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HOT TOPIC The Official Robert Greene Thread

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Ubermensch

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In the beginning.

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"Let’s say that through some miscarriage of justice, you find yourself locked in prison tomorrow. Browsing through the prison library, you find there is one book that is constantly requested, but hard to get your hands on. What would you think that book was? Legal case STUDIES? Lock-picking manuals? The Bible perhaps? Close, but no cigar.

It’s none other than Robert Greene’s bestselling The 48 Laws of Power, which has sold over 1.2 million copies worldwide. Greene’s books are famously the most requested in correctional facilities across the United States, an achievement he bears with pride. (The author has a folder dedicated to the fan mail he receives from inmates).

However, it’s not just convicts who have taken to Greene’s works. His books are a favourite of WALL STREET executives, movie moguls and hip hop superstars. Some of his more notable fans include rappers Busta Rhymes, 50 Cent, Jay Z, and Kanye West.

With five international bestsellers on strategy power and seduction, Greene is the hero of schemers, manipulators and the power hungry; from the Hollywood elite to the lowliest criminal. If the subject matter of his books is anything to go by, you’d think he would present like a character from Game of Thrones, cold and conniving.

Yet for all his accolades, Greene seems astonishingly normal. A native of Los Angeles, Robert Greene currently lives a quiet life in a Spanish-style villa in the suburb of Los Feliz. -Foundrmag.com"
 

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Sovereign

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Hm… i did like the Greens books, but i must say i found Prince to be much better and more useful.


And if there is so much attention on his books, are they really useful to us (i'm referring to the 'the mainstream is not rich'), except to know the ways in order not to fall prey to them?
 

jason91

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In the beginning.

@Achilles

@ChasingPaper

@S&P


"Let’s say that through some miscarriage of justice, you find yourself locked in prison tomorrow. Browsing through the prison library, you find there is one book that is constantly requested, but hard to get your hands on. What would you think that book was? Legal case STUDIES? Lock-picking manuals? The Bible perhaps? Close, but no cigar.

It’s none other than Robert Greene’s bestselling The 48 Laws of Power, which has sold over 1.2 million copies worldwide. Greene’s books are famously the most requested in correctional facilities across the United States, an achievement he bears with pride. (The author has a folder dedicated to the fan mail he receives from inmates).

However, it’s not just convicts who have taken to Greene’s works. His books are a favourite of WALL STREET executives, movie moguls and hip hop superstars. Some of his more notable fans include rappers Busta Rhymes, 50 Cent, Jay Z, and Kanye West.

With five international bestsellers on strategy power and seduction, Greene is the hero of schemers, manipulators and the power hungry; from the Hollywood elite to the lowliest criminal. If the subject matter of his books is anything to go by, you’d think he would present like a character from Game of Thrones, cold and conniving.

Yet for all his accolades, Greene seems astonishingly normal. A native of Los Angeles, Robert Greene currently lives a quiet life in a Spanish-style villa in the suburb of Los Feliz. -Foundrmag.com"

I understand your point of view but hardly agree with Greene's books. They are simply a way for him into the market. People tend to purchase things that have some specific message in it. His notable fans (50 cent, Jay Z, etc.) are fans because it adds to their public image (brutal ruthless taking advantage of others at their cost, etc) - which is what sells to the specific target market. It helps the rappers get more market share. The "hood" generally has a view of taking from others. And they generally need books and music like these to supply their belief of how the world works.

The truly successful people generally have continuous relationships - which are mutually beneficial. And they provide value - generally through actions of integrity. Even Robert Greene is adding value to the "hood" by giving them a form of education. Lol

Don't take his books too seriously.. he's not in a position of power, he is a writer. Of course certain contents of his books may be true - but he paints a very imaginary world where people only get ahead by acting in the way described in the book. The people in jail buy into what hes saying because they are in jail.. how do you think they got there in the first place? Lol
 

Veloce Grey

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Hm… i did like the Greens books, but i must say i found Prince to be much better and more useful.

Damn straight! I've lost count of the number of awkward social situations I've been in with nothing to say until I remember Prince and let fly with "I got a lion in my pocket and baby he's ready to roar"
 

The Wall

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I understand your point of view but hardly agree with Greene's books. They are simply a way for him into the market. People tend to purchase things that have some specific message in it. His notable fans (50 cent, Jay Z, etc.) are fans because it adds to their public image (brutal ruthless taking advantage of others at their cost, etc) - which is what sells to the specific target market. It helps the rappers get more market share. The "hood" generally has a view of taking from others. And they generally need books and music like these to supply their belief of how the world works.

