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NOTABLE! former student of the foundation(dane maxwell) willing to answer questions

McCoyH

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It sounds like you paid a ton of money and time to learn something that MJ covers in just one chapter of his book.
 

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orangjul

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Dec 29, 2013
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I'm glad I found this thread. I just listened to a podcast interview by Pat Flynn with Dane Maxwell and felt very inspired. The podcast had some great content that made me think. I looked at the Foundation website very briefly, but seeing the heavy marketing definitely rose a red flag for me so I decided to come on here and do a quick search. Glad I got to read some feedback from actual students about the course and didn't waste any time considering it any more. Thanks everyone for sharing.
 

DavidW

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Jan 4, 2014
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I was in the second Foundation launch. Stayed in the foundation till it ends however was not successful in starting a software
company with paying customers.

Cons.
Dane told us the Foundation would be closed to a select few. A month
after it started, he reopened the Foundation class to allow more
people in. This made Dane a liar and was when I really started to see that
he was just a marketer.

If do not like phone prospecting, than this program may not
be for you. The foundation tries to promote this"take action"
culture, and people would post in Hipchat how many cold calls
they made a day. Found out later that cold calling is a big waste of
time and some people will never be good at phone persuasion.

Dane should tell you before you join that his method of building
software companies involves you spending hours on the phone talking to
people to find the correct idea and them more hours on the phone convincing people
to invest in your solution.

If you do not have experience in copywriting, sales and a budget that exceeds the
4000 you pay Dane, this may not be the program for you.

Pros.

You will learn marketing, because Dane and Andy use marketing tactics to get you
to buy into the Foundation. Hell, their sales letter on the day of launch was really good.

The community created by Dane and Andy is really supportive of each other, however you start to
get some elitism as some members start to advance and others do not.

The program opened my eyes as to what is possible in life. Dane does not seem especially smart and the numbers
he and Andy do on the first month of the Foundation are about a quarter mill.


I learned alot in the Foundation, however Dane and Andy market the program as being simple and it is not.
Dane is teaching you to do something he has never done himself. I do not believe that the software for Dane's company
paperless pipeline was underwritten by the users and Dane never touched his pocket.
Wanted to ask for my money back, however I did not feel like fighting to get it. So I took everything I learned as a lesson and
moved on.
 

Tregan

Contributor
Jul 16, 2013
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I agree that the marketing is great with the Foundation, a week before the last launch Dane had on past students that had been successes. Every night for about a week he did video chats with them. I thought they were great and if you didn't do the program you could still take a ton of info just from those calls.

I like the concept of the foundation especially finding pain points and coming up with solutions. Now getting from point a to b to c is not as easy as it's made out to be but I think it all comes down to your niche and how well you can provide those solutions.

What I don't like about the Foundation are the success percentages, I think it's somewhere around 10% for last year? In all fairness the percentage is probably lower, around 7 or 8%. I don't like those odds. A 92% failure rate is nothing I want to hear as I invest $4K+.

My .02 cents!
 

Heisenberg

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Dec 11, 2013
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One thing that saddened me a bit, was your skepticism around limiting beliefs.

Here is one of the students who fully embraced limiting beliefs.

Video ----> http://zannee.wistia.com/medias/bqj3dlmxw0

There is no hype or fluff in any of that video. Just a real dude who embraced what we taught fully.

And now he's quitting his job at Tesla motors.

Note: This video is unreleased and private for a few more days. Please don't share it around the net. Yet.
Lets be clear here,

This guy is an exception rather than an ordinary student - he was the 1 in 10 that came out with a business.

Is it the removal of limiting beliefs that made him succeeded? Or is it the fact that he has major experience in software, as he was a software developer? Or could it be because he had connections that allowed him to partner up with someone instead of spending 70k he didn't have on the development?
 

Tregan

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Jul 16, 2013
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Lets be clear here,

This guy is an exception rather than an ordinary student - he was the 1 in 10 that came out with a business.

Is it the removal of limiting beliefs that made him succeeded? Or is it the fact that he has major experience in software, as he was a software developer? Or could it be because he had connections that allowed him to partner up with someone instead of spending 70k he didn't have on the development?
Very valid points! I've thought similar. If someone already 'knows' the industry and/or has extensive contacts then doesn't that actually give them a huge advantage? I think so. However, there are other success stories in the Foundation where people didn't have that advantage.
 

