The Entrepreneur Forum | Startups | Entrepreneurship | Starting a Business | Motivation | Success

Copy Writing Tricks You Can Use Today!

Remove ads while supporting the Unscripted philosophy...become an INSIDER.

BlakeIC

Silver Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
Jan 9, 2014
847
825
293
Not Washington
This is a compilation of copy writing notes I have taken from multiple books.

This document is not by any means complete, there is still many pages to go.
(I got sick over night and my current tasks at hand are taking much more time than expected)

Some notes are straight rips from the book because taking small or big notes wouldn't be able to capture what the author was trying to show or say.

Creating this document has allowed me to trim off fatty portion of the notes.
While there is still some repetition and fatty pieces in this, it is much better than what it was.

WHO THIS IS FOR
- You have no experience in writing copy (this is to everyone)
- You live a busy life and don't have the time to learn EVERYTHING there is to copy
(although if you are a business owner or someone blazing your own path, learning this skill is crucial)

The motivation behind me posting my notes publicly was from seeing other copy

writers (who have clients) that make such simple mistakes that made me question

how they got clients to pay them in the first place (not firing shots at anyone).

Here is a google doc link where all of the notes will be (not finished yet)
Copy Writing Notes

^This is to allow people to view the notes all in one document vs notes being scattered across the thread taking more of their precious time.

"Experience is the best teacher" - I don't remember

CA$HVERTISING NOTES
  • Convey Benefits and advantages

  • Present facts, stats, evidence, testimonials, studies, reports

  • Tension -> Desire -> Action to satisfy desire

  • Others find it pleasant to read how others have satisfied themselves

  • Use language that is specific & creates a mental movie

  • First use of any product is in a consumer's mind
Stages of Fear

  1. It scares the hell out of people

  2. It offers a specific recommendation for overcoming the fear

  3. The recommended action is perceived as effective for reducing the fear

  4. Recipient believes they can perform the recommended action

  • Deadlines & Scarcity induce fear

  • Present to consumer benefit of the benefit

  • Copy & Images should always show positive results

  • Reciprocation = Give free gift and consumers will feel compelled to purchase from you

  • Create specific outcomes

  • Influence from the start
    • Give a conclusion/view and work your way back
  • Foreshadowing: make them ask questions

  • Use rhetorical questions (best for message retention)

  • Use colorful and easy to understand facts & figure charts

  • Length implies strength
    • Product is to be reviewed more favorly when it contains numerous credible facts & figures (includes testimonials)

To sell anything to anyone

  • Write so people understand (psychology of simplicity)

  • Keep sentences to 11 words max

  • Refer to people 14 words out of 100

  • Allow people to think less

  • 70-80% words = 1 syllable
Be Specific!

Don't: Want your entire body to look more appealing?

Do: Do you want a rippling, rock-hard stomach?

  • Use short, simple words.

  • The shorter your sentences, the better.
    • Express only 1 thought in a sentence
The Short Short Paragraph Trick

  1. Limit paragraphs to 4-5 short sentences

  2. Keep first 11 words max
Pile On The Personal Pronouns Personality

  • Load copy with pronouns: you, me , she, I , you, him, they, them

  • Helps turn mass media communication into personal communication

  • Use bigger font paragraph leads
    • “You Learned”
Bombard Your Reader With Benefits

Feature = Component of Product

Benefits = What you get

NOBODY cares about your new equipment/anniversary unless it benefits them


Put Your Biggest Benefit In The Headline

Don’t Say: Attention food servers: New workshop teaches you tricks of the trade!

Do Say: Attention Food Servers: New workshop teaches you how to boost your tips 512%... Or your money back!



Don’t: Louise Taylor Designs Homes of Distinction

Do Say: Award winning interior designer Louise Taylor turns your house into a gorgeous model for less than ever dreamed possible!



  • The headline is the ticket to the meat, use it to flag down readers who are prospects for the kind of product you are advertising

  • Use short headlines, as headlines grow, readership shrinks.

Crank Up The Scarcity

  • Limited quantity/sale ends april 5th!

  • Call before april 5th!

  • Good for only first 50 callers!
Psychologically Potent Headline Starters

“There are four important qualities that a good headline may possess. They are:1. Self-interest. 2. News. 3. Curiosity. 4. Quick, easy way.” - John Caples

1. FREE: “Free Book Shows You How to Write Sneaky Advertising That Practically Forces People to Send You Money!”

2. NEW: “Powerful New Seminar Teaches Flea Marketers the Power of ‘Flea-Psych’ to Drive People Into a Buying Frenzy”
3. AT LAST: “At Last...A Bakery That Uses Only Organic Sugar, Flour, Milk, and Eggs!”

4. THIS: “This New Invention Stops Any Attacker in His Tracks Without a Gun, Knife, or Black Belt in Karate.”

5. ANNOUNCING: “Announcing the Hottest New Sandwich Craze From Southern California: The Malibu Crust Pocket!”

6. WARNING! “WARNING! Some Dog Groomers Wrap a Noose Around Your Dog’s Neck!”

7. JUST RELEASED: “Just Released: Psychologist’s Study Reveals Little-Known Speaking Patterns That Immediately Put Rude Salespeople in Their Place.”

8. NOW: “Now You Can Stop Any Attacker Without Guns, Knives, or a Black Belt in Karate.” 9. HERE’S: “Here’s How a 95-Pound Granny Made a 275Pound Psychopathic Killer Cry Like a Baby for its Rattle....”

