The Entrepreneur Forum | Startups | Entrepreneurship | Starting a Business | Motivation | Success

Book: Blue Ocean Strategy

Remove ads while supporting the Unscripted philosophy...become an INSIDER.

Xeon

All Cars Kneel Before Pagani.
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Sep 3, 2017
1,329
2,800
666
Singapore
I'm currently at Chapter 2, and the takeaway is that the strategy is about taking an existing type of product from an established / saturated industry, then marketing it to a different audience, and modifying the product to cater to that new audience to achieve market/product fit. Basically, changing up the marketing angle.

However, it seems that this strategy is more suitable for companies who already have the $$$ to conduct extensive research on markets / industries, in order to be able to use the frameworks and graphs/charts/systems mentioned in the book?

Has anyone read this book and applied the stuff inside to your own business, with at least some degree of success?
Curious what everyone's thoughts on this book is.
 

Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum. Subscribe.

MJ DeMarco

Administrator
Staff member
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Jul 23, 2007
30,028
107,242
3,751
Fountain Hills, AZ
I enjoyed the book, but yea, I can see there being some difficulty for newbie entrepreneurs with limited capital.

Guess the general idea is to think outside the box.
 

Jon Anthony

Bronze Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Jan 5, 2019
56
293
165
Doesn't seem like it'd be that hard.

To make billions? Yeah, sure.

But think about it. This happens all the time.

Weight loss products selling to fat people?

Someone comes along and makes a "post pregnancy" workout/diet.

Someone makes a "tea slenderizer" for hippies.

A "hardcore fat cutting supplement" for the roid heads and gym junkies.

It's all the same ingredients (85% at least) just marketed to different groups.
 

rpeck90

Silver Contributor
Speedway Pass
Nov 26, 2016
210
984
332
30
United Kingdom
It's a cross between positioning and innovation.

You need an innovative product (iPod), but to position that product in a way which will actually "create" demand (as I explained in my branding post which I sent to @Xeon). iPod's success wasn't purely based on it being a "better MP3 player" (too expensive for that) - it was based on the idea that you could "finally" enjoy your entire music collection without having to carry 100's of CD's.

Same deal with iPhone. As a phone, it's marginally better. Obviously a "great" product, but really worth it? The big difference with the iPhone came from its Internet connectivity (3G). This - coupled with the ability to "browse" real websites - switched its proposition from a "phone" to a means to connect more deeply with a larger group of people. "Social media" amplified this and we all know the rest.

As I also explained in my branding post, the problem you have is you're looking at this from an "outside in" perspective. You can't build a "Red Bull" if you're trying to market an "Energy Drink". That's not what people are buying. No one "needs" an energy drink. To quote my post, Red Bull are selling "adrenaline in a can" -- and their "blue ocean" came about from the curation of experiences which could be attributed to a lifestyle conducive to "needing" said adrenaline boost.

Brands (which is basically what you're referring to with this) are focused on the curation of demand. This happens when the people behind the brand actively engage with creating a shift in the market, and create a product/solution which people can use to improve their lives in a new way. Repackaging a product for another audience will NOT achieve this (as it supposes the audience already exists). This is obviously a difficult thing to "get", hence why many company founders are held in reverence.

Ultimately, the reason you're having trouble digesting the book's idea is because you're not being intrinsic with the way marketing works. People are not a "market", they are people with lives & desires. Sparking one of these desires is where the "blue ocean" comes from -- inspiring someone to change their behaviour in some new & exciting way.

I can explain more if required.
 

Ernman

Gold Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Feb 8, 2019
735
1,603
471
60
Florida, USA
It's a cross between positioning and innovation.

You need an innovative product (iPod), but to position that product in a way which will actually "create" demand (as I explained in my branding post which I sent to @Xeon). iPod's success wasn't purely based on it being a "better MP3 player" (too expensive for that) - it was based on the idea that you could "finally" enjoy your entire music collection without having to carry 100's of CD's.

Same deal with iPhone. As a phone, it's marginally better. Obviously a "great" product, but really worth it? The big difference with the iPhone came from its Internet connectivity (3G). This - coupled with the ability to "browse" real websites - switched its proposition from a "phone" to a means to connect more deeply with a larger group of people. "Social media" amplified this and we all know the rest.