Heisenberg

Contributor
Dec 11, 2013
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I would have no problem with what Dane is doing if it wasn't marketed directly towards beginners (read title: The Foundation). He sound at least make it clear that it is not as easy as he makes it sounds. He should make it clear that for every 9 out of 10 people reading his long, promising sales letter, would not come out with a business. And that those who are lucky enough to come out with a business are likely to go bust within the next 12 months as that is the nature of business.

The most ethical thing he could do is target more intermediate entrepreneurs instead of clueless kids, because only those people are really gonna get their money's worth - but he would never do that as there will be significantly less money in it for him.
 

Tregan

Contributor
Jul 16, 2013
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60
I would have no problem with what Dane is doing if it wasn't marketed directly towards beginners (read title: The Foundation). He sound at least make it clear that it is not as easy as he makes it sounds. He should make it clear that for every 9 out of 10 people reading his long, promising sales letter, would not come out with a business. And that those who are lucky enough to come out with a business are likely to go bust within the next 12 months as that is the nature of business.

The most ethical thing he could do is target more intermediate entrepreneurs instead of clueless kids, because only those people are really gonna get their money's worth - but he would never do that as there will be significantly less money in it for him.
Again, great points. There is some really effective marketing involved no doubt. My suggestion to people is to learn all you can from all the Foundation videos/website/etc.. and devour all the info from successful past students like Geordie Wardman, Josh Isaak, Carl Mattiola, etc.. and then work your own system. I'm trying that but I'll be honest, it's hard. The simple action of validation can be enough to drive most people away.
 

Young-Gun

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This was a fascinating read.

Agree that the OP came off pretty well: worked hard by his own standards, invested time and money of his own. Dane impressed me with his refund offer, although naturally he gets "good press" for doing so, and honestly I think the refund is owed if the purchaser wants it. (promises were grander than could be delivered in that time)

Where the OP could have done better in my humble opinion:
I was cringing so much as he described the 6 months he spent (sorry "wasted" according to him) before he realized that he was "nowhere near" his goal - that he didn't know enough.

Good. I agree, it takes about 6 months to realize I'm a total idiot that has only just realized the magnitude of his ignorance.
But then you gave up??? MAAAAAAN wtf?

Put another way, you spent six months learning that you were a complete idiot.. that you knew nothing.. and then were just like.. "OK."

"On to the next thing where I'll probably be an idiot in that too." (Nothing personal I just mean we're all idiots when we start something brand-new to us)

Those 6 months have to be invested to get to ground zero. But now you see WHAT needs to be learned... even if it's a MASSIVE undertaking.. that's the whole thing about business, and success, it always SEEMS insurmountable, you have to know that it only SEEMS that way.

Imagine this:
6 months - learning the absolute basics, the terminology, "learning what you need to learn", coming up with ideas
6 more months - refining ideas, starting to learn the specific things you'll need, even though you're a novice
6 more months - your business idea seems valid after many refinements. You're now at an intermediate level of knowledge in the field
6 more months - Serious progress has been made. You've outsourced a few major tasks; because of the last 18 months, you're somewhat qualified to evaluate employees, and even one or two hiring mistakes doesn't set you back, because now you see them as learning experiences.
6 more months - with the help of the best employees, you learn faster and faster. Product moves to operational stages and starts testing
6 more months - product iterates to a professional level of quality.You're no programmer now, but you're quite an experienced manager of programmers. You're confident that you could manage another team and do it even better next time
6 more months - product cashflow is respectable. It's not what you originally set out to hit (it's about half that) BUT!! Now you have a founder's education in this field

So far, elapsed time is 3.5 years, and you have a moderately-profitable software product
But more importantly, you've just finished your basic"free education" as a software enterprise founder and CEO

Now everything is accelerated. Let's try again on our SECOND software product.
6 months - researching a far larger, more important, more difficult need for your next software product and laying out a plan
6 months - getting the rough design made, finding first customers
6 months - improving everything with feedback and get to a nice, stable profitable software product
6 months - grow grow grow, and also package with previous software product if possible

Now, 5.5 years have gone by and you have 2 profitable software products along with the know-how to quickly brainstorm, plan, design, create, market, and grow your software sales.

Let's give it a few more steps:
6 months - document everything that keeps the business running
6 months - start shopping buyers and getting legal and financial advice
6 months - conclude the sale with the best offer

Total elapsed time: 7 years - build a software company, brought it to profitability and exited by selling it to a giant tech company

But just to put in perspective, you referenced "6 months" as some huge time investment. Not to be harsh, but buddy, friend, 6 months is just long enough for the trek to the base-camp of the mountain where you set up tent and gaze in awe at the magnitude of the climb awaiting you - but don't gaze too long.