The truly successful people generally have continuous relationships - which are mutually beneficial. And they provide value - generally through actions of integrity. Even Robert Greene is adding value to the "hood" by giving them a form of education. Lol

Don't take his books too seriously.. he's not in a position of power, he is a writer. Of course certain contents of his books may be true - but he paints a very imaginary world where people only get ahead by acting in the way described in the book. The people in jail buy into what hes saying because they are in jail.. how do you think they got there in the first place? Lol

I see where you're coming from and I agree, he is JUST a writer, but a very skilled writer in aggregating and collating information and examples then putting them into an enjoyable to read form, much like Machiavelli did with The Prince.

It comes down to the reader in what they take away from his books. Some people may find clarity or enlightenment in his books, but for those people i'm certain a lot of people will read his books and come away learning absolutely nothing as they don't feel it relates to them or their world views.

TMF for example, I'm sure there are people who have enjoyed reading it yet there view on businesses, money and time haven't changed in the slightest.

Ultimately I find Robert Greenes books incredible for expanding my world view, relating with others and improving myself as person and if it was just his way of getting into the market, he's done a mighty fine job of it as I have certainly received value from them
 

Sovereign

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Ultimately I find Robert Greenes books incredible for expanding my world view, relating with others and improving myself as person
Quite some time ago there was another quite popular business book, which wasn't initially intended as such (it was written in 17th century), called the 'Book of five rings'.

It depicts strategy (sword fighting), but it relates to far broader aspects of one’s life. I would say that 'The 48 laws of power' are mainly intended as ''deception'' or temporary methods, rather than as a way of life – which 'The Prince' and the 'Book of 5 rings' are.
Thus 'The 48 laws of power' is more event like (quick patch in the moment you need it), while the other 2 are more process oriented (a holistic suggestion of a ‘’way’’ to live by). Although the letter 2 are slightly outdated, they still apply and very worth reading.


p.s.: is it allowed to post affiliate marketing links in posts like this?
Wouldn’t it add to the forums Google ranking?
 

The Wall

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Quite some time ago there was another quite popular business book, which wasn't initially intended as such (it was written in 17th century), called the 'Book of five rings'.

It depicts strategy (sword fighting), but it relates to far broader aspects of one’s life. I would say that 'The 48 laws of power' are mainly intended as ''deception'' or temporary methods, rather than as a way of life – which 'The Prince' and the 'Book of 5 rings' are.
Thus 'The 48 laws of power' is more event like (quick patch in the moment you need it), while the other 2 are more process oriented (a holistic suggestion of a ‘’way’’ to live by). Although the letter 2 are slightly outdated, they still apply and very worth reading.


p.s.: is it allowed to post affiliate marketing links in posts like this?
Wouldn’t it add to the forums Google ranking?

If you don't mind me asking, can you explain to me what makes "The 48 laws of power" an event compared to "The Prince" and "Book of 5 rings", i'd like to get your complete take on it.

You'll probably find the answer to your question here
https://www.thefastlaneforum.com/community/pages/about/#therules
 
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Sovereign

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If you don't mind me asking, can you explain to me what makes "The 48 laws of power" an event compared to "The Prince" and "Book of 5 rings", i'd like to get your complete take on it.

You'll probably find the answer to your question here
https://www.thefastlaneforum.com/community/pages/about/#therules
Thank you, found it in the toolbox.


Perhaps i haven't put it in the best terms, what i was trying to say is that 'The 48 laws' provides you with techniques for acting or reacting to other people. It is not so much about ''giving'' you a way of thinking which then springs actions (in accordance with that thinking) on its own. It's not so much a ''tactics'' book as it is a guide on what to do.

The other 2 books on the other hand, provide only basics of thinking and leave you to choose your own actions. They give pointers, but not a definite guide.

As i see it (read that as IMHO) 'The 48 laws' don't allow for enough duality and uncertainty in life. They seem to have a straightforward, immediately applicative 'do this' answer to every problem.


I have a feeling you are preparing to take me apart. Feel free to do so, after all we’re here to debate.
 
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The Wall

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Thank you, found it in the toolbox.


Perhaps i haven't put it in the best terms, what i was trying to say is that 'The 48 laws' provides you with techniques for acting or reacting to other people. It is not so much about ''giving'' you a way of thinking which then springs actions (in accordance with that thinking) on its own. It's not so much a ''tactics'' book as it is a guide on what to do.

The other 2 books on the other hand, provide only basics of thinking and leave you to choose your own actions. They give pointers, but not a definite guide.

As i see it (read that as IMHO) 'The 48 laws' don't allow for enough duality and uncertainty in life. They seem to have a straightforward, immediately applicative 'do this' answer to every problem.


