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To Put Prices on a Website or Not - Service Business

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AustinS28

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Hey guys, there is a lot of conflicting thought that I've read around this topic.

I have a personal training business. I have a website I made myself, but it basically serves as an about me...

I hired someone to make a new website with functionality. It's a lot of programming that I can't do. It also offers a lot to my customers and pulls me ahead of a lot of my competitors.

I am writing sections of the website. I charge a premium price $110/hour, but sell in packages that reduce the hourly rate.

I am wondering what the thought is of leaving prices off the site to attract more customers for a consultation so I can better sell to them once I have them. The idea is that I won't scare people away with price.

If I put them on their however, I should suspect that the potential customer is fully aware and a stronger lead.
 

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csalvato

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Hey guys, there is a lot of conflicting thought that I've read around this topic.

I have a personal training business. I have a website I made myself, but it basically serves as an about me...

I hired someone to make a new website with functionality. It's a lot of programming that I can't do. It also offers a lot to my customers and pulls me ahead of a lot of my competitors.

I am writing sections of the website. I charge a premium price $110/hour, but sell in packages that reduce the hourly rate.

I am wondering what the thought is of leaving prices off the site to attract more customers for a consultation so I can better sell to them once I have them. The idea is that I won't scare people away with price.

If I put them on their however, I should suspect that the potential customer is fully aware and a stronger lead.

In a high touch business you normally want your sales reps to do the selling, not your website.

Often times, a single page can't really get across the value that needs to be demonstrated to justify a premium price. It's difficult to make that case without actually talking to someone.

For that reason, I don't include prices on the website for my service business.
 

biophase

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Hey guys, there is a lot of conflicting thought that I've read around this topic.

I have a personal training business. I have a website I made myself, but it basically serves as an about me...

I hired someone to make a new website with functionality. It's a lot of programming that I can't do. It also offers a lot to my customers and pulls me ahead of a lot of my competitors.

I am writing sections of the website. I charge a premium price $110/hour, but sell in packages that reduce the hourly rate.

I am wondering what the thought is of leaving prices off the site to attract more customers for a consultation so I can better sell to them once I have them. The idea is that I won't scare people away with price.

If I put them on their however, I should suspect that the potential customer is fully aware and a stronger lead.

Tough to say. I usually look for prices and when I don't see them I move on. I hate calling a business and finding out they were way out of my price range. Only after I see the price, do I look at their offer. I like listing prices because you don't get the callers that can only pay $20/hr. You will waste alot of time with them.
 

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I would opt for including prices on your website, even if it is a from price.

Think of it as the first step of qualification, you need to qualify your prospects before you can sell to them. My example would be my slow lane job, if I speak to someone who wants a holiday for 2 weeks in Vietnam but only has a budget of £1000 per person then there is no way I will even look at it. Had I not found out their budget I could've wasted hours of my time looking for something that doesn't exist.

For you that would mean spending hours on the phone trying to sell your services to people who can't afford what you have to offer.

Don't try and sell to the people who don't get it, you will waste a lot of time and damage your attitude/motivation. Nobody wants to waste time talking to people who can't afford their product.

Just my 2 pence/cents worth.
 

liquidglass

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I would include your prices hands down. I'm like Biophase in that if I don't see the prices listed on a site I move on to their competitor. I'm sure you're wondering why, it's simple, I like to make quick decisions and if you add another step to my decision making process (especially a phone call) I'll move to the person who makes it easy for me to say yes.

I've done sales for years so I understand your struggle but when a website doesn't make prices readily available I have a few flags that go off in my head:
1) they want to get me on the phone to upsell me (waste of my time)
2) They aren't transparent enough for me so I inherently don't trust how they do business
3) They charge outrageous prices and want to talk to me to justify them (again waste of my time)

I'm on the website because I've said I'm interested in what they are offering by clicking or searching for it so I'm usually ready to say yes and whip out my debit card. If you put any more walls between me and decision making or your payment portal I'll look elsewhere.