As I also explained in my branding post, the problem you have is you're looking at this from an "outside in" perspective. You can't build a "Red Bull" if you're trying to market an "Energy Drink". That's not what people are buying. No one "needs" an energy drink. To quote my post, Red Bull are selling "adrenaline in a can" -- and their "blue ocean" came about from the curation of experiences which could be attributed to a lifestyle conducive to "needing" said adrenaline boost.

Brands (which is basically what you're referring to with this) are focused on the curation of demand. This happens when the people behind the brand actively engage with creating a shift in the market, and create a product/solution which people can use to improve their lives in a new way. Repackaging a product for another audience will NOT achieve this (as it supposes the audience already exists). This is obviously a difficult thing to "get", hence why many company founders are held in reverence.

Ultimately, the reason you're having trouble digesting the book's idea is because you're not being intrinsic with the way marketing works. People are not a "market", they are people with lives & desires. Sparking one of these desires is where the "blue ocean" comes from -- inspiring someone to change their behaviour in some new & exciting way.

I can explain more if required.
I think you've nailed it rpeck90. Interestingly, I did a case study on Red Bull while earning my MBA.
 

PedroG

Silver Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Oct 1, 2013
297
750
293
NH
Love this book. It's probably in my top 2 or 3. A lot of great strategies on how to break into existing industries with a different offer.
 

Olimac21

Silver Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Dec 3, 2015
442
575
260
27
Belo Horizonte, Brasil
It is about finding new attributes where your product can shine and target that. Some examples were Cirque du Soleil and a wine brand if I remember well, of course big boys have advantages but my taking is about being innovative and thinking outside the box about the needs of your customers rather than traditional fire vs fire kind of competition.
 

Jaden Jones

Igloo Builder
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Aug 22, 2018
273
347
174
Canada
I enjoyed it, I took it as another "find a niche book" but the examples were good and entertaining.
 
OP
OP
Xeon

Xeon

All Cars Kneel Before Pagani.
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Sep 3, 2017
1,329
2,800
666
Singapore
Thanks for the insight guys!

And it's time for some brain squeezing..... :blush:

It's a cross between positioning and innovation.
Tbh, I've been so into the whole brand story telling and positioning that I overlooked the innovation part.
I always thought that any product with the right positioning = success.
In other words, one can sell any product and make it big by marketing alone.


Same deal with iPhone. As a phone, it's marginally better. Obviously a "great" product, but really worth it? The big difference with the iPhone came from its Internet connectivity (3G). This - coupled with the ability to "browse" real websites - switched its proposition from a "phone" to a means to connect more deeply with a larger group of people. "Social media" amplified this and we all know the rest.
Again, I overlooked the iPhone thing. I always assume iPhone == just another phone with a hippie / luxury twist applied to it with Apple's marketing warchest to create a certain perception in people's minds, thus making them want it.


You can't build a "Red Bull" if you're trying to market an "Energy Drink". That's not what people are buying. No one "needs" an energy drink. To quote my post, Red Bull are selling "adrenaline in a can" -- and their "blue ocean" came about from the curation of experiences which could be attributed to a lifestyle conducive to "needing" said adrenaline boost.
In other words, Red Bull is creating a certain lifestyle which they steer their target customer towards, and once that target customer starts soaking in their ads/copy, and gets drawn into their "world", that target customer will feel like they need to drink Red Bull in order to live that life curated by Red Bull?

Btw, Red Bull doesn't seem to have the innovation component though. Positioning yes, but innovation probably doesn't apply to them (nothing special about their drink, no breakthrough and doesn't make you run 3x faster).


Brands (which is basically what you're referring to with this) are focused on the curation of demand.
I don't quite understand the "curation of demand" phrase. In this context, it means orchestrating the demand / creating the desire in people?


This happens when the people behind the brand actively engage with creating a shift in the market
I assume this means spending millions of $$$ on ads / marketing in order to be able to shift the market and make them see things / influencing their desires in a certain way.