MJ says it's all about process - the process of climbing a little of the mountain each day, for as long as it takes, no matter which of your friends fall of the face to their death, no matter what of your tools break.

I believe you've probably gotten that, by reading the responses to this thread. You don't fail or succeed because of your training, or your mentors.

You fail or succeed because you have either accepted failure as an option, or you have not. I have not. I'm not counting days, months, miles to the summit. I'm just deciding what I need to do today and then doing it.

I'll pull you up if you pull me up. Keep at it man, I wish I'd started in software back when I first moved to self-employment. Honestly, software is where the REAL money is.
 

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Vanessa

New Contributor
Mar 20, 2014
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Hey all

I am a former student the second class of the foundation by dane maxwell--

I totally failed hard..

anyway Im willing to answer any questions you all might have..

fire away[/q
Let's dissect the info a bit better, as I was a student of TheFoundation v2 too:

I agree with GregH in most parts and as we all know that 1000 people come in, few stick till the end and maybe 1 succeeds (in every training). But who succeeds most of the time? The one who provides the service/training/ etc, right? (the one who sells not the one who buys)

This program generated half of million $ in sales last year. From all the students, who generated at least $100k? (I'll let others who participated, answer this).


About technology/programming/hiring a programmer and so on:

By profession, I am a software engineer and I know the ins/outs of how to code. One of the "solution" for hiring a coder, that they gave, was to go to Odesk/Elance/Guru and post a job using a "text template" asking for the best coder. And then start filtering and decide on one programmer.

Now I'm telling you this: If you DON'T know how to code, or you don't know somebody (a programmer) who can assist you in monitoring the ones you're hiring, YOU ARE TAKING A TREMENDOUS RISK.

Why?

Well they will spot you instantly, that you're a newbie and they will play you all day long. Remember I'm not talking about web design or some fancy "javascript" tricks for your site. I'm talking about a software (either web based/cloud or desktop based) that can actually perform.

And after all this, there is the "testing" part. Some might underestimate it, but THIS is a continuous process for the SAAS. How come? Only when you start using the software you can actually detect bugs: overloads, memory crash, variable allocation and so on. At this point you kind of depend on your programmer (and the speed of execution they have).

Did you know that each programmer has an individual coding style? This means that you have to tell them to write a clean code and use a lot of ("//" comment lines) so the next programmer who will code, will clearly understand what on earth was coded there (I bet most of you didn't know this).

Back to TheFoundation, one of Dane's SAAS was "pipeline" something. Well rest assured that he didn't go blind in this market. He had family members who were in this niche for a decade and already knew the ins and outs.

Of course Dane was asking "how do you feel about it" and doing that "yoga/zen" thing because there's NO WAY to give a precise answer to a question, in a market you have NO IDEA about.

As you probably saw the new AMA from him, well I believe that's most likely because ( I can bet on this) he's going to launch the new Foundation soon. My inbox is bleeding with this kind of emails. They are pushing hard to launch.

The only thing that I really found valuable and interesting was the way that HE SOLD to us. The pre-sale funnel, email squeeze page, designs, interviews with big names. That's what has to be learned.

Yes MJ, you were right in the first place. Boy oh boy, this Internet is filled with lots of kids and sharks.

Thank you AdrianN for pointing this out.

I am also with IT background and I was very skeptical about the hiring programmer part of the course. As a developer/BA/PM I know exactly what you're talking about, bugs, decode, and delivering on time, and end-user support system. Listening to all the process given, I was wondering what support do the Foundation have for their members to help them validate their programmer codes and make certain that everything going well. How do they hold programmer accountable. Especially Freelance programmer, they can come and go, and without documentation, you'll be left with more headache to deal with the next programmer you hire. Not to mention time and money wasted.

What is Documentation? when you hired by any company as a developer, not only do you need to do codes, but you also responsible for documentation. All companies require this and it is standard procedures so that when they fire you or if you leave, the next programmer can pickup where you left off. Good documentation must included screen shots explaining what you did and the code algorithm and of course // within codes like AdrianN mentioned as comments. But if you have some coder that did "spaghetti code" (a term that programmer use to describe bad coding style) and don't document or did vague/bad documentation, the next coder would have to take times (lots of times) to decipher what the heck the previous coder trying to do and pick up the pace. During this period of time can cause you/the company lots of money.