I have a feeling you are preparing to take me apart. Feel free to do so, after all we’re here to debate.

I see, so do you feel that specifically "The 48 Laws" is heavily instructional and clear cut not providing room for personal interpretation like "The Prince" or "Book Of 5 Rings"?
Is it not a "tactics" book per se as it does not apply to far broader aspects in life?

If that's the case then we may have interpreted the book in different ways and for that I have a final question for you.

What was your intention / motivation behind reading "The 48 Laws"?
 

Ubermensch

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Hm… i did like the Greens books, but i must say i found Prince to be much better and more useful.


And if there is so much attention on his books, are they really useful to us (i'm referring to the 'the mainstream is not rich'), except to know the ways in order not to fall prey to them?

Greene likens The 48 Laws to a mirror. What readers see in it reflects what they see in themselves. Unfortunately, for his critics, their problem is that he speaks the truth. The truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth. That makes some people uncomfortable. For most, it is empowering.

To understand Greene, you need to understand philosophy. Greene almost lovingly refers to Machiavelli as his "mentor." He used that word. To understand Greene, you need to understand Machiavelli. You need to understand Machiavelli, you need to understand Cesare Borgia, the inspiration for Machiavelli's The Prince.

The philosophy doesn't end with Machiavelli, it only begins. Look at all of the Nietzsche quotes all over Greene's work. They are in every one. In an interview with Joe Rogan, Greene stated that his next book (this was quite some time before he had chosen the title "The Laws of Human Nature") is about the Ubermensch. Surely, Greene knows about Nietzsche's concept of The Ubermensch and its influence upon modern-day superheroes. It's not that Nietzsche first thought of the Ubermensch concept (he didn't); it's what he did with it.


@The Wall

"I see where you're coming from and I agree, he is JUST a writer"

Hm.

He has some real life power, though. Just look at his strategic advising of the American Apparel corporation.

Machiavelli was "just" a writer, yet did he not instruct and guide The Prince, and future Princes (even in death), through the treacherous valleys and shadows of power games at the highest levels?

Not to get religious, but was Muhammad "just a writer"? Was Buddha? Were the authors of the Bible? The "JUST" context doesn't seem right at all here. Words shape the course of human history. I guess if you want to say someone is "JUST" a writer, you should contemplate just what the heck a writer is.

Would you say that the President of the United States is JUST the President? Of course not. So why apply the same word - in the same context - to the guy who is JUST a writer, yet his words of wisdom are guiding the President to determine the laws by which you live.

Robert Greene's name was just dropped in the last Mark Wahlberg movie, The Gambler. That's probably a testament to his real-life power. The guy who wrote the script is, JUST a writer, and he called Greene the modern-day Shakespeare. Subtly. Indirection.

@The Wall

I see, so do you feel that specifically "The 48 Laws" is heavily instructional and clear cut not providing room for personal interpretation like "The Prince" or "Book Of 5 Rings"

Very interesting choice of words there. "Clear cut," when talking about Musashi's magnum opus.

If you found Musashi instructive, then I suggest Dr. HAHA Lung's collected works of mind-warping greatness. While Greene discusses meditation - which he started after being amazed by Curtis Jackson's in-person, real-life power - I have not seem him spell out his meditation techniques in detail... at least not explicitly. Of course, simple lines from Greene works can be used for effective meditation. For instance, in the 33 Strategies of War, he tells the reader to "think of strategy as a series of lines and arrows," all aimed at your goal. If you are meditating on the actions that you need to take to hit your goals, then you're not only "planning all the way to the end," in the context of "grand strategy," you are doing something called Outcome Based Thinking:


That said, Dr. HAHA Lung spells out specific meditation techniques, for specific scenarios, and he talks a whole lot about Musashi and Sun-tzu. I first heard of Dr. HAHA Lung from a military friend of mine. Let's just say that he was trained to be "persuasive." He told me that, in his line of work, they tell you to read HAHA Lung and Robert Greene. They both provide great wisdom and guidance, and they both eloquently glorify Musashi's murderous exploits, while simultaneously (and most importantly), drawing strategic analogies and interpretation.

@The Wall

"Is it not a "tactics" book per se as it does not apply to far broader aspects in life?"

Check out this link.

There is a difference between tactics and strategy, a very well-defined one. Greene's books are books on strategy, yet they also touch on tactics. I do not mean to offend you, but if you truly regard Greene's books as tactics - and not strategy - I think that is a pretty awesome misinterpretation. Greene is very explicitly focused on strategy. In fact, 33 Strategies of War contains a brilliant demonstration of how Sun-Tzu, long-term and strategic thinking defeats tactical thinking.