Repackaging a product for another audience will NOT achieve this (as it supposes the audience already exists)
When I think of repackaging a product for another audience previously, I was thinking along the lines of say, taking an existing product, e.g: a gaming mouse, then redesigning it and cater / market that to serious girl gamers. But like you said, assuming the audience in this case (serious girl gamers) are not huge, it could potentially fail.....


People are not a "market", they are people with lives & desires. Sparking one of these desires is where the "blue ocean" comes from -- inspiring someone to change their behaviour in some new & exciting way.
The last line lit up my mind. :thumbsup:
 

rpeck90

Silver Contributor
Speedway Pass
Nov 26, 2016
210
984
332
30
United Kingdom
make it big by marketing alone.
Not at all -- you need something which is going to deliver a distinct set of results. This is what I tried to explain with the "product"/"offer" stuff in the post I sent. The product has to work better than anything on the market... the offer is how you position it for use by a particular group of people.

In the case of the iPod -- a means to listen to your favourite music without having to carry CD's...
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NlHUz99l-eo

Another good example is Febreze. If you don't have it in Singapore, Febreze is basically a spray (you'd call it a "mist" selling to women) that you can use to make your home smell nice. If you've just been cooking fish or something, it's meant to "neutralize" the odors and give your home a nice smell...

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYjyz7Q8_zI

Whilst Febreze works well as a product - there are two things to appreciate when considering it from a "marketing" angle.

Firstly, it's NOT a deodorant/air freshener. This might sound simplistic, but is SUPER important -- in order to correctly "position" the product (with an appropriate offer), you need to understand the CORE reason why it exists. If someone wanted to make their home smell good, they'd just spray their favourite fragrance, right? Although that would work, it only masks the smell, doesn't get rid of it entirely. Febreze (and there are others now) is designed to eliminate odors. It's meant to do it with some chemical wizardry, but that doesn't matter. The point is that it's an odor eliminator.

Secondly, it's used to make a home feel more "homely".
This is the offer. Men don't buy Febreze unless it's going to get them laid. Women buy it to make the house smell more like a warm, loving home. These are the two triggers that would get people interested in it. As mentioned previously, no one "needs" Febreze (there's no latent demand), but when you wrap it in an effective offer, suddenly, it starts to make "sense" to the buyer.

What makes Febreze interesting is that it's actually the subject of quite a well known marketing story (which you'll learn a lot from). Basically, the SAME product (that's now a $1bn brand) was originally sold as an "odor eliminator", with an ad campaign and everything. It tanked. It tanked because most people don't think their house smells. They're used to the dog odor or whatever... thus there was no demand for the product. The product worked... but the offer wasn't strong enough to get people buying.

In looking at the problem, P&G marketeers found that the people who loved the product were using it as a "reward" for when they'd done the cleaning. You know once you've vacuumed and the place "feels" clean? Well they were using Febreze as a way to make it smell clean too. Obviously the WRONG way to use the product, but it's what they were using it for anyway.

The minute the P&G team re-positioned the product as a "reward" for cleaning, sales increased. Obviously, the product was still exactly the same, but it's "offer" had changed. Whilst interesting, you must appreciate that it is only possible if you have a legitimate innovation to bring to the market.

VERY good simplified version of the story.

thus making them want it
I bought an iPhone 4 because when I was in Ukraine, I had to find an office and had no clue about who to ask. My friend had his iPhone, we found wifi, and found the location very quickly thanks to Google maps. That's the value of the iPhone. The luxury aspect is just Apple's way of presenting the offer as a groundbreaking piece of technology (which is Apple's real tour de force).

Red Bull is creating a certain lifestyle which they steer their target customer towards,
Red Bull created / imported the first "energy drink" into the West (from what I've read). This energy drink works (I've never drank it) on its own. You *could* sell it as an energy drink. But then who would your market be? Old grandmas and housewives going through the menopause. A much better way to sell it is to make "normal" people want it. How do you do this? You create a reason for them to require an "energy drink" - which in the case of RB was to fund/sponsor these epic adrenaline-based events. Now, if you wanted to "do an all nighter", or live vicariously, you'd instinctively reach for the silver + blue cans.