When I listening to the course, I can hear MJ talking and pointing things out and I can see it more clearly than I never did before. Thank you MJ for your book. I've learned a ton and I look at making money in a whole new ways.

However, with all this being said, if one can try hard to succeed and create a system like what the Foundation marketed. It is still a Fastlanes because it satisfy all five Commandments: Control, Entry, Need, Time, and Scale.

And, it's falls into the #1 of #1 Potential Fastlanes: Internet: Subscription-Based. I think is dual-able if you keep at it. Remember what MJ said, Fastlanes is not easy, validate programmer's codes can consider to be a process in itself and if you can master this process. You are closer to Fastlanes Freedom.

I think MJ would agree. ;)

Thank you AdrianN and Greg for reaching out with your valuable input. This help a lot in understand what product/services the Foundation offered.

 

Vanessa

New Contributor
Mar 20, 2014
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Again, great points. There is some really effective marketing involved no doubt. My suggestion to people is to learn all you can from all the Foundation videos/website/etc.. and devour all the info from successful past students like Geordie Wardman, Josh Isaak, Carl Mattiola, etc.. and then work your own system. I'm trying that but I'll be honest, it's hard. The simple action of validation can be enough to drive most people away.
You have very good point "The simple action of validation can be enough to drive most people away" All I can say after reading this is #Fastlanes. :D Commandments #2: Entry.
 

Vanessa

New Contributor
Mar 20, 2014
5
5
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This was a fascinating read.

Agree that the OP came off pretty well: worked hard by his own standards, invested time and money of his own. Dane impressed me with his refund offer, although naturally he gets "good press" for doing so, and honestly I think the refund is owed if the purchaser wants it. (promises were grander than could be delivered in that time)

Where the OP could have done better in my humble opinion:
I was cringing so much as he described the 6 months he spent (sorry "wasted" according to him) before he realized that he was "nowhere near" his goal - that he didn't know enough.

Good. I agree, it takes about 6 months to realize I'm a total idiot that has only just realized the magnitude of his ignorance.
But then you gave up??? MAAAAAAN wtf?

Put another way, you spent six months learning that you were a complete idiot.. that you knew nothing.. and then were just like.. "OK."

"On to the next thing where I'll probably be an idiot in that too." (Nothing personal I just mean we're all idiots when we start something brand-new to us)

Those 6 months have to be invested to get to ground zero. But now you see WHAT needs to be learned... even if it's a MASSIVE undertaking.. that's the whole thing about business, and success, it always SEEMS insurmountable, you have to know that it only SEEMS that way.

Imagine this:
6 months - learning the absolute basics, the terminology, "learning what you need to learn", coming up with ideas
6 more months - refining ideas, starting to learn the specific things you'll need, even though you're a novice
6 more months - your business idea seems valid after many refinements. You're now at an intermediate level of knowledge in the field
6 more months - Serious progress has been made. You've outsourced a few major tasks; because of the last 18 months, you're somewhat qualified to evaluate employees, and even one or two hiring mistakes doesn't set you back, because now you see them as learning experiences.
6 more months - with the help of the best employees, you learn faster and faster. Product moves to operational stages and starts testing
6 more months - product iterates to a professional level of quality.You're no programmer now, but you're quite an experienced manager of programmers. You're confident that you could manage another team and do it even better next time
6 more months - product cashflow is respectable. It's not what you originally set out to hit (it's about half that) BUT!! Now you have a founder's education in this field

So far, elapsed time is 3.5 years, and you have a moderately-profitable software product
But more importantly, you've just finished your basic"free education" as a software enterprise founder and CEO

Now everything is accelerated. Let's try again on our SECOND software product.
6 months - researching a far larger, more important, more difficult need for your next software product and laying out a plan
6 months - getting the rough design made, finding first customers
6 months - improving everything with feedback and get to a nice, stable profitable software product
6 months - grow grow grow, and also package with previous software product if possible

Now, 5.5 years have gone by and you have 2 profitable software products along with the know-how to quickly brainstorm, plan, design, create, market, and grow your software sales.

Let's give it a few more steps:
6 months - document everything that keeps the business running
6 months - start shopping buyers and getting legal and financial advice
6 months - conclude the sale with the best offer

Total elapsed time: 7 years - build a software company, brought it to profitability and exited by selling it to a giant tech company

But just to put in perspective, you referenced "6 months" as some huge time investment. Not to be harsh, but buddy, friend, 6 months is just long enough for the trek to the base-camp of the mountain where you set up tent and gaze in awe at the magnitude of the climb awaiting you - but don't gaze too long.