10. THESE: “These Three Very Italian Men Make a Pizza to Kill For.”

11. WHICH OF: “Which of These Hot Bodies Would YOU Like to Show Off?”

12. FINALLY: “Finally...a Self-Improvement Seminar That Moves, Empowers, and Transforms You for Life!”

13. LOOK: “LOOK! Now You Can Buy Cotton Candy Machines at Wholesale Prices.”

14. PRESENTING: “Presenting the Easiest Way Ever Developed to Learn the Piano.”

15. INTRODUCING: “Introducing the Only Water Ice Stand in Philly that Uses Real Fresh Fruit.”

16. HOW: “How to Sing Like an American Idol in 90 Days or Less—Guaranteed.”

17. AMAZING: “Amazing New DVD Lowers Your Blood Pressure by Just Watching It!”

18. DO YOU: “Do You Know How to Stop Vicious Dog Attacks with the Push of a Button?”

19. WOULD YOU: “Would You Trade $2 for Our Famous Brick-Oven Pizza?”

20. CAN YOU: “Can You Be Sure Your Child Won’t Get Kidnapped?”

21. IF YOU: “If You Hate Cleaning Your Pool, This Ad Brings Good News!”

22. STARTING TODAY: “Starting Today You Can Dance 97% Better...If You Follow These Rules.”

12 Ways to Lure Readers Into Your Copy


“Just Released! Psychologist’s Study Reveals Little-Known Speaking Patterns That Immediately Put Rude Salespeople in Their Place.”

1. Continue the Thought in the Headline:

“You know the rude salespeople we mean. The ones with the big mouths who don’t understand the word no . The ones who push and push and won’t leave you alone....”

2. Ask a Question:

“How would you handle yourself in a sticky situation like this?”

3. Quote a Respected Authority:

“According to communication psychologist R. Butler Sinclair, there’s no need for anyone to feel intimidated by the high-pressure tactics used by....”

4. Give ’Em a Free Taste:

“The next time you’re confronted by a pushy salesperson, do this: Wait until he is finished speaking. Then raise your left hand to your mouth and say, ‘You know, you really didn’t....’”

5. Challenge Them to Prove It Works:

“Here’s what we want you to do. Read pages 8 and 9 of this incredible new book—no more. Then go to the dealership with the reputation for the most obnoxious and belligerent....”

6. Start With a Story of Skepticism:

“When we first received the manuscript from the author, we were skeptical. But some of us in the editorial office actually tried some of Sinclair’s tricks, and we were absolutely blown away.”

7. Tell What Others Are Saying (Bandwagon Effect):

“Nobody hates obnoxious salespeople more than I do. So when I first saw the ad for this book I though it was too good to be true. It is, in fact, the most powerful book I’ve ever read on dealing with rude coworkers, salespeople, and mothers-in-law. —Bob Manstreth, Philadelphia, Pa.”

8. Play Reporter:

“Philadelphia, PA—A New York psychologist has just released the findings of a seven-year study that explains how any man or woman can use the power of a new type of communication psychology to deal with obnoxious people.”

9. Get Personal With You, You, You:

“Have you ever been hassled by a salesperson who can’t take no for an answer? Do you hate when people push you around and manipulate you? Would you like to know a powerful new way to instantly put these obnoxious people in their place? A way that gives you the upper hand....”

10. Tell a Dramatic Story:

“According to communication psychologist R. Butler Sinclair, there’s no longer any need for anyone to feel intimidated by the high-pressure tactics used by....”

11. Give Super-Detailed Specs:

“This amazing new book—a hefty 8 1/2 × 11-inch leatherbound, hardcover beauty—is jam-packed with over 327 pages, 10 information-filled chapters, and 45 of the most effective new communication tools ever developed for....”

12. Lure them with a Very Short First Sentence:

“Don’t you hate it?”

“It’s so annoying!”

“It makes me sick.”

“I can’t stand it!”


  • Don’t make ads sqaure like others (in reference to newspapers and mediums alike)

  • Use circular border

  • DON’T USE WHITE ON BLACK TEXT (nobody gives a shit if it looks cool)

  • Also known as the reverse type pitfall, it also slows down reader (BECAUSE IT IS HARDER TO READ, JUST LIKE PUTTING THIS IN ALL CAPS SLOWS DOWN READERSHIP TOO)

  • Crush your competition with specificity (educate about what you/how your product works)

  • What can I say about my product that may be obvious to me, but my market knows little about?

  • Tell about the process, effort, money involved

  • Point out any major advantages.

Ogilvy Layout Principle


  • Upper ⅔ is an image -> just below utilize a drop initial (example of drop initial below)


OR

  • Upper ⅓ is an image -> Headline -> Lower ⅔ sales copy

  • NEVER use an illustration without a caption under it

  • Utilize a brief selling message or human interest message in every caption

Use Only Serif Typefaces

  • Arial

  • Times New Roman

  • Courier

  • Lato (My favorite)


Bottom Line: (According to Drew Whitman) Arial font size 12 is best.

EDIT:
Part 2 is down below (finished for now)
(Exceeded 20,000 character limit in this post)
The google doc is about 18 pages long.
Copy Writing Notes
 

Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum. Subscribe.