I don't quite understand the "curation of demand" phrase
You'd do well to read about latent demand. As I mentioned previously, certain products/services are "always" in demand because they are logically required to live certain types of lives (typically tied to sex or money). This is why prostitution is often referred to as the "oldest profession".

Most "businesses" only work with latent demand, and thus are unable to grow/expand. I see it often.

The true magic of branding (and the "blue ocean" strategy) is the idea that people are interested in buying certain products IF they are given a big enough reason to go for them. This is where the likes of personal computers, cars, smartphones, etc come from. If you had all the women you'd ever want, all the food you'd ever want, on some tropical island - you wouldn't care about any of the latest innovations... you'd be too busy with the women. But what if you don't live that idyllic lifestyle? Well... suddenly, the likes of "gambling", business and a range of other avenues soon become appealing. This is demand curation.

Good explanation (replace "marketing" with "offer" and "innovation" with "product"):


taking an existing product, e.g: a gaming mouse, then redesigning it and cater / market that to serious girl gamers
This won't get anywhere. I've done it and tried it all before -- there is VERY little value proposition in re-purposing products like that.

I assume this means spending millions of $$$ on ads / marketing in order
It just means doing things "your way". If you're good at what you do, you shouldn't need to spend any money on ads -- your buyers should bring others with them each time.
 

Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum. Subscribe.

OP
OP
Xeon

Xeon

All Cars Kneel Before Pagani.
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Sep 3, 2017
1,329
2,800
666
Singapore
Not at all -- you need something which is going to deliver a distinct set of results. This is what I tried to explain with the "product"/"offer" stuff in the post I sent. The product has to work better than anything on the market... the offer is how you position it for use by a particular group of people.

In the case of the iPod -- a means to listen to your favourite music without having to carry CD's...
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NlHUz99l-eo

Another good example is Febreze. If you don't have it in Singapore, Febreze is basically a spray (you'd call it a "mist" selling to women) that you can use to make your home smell nice. If you've just been cooking fish or something, it's meant to "neutralize" the odors and give your home a nice smell...

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYjyz7Q8_zI

Whilst Febreze works well as a product - there are two things to appreciate when considering it from a "marketing" angle.

Firstly, it's NOT a deodorant/air freshener. This might sound simplistic, but is SUPER important -- in order to correctly "position" the product (with an appropriate offer), you need to understand the CORE reason why it exists. If someone wanted to make their home smell good, they'd just spray their favourite fragrance, right? Although that would work, it only masks the smell, doesn't get rid of it entirely. Febreze (and there are others now) is designed to eliminate odors. It's meant to do it with some chemical wizardry, but that doesn't matter. The point is that it's an odor eliminator.

Secondly, it's used to make a home feel more "homely". This is the offer. Men don't buy Febreze unless it's going to get them laid. Women buy it to make the house smell more like a warm, loving home. These are the two triggers that would get people interested in it. As mentioned previously, no one "needs" Febreze (there's no latent demand), but when you wrap it in an effective offer, suddenly, it starts to make "sense" to the buyer.

What makes Febreze interesting is that it's actually the subject of quite a well known marketing story (which you'll learn a lot from). Basically, the SAME product (that's now a $1bn brand) was originally sold as an "odor eliminator", with an ad campaign and everything. It tanked. It tanked because most people don't think their house smells. They're used to the dog odor or whatever... thus there was no demand for the product. The product worked... but the offer wasn't strong enough to get people buying.

In looking at the problem, P&G marketeers found that the people who loved the product were using it as a "reward" for when they'd done the cleaning. You know once you've vacuumed and the place "feels" clean? Well they were using Febreze as a way to make it smell clean too. Obviously the WRONG way to use the product, but it's what they were using it for anyway.

The minute the P&G team re-positioned the product as a "reward" for cleaning, sales increased. Obviously, the product was still exactly the same, but it's "offer" had changed. Whilst interesting, you must appreciate that it is only possible if you have a legitimate innovation to bring to the market.

VERY good simplified version of the story.


I bought an iPhone 4 because when I was in Ukraine, I had to find an office and had no clue about who to ask. My friend had his iPhone, we found wifi, and found the location very quickly thanks to Google maps. That's the value of the iPhone. The luxury aspect is just Apple's way of presenting the offer as a groundbreaking piece of technology (which is Apple's real tour de force).