When selling insurance of course the prices vary a lot from $20 - hundreds - thousands. But when I had people prequalifying the leads even if it was an automated system they called into it always gave a price that I knew anyone could get insured with no matter what their conditions were. If they didn't like it, they stopped right there. Saved me more time than they money would have been worth talking to people that weren't really interested or couldn't afford it.
 

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I usually move on if I dont see prices, dont like wasting my time.

Contacted a few copywriters asking for prices and they come back with £500 an hour and stuff, im like jeez if I knew that I wouldnt have bothered contacting you.

You can always do case studies of previous clients work and maybe show how much that work costs. Or examples of prices for certain works but say pricing is dependant on the job. You need something on there unless you love writing back to ppl with your price and getting rejected.
 

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We put a "from xx€/month" on our site. Usually I then sell them something higher.

I personally hate it when I dont see any prices. Dont need to be exact, but I like to have a rough estimate before I talk to a sales rep.
 

Tobore

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What if you add a "REQUEST QUOTE" or "GET QUOTE IMMEDIATELY!" button on your site?

With that you could still grab their email too without getting them scared.
 

csalvato

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It's great that everyone here likes to see prices. Of course you do. But qualification is done on the PHONE for high end pricing >$500.

If it didn't work well, most companies in this space would list their prices on the website. Here are some examples that don't:

http://www.cellinoandbarnes.com/
One of the biggest personal injury law firms in the country. You won't find a single price on their website. All their qualification is done on the phone, and their deals are worth multi-millions.

http://www.blackliondigital.com/services/
The site of a business of a mentor of mine. They are killing it but don't have a single price listed on their site, except for small ticket items intending to be sold only to existing clients...who have already been qualified through buying.

---
But here's an example of a business with a high end ticket item that does list prices:

https://www.kissmetrics.com/pricing

A popular internet marketing/tracking company. Charges $2000 for its highest level plan, then asks you to contact a rep if you have even bigger needs.

The only way to know which is better for your business is to test it and see what has a better close rate.

Personally, I prefer to start w/o listing prices so I can get feedback and talk directly with as many customers as possible before they self-disqualify.
 

AustinS28

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This is getting me thinking a little bit more.

I don't have a single package that costs under $1000, but can definitely appeal more by putting the hourly rates to make it less intimidating.

I also offer more on my website than competitors and a plan with a full money back guarantee which is virtually unheard of in personal training because people can't do it. I think that qualifies my prices a bit more.

I stayed up last night to look at some of my competitors and most list some form of pricing even if it's just starting price.

I've wasted my time in the past on a few leads that didn't know the cost beforehand. I find it hard to justify my price unless I do offer certain additional services than my competitors which I will be (interactive site with a lot of resources and tools). I know I am a great trainer too, or at least salesman, I've had customers that have been with my the past year or two religiously working out multiple times a week and spending over 15k a piece. Those are the people I am looking for.

I got a good name I believe as well for my .com as far as search engines are concerned.

I'll start with them on there and I guess see how it works and can always go back and correct.
 

healthstatus

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In your business you know that it takes a certain number of sessions per week to see any success and since you are looking for more long term clients I would give them a monthly budget range.

Right off the top of my head:
I am committed to helping you reach your goals, but commitment in fitness is a two way street. I only take clients that are willing to have a minimum of 2/3 (30/45/60) minute sessions each week, anything less than that will create frustration, for both of us. Depending on your level of commitment and time you want to spend working to reach your fitness goals, you should plan on a monthly budget of at least $1000 for the first 3 months.
(swap out and put appropriate numbers where you need them.)
 

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Fatal Jay

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I don't do prices. I just landed a high price deal with my church to build a site for them. What I do is name my price, then compare them to other prices but I never post prices on website unless it's something considered fair or cheap price by the masses.
 

BlakeIC

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Tough to say. I usually look for prices and when I don't see them I move on. I hate calling a business and finding out they were way out of my price range. Only after I see the price, do I look at their offer. I like listing prices because you don't get the callers that can only pay $20/hr. You will waste alot of time with them.