Last edited:

Argue

Gold Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Oct 1, 2016
646
2,384
555
28
NYC
Very good stuff here. Keep it coming.
 

edwardlobo

New Contributor
Aug 8, 2016
5
5
13
48
Thanks
This is really good
I read cashadvertising
What other books are good for teaching yourself copywriting ?
Thanks


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Mr.Chaos

Wolves love Ice Cream.
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
Mar 16, 2016
221
638
266
29
Atlanta
This is a compilation of copy writing notes I have taken from multiple books.

This document is not by any means complete, there is still many pages to go.
(I got sick over night and my current tasks at hand are taking much more time than expected)

Some notes are straight rips from the book because taking small or big notes wouldn't be able to capture what the author was trying to show or say.

Creating this document has allowed me to trim off fatty portion of the notes.
While there is still some repetition and fatty pieces in this, it is much better than what it was.

WHO THIS IS FOR
- You have no experience in writing copy (this is to everyone)
- You live a busy life and don't have the time to learn EVERYTHING there is to copy
(although if you are a business owner or someone blazing your own path, learning this skill is crucial)

The motivation behind me posting my notes publicly was from seeing other copy

writers (who have clients) that make such simple mistakes that made me question

how they got clients to pay them in the first place (not firing shots at anyone).

Here is a google doc link where all of the notes will be (not finished yet)
Copy Writing Notes

^This is to allow people to view the notes all in one document vs notes being scattered across the thread taking more of their precious time.

"Experience is the best teacher" - I don't remember

CA$HVERTISING NOTES
  • Convey Benefits and advantages

  • Present facts, stats, evidence, testimonials, studies, reports

  • Tension -> Desire -> Action to satisfy desire

  • Others find it pleasant to read how others have satisfied themselves

  • Use language that is specific & creates a mental movie

  • First use of any product is in a consumer's mind
Stages of Fear

  1. It scares the hell out of people

  2. It offers a specific recommendation for overcoming the fear

  3. The recommended action is perceived as effective for reducing the fear

  4. Recipient believes they can perform the recommended action

  • Deadlines & Scarcity induce fear

  • Present to consumer benefit of the benefit

  • Copy & Images should always show positive results

  • Reciprocation = Give free gift and consumers will feel compelled to purchase from you

  • Create specific outcomes

  • Influence from the start
    • Give a conclusion/view and work your way back
  • Foreshadowing: make them ask questions

  • Use rhetorical questions (best for message retention)

  • Use colorful and easy to understand facts & figure charts

  • Length implies strength
    • Product is to be reviewed more favorly when it contains numerous credible facts & figures (includes testimonials)

To sell anything to anyone

  • Write so people understand (psychology of simplicity)

  • Keep sentences to 11 words max

  • Refer to people 14 words out of 100

  • Allow people to think less

  • 70-80% words = 1 syllable
Be Specific!

Don't: Want your entire body to look more appealing?

Do: Do you want a rippling, rock-hard stomach?

  • Use short, simple words.

  • The shorter your sentences, the better.
    • Express only 1 thought in a sentence
The Short Short Paragraph Trick

  1. Limit paragraphs to 4-5 short sentences

  2. Keep first 11 words max
Pile On The Personal Pronouns Personality

  • Load copy with pronouns: you, me , she, I , you, him, they, them

  • Helps turn mass media communication into personal communication

  • Use bigger font paragraph leads
    • “You Learned”
Bombard Your Reader With Benefits

Feature = Component of Product

Benefits = What you get

NOBODY cares about your new equipment/anniversary unless it benefits them


Put Your Biggest Benefit In The Headline

Don’t Say: Attention food servers: New workshop teaches you tricks of the trade!

Do Say: Attention Food Servers: New workshop teaches you how to boost your tips 512%... Or your money back!



Don’t: Louise Taylor Designs Homes of Distinction

Do Say: Award winning interior designer Louise Taylor turns your house into a gorgeous model for less than ever dreamed possible!



  • The headline is the ticket to the meat, use it to flag down readers who are prospects for the kind of product you are advertising

  • Use short headlines, as headlines grow, readership shrinks.

Crank Up The Scarcity

  • Limited quantity/sale ends april 5th!

  • Call before april 5th!

  • Good for only first 50 callers!
Psychologically Potent Headline Starters

“There are four important qualities that a good headline may possess. They are:1. Self-interest. 2. News. 3. Curiosity. 4. Quick, easy way.” - John Caples

1. FREE: “Free Book Shows You How to Write Sneaky Advertising That Practically Forces People to Send You Money!”

2. NEW: “Powerful New Seminar Teaches Flea Marketers the Power of ‘Flea-Psych’ to Drive People Into a Buying Frenzy”
3. AT LAST: “At Last...A Bakery That Uses Only Organic Sugar, Flour, Milk, and Eggs!”

4. THIS: “This New Invention Stops Any Attacker in His Tracks Without a Gun, Knife, or Black Belt in Karate.”

5. ANNOUNCING: “Announcing the Hottest New Sandwich Craze From Southern California: The Malibu Crust Pocket!”

6. WARNING! “WARNING! Some Dog Groomers Wrap a Noose Around Your Dog’s Neck!”

7. JUST RELEASED: “Just Released: Psychologist’s Study Reveals Little-Known Speaking Patterns That Immediately Put Rude Salespeople in Their Place.”

8. NOW: “Now You Can Stop Any Attacker Without Guns, Knives, or a Black Belt in Karate.” 9. HERE’S: “Here’s How a 95-Pound Granny Made a 275Pound Psychopathic Killer Cry Like a Baby for its Rattle....”