Red Bull created / imported the first "energy drink" into the West (from what I've read). This energy drink works (I've never drank it) on its own. You *could* sell it as an energy drink. But then who would your market be? Old grandmas and housewives going through the menopause. A much better way to sell it is to make "normal" people want it. How do you do this? You create a reason for them to require an "energy drink" - which in the case of RB was to fund/sponsor these epic adrenaline-based events. Now, if you wanted to "do an all nighter", or live vicariously, you'd instinctively reach for the silver + blue cans.


You'd do well to read about latent demand. As I mentioned previously, certain products/services are "always" in demand because they are logically required to live certain types of lives (typically tied to sex or money). This is why prostitution is often referred to as the "oldest profession".

Most "businesses" only work with latent demand, and thus are unable to grow/expand. I see it often.

The true magic of branding (and the "blue ocean" strategy) is the idea that people are interested in buying certain products IF they are given a big enough reason to go for them. This is where the likes of personal computers, cars, smartphones, etc come from. If you had all the women you'd ever want, all the food you'd ever want, on some tropical island - you wouldn't care about any of the latest innovations... you'd be too busy with the women. But what if you don't live that idyllic lifestyle? Well... suddenly, the likes of "gambling", business and a range of other avenues soon become appealing. This is demand curation.

Good explanation (replace "marketing" with "offer" and "innovation" with "product"):



This won't get anywhere. I've done it and tried it all before -- there is VERY little value proposition in re-purposing products like that.


It just means doing things "your way". If you're good at what you do, you shouldn't need to spend any money on ads -- your buyers should bring others with them each time.

Man, I spent 4 hours reading and absorbing your teachings, and also reading the Medium article you linked to.
Indeed, there's many many things I've learned just from that article alone. I was taking down notes as I went along.

CUE (doing an activity) ----> ACTION (using a product to perform the CUE) ----> REWARD (something you get in return that makes you feel good [emotionally] for doing that ACTION) ----> After multiple uses/repetitions ----> CRAVING ----> Becomes a HABIT ----> REPEAT FROM CUE

I can actually see how to apply the above flow to any product :blush:

Another thing I've learned from that article is the painkillers vs vitamins concept:



This is new to me. All along, I always thought it's about solving "problems", finding pain points.
However, I was confused, because not all products solve problems (like you said, some things just lack the latent demand).
The lines in red cleared this up fully.

Also, I've been thinking deeply about the part where you mention Innovation (Product) + Positioning (Offer).
I assume if one executes both of these 2 together successfully, a blue ocean is created? Thinking back, it seems all the successful big brands did this well. Very well in fact. Starbucks, Red Bull, McDonald's, Nike, you name it.....and this one.....K9 SportsSack lol

Just one more thing to clear up:

you need something which is going to deliver a distinct set of results.......The product has to work better than anything on the market...
For the Innovation part, when you say the product has to deliver distinct results + work better than anything on the market, do you mean that the result always has to be performance-based (e.g: Frebreze's odor eliminator feature, Red Bull's energy boosting capability)?

Can it be something that just looks more aesthetically better? Would that be considered "innovation" to you though?
Say, for automobiles, for example. Or headwear.

The more I think I know, the more I realise I don't lol
 

rpeck90

Silver Contributor
Speedway Pass
Nov 26, 2016
210
984
332
30
United Kingdom
Would that be considered "innovation" to you though?
My barometer of "innovation" comes from Peter Thiel: "do more with less".

Whilst he was using this in a purely technological context, I've yet to find an instance where it doesn't apply.

When you think about delivering a "product" - and, remember, this is about the "blue ocean" stuff - you need to be looking at what your thing is going to do "better" than anybody else. If you are getting your feet wet, or trying to gain traction, then you can just replicate something that's been done already.

To create demand is a different ballgame.

All of the big guys "innovated" by creating a product which did more (in some area) than the other guy. As explained, the way they made this "work" in the marketplace was to then "position" it with an appropriate offer. Without any core discernible "innovation", no amount of ads/promo/branding will do anything to make it more appealing ("lipstick on a pig").