Put the prices, from what I think it would increase conversion
If i go to a website and it doesnt have the prices I just leave no questions asked
 

blackhat

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I also move on as soon as I see prices aren't listed. I'm fine if it is just a ballpark i.e. "starting at" or "from" but I'm moving on if all it says is contact us for a quote.
 

Mass

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This is getting me thinking a little bit more.

I don't have a single package that costs under $1000, but can definitely appeal more by putting the hourly rates to make it less intimidating.

I also offer more on my website than competitors and a plan with a full money back guarantee which is virtually unheard of in personal training because people can't do it. I think that qualifies my prices a bit more.

I stayed up last night to look at some of my competitors and most list some form of pricing even if it's just starting price.

I've wasted my time in the past on a few leads that didn't know the cost beforehand. I find it hard to justify my price unless I do offer certain additional services than my competitors which I will be (interactive site with a lot of resources and tools). I know I am a great trainer too, or at least salesman, I've had customers that have been with my the past year or two religiously working out multiple times a week and spending over 15k a piece. Those are the people I am looking for.

I got a good name I believe as well for my .com as far as search engines are concerned.

I'll start with them on there and I guess see how it works and can always go back and correct.

Hi Austin,

I think that is the way to go, I work in a service profession aswell and sometimes, people just don't get it.

For you I would imagine you get plenty of people saying "But Austin, I read that if I lift too many weights I'm going to look like the incredible hul rather than tone up" or "But I thought all Carb's are bad?!". Anyone who has spent 5 minutes reading bodybuilding.com thinks they are a expert.

By having a pricing system I would anticipate that the time wasters are drastically reduced and the people who do get in touch will be worthy of your skills. One of my toughest (and most educational boss's) once told me "Not all customers are good customers. Its just as important to know who not to sell to as to know who to sell to"

Mass
 

NVious

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Rack the shotgun to quote Perry Marshall (eliminate bad leads).

IF someone is merely looking at price when it comes to something as invaluable as their health, they're not going to be a good lead and even if you do convert them, what is their mentality going into the training (oh he better be worth it!!! I'm paying a pretty penny!!).

IMO the best thing would be to do a starting from to give people an idea so that the time wasters can be told "what were you expecting, it says starting from XYZ," BUT the people who ARE calling in are actually much more qualified.

The problem really comes down to this:
Do you NEED more customers or do you only want the best customers right now?

Let's break it down further, situation 1 where you DON'T put prices:

Maybe you get more calls, but you WILL get more time wasters (as you've already seen), if you're worth $110 an hour (conservatively speaking seeing as some hours you've probably sold 5k+ packages), that time wasted could amount to $50...75 and even potentially make you miss out on an opportunity that could've converted into the 5k and for what?

For a customer that is already nickle and diming THE most important aspect of even existing (their body)? I mean even if you convert them, as I said, how confident are you they will 1.Get results 2.Stick with it or 3.Refer people over because remember bad clients=undermining your name=no referrals

OR you DO put some sort of pricing to let people know "Are you serious? If not kindly f*ck off:"

Now every lead is "qualified" (racked that shotgun) in some sense and you're already starting off on good ground (they value their health, they value your services and they are taking it seriously enough to KNOW that the investment WILL be worth it).

Is this client likely to get results? Is this client likely to stick with it? Are they likely to after having done 1 and 2 do number 3 in referring people over to you? Again this is a client that could potentially be worth way more than the immediate fees they make in not just their immediate business, but the long term business AND their referrals.

I'd do the starting from to weed out the contenders from the pretenders and I would create a sales script so as to let people know you ONLY want serious people as far as who you work with, again racking the shotgun but making the sort of client you have much more likely to convert into a VERY lucrative long term client....thus foregoing the nickle and dimers who won't get results, won't stick with it, won't refer and will sully your name.
 