Robert Greene describes his favorite law in the 48 Laws, the Law of Formlessness: Law #48. This is the Law in which he describes the dichotomy between Chess and Go, between Western strategic thought and Eastern strategic thought. Look at the scholars of war quoted throughout the Sun-Tzu documentary. In some cases, they sound as if they reading from the pages of 50th Law, 33 Strategies of War, and the 48 Laws of Power. They all say the same thing: Focus on the long-term strategy, not the short-term reality in front of you.
 
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xuyigang

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Thanks for the post! I have purchased the 48 laws two weeks ago. My wife has been a national level government employee back in China for 6 or 7 years til we came to US in our early 20's.

I have not finished reading the book yet, but one thing is for sure, many of the laws are widely being used in China, in the lofty political realm and in the lowly daily life.
 

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James Thornton

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Man who can remember 48 damn laws? Please, without referencing, someone recite them.

Now, can you remember CENTS? There's "power" in simplicity.
 
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LifeTransformer

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I haven't read the 48 laws yet, the 50th law was pretty good though I thought, helped me overcome a niggling anxiety I was having trouble shaking off.

Speaking of the book of five rings, since reading that I've been trying to live by the one major quote I pulled from it; "Do nothing that is of no use".
 

The Wall

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@Ubermensch, you may have misinterpreted what side i'm agreeing with, maybe I wasn't clear enough

@The Wall

"I see where you're coming from and I agree, he is JUST a writer"

Hm.

He has some real life power, though. Just look at his strategic advising of the American Apparel corporation.

Machiavelli was "just" a writer, yet did he not instruct and guide The Prince, and future Princes (even in death), through the treacherous valleys and shadows of power games at the highest levels?

Not to get religious, but was Muhammad "just a writer"? Was Buddha? Were the authors of the Bible? The "JUST" context doesn't seem right at all here. Words shape the course of human history. I guess if you want to say someone is "JUST" a writer, you should contemplate just what the heck a writer is.

Would you say that the President of the United States is JUST the President? Of course not. So why apply the same word - in the same context - to the guy who is JUST a writer, yet his words of wisdom are guiding the President to determine the laws by which you live.

Robert Greene's name was just dropped in the last Mark Wahlberg movie, The Gambler. That's probably a testament to his real-life power. The guy who wrote the script is, JUST a writer, and he called Greene the modern-day Shakespeare. Subtly. Indirection.

Here I was referring to "The 48 Laws" as clear cut as @Sovereign refers to it having no duality, not Musashi's work. I'll also take on your recommendations after I've finished up with Ready, Aim, Fire thanks.

Robert Greene is JUST a writer just as much as I would call Michelangelo JUST an artist, both pinnacle examples of what being a writer or an artist is. As you stated though the context of me saying it was not very good.

@The Wall

"Is it not a "tactics" book per se as it does not apply to far broader aspects in life?"

Check out this link.

There is a difference between tactics and strategy, a very well-defined one. Greene's books are books on strategy, yet they also touch on tactics. I do not mean to offend you, but if you truly regard Greene's books as tactics - and not strategy - I think that is a pretty awesome misinterpretation. Greene is very explicitly focused on strategy. In fact, 33 Strategies of War contains a brilliant demonstration of how Sun-Tzu, long-term and strategic thinking defeats tactical thinking.



Robert Greene describes his favorite law in the 48 Laws, the Law of Formlessness: Law #48. This is the Law in which he describes the dichotomy between Chess and Go, between Western strategic thought and Eastern strategic thought. Look at the scholars of war quoted throughout the Sun-Tzu documentary. In some cases, they sound as if they reading from the pages of 50th Law, 33 Strategies of War, and the 48 Laws of Power. They all say the same thing: Focus on the long-term strategy, not the short-term reality in front of you.

I agree, Robert Greene is a very strategic and philosophically invoking writer and again, you may have misinterpreted it again, the question was directed at @Sovereign and questioning his definition of what a "tactics" book was, out of context it appears very different the question.


Also @Ubermensch a quick question if you may. What are your thoughts on Mastery? I personally loved it but find it hard to apply to business
 
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doncruz

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Robert Greene has nothing to do here.
I have read it, and it is nothing but a bunch of BS.
Sorry.
 

Ubermensch

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@Ubermensch, you may have misinterpreted what side i'm agreeing with, maybe I wasn't clear enough



Here I was referring to "The 48 Laws" as clear cut as @Sovereign refers to it having no duality, not Musashi's work. I'll also take on your recommendations after I've finished up with Ready, Aim, Fire thanks.