You need something which is going to work to deliver 100x the results that anyone else can. The simplest way to do this is by identifying a "niche"/"pain point" and focusing the entire product around that ("bagless vacuum cleaner", "energy drinks", "running shoes", "broadband Internet", "decentralized currency")... "toasted" cigarettes...

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKcneQ6N50Q

The "result" you deliver can be anything. It doesn't need to be tied to performance, but does need to be something you can justify to the consumer as being something they can leverage in their lives to enjoy a more connected, spiritual, enlightened, sex-filled, [insert adjective] experience. The "experience" you're able to create thanks to the innovation inside your product is what the "offer" is meant to represent. The best companies essentially "live" their offer -- just look at Apple.

There's a great article I bookmarked a long time ago about it here:
Secrets Revealed: How To Sell Ice To Eskimos

In that article, the "product" is ice and the "offer" is HEAT ;-)

-

If you take the "shared hosting" thing I wrote about at the start of the year (I'll hopefully have an update for that soon), the bottom line is that market is 1) massive 2) highly competitive 3) awash with people better than me.

There's just been a company awarded $10m in funding to create a similar solution for database management - Aiven raises $10 million to manage databases across cloud platforms

Whilst this all works... there's a problem... Who cares?

The majority of "software" products are designed for developers. No one really gives a shit about them, and the people who do use them - purely for functionality purposes - are extremely flaky. In other words, they're scratching an itch... dealing with latent demand. This limits their potential for growth ("red ocean"), as they're just pitching their "product" against another.

If you want to "create" demand for that type of setup, you need to go out and reach people who haven't yet even considered a need for the product. Whilst you can do this with ads, you can also do it the old fashioned way as well (networking/sales). My aspiration for that other product is not to make a hosting product, but to create an underlying business tool which can help manufacturing-centric companies to further integrate their processes in a more coherent & profit-centric way.

The way I've worked on doing this is 1) focus it on CLOUD VPS infrastructure + 2) create a compelling USE CASE for the product within business. Thus, the "product" becomes "cloud infrastructure", and the "offer" becomes core business growth.

To promote that product, I will not need to "sell" the fact it's "cloud". No one cares about that. What they care about is how that technology can be used to further grow their underlying business. They react to the "results" I gain on behalf of this new way of thinking. The better I can demonstrate + illustrate those results, the more perceived value they ascribe to the offer.
 

rpeck90

Silver Contributor
Speedway Pass
Nov 26, 2016
210
984
332
30
United Kingdom
Can it be something that just looks more aesthetically better
As a designer, I think you'll appreciate the Steve Jobs quote more than anyone in this instance...

Design is not how it looks, it's how it works.
 

astr0

Grinding
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Dec 3, 2017
328
454
232
32
Lviv, Ukraine
I'm currently at Chapter 2, and the takeaway is that the strategy is about taking an existing type of product from an established / saturated industry, then marketing it to a different audience, and modifying the product to cater to that new audience to achieve market/product fit. Basically, changing up the marketing angle.

However, it seems that this strategy is more suitable for companies who already have the $$$ to conduct extensive research on markets / industries, in order to be able to use the frameworks and graphs/charts/systems mentioned in the book?

Has anyone read this book and applied the stuff inside to your own business, with at least some degree of success?
Curious what everyone's thoughts on this book is.
Haven't read the book, but I think the NDA project is something like that.

It's similar to many products in a big, established and a little saturated industry.
The client just worked from a solution to solve a need in a pretty small niche that had no competition.
Zero research, graphs/charts/systems, and frameworks to validate it. Just common sense that the idea would work and positive responses from some investors and people in the big industry and in the niche.
We've also made it much much simpler than products in the big industry from the UX side as all of them are bloated.
It kicks a$$ right now in the niche. We're thinking of applying the same approach and scale it to different niches.
If things would go well, we might even consider competing in the big industry someday once we'll have everything to pass the entry barrier.
Some of our users are experienced with the big industry too and they really like the simplicity and ease of use of our product.
That might be an important value skew allowing us to compete with all the big guys out there.