Tyler Ellison

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There's only one way to know: TEST.

Everybody has an opinion but nobody can predict the best possible future in your unique situation.

If you're already onto A/B split testing then awesome, do that.

If not, you can do something like this:

Week 1: No price listed, use a contact button for leads. (control)
Week 2: 1 price listed, like "Start now for as low as $110/month" - use a contact button for leads.
Week 3: Multiple prices listed, 'Option 1: $110/month, Option 2: $250/month' or whatever. Include a short bullet list of the packages. - use a contact form
Week 4: Use a custom flash script that takes their answers and 'generates a custom quote'.

Most of those are pretty simple and straightforward except for the last one.

I think the last option will get you the best qualified leads, followed by week 2. I think week 3 will be the worst.

Your programmer should be able to set you up with these. If you want to split test all variations at the same time (best option) I recommend using a split testing software like Visual Website Optimizer/Optimizely/Improvely something like that. Google Analytics has a split testing with goal tracking option too but my use of it has found it buggy.
 

AustinS28

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Thanks all, this is a rough draft of the services page...new site should be done hopefully before September so some edits will be made. Going to list price and will keep the forum posted on lead generation.

---

Services

Private Client

Private one-on-one sessions with a fitness professional.

Private sessions are for a client with specific goals and offer the highest level of service. All programs are built around peak performance. The design of each program is custom taking into account injury prevention and targeting the objectives of the client. Our client will have full access to our progress tools and an easy view of week by week results.
  • Bespoke Programming
    • Programs include, fat loss, toning, strength and conditioning, endurance training, hypertrophy training.
  • Speciality Programming
    • Preventative programming designed to increase longevity, improve cholesterol and A1C markers and lower blood pressure. Healthy equals happy.
  • Special Needs Programming
    • Some of our trainers have experience working with adults and children with Autism and Prader-Willi Syndrome.
  • 1 Hour Training Session
  • Access to Online Client Portal
  • Convenient Location (in-home, your gym, or a gym we provide).
  • Convenient Scheduling (online scheduling tool to coordinate trainer/client availability)
$110/Hour
$100/Hour 12 Sessions

Semi-Private Client

Small group personal training sessions with a fitness professional.

Our semi-private sessions are catered to people who are looking to improve body composition through high intensity interval training (HIIT). These workouts are comprised of 1 trainer and a group of 5 clients. Semi-private sessions offer a greater level of instruction and exercise precision than found in group exercise classes. This aids in injury prevention and exercise technique. These workouts burn fat, build muscle and improve blood lipids.
  • HIIT Programming
    • High intensity interval training that incorporates cardiovascular and weightlifting exercises in an all encompassing program which burns fat and builds muscle.
  • 1 Hour Session
  • Access to Online Client Portal
  • Convenient Location (at gym, in-park)
  • Convenient Scheduling (online scheduling tool to view open classes)
$40/Hour 12 Sessions (sessions expire after 45 days)
$35/Hour 24 Sessions (sessions expire after 75 days)

Guaranteed Programming

Commitment has its Perks.

We guarantee results. Our guaranteed programming is private client sessions with a time commitment. A client committing to a total of 4 training sessions per week in 3 month blocks qualifies for our money back guarantee. We want you to succeed and know our programs are most proficient for the dedicated. Guaranteed programming also offers the incentive of a reduced hourly rate to accommodate the amount of training.
  • Bespoke Programming
    • Programs include, fat loss, toning, strength and conditioning, endurance training, hypertrophy training.
  • Speciality Programming
    • Preventative programming designed to increase longevity, improve cholesterol and A1C markers and lower blood pressure. Healthy equals happy.
  • Special Needs Programming
    • Some of our trainers have experience working with adults and children with Autism and Prader-Willi Syndrome.
  • 1 Hour Training Session
  • Access to Online Client Portal
  • Convenient Location (in-home, your gym, or a gym we provide).
  • Convenient Scheduling (online scheduling tool to coordinate trainer/client availability)
  • We guarantee that we will improve your baseline numbers or issue you a full refund. Each program must be strictly adhered to and a commitment must be pledged. Terms will be presented before purchase.
$90/Hour - 3 Months (4x/Week)
$85/Hour - 6 Months (4x/Week)
$80/Hour - 12 Months (4x/Week)
 

Kung Fu Steve

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Are you worried about people being turned off by your perception of high prices?