MJ says it's all about process - the process of climbing a little of the mountain each day, for as long as it takes, no matter which of your friends fall of the face to their death, no matter what of your tools break.

I believe you've probably gotten that, by reading the responses to this thread. You don't fail or succeed because of your training, or your mentors.

You fail or succeed because you have either accepted failure as an option, or you have not. I have not. I'm not counting days, months, miles to the summit. I'm just deciding what I need to do today and then doing it.

I'll pull you up if you pull me up. Keep at it man, I wish I'd started in software back when I first moved to self-employment. Honestly, software is where the REAL money is.
Bravo! very well said. So inspiring Young-gun! I like the last part "I'll pull you up if you pull me up." :D
 

Finally

PARKED
Apr 23, 2014
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well MJ was right as were others when he said that the whole application process was just a marketing ploy; I don't think anyone was "turned" away

the information was laid out in a very sloppy manner honestly-- the info that was put was not bad at all-- just not laid out in any coherent way

everyone who did it with me was very cool and very excited to learn

people were very nice and bought in big time to what dane taught-- maybe too much for my taste ( but thats just personal), because towards the end it felt very cult-like .... you couldnt disagree with anything being taught and if you were failing it was due to "limiting beliefs"-- :/

I believe I failed because I went in knowing nothing about marketing/ business/ SaaS/ copywriting/ anything... I spent much of the first few months catching up-- half the time I didnt know what I was talking about or learning... It was overwhelming because to start a software business when you know nothing about software is kinda crazy in retrospect

its not impossible-- just highly unlikely

I took a ton of action... I made about 50-60 calls.. sent 2000 emails using the scripts they gave me-- did in person visits -- and tried to"extract" many problems in a business that were simple and easy to solve and no other solution existed

You had to totally understand a market like the back of your hand, and it was hard...

in the end.. I didnt get many ideas to work with and I kept spinning my wheels
I was lost,confused and frustrated and it topped off with one of the members starting his own info products and signing up other students and having them market for him in a MLM format in a very aggressive manner.. wasnt cool

do I think the foundation gave good info? yes I do... it was just laid out in a confusing manner

I dont think the foundation is for newbies or people without a background in software or business

also the cash needed to pay for software development was very high and the whole " get people to pay for you" thing was a little pie in the sky and Im not sure many people did that

in the end I think 10% of students had some success and I think only 1% did very very well... but to my knowledge they were already into software and business and this "system" just kind of helped them along

so my advice for anyone out there thinking about doing it is this...
if you know software or have a strong background in business then this might be for you, if not... stick to these forums

the basics are
- choose a market
- send emails/cold call and talk to the best people in that industry
- ask them about their day and see if there is any problems that could be solved with software
-presell them on the idea
- validate with asking for money
-build MVP
-get more beta users
-launch


I dont think Im giving away any secrets as Dane and Sam both said the same thing in many many many interviews

Id be happy to answer any more questions
Hi. My name is Enrique.
What does, "Build MVP" mean? And what do you mean when you say, "Get more beta users?" How do you get people to become beta users. And finally, When pre selling, what f they ask, "What is your website?" and I still haven't built since I'm first pre selling to see if the idea is viable?

Thanks.
 
OP
OP
GregH

GregH

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Hi. My name is Enrique.
What does, "Build MVP" mean? And what do you mean when you say, "Get more beta users?" How do you get people to become beta users. And finally, When pre selling, what f they ask, "What is your website?" and I still haven't built since I'm first pre selling to see if the idea is viable?
Thanks
Minimum Viable Product... basically something that doesnt have lots of bells and whistles and is the simplest form of a product... if it was a car, it would be the frame, the wheels, the steering wheel and a seat with a motor that runs.... you dont want to overload the first version of your product with lots of stuff.. I think the term MVP was popularlized by Author Eric Reis if you want to google that name

Beta Users... Im guessing you offer them a deeply discounted price or have them fund the cost of the project and they help you decide what features you would want to include in future versions of your product...

Pre-selling..... if you don't have a product, why would you have a website? just say something like " we're not launching the website until we release the first version of our product... we don't even have a name for it yet"

you could build a website that has a sales video with just texts and mockups like a concept video for what the product WILL become..almost like a kickstarter thing

maybe include a signup for email box that says " Let me know when this is available" to gauge interest
or even a paypal button and try to sell them on buying a lifetime membership at 75% off the normal price
 

Mac

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Sam Ovens (one of the Foundations graduates that has now become apart of the Foundation) appeared on Tai Lopez' snapchat... Yeah, you guys are gonna love this one...