10. THESE: “These Three Very Italian Men Make a Pizza to Kill For.”

11. WHICH OF: “Which of These Hot Bodies Would YOU Like to Show Off?”

12. FINALLY: “Finally...a Self-Improvement Seminar That Moves, Empowers, and Transforms You for Life!”

13. LOOK: “LOOK! Now You Can Buy Cotton Candy Machines at Wholesale Prices.”

14. PRESENTING: “Presenting the Easiest Way Ever Developed to Learn the Piano.”

15. INTRODUCING: “Introducing the Only Water Ice Stand in Philly that Uses Real Fresh Fruit.”

16. HOW: “How to Sing Like an American Idol in 90 Days or Less—Guaranteed.”

17. AMAZING: “Amazing New DVD Lowers Your Blood Pressure by Just Watching It!”

18. DO YOU: “Do You Know How to Stop Vicious Dog Attacks with the Push of a Button?”

19. WOULD YOU: “Would You Trade $2 for Our Famous Brick-Oven Pizza?”

20. CAN YOU: “Can You Be Sure Your Child Won’t Get Kidnapped?”

21. IF YOU: “If You Hate Cleaning Your Pool, This Ad Brings Good News!”

22. STARTING TODAY: “Starting Today You Can Dance 97% Better...If You Follow These Rules.”

12 Ways to Lure Readers Into Your Copy


“Just Released! Psychologist’s Study Reveals Little-Known Speaking Patterns That Immediately Put Rude Salespeople in Their Place.”

1. Continue the Thought in the Headline:

“You know the rude salespeople we mean. The ones with the big mouths who don’t understand the word no . The ones who push and push and won’t leave you alone....”

2. Ask a Question:

“How would you handle yourself in a sticky situation like this?”

3. Quote a Respected Authority:

“According to communication psychologist R. Butler Sinclair, there’s no need for anyone to feel intimidated by the high-pressure tactics used by....”

4. Give ’Em a Free Taste:

“The next time you’re confronted by a pushy salesperson, do this: Wait until he is finished speaking. Then raise your left hand to your mouth and say, ‘You know, you really didn’t....’”

5. Challenge Them to Prove It Works:

“Here’s what we want you to do. Read pages 8 and 9 of this incredible new book—no more. Then go to the dealership with the reputation for the most obnoxious and belligerent....”

6. Start With a Story of Skepticism:

“When we first received the manuscript from the author, we were skeptical. But some of us in the editorial office actually tried some of Sinclair’s tricks, and we were absolutely blown away.”

7. Tell What Others Are Saying (Bandwagon Effect):

“Nobody hates obnoxious salespeople more than I do. So when I first saw the ad for this book I though it was too good to be true. It is, in fact, the most powerful book I’ve ever read on dealing with rude coworkers, salespeople, and mothers-in-law. —Bob Manstreth, Philadelphia, Pa.”

8. Play Reporter:

“Philadelphia, PA—A New York psychologist has just released the findings of a seven-year study that explains how any man or woman can use the power of a new type of communication psychology to deal with obnoxious people.”

9. Get Personal With You, You, You:

“Have you ever been hassled by a salesperson who can’t take no for an answer? Do you hate when people push you around and manipulate you? Would you like to know a powerful new way to instantly put these obnoxious people in their place? A way that gives you the upper hand....”

10. Tell a Dramatic Story:

“According to communication psychologist R. Butler Sinclair, there’s no longer any need for anyone to feel intimidated by the high-pressure tactics used by....”

11. Give Super-Detailed Specs:

“This amazing new book—a hefty 8 1/2 × 11-inch leatherbound, hardcover beauty—is jam-packed with over 327 pages, 10 information-filled chapters, and 45 of the most effective new communication tools ever developed for....”

12. Lure them with a Very Short First Sentence:

“Don’t you hate it?”

“It’s so annoying!”

“It makes me sick.”

“I can’t stand it!”


  • Don’t make ads sqaure like others (in reference to newspapers and mediums alike)

  • Use circular border

  • DON’T USE WHITE ON BLACK TEXT (nobody gives a shit if it looks cool)

  • Also known as the reverse type pitfall, it also slows down reader (BECAUSE IT IS HARDER TO READ, JUST LIKE PUTTING THIS IN ALL CAPS SLOWS DOWN READERSHIP TOO)

  • Crush your competition with specificity (educate about what you/how your product works)

  • What can I say about my product that may be obvious to me, but my market knows little about?

  • Tell about the process, effort, money involved

  • Point out any major advantages.

Ogilvy Layout Principle


  • Upper ⅔ is an image -> just below utilize a drop initial (example of drop initial below)


OR

  • Upper ⅓ is an image -> Headline -> Lower ⅔ sales copy

  • NEVER use an illustration without a caption under it

  • Utilize a brief selling message or human interest message in every caption

Use Only Serif Typefaces

  • Arial

  • Times New Roman

  • Courier

  • Lato (My favorite)


Bottom Line: (According to Drew Whitman) Arial font size 12 is best.

TO BE CONTINUED

Nice, I remember getting help from you on FB when I first started! Thanks!!
 

TeaEarlGreyHot

Contributor
Jan 10, 2017
15
34
17
Texas
Not sure if this is welcome here, but I have some notes from a book I read at the library the other day. I can't remember what it was called I'll have to check next time... Wondering other's thoughts now since you listed pronouns like I, me, we. This book had a nice little list of words to never use.