Robert Greene is JUST a writer just as much as I would call Michelangelo JUST an artist, both pinnacle examples of what being a writer or an artist is. As you stated though the context of me saying it was not very good.



I agree, Robert Greene is a very strategic and philosophically invoking writer and again, you may have misinterpreted it again, the question was directed at @Sovereign and questioning his definition of what a "tactics" book was, out of context it appears very different the question.


Also @Ubermensch a quick question if you may. What are your thoughts on Mastery? I personally loved it but find it hard to apply to business

Consider Robert Greene's influence on 50 Cent.


(3:25 - 4:25):

Master the Art of Timing...

Breakfast Club

@The Wall

The simple concept behind Mastery reflects some of the deepest aspect in the soul of The Fast Lane. There is a process, and you have to respect it. You have to put in lots of hours. First, the first hour. Then hundreds of hours. Then tens of thousands of hours. Always learning, like Musashi.

Ask any military general in a true position of power, and he should know Sun-Tzu. That's a fact. If the business and war parallel is true, then all the more reason to learn the ways of Sun-Tzu. With indomitable mastery, Greene connects aspects of Sun-Tzu's wisdom with seduction, power, and war.

Power requires a specific application of certain skills. It is ironic, because the absolute best of Robert Greene's critics actually reinforce the truth of his work.

You have to be willing to go further than your enemy. You must demonstrate Mastery beyond comprehension to win. All you have to do is know more than your enemy. That's why Sun-Tzu says know your enemy. Know yourself. Know your market, the metaphorical battlefield.

So many of the biographies in Mastery resonate with me, particularly that of Charles Darwin. Arguably the greatest scientist of all time, just because of his discovery, he changed the course of human history. Now that we know our true ancestry, our true origins, this has fascinating applications when you consider the bigger picture.

As the song says, this show we're on right now began 13.9 billion years ago. The Big Bang started it. This fascinates me, and I can't see how it wouldn't fascinate anyone else. When you meditate, trying contemplating deeply on the the fact that you are - literally - the offspring of explosions and stars.

They say to know where you're headed, you have to know where you come from.

Let me get back to Greene's critics.

Let's take the best example. The most intellectual, scholarly example: Jeffrey Pfeffer (born July 23, 1946, St. Louis, Missouri), is an American business theorist and the Thomas D. Dee II Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, and is considered one of today's most influential management thinkers.[1][2] Pfeffer strives to educate and inspire leaders to seek power through evidence-based management, the knowing-doing gap, high performance culture, and unconventional wisdom.

While Professor Pfeffer is not the most vitriolic of Greene's critics, he is certainly the most distinguished and qualified. And yet, look at him speak and lecture. He exudes, eschews, and espouses so much of what is in the 48 Laws, The Art of Seduction, the 33 Strategies of War, and the 50th Law. Anyone who has seen his lectures and read his work, knows this to be true. In other words, if the folks that doubt Greene's legitimacy were to study true strategy and true power, they would come to the conclusion that many already have: it's the truth.

And so, again, the 48 Laws and all of Greene's work is a mirror.

The ultimate takeaway from this should be - if the War and Business analogy is real - study Sun-Tzu. Study strategy. Study the 33 Strategies.

1) Sun-Tzu and the Art of Business

2) Von Clauzewitz: Business is War

3) Business as War: Fast Company

4) Business is war, soldier tells bosses.
 
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doncruz

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I'll be fun to watch mister Greene to try starting a business using 15 century crap
 

Ubermensch

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On this forum, strategy has come up a few times lately.


People often point out that contradictions within Greene's laws. Doing so merely reveals an improper understanding of Greene's work. As Greene has mentioned, you must keep in mind context when analyzing and applying the laws to your own life.

Not everyone has enemies to crush.

Law 4, Always Say Less Than Necessary, has an obvious contradiction.

James Thorton revealed this contradiction with his post earlier in this thread.

Man who can remember 48 damn laws? Please, without referencing, someone recite them.

Now, can you remember CENTS? There's "power" in simplicity.

Indeed, 48 Laws is a lengthy book. Writing such a book, and many afterwards, doesn't quite seem like saying less than necessary.

It's all about context.

In my own endeavors, I see how this applies to my sales calls.

I record all of my sales calls, because it helps me review key facts and factors that I may have missed in the call. It also allows me to identify follow-up points, and next action steps to make sure I get to the close.

Reviewing an important call yesterday, I noticed how I used way too many words to answer a potential strategic partner's, prospects, or client's question.

Today, the deals I chase have the potential to make me $10,000 - $15,000 at