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How soon in your life did you get your financial focus?

Runum

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You guys that have this focus early in life really make me envious.

I received absolutely no financial education growing up. I guess my parents couldn't teach me what they didn't know. I spent my life racing cars and building race cars until I was 40. I got into it at 18 because it was fun. My whole working life was dedicated to finding the next race. I spent a hoard of money and time in this hobby. I did put some money away in IRA's but a lot was lost in 2001. At 40 I figured out that I couldn't physically do this when I was 60 so I had to figure something else out less physically demanding. I went to college at 40 and got a bachelors degree at 43 and became a teacher(false security). I still knew something was missing, not the right path. Finally found RD books and others that steered me right. I now have 4 investment properties that cash flow well and work everyday to acquire more. I have a plan to quit teaching in 3 years.

I am impressed by all of your early successes in life.

All I can say is I got here as soon as I was aware.

I will guarantee my kid will not be able to say that she did not receive any financial education from her parents.

What's your story?:cheers:
 

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Yankees338

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Jul 24, 2007
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I was fortunate enough to be Bar Mitzvah'd which means a pretty big payday at an early age. I constantly ask my dad for things and he replies, "no", almost automatically. (I'm 16 now, btw.) He wouldn't allow me to dip into my Bar Mitzvah savings either. I hated the idea that all the money I had in my savings account would just be pissed away to a college, and I wouldn't see any of the money. I knew there was a better thing to be doing with my money from the time I was 14; however, the answer didn't come until my Entrepreneurship class teacher recommend I read RDPD. From that point on, I've had a fascination with investing and real estate (which I'd had an interest in from the time I was 12) and I attempt to further my education in the subjects every day.

I'm still only 16, so I haven't taken any "action" yet per se, but I have done quite a bit of learning and it's an experience I feel will greatly benefit me in the future. I'm trying to start an internet business now, but it doesn't look like it will be happening just yet. I've already received another offer from someone to partner up for an online business (this person is 24) so I'm hoping that will work out.

And the rest of you -- what's your story?
 

Andrew

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When I was a just kid, 11 or 12, there was a radio show I listened to, "Bruce Williams." I wasn't really interested in it, I just left the talk radio station on all day. People were always calling asking about retirement questions so I started to figure money was pretty important. My parents also played a role. They were very thrifty, but I never liked the idea of nickle and diming my way through life.

In high school I began reading economics books. A combination of the need for an income and understanding of money made me choose the entrepreneurial path pretty quickly.
 

1320Trader

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Aug 14, 2007
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I started focusing when I was living in my g/f's moms basement with no drywall counting change so I could go get food @ 20yrs old. Since then I've been working 2 jobs (at least 60hrs a week...sometimes more towards 80). Unfortunately I still spent some money on cars for the next 2 years. However, I have dropped that for the time being to focus on my finance and business knowledge. Now im really into the stock market....I feel like thats my calling.
 

andviv

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In ten years we went from being a mid-class family in a south american country, to be poor. From owning a condo and two cars to rent and use public transportation. From having a decent variety of food to "recycling food", which is eating on Wednesday what's left over from Sunday. In my culture Education is critical. People starve to send the kids to school. Our families send their kids to the best school they can afford (or even worse, the one they can't afford) to give their kids a better chance.

When I came here to the US I came to study a Master's degree on Computer Science (my background is IT related) but then I saw opportunities everywhere and decided to stay.

I have had curiosity about money since graduating from college, when I was the best student in my class and graduated as the #1, but others were getting better salaries and better jobs. That's when I realized that it was not important and that my family had lied to me (lied in the sense of instilling in me the need to be the best student as that guarantees the best jobs available) but like some others said before, they can't teach you what they don't know.

Four years ago I read RDPD and that was an eye opener. I did not eat or sleep until I finished it. and then I read it again and again. It changed my perspective about money and financial possibilities. I started reading the RDPD forums and learning from many of the experts there. And now I am doing better --way better -- than before. I was lucky in the sense that I could read the book when still in my 20's, so I know I have time to make it happen.
 
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AJGlobal

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Both my parents were born in sicily and my father had no education from the US just my mother. I guess watching my dad start his own business after working in the masonry union and being sucessful at it barely being able to write and speak in broken english made me realize that I could do whatever I wanted and be good at it seeing that I actually had an education here in the US. I never even finished college, for me it was a waste of time IMO. I learned through trial and error but started thinking in this way as early as I can remember. I knew I was going to work for myself I just didn't know what it was going to be yet. I had a couple different business back east before I picked up and moved out to AZ at age 23 and worked out here doing odds and ends looking and waiting for the right opportunity to come my way and before my 24th B-day. It did, and I was ready. I had already tought myself all the things you had asked about and learned more and more as I started making money and needed to know how to maximize my profits and tax benfits. By the time I was 25 going on 26 I had retiement accounts set up and other investments brewing. Going on 33 this year and all of that stuff has and still is paying off now. Mind you when I got here, I had nothing. I had sold eveything back east and had pretty much run out of money. I had $20 in my pocket with a few hundred in the bank, clothes in a suitcase that were outdated and in need of a haircut. I started with less here in AZ than I had when I lived in NY.
 

S928

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Aug 7, 2007
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Interesting post! I've always been financially focused. For example, growing up I would always save a portion of my allowance and I started my ROTH IRA at 18. Despite saving and investing at a younger age, I soon realized I needed to make a bolder move to become finacially free and that's when I decided to pursue RE. So far, things have been so-so. I'm doing better than most, but still not good enough! I leave my employer, Uncle Sam, in less than three years and I CAN'T wait. The military is a poor man's job and I've never meet a single millionaire, yet just about everyone has the biggest ego - plain losers I swear who are dependent on peanuts.
 

MJ DeMarco

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I started studying the rich at a young age. My goal was to discover what their secret was in obtaining wealth at such a young age --- if you subtract the athletes and entertainers you're are left with 1 sole group: Entrepreneurs. Thats when I knew the correct path -- probably 16 years old. To that end, I started studying subjects in that area - both in college and via books.
 

Onasip3

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Aug 17, 2007
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Queen Creek AZ
Unfortunately I am just beginning but it is better late then never. I grew up in a very low income family, my parents didn't know anything about finance and managing money (still don't). I promised my wife and myself that my son would never have to live the way I did. So when he was born I took the only steps I knew to make sure he didn't go without. I am military so the pay is not that good and I ended up working 2 jobs in order for my wife to stay at home with him. This was by choice I wanted her to stay home with him so he had that sense of family(didn't want him raised by the daycare system) it's hard enough on a kid when his father is constantly gone at a moments notice. I made a few good moves and we are doing okay financially now but I have a long way to go.
I picked up the Rich Dad book about 3 years ago and I was hooked. It opened my eyes to so much and I started my plan for the future. I have been teaching my son everything I know and he is already off to a great start. He will start college next semester in AZ and will be ready to buy his first property in about 6 months. He has so many ideas and I encourage him to make the move while he is young.

Rob
 

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