only time will tell, but I have faith in myself.

Only problem with my past few ideas was boredom + lack of faith in idea, which has been a fatal combination. But I've changed my strategy so I probably won't be giving up on ideas anymore :D
 

mguerra

Bronze Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Mar 23, 2015
177
199
153
28
Hey Lex, thanks for taking the time to respond.

My goal all along has been to build a business and then sell it for a few million so I'm not sure I'll be able to stop working on it for extended periods of time.

Isn't it possible to force yourself to work even when bored? I'd be willing to do so even if it feels miserable.

I'm probably naive, but I feel like a huge lump sum of cash would be more exciting than passive income.

But should my original plan fail, I'll keep in mind what you've said and cycle between several businesses. Interesting suggestions, thanks.

Hey brother,

Let me offer you a different perspective here.

I, just like you, had this tunnel vision on the "EXIT route" after reading TMF . After all, before reading the book I really didn't have any other clear vision on how to succeed and get rich.

But, after walking that path for 3 straight years, I've discovered that:

1. It isn't so simple
2. Theres LOTS of other variables
3. Maybe isn't the best way to get rich (considering the stage we are now as a global society)

What I've come to discover is that there is other ways to get rich that doesnt involve you "eating shit" for 3-5 straight years to have a 50/50 chance to "make the big bucks" in the end.

For a variety of reasons, I've discovered that this isn't the best way to go about getting rich for me.

I've come to prefer a path similar to @Lex DeVille , where I build several cash flow business that I can run, manage and delegate 80% of it - while it still injects net profit to my bottom line (bank account) every month/quarter/semester.

I prefer this model for many reasons. The main one is that I get to deal with the effects (and challenges) of financial success in a more progressive and organic way (versus having nothing on my name and suddenly receiving some millions, if all goes right).

The mistakes I made on my last venture (due to lack of financial maturity and experience) was really PAINFULL, and I learned a lot from that. We basically lost half a MILLION (brazilian reais) in a megalomaniac office project that went down and it only made us burn a shitload of money and time - while distracting us from what really matters: PROFITS.

What caused that? Partnership problems, investors pressure, lack of experience, immaturity and being caught-up in the "startup" world.

F*ck that shit.

After this and other incidences, I've came to learn that what really matters is cash under your name. Period.

After realizing this (and seeing where the world was heading with the home office culture), I sold my company equity to my previous partner at a really discounted price and became free again.

Guess what?

It turned out to be one of the BEST decisions I've ever made.

With my time and capital free from "owning a company" obligations, I've been able to multiply my net worth by a GREAT margin. Not only that, but I improved my quality of life and lifestyle a TON and I'm currently running multiple other projects that doesn't consume my time/energy nearly as much as "owning" a startup and brings net, PURE PROFIT to my bottom line every month or so.

Let me be clear: I'm not saying that it's the only way or BEST way to go about it.

I'm just offering my 2 cents of experience to maybe open your mind and expand your vision to different paths you can go to achieve the so desired financial freedom.

Hope that helps.

Crush it!
 
Last edited:

999michaelh

New Contributor
Mar 20, 2021
43
19
39
Hey brother,

Let me offer you a different perspective here.

I, just like you, had this tunnel vision on the "EXIT route" after reading TMF . After all, before reading the book I really didn't have any other clear vision on how to succeed and get rich.

But, after walking that path for 3 straight years, I've discovered that:

1. It isn't so simple
2. Theres LOTS of other variables
3. Maybe isn't the best way to get rich (considering the stage we are now as a global society)

What I've come to discover is that there is other ways to get rich that doesnt involve you "eat shit" for 3-5 straight years to have a 50/50 chance to "make the big bucks" in the end.

For a variety of reasons, I've discovered that this isn't the best way to go about getting rich for me.

I've come to prefer a path similar to @Lex DeVille , where I build several cash flow business that I can run, manage and delegate 80% of it - while it still injects net profit to my bottom line (bank account) every month/quarter/semester.

I prefer this model for a variety of reasons. The main one is that I get to deal with the effects (and challenges) of financial success in a more progressive and organic way (versus having nothing on my name and suddenly receiving some millions, if all goes right).