...what if I told you $110/hr is not really the premium price in that market?

...at least for someone who knows what they are doing (which you sound like you do).

Some joker at Lifetime charges $90-130/hr depending on the position.
 

AustinS28

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Are you worried about people being turned off by your perception of high prices?

...what if I told you $110/hr is not really the premium price in that market?

...at least for someone who knows what they are doing (which you sound like you do).

Some joker at Lifetime charges $90-130/hr depending on the position.

It's location dependant. It is a middle of the road price in manhattan and upon looking at some of my competitors sites recently I may just increase.

I do sell in packages however. I don't mind charging someone less that spends 10k/year on training which is the bulk of my business.

I will also tell you most jokers at lifetime have trouble getting and retaining clients.

I worked at equinox for a year which charges more on the hour and most trainers did so poorly.

Most people couldn't last 6 months at that job. That I worked with. I read somewhere the turnover rate in the industry is 85% within the first year.

However you are correct. I don't think it would be indicating putting that price on there and won't due to the fact that these people should be accustomed to seeing what other gyms charge.
 

hestati

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There's only one way to know: TEST.

Everybody has an opinion but nobody can predict the best possible future in your unique situation.

If you're already onto A/B split testing then awesome, do that.

If not, you can do something like this:

Week 1: No price listed, use a contact button for leads. (control)
Week 2: 1 price listed, like "Start now for as low as $110/month" - use a contact button for leads.
Week 3: Multiple prices listed, 'Option 1: $110/month, Option 2: $250/month' or whatever. Include a short bullet list of the packages. - use a contact form
Week 4: Use a custom flash script that takes their answers and 'generates a custom quote'.

Most of those are pretty simple and straightforward except for the last one.

I think the last option will get you the best qualified leads, followed by week 2. I think week 3 will be the worst.

Your programmer should be able to set you up with these. If you want to split test all variations at the same time (best option) I recommend using a split testing software like Visual Website Optimizer/Optimizely/Improvely something like that. Google Analytics has a split testing with goal tracking option too but my use of it has found it buggy.

Doesn't work this way with expensive items. He doesn't sell 200/week, and if he sold 1 5k packages one week and 2 3k packages the next week, what will this tell you? What if he got 50 calls when not listing the price and 10 calls when listing, but no one bought, what does it tell you? In this case A/B should run for a long time, like 6 months and then you just compare the revenue from both, but then you'll be like "omg, I just lost 60k in revenue".

List the prices.
 

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NVious

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Doesn't work this way with expensive items. He doesn't sell 200/week, and if he sold 1 5k packages one week and 2 3k packages the next week, what will this tell you? What if he got 50 calls when not listing the price and 10 calls when listing, but no one bought, what does it tell you? In this case A/B should run for a long time, like 6 months and then you just compare the revenue from both, but then you'll be like "omg, I just lost 60k in revenue".

List the prices.

Doesn't work in the way you described either.

The "Omg I lost 60k" is meaningless, what if he wanted to test it when he was charging $200 an hour...$300....more.

No such thing as mistakes in business, you either win or you learn (or you go slowlane).

As long as something isn't egregiously out of the ball park of possibility, it should be tested.
 

Kung Fu Steve

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It's location dependant. It is a middle of the road price in manhattan and upon looking at some of my competitors sites recently I may just increase.

Not to hate but this sounds like a limiting belief. Call me on my bullshit but at least entertain the thought you are only charging 1/3rd of what you should be charging.