As a former energy-drink junkie I would say Red Bull is somehow a little different from the competition.
The effects on focus and concentration are pretty weak.
However, it's the only energy drink that doesn't allow me to sleep straight after drinking it.
Also, I could easily drink 5 bottles of two different "focus" competitors a day, but more than one big can of Red Bull was rejected by my body.
It just felt so bad I no longer wanted it.
So the only use case for Red Bull was to drive safely when I was tired and sleepy.
From the focus perspective, pure water was better.
There are energy drinks with similar effects too, but Red Bull has better quality (can't drink even a bottle of them).
Agree, that the marketing is by far the biggest reason for it to kick a$$. Same with Monster.
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
Xeon

Xeon

All Cars Kneel Before Pagani.
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Sep 3, 2017
1,329
2,800
666
Singapore
If you are getting your feet wet, or trying to gain traction, then you can just replicate something that's been done already.
Yup, definitely need to get my feet wet and earn some scars like Steve Jobs before venturing into the blue ocean stuff.
But really, this whole thing is all very interesting.

All of the big guys "innovated" by creating a product which did more (in some area) than the other guy. As explained, the way they made this "work" in the marketplace was to then "position" it with an appropriate offer. The simplest way to do this is by identifying a "niche"/"pain point" and focusing the entire product around that ("bagless vacuum cleaner", "energy drinks", "running shoes", "broadband Internet", "decentralizedcurrency")... "toasted" cigarettes..........The "result" you deliver can be anything. It doesn't need to be tied to performance, but does need to be something you can justify to the consumer as being something they can leverage in their lives to enjoy a more connected, spiritual, enlightened, sex-filled, [insert adjective] experience. The "experience" you're able to create thanks to the innovation inside your product is what the "offer" is meant to represent.
THIS totally. Thanks a lot, and to other folks here as well. Once the forum is back to normal, I'll rep you hard. :cool:
 

astr0

Grinding
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Dec 3, 2017
328
454
232
32
Lviv, Ukraine
The new forum UI sucks honestly. I'd prefer the old version.
>> OFFTOP
You just got used to the old one.
The avatars are square already.
The latest posts section is much better than just after the update.
It looks more modern, the old one probably was like 10 years old.
It's getting better, so someone is working on it to be better.
<<
 
OP
OP
Xeon

Xeon

All Cars Kneel Before Pagani.
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Sep 3, 2017
1,329
2,800
666
Singapore
The new forum UI sucks honestly. I'd prefer the old version.
What.....?! I thought the look and UI we're seeing now is the temporary one, and that once it's fully ready in 72 hours, it'll revert to an actual one?
If not, then it sucks tbh......it looks really dead and lifeless, reminds me of late 1990s VBulletin forum software......
 

0dysseus

Contributor
May 23, 2018
34
37
110
Berlin, Germany
I see this book recommended here and there, but honestly it never intrigued me enough to read it. From the summaries I read, it basically suggested find your niche, iterate on an idea, stuff like that.
 

Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum. Subscribe.

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.

Sponsored Offers

  • Sticky
MARKETPLACE Lex DeVille's - Advanced Freelance Udemy Courses!
Will definitely join start a freelance business and freelance copywriting to start my career as...
  • Sticky
MARKETPLACE You Are One Call Away From Living Your Dream Life - LightHouse’s Accountability Program ⚡
Here is where you eliminate uncertainty from the future! I wanted to post this image as I...
  • Sticky
MARKETPLACE KAK’s “Kill Bigger” Incubation Program- With DAILY personal attention.
Hey Guys! I wanted to give a quick update on what this program has become. In its infancy, we...


Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum. Subscribe to become an INSIDER.

Fastlane Insiders

View the forum AD FREE.
Private, unindexed content
Detailed process/execution threads
Monthly conference calls with doers
Ideas needing execution, more!

Join Fastlane Insiders.

Top Bottom
AdBlock Detected - Please Disable

Yes, ads can be annoying. But please...

...to support the Unscripted/Fastlane mission (and to respect the immense amount of time needed to manage this forum) please DISABLE your ad-block. Thank you.

I've Disabled AdBlock