NEVER use:
"difference" "solutions" "quality" -- not specific enough, just talk.
"it" -- say the product name
"technology" "lifetime" "source" -- vague fluff
any superlatives -- again, just talk
self pronouns like I, we, me, ours, etc. -- everything should be about value delivered to the consumer

now, I've seen that rule broken a lot especially with artisan goods that are about quality craftsmanship.. Perhaps an exception, or--? Thoughts?

It also had other nuggets like the fear of loss being more powerful than the opportunity to save (instead of saying "you could save $1 a day " say "you are letting $365 go down the drain every year")
you product's value is not based on how much it costs to make but it's results. (you're not selling pool cleaning supplies you're selling having a clean pool) I think this also applies to changing your perspective on marketing it.
sell with numbers not adjectives

and lots of other things that have been said on this forum a million times over.
 
OP
OP
B

BlakeIC

Silver Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
Jan 9, 2014
847
825
293
Not Washington
Nice, I remember getting help from you on FB when I first started! Thanks!!
Hey there!
How are your copy gigs going?

Thanks
This is really good
I read cashadvertising
What other books are good for teaching yourself copywriting ?
Thanks


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Scientific Advertising by Claude Hopkins
^There is a PDF circulating of this book that doesn't have the first 200 pages.
I mention this because, i learned more out of the first 200 pages than I did in the last 100. (rough estimates)
So if you do get this book, get the FULL book.

How to Win Friends and Influence People
Ogilvy on Advertising
(I checked this out from the library) <- I wouldn't pay for this book
Advertising Ideas by John Caples -> Good luck finding this one. I was lucky to find the PDF and print out all 200 pages (i think it's 200?). As it was not available ANYWHERE for sale.

I just started The Robert Collier Letter Book so far so good. Some of the sales letters presented in this book really ramble on (to a point where I couldn't tell what the letter was trying to sell).

With The Robert Collier Letter Book DO NOT buy the one by the Important Books company.

It is full of misspellings and screwed up formatting that makes it impossible to read (I am 100% serious)

I just ordered 2 other books that are shipping here to me right now
- How To Write A Good Advertisement
- 7 Steps to Freedom II: How to Escape the American Rat Race by Ben Suarez

Every book I have read in regards to copy so far has resulted in me always learning something new.

Whether it was published in 1920 or 2000

edit:
Words That Sell (Revised & Expanded Edition)
Coaching Questions by Tony Stoltzfus (Great book for the B2B space for when you deal with clients)
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
B

BlakeIC

Silver Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
Jan 9, 2014
847
825
293
Not Washington
Not sure if this is welcome here, but I have some notes from a book I read at the library the other day. I can't remember what it was called I'll have to check next time... Wondering other's thoughts now since you listed pronouns like I, me, we. This book had a nice little list of words to never use.

NEVER use:
"difference" "solutions" "quality" -- not specific enough, just talk.
"it" -- say the product name
"technology" "lifetime" "source" -- vague fluff
any superlatives -- again, just talk
self pronouns like I, we, me, ours, etc. -- everything should be about value delivered to the consumer

now, I've seen that rule broken a lot especially with artisan goods that are about quality craftsmanship.. Perhaps an exception, or--? Thoughts?

It also had other nuggets like the fear of loss being more powerful than the opportunity to save (instead of saying "you could save $1 a day " say "you are letting $365 go down the drain every year")
you product's value is not based on how much it costs to make but it's results. (you're not selling pool cleaning supplies you're selling having a clean pool) I think this also applies to changing your perspective on marketing it.
sell with numbers not adjectives

and lots of other things that have been said on this forum a million times over.
These are great.

In regards to the "self pronouns like I, we, me, ours, etc.", the way I see it is that they have a time and place for them. Using the self pronouns aren't always appropriate.
 
OP
OP
B

BlakeIC

Silver Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
Jan 9, 2014
847
825
293
Not Washington
Here is part 2
(this sickness is really kicking my butt, maybe I shouldn't have accidentally drank out of another sick persons cup)

You will notice, as the notes for the other books are added, the less there will be.

Why?

Because if multiple books cover the same subject matter, i do not write it down again.


#12 The Power Of Questions

  • Use questions in headlines, subheads, body

  • Question should lure them to find an answer

  • Use open loop questions
Example:

Do you want to know one simple technique that will triple your coupon response with no additional cost or effort? (A: Yes)

  • Make a list of benefits of your product (not features)
    • Rank them in order of importance to the customer
      • Take the #1 benefit and open your letter with it incorporated
  • Starts your sales letter with a question (effective for getting them to read deeper)

  • It is always a good idea to incorporate a quick fix into your first sentence

  • The purpose of the 1st sentence is to get them to read the 2nd -> 3rd and so on

  • Question opener on the first sentence such as “Do You Want?” followed by extremely positive benefit is a great way to keep your prospect reading

AIDA (Progression of your ad/web page)

Attention

Interest

Desire

Action

  • Utilize customer testimonials

  • Use powerful visual adjectives
Example:

  • Rake in $2,750 cash weekly!