He was offering a consulting accelerator course (he even ripped off the courses name from Perry Marshall) and held a free webinar. In the webinar he claimed to have made millions of dollars off his consulting business in less than a year and moved from New Zealand to an expensive apartment in Manhattan. He showed his infusionsoft account which displayed $900,000 (and it stated it was a % of increase that showed $97 in his account a year prior). Meanwhile he was stating that he was making $900k monthly. And in the webinar he said that it was live and wouldn't be recorded.

In the interview the video skipped back a few seconds by accident and completely revealed that he wasn't in fact recording the webinar live. And when he was doing a live Q&A, he wasn't even answering questions that were popping up in the chat. The sales funnel he built was phenomenal though, it was very compelling. He must've learned it from Dane himself!

Although the webinar was scripted, he still provided some value with the video on how to acquire consulting clients. But, it was a complete upsell into his consulting accelerator program for $2,000. On the Tai Lopez webinar he charged $3,000 and on another funnel he was charging $2,000. Which came across as a total scam to me. And then he said it wouldn't be recorded and there it was in my email after, completely recorded. He also stated that it wouldn't be available after 100 seats filled up, which was a total lie. He's like "Yeah we're at 80 seats now, this is definitely gonna sell out guys." And then I check in my email two days after and he's still offering to sell it to me. Clearly it's a scam and he learned from the best at the Foundation.
 

JScott

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Hypothetical question...

If someone reads my book but can't sell, can't write, and can't communicate and yet this reader "takes action" for a few weeks, and doesn't get results, does that make my book a scam? Does that make me any less of an instructor?
Not familiar with the foundation, but I spend a lot time dealing with questions people have about "gurus" in the real estate world...

My general take on the subject boils down to, "What is the Expected Value of the return the students receive? Is it more or less than the cost of admission?" If it's less, it's a scam (value hasn't been delivered as promised). If it's more, it's not a scam (though it still may not be worthwhile).

For example, if the foundation costs about $4K, does the average profit earned from foundation students following the education exceed $4K? If so, not a scam.

Of course, an equally important question is variance (percentage sucessful). If the foundation costs $4K, 99% of students earn nothing and 1% of students earn $400K+, then it meets my definition of not a scam. But, that doesn't make it worthwhile, obviously, in that situation.

MJ - Seems safe to say that a very large percentage of the readers of your book would say that the value they've received from the book is far in excess of the price. But, I've read other business books where i'd be willing to bet that the average reader never recovered the cost of the book using the information inside. So, yes, those books are in essence a scam, and those authors are certainly not worthy of the title "instructor"...
 

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JAVB

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So the video-answer never came? :blank:

I was also looking into The Foundation... but here's the thing with these type of programs: There's no way the authors would make "more money" with "less work" with The Foundation than applying the "guaranteed" process they teach to two o three SaaS of their own. Dane says his SaaS is now a multimillion dollar company, so why, why, why would you charge people $4K?

Dane says this is just about passion, dream, and helping people. So it's not about the money. Isn't actually about helping Entrepreneurs? Ok, so make it free. Heck, charge people $100, with the promise of refunding it just to those that stick around till the end. Make it free, and make the application process HARD and REAL. Accept only the best potential entrepreneurs. Make it your legacy, and let the "acceptance" be the real filter, not the price tag.

I gotta give it to them, their marketing is superb! And that's precisely the problem.

I can't say The Foundation is a scam or that it doesn't work. I didn't enroll, nor will I. What I'm trying to do here is to point out the basic problem info and educational products have when they make blunt promises and have high price tags. Whether this program works or not, it is fighting a hard to win battle from the very beginning.

If you have created a multi-million dollar SaaS businesses, you don't need to charge people $4K for an online "course" and implement highly sophisticated marketing techniques. It definitely seems that what's turning the author rich is actually the course in itself and not that he's coming to the table already rich and wealthy. (even if that's not the case, it's a perception problem)

@MJ DeMarco created his books and put them out there. Good quality, freaking awesome books. He didn't care about marketing or super crazy squeeze pages or whatever. The book was superb and its quality and value in a market willing to go for it made it a success. Period. Had @MJ DeMarco charge TOP dollars for a seminar where he'd teach the same in the book, we would've had to fight the same skepticism all these other info products fight.
 
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