I do sell in packages however. I don't mind charging someone less that spends 10k/year on training which is the bulk of my business

Best way to do it obviously. Hourly is meant to be the juxtaposition for programs. I would venture to guess if you started charging 299/hr for one session but you offered your 12 week course for only $80/hr you would have more sales.

I will also tell you most jokers at lifetime have trouble getting and retaining clients.

I worked at equinox for a year which charges more on the hour and most trainers did so poorly.

Most people couldn't last 6 months at that job. That I worked with. I read somewhere the turnover rate in the industry is 85% within the first year

Abso-freaking-lutely.


However you are correct. I don't think it would be indicating putting that price on there and won't due to the fact that these people should be accustomed to seeing what other gyms charge.

One message that you send out by placing your prices out in the open is that you are sure and confident. When you don't put them out there you seem either extremely exclusive or a shiester.

I don't always like to tell people to increase their prices (especially for the same level of service) but in some cases it makes sense. If you doubled your prices and lost half your clients you would still make the same money for a lot less work. Thus opening yourself up for more higher-paying clients and more opportunities.

P.S. I may suggest non-traditional methods as well including contractual packages with monthly installments, group classes, etc. Eventually if you're looking to scale your business you'll need products instead of services but I'm sure you recognize that by now. Services are good money until you stop working.
 

AustinS28

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Not to hate but this sounds like a limiting belief. Call me on my bullshit but at least entertain the thought you are only charging 1/3rd of what you should be charging.



Best way to do it obviously. Hourly is meant to be the juxtaposition for programs. I would venture to guess if you started charging 299/hr for one session but you offered your 12 week course for only $80/hr you would have more sales.



Abso-freaking-lutely.




One message that you send out by placing your prices out in the open is that you are sure and confident. When you don't put them out there you seem either extremely exclusive or a shiester.

I don't always like to tell people to increase their prices (especially for the same level of service) but in some cases it makes sense. If you doubled your prices and lost half your clients you would still make the same money for a lot less work. Thus opening yourself up for more higher-paying clients and more opportunities.

P.S. I may suggest non-traditional methods as well including contractual packages with monthly installments, group classes, etc. Eventually if you're looking to scale your business you'll need products instead of services but I'm sure you recognize that by now. Services are good money until you stop working.


I love this advice and had some of these ideas already.

I'm going to spike my hourly rate. I'm offering 3/6/12 month programs I think that's an absolutely awesome way to push people into those deals and the contractual thing seems pretty sweet as I was heading down that path as well.

I have some product ideas and have been working on a related book. The passive income avenue is what I'm looking to build into so you're right about the end goal being products instead of services. I already work only 20ish hours a week at a physical location and make more than a lot of my friends putting 50/60/70/80 hours into their corporate positions. I do work more than 20 hours with business development but it's fun and I dictate all my tasking and hours.
 

MEAH

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If you do list your prices.. how many contact emails are you now missing out on if you eventually have a less expensive product/service you could sell that lead down the road?

I have never listed my training prices so I could at least start conversations with leads and have their email addresses.

I'm far from an expert in marketing but isn't --> "The money is in the list" ?? like everyone preaches?

If I listed prices I would lose about 90% of my list as I only close one out of ten and the only objection is price.

Now that I have a list I do email marketing and eventually will have something else to sell that list.

Just my .02
 

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Doesn't work this way with expensive items. He doesn't sell 200/week, and if he sold 1 5k packages one week and 2 3k packages the next week, what will this tell you? What if he got 50 calls when not listing the price and 10 calls when listing, but no one bought, what does it tell you? In this case A/B should run for a long time, like 6 months and then you just compare the revenue from both, but then you'll be like "omg, I just lost 60k in revenue".

List the prices.

I respectfully disagree.

On the internet we get feedback much faster than any other medium. Running A/B for 6 months is old way of thinking.

1 week may not be enough but I don't know any business that would spend 6 months for a single A/B test online. That was just an example of what could be done.

Doing nothing brings in no data. There should ALWAYS be something that's being tested.
 