  • Mouth watering, sugar sweet, hand picked apples

  • Enjoy pure crystal clear, glacier-fresh water

  • Play up your 2 biggest benefits with power visual adjectives and specific language

VAKOG

Visual (sight)

Auditory (sound)

Kinesthetic (feeling or emotions)

Olfactory (smell)

Gustatory (taste)

  • Create internal relationships to prime the consumer to buy

  • Power your ads with images

  • Ads consisting of 50% visuals were recalled 30% more often

  • Ads with 75% visuals were recalled 50% more

  • Showing the product attracts 13% more readership

  • Always provide a contact phone number (credibility)

  • Copy can never too long, only boring

Offer Testing

  • Free is a powerful word

  • “Buy one get one free” is stronger than “50% off”
Or

  • “2 Bottles for the price of one!”


  • When creating a promo news article, don’t be too enthusiastic, keep it objective

  • Best frequency for emailing your list is 1 time a week

Best Way To Get Emails Opened

  • Be a familiar sender (use your business name)

  • Personal subject line

  • Offer of interest in the subject, precision target your market

  • Ads with slow movement have higher click rates


  • Longer guarantees = more sales (6 months, 10 months, 1 year)

Ranking For Colors In Sales Material

  1. Blue

  2. Red

  3. Green

  4. Violet

  5. Orange

  6. Yellow
Color Combos

  1. Blue Yellow

  2. Blue Red

  3. Red Green

  4. Purple Orange

  5. Red Orange Woman: Yellow Orange


  • Black & White ads work best when stating benefits

Psychology Of Pricing

  • Odd-even theory claims prices ending in odd decimal amounts suggest better deal

  • Prestige Pricing: Use only whole-rounded numbers

  • Use white space around ads (if possible, mostly in reference to newspaper/direct mail)

  • It's not clever to be clever

22 Response Superchargers

1. FORGET style—sell instead!

2. SCREAM “Free Information!”

3. WRITE short sentences and keep them reading.

4. USE short, simple words.

5. WRITE long copy.

6. BOIL it down; cut out the fluff!

7. STIR up desire by piling on the benefits.

8. SHOW what you’re selling—action shots are best.

9. GET personal! Say: you, you, you.

10. USE selling subheads to break up long copy.

11. PUT selling captions under your photos.

12. WRITE powerful visual adjectives to create mental movies.

13. SELL your product, not your competitor’s.

14. DON’T hold back, give them the full sell now!

15. ALWAYS include testimonials!

16. MAKE it ridiculously easy to act.

17. INCLUDE a response coupon to encourage action.

18. SET a deadline to break inertia.

19. OFFER a free gift for quick replies.

20. SAY the words Order Now!

21. OFFER free shipping.

22. BOOST response 50 percent or more with a “Bill Me” or credit option.


9 Ways to Convey Value

1. SCREAM “Sale!”

2. GIVE them a coupon.

3. DIMINISH the price: “Less than a cup of coffee a day.”

4. EXPLAIN why the price is low: “Our boss ordered too many!”

5. AMORTIZE it: “Just $1.25 a day.”

6. BOOST the value: Tell what it’s worth, not only what it costs.

7. TELL how much others have paid (and we’re happy to do so!).

8. CREATE a sense of scarcity with deadlines.

9. EMPLOY psychological pricing.



13 Ways to Make Buying Easy

1. GIVE your street, e-mail, and Web address.

2. GIVE your phone number.

3. PROVIDE street directions and parking advice.

4. SAY “It’s Easy to Order...”

5. ACCEPT phone orders.

6. ACCEPT mail orders.

7. ACCEPT online orders.

8. ACCEPT fax orders.

9. ACCEPT credit cards.

10. ACCEPT personal checks.

11. GET a toll-free phone number.

12. INCLUDE a long, strong guarantee—longer than your competition’s.

13. OFFER installment payments for products more than $15 (“3 easy payments of just $10.99”), shown to boost response 15 percent.


11 Ways to Boost Coupon Returns

1. TELL them in the headline or subhead to return the coupon.

2. SAY “Buy 1 Get 1 Free!” instead of “50% Off.”

3. USE a big “FREE!” at the top of your ad.

4. TELL what the coupon brings; say it again inside the coupon itself.

5. SHOW what the coupon brings with a small photo or illustration.

6. USE a bold coupon border.

7. SET a hard (firm date) or soft deadline (“The First 100 People...”).

8. PROVIDE check-off boxes to get people involved.

9. SAY “Valuable Coupon” at the top.

10. GIVE sufficient room for fill-ins.

11. POINT to the coupon with bold arrows.


46-Point “Killer Ad” Checklist

Here’s a fast and easy way to help ensure your ads contain the ingredients for success. Check all that apply to your ad; the more, the better.

Headline

[ ] Does it feature your product’s biggest benefit? (The #1 most important rule.)

[ ] Is it a real grabber? Does it elicit an emotional response ?

[ ] Does it use any of the 22 Psychologically Potent Headline Starters shown in Chapter 3?

[ ] Is it significantly larger than your body copy? Boldfaced too?

[ ] Is it powerful enough to get people to read your body copy?

[ ] Does it make some kind of offer? [ ] Is it authoritative, and not wimpy?

[ ] Is the headline set in initial caps? (This Is Initial Caps.) Use ALL CAPS only if your headline is short—about four to five words or so.

[ ] Is it in quotes? This can boost reading 25 percent.


Body Copy: First Sentence

[ ] Are you using one of the dozen body copy jump-starters shown in Chapter 3?

[ ] Does it naturally flow from the headline?

[ ] Does it get right into the benefits for the reader, instead of bragging about your company?

[ ] Does it almost force them to read the second sentence?

[ ] Is you one of the first few words? Body Copy: General

[ ] Does it focus on how the reader will benefit?