The mistakes I made on my last venture (due to lack of financial maturity and experience) was really PAINFULL, and I learned a lot from that. We basically lost half a MILLION (brazilian reais) in a megalomaniac office project that went down and it only made us burn a shitload of money and time - while distracting us from what really matters: PROFITS.

What caused that? Partnership problems, investors pressure, lack of experience, immaturity and being caught-up in the "startup" world.

F*ck that shit.

After this and other incidences, I've came to learn that what really matters is cash under your name. Period.

After realizing this (and seeing where the world was heading with the home office culture), I sold my company equity to my previous partner at a really discounted price and became free again.

Guess what?

It turned out to be one of the BEST decisions I've ever made.

With my time and capital free from "owning a company" obligations, I've been able to multiply my net worth by a GREAT margin. Not only that, but I improved my quality of life and lifestyle a TON and I'm currently running multiple other projects that doesn't consume my time/energy nearly as much as "owning" a startup and brings net, PURE PROFIT to my bottom line every month or so.

Let me be clear: I'm not saying that it's the only way or BEST way to go about it.

I'm just offering my 2 cents of experience to maybe open your mind and expand your vision to different paths you can go to achieve the so desired financial freedom.

Hope that helps.

Crush it!
Hey mguerra,

First of all, thanks for taking the time to write such a detailed response :D

I think you assumed that I wanted to launch something like a VC-backed startup. My goal was to just bootstrap a business without needing many employees. Maybe a few freelancers but it would probably just be a solopreneur journey.

So the goal was to sell my business that I created myself, with no obligations imposed on me by co-founders or investors. My apologies if I made that unclear.

I don't even have one profitable business yet so ima work on it and see what I can do as a solopreneur(with a few freelancers). Maybe it'll be worth millions, maybe it'll just become one passive income stream :D
 

mguerra

Bronze Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Mar 23, 2015
177
199
153
28
Hey mguerra,

First of all, thanks for taking the time to write such a detailed response :D

I think you assumed that I wanted to launch something like a VC-backed startup. My goal was to just bootstrap a business without needing many employees. Maybe a few freelancers but it would probably just be a solopreneur journey.

So the goal was to sell my business that I created myself, with no obligations imposed on me by co-founders or investors. My apologies if I made that unclear.

I don't even have one profitable business yet so ima work on it and see what I can do as a solopreneur(with a few freelancers). Maybe it'll be worth millions, maybe it'll just become one passive income stream :D

No need to apologize mate, I got your point.

Maybe my point could be made clearer. So, here it goes:

Stop thinking only about selling for MILLIONS in equity in the "end". Start thinking about cashing in multiple digits in profits along the way.

This way you make the process much more pleasurable and rewarding - while freeing yourself from the obssessive focus on money and allowing you to develop other areas of your life/personality and become more happy and whole as an individual - while still be KILLING in business.

This way you become richer, happier and much more free.

And yes, bootstrapping is WAY better, imo.
 

Sponsored Offers

  • Sticky
MARKETPLACE Fox Web School "Legend" Group Coaching Program 2021
Hey Rob, been watching your infoproduct and coaching business and it looks so good, other than...
MARKETPLACE 7 Days To Freedom: From Wantrepreneur/Wage Slave To Freelancer
I attended the live session, really loved it! It gives some useful and practical tips on how to...
  • Sticky
MARKETPLACE Lex DeVille's - Advanced Freelance Udemy Courses!
Three things: 1. Discord Chat is open. Click here for free access. 2. New YouTube Channel...
Introducing MJ's Personal Unscripted Network, Join Now for FREE!
Any chance to make it available outside of US? It has been available outside of the US on...
MARKETPLACE Not sure how to start? This free book will teach you how to build a successful web design business
If there’s one thread I see repeated over and over again on the forum, it goes like this: “I...
  • Sticky
MARKETPLACE You Are One Call Away From Living Your Dream Life - LightHouse’s Accountability Program ⚡
Thanks for clearing that up. What do you recommend for those who are still in the process of...

Forum Sponsor

Over 100 Fastlane Students
More Details...

New Topics

Fastlane Insiders

View the forum AD FREE.
Private, unindexed content
Detailed process/execution threads
Monthly conference calls with doers
Ideas needing execution, more!

Join Fastlane Insiders.

Top Bottom