Carny

Bronze Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Mar 20, 2013
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I can see the argument both ways, but I lean towards not listing prices. If prices are listed people will focus on that. Talk to them and get their focus on what they can be so they see the value and not just the cost.

Either way get away from an hourly rate. Sell results. Does anyone ever buy just one hour? Doesn't seem worthwhile for you or them. Create different packages with the least expensive being whatever the minimum is that someone can see some results.

Listing your hourly rate turns you into a commodity that can easily be compared. Even if they won't get the same service they will focus on price. It also makes it seem expensive compared to what they make, especially when they have no idea how many hours it will take. It's expensive and open ended. With packages the focus is on what they are getting.

If you want to weed some people out you could do a starting at price but personally I would go with no prices. I think most people expect it to cost considerably more than a gym membership and you have a chance to shoe them the value.

I own a service business and I don't list prices. In fact I charge to give a price, but I have to travel to their house.
 

NVious

Bronze Contributor
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Jun 12, 2015
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If you do list your prices.. how many contact emails are you now missing out on if you eventually have a less expensive product/service you could sell that lead down the road?

I have never listed my training prices so I could at least start conversations with leads and have their email addresses.

I'm far from an expert in marketing but isn't --> "The money is in the list" ?? like everyone preaches?

If I listed prices I would lose about 90% of my list as I only close one out of ten and the only objection is price.

Now that I have a list I do email marketing and eventually will have something else to sell that list.

Just my .02

If you're nickle and diming your health......
 

Kung Fu Steve

Legendary Contributor
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I like the way you're thinking. The only challenge I see is that instituting best practices from other industries is perfect... unless they don't fit.
Obviously "conversion rates" soar when you're sitting at the table with someone versus getting them to your website.

No reason to do e-mail marketing when you should have sold them the first time you talked to them on the phone.

Maybe I'm wrong but I'm guessing most of your clients come from referrals@AustinS28 ?

Do you actually capture leads on your website? If you were to "80/20" the business, where is the 20% you should be focusing on? (maybe it's not online yet?)
 

AustinS28

Silver Contributor
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Sep 25, 2014
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Manhattan, NY
I like the way you're thinking. The only challenge I see is that instituting best practices from other industries is perfect... unless they don't fit.
Obviously "conversion rates" soar when you're sitting at the table with someone versus getting them to your website.

No reason to do e-mail marketing when you should have sold them the first time you talked to them on the phone.

Maybe I'm wrong but I'm guessing most of your clients come from referrals@AustinS28 ?

Do you actually capture leads on your website? If you were to "80/20" the business, where is the 20% you should be focusing on? (maybe it's not online yet?)

You are very right in the fact that business has been driven by my current client base. All of my clients have been picked up from four different avenues, client referrals (including one client who gave my gift cards to everyone working at the business they owned)/craigslist/findyourtrainer.com/someone talking to me after seeing me train a client.

My best clients have been referred. So 80% of my business is coming from 20% of my clientele, but I do nurture those relationships. I'm very good to my customers, I remember birthdays, significant others life events, get gifts here and there after we talk about stuff, write thank yous etc. That's my strong point.

I don't pick up customers often, I mean once a month is doing well, but when that once a month person works with me for over a year and you keeping adding someone to the roster like that it's a nice accomplishment.

Online has been my target for a few reasons.

-My current site trainwitha.com I made on wix in 1 day. I have 0 experience with web development.
- http://www.manhattantrainer.com when finished is going to offer some cool things most trainers do not offer including money back guarantees on certain programs (If you spend $3000 bucks on 3 months of training, I better get you results in a couple months or I'm fine giving your money back). On that token you need to commit to training with me 4x per week or you void our agreement as well as some other terms. On top of that I am making a login for all my customers. On most people's site you see bios and pictures. With the login all my clients health/performance statistics will be graphed. This will aid in showcasing progress for guaranteed programs. I'm also trying to make health the center of my business with aesthetics and performance being added on top of that.
 

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