[ ] Does it tell your readers why they should buy from you, rather than from a competitor who offers the same product/service?

[ ] If your product or service is exciting, does your ad sound exciting?

[ ] Does it progress in a logical, methodical way?

1. Get attention.

2. Stimulate interest.

3. Build desire.

4. Offer proof.

5. Ask for action.

[ ] Are you trying to sell only one product at a time? (This is best. However, some businesses, such as: delicatessens and furniture stores, can get away with more. Those are more similar to catalog ads: “Here’s everything we got.”)

[ ] Do you use selling subheads to break up long copy blocks to make them easier on the eye?

[ ] Is the copy colorful, sprinkled with power visual adjectives where appropriate?

[ ] Is it believable? (Not overblown or ridiculous.)

[ ] Is it respectful of the reader and not insulting to his or her intelligence?

[ ] Is it emotional? Does it create emotion (positive or negative)?

[ ] Do you use the principle of extreme specificity?

[ ] Are your words, sentences, and paragraphs short? Simple words?

[ ] Are your printed ads, sales letters, brochures, and such set in a serif typeface, such as Schoolbook? Is your Web copy set in a sans-serif typeface such as Arial or Verdana?

[ ] Do you tell your readers what you want them to do in a super-simple way?

1. Clip this coupon.

2. Bring it to our store by August 21.

3. Save 50%.

[ ] Do you outright ask for the sale?

[ ] Did you set a deadline, if appropriate? (Most of the time it is!)

[ ] If you have a lot of benefits to offer, do you list them in bullet or numbered form?

[ ] Do you use testimonials? If you don’t have them, get them!

[ ] Is your business name and phone number large and instantly noticeable?

[ ] Did you include your logo? (Use it all the time—the more often people see it, the more brand equity it builds.)

[ ] Do you give directions, maps, or landmarks? (They may be more necessary than you think.)

[ ] Did you key your ad to better track responses?


Layout and Design

[ ] Did a professional designer produce your ad? (Not a layout person!)

[ ] Is your headline big and bold?

[ ] Is the headline broken at the right words? For example:

[ ] Is the ad easy to read? Is there a focus? (The eye should naturally be pulled to certain areas first, not jump around.)

[ ] Is there sufficient white space? Did you wrap it in white?

[ ] Did you indent your paragraphs? This makes reading easier.

[ ] Is the number of separate elements kept to a minimum? (Don’t have a million little tint blocks with type, three bursts, two blocks of bullets, a corner flag, and four reverse-type panels!)

[ ] Do you use art (photos or illustrations) relevant to your sales message? (Please, no babies for steel-belted tire ads!)

[ ] Did you use a minimum number of typestyles? (One or two; three max! Unless a professional designer recommends it in a unique situation.)

[ ] Do you feature a picture of a person looking at you? (It’s one of the most powerful ways to grab people’s attention.)


I must have skipped notes on this, look into the flesch-kincaid scoring of text. The higher the number you get the better. (It is out of 100)

(Flesch-kincaid scores the readability of your text)









Ogilvy On Advertising
  • The difference between a good ad and a bad ad is how much homework you have done

  • Brief with client to learn about product

  • Find out how consumers think about your product
    • The language they use

    • What attributes are important

    • What promise would be most likely to make them buy your brand
  • Identify a brand positioning stance you want to take (Saab = Winter Car)

  • Identify a brand image & personality

  • Every ad should be done in contribution to the brand

  • Create confidence that your product is confidently good

  • If you and your competitor make excellent products don’t try to imply that your product is better
    • Say a more clear, honest and informative job of saying it
  • You are advertising to a moving parade, not a standing army

  • When you reach for the stars, you may not quite get one, but you won’t come up with mud either

  • Ads with news are recalled 22% more often than those without news

  • If your headline does not sell your product, you have wasted 90% of your money
  • Headlines that work best promise the reader a benefit

  • People are 5x as likely to read your headline vs body copy

  • When using news in headlines

    • It can be the announcement of a new product

    • Improvement to old product

    • New way to use old product
  • Don’t use words like “Amazing, introducing, now, suddenly

  • Headlines of 10 words sell more than short headlines

  • When headlines are put in a quote they are recalled 28% more

  • Attract above average readership with helpful headlines/info
Example: “How To Win Friends & Influence People”

  • Specifics are more memorable and credible than generalities

  • Crowd scene images don’t pull like single person images

  • Don’t show human faces bigger than normal, it reduces readership

  • Historical subjects bore the majority of readers

  • DO NOT assume subjects that interest you will interest your readers

  • You cannot bore people into buying your product

  • Do not address readers as though they were gathered in a stadium

  • Do not use analogies

  • Do not use superlatives “our product is the best in the world!”

  • Brag & Boast convinces nobody

  • Testimonials make you more credible

  • Use testimonials from experts

  • Include the price in your product ads wherever they are

  • The more facts you tell, the more you sell

Image -> headline -> copy


  • When you have to communicate a lot of different points use call outs

*Copy has priority over illustration

*Copy is set in serif type

*Every photograph has a caption

*Copy starts with drop initials

*The type is set in black text on white backdrop

*Write like an editor not an advertiser


  • Limit opening paragraph to 11 words max

  • Use crossheads every 2-3 (in reference to newspaper & direct mail, still use them though)

  • Short lines increase readership

  • Set key paragraphs in bold face or or italic

  • Line spacing between paragraphs increases readership by 12%

  • Use 11 point font (in reference to newspaper & direct mail)

  • B2B = Looking for responsiveness, support, service & a good product (as well as facts)

  • Make a specific promise (no generality or vagueness)

  • Demonstrations are more effective when done in comparison with your competitors
Note from BlakeIC ^Some argue that when doing the comparison that you do not want to mention the brand you are comparing against. Do your research on that one.

  • Companies that differentiate themselves will do the best



My Life In Advertising: Scientific Advertising
  • Is your service (b2b) an expense which they attempt to minimize? (does your service help them profit)

  • Always provide samples

  • Demonstrate the product

  • Consumers want honesty

Never advertise something like “Buy my brand and be sure to get the original!” (remember superlatives)

LISTEN UP: David Ogilvy argues to compare your product against your competitor

Claude Hopkins argues not to compare your product even if you are better

You will notice contradictions in these notes between authors.


  • Explain your product production in detail

  • Even though people make your exact product, tell the pains you take to excel

  • Tell factors & features which others feel too commonplace to claim

  • Be the first to tell the facts

  • Have a very strong guarantee

    • “If my product doesn’t work it’s free!”
  • Try to hedge & protect yourself, mother nature will circumvent you. Do the opposite and human nature will justify it

  • Ask a person to take a chance on you and you have a fight

  • Offer to take a chance on him and the way is easy

  • Appear unselfish to your customers desires and they will flock to you (now if dealing with luxury, according to the book “luxury strategy” they argue against being receptive to consumer wants)

  • People are after results, not how you get there

  • Entering a field with the “BUY MY BRAND” appeal is selfish and repugnant to all

  • Screaming low prices will force others to ignore you

  • Using claims like “we profit 3%” are a better way of announcing a low price

  • Every word must mean something, waste no space.

  • From start to finish offer service, that is what your consumer wants

  • FORGET yourselves entirely

  • Boasting is repulsive

  • There is no place in advertising for FRIVOLITY or HUMOUR

  • Never seek to amuse in advertising (don’t make that the goal)

  • Do not make expected claims

  • Do not feature ‘ills’ or negatives

  • Show & Feature the happier results

  • Any studied attempt to sell, if apparent creates corresponding resistance (I imagine he means in a scenario when you under deliver in value - blakeic)

  • If it won’t work in person, it won’t work in print

  • Being ‘brief’ in print does not work in person so don’t be brief in print

  • Create headlines which hail your market

  • Address the people you serve (your market) and sell to them only

  • People want bargains, not cheapness

  • Offers entitled to classes like veterans will go out of their way to get their deal

  • The weight of an argument can be multiplied by making it specific

“Our prices have been reduced!” Should be “Our prices have been reduced by 25%!”

  • Never attack others in advertising

  • Show the bright & happy attractive side

  • Show the end result

  • Tell people what to do, not what to avoid

  • Do not use before & after ads

Advertising Ideas By John Caples
Good luck getting a copy of this, a paperback copy supposedly costs up to $1,000. Although I do have a paperback copy, i do not see it being worth anything close to that.

It is not really possible to take notes on Advertising Ideas due to its nature of formatting & style.


  • Use pictures that look like regular people, not models (formal)

  • Suggest big news through large text

  • Utilize curiosity arousing headlines

  • Do not hesitate using long copy, true prospects read it.

  • Headline tells a story

  • Always use copy under images (captions)

  • Sub-heads suggest a story

  • News headlines impel attention

The Robert Collier Letter Book
Get the version by Robert Collier Publications
This book is sort've the same in terms of style. Reading notes on this book will not do justice in being able to capture what Robert Collier is trying to show/demonstrate.

  • What is the bait that will tempt your readers

  • How can you tie that up with your offer?

  • Study your reader, what interests them?

  • Study your proposition to see how you it can be made to tie in with their interests

  • Begin without knowing what to say and end without knowing what you have said

  • What feeling do I want to arouse in the reader?

  • When it is action you want, go after emotions every time

  • Tell a man something new and you have his attention, give it a personal twist or show its relation to his business and you have his interest

  • How can I better my condition? (A man as he looks himself in the mirror)
 
Last edited:

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.

Sponsored Offers

  • Sticky
MARKETPLACE Kill Bigger Incubator
Hey @Cruiser I just shot you a reply! Amazing product BTW!
  • Sticky
MARKETPLACE Fox's Web Design Guide: Earn $100K this year (Yes, 2020!) and Go Fastlane
I'm thinking about joining the program. How is it like joining from Asia (Japan specifically)...
  • Sticky
MARKETPLACE Lex DeVille's - Advanced Freelance Udemy Courses!
Well, we made it halfway through the year. Don't know what the rest'll bring, but it's gonna be...
  • Sticky
FEATURED! Introducing... WEALTH EXPO$ED, A Short Story By MJ DeMarco
Not really a teaser but it does employ a fictional story, so that is similiar. This upcoming...
  • Sticky
MARKETPLACE You Are One Call Away From Living Your Dream Life - LightHouse’s Accountability Program ⚡
Dropping a quick note in here to say... if you are on TFL, you are part of an elite group of...



Forum Sponsor

sponsor

New Topics

Fastlane Insiders

View the forum AD FREE.
Private, unindexed content
Detailed process/execution threads
Monthly conference calls with doers
Ideas needing execution, more!

Join Fastlane Insiders.

Top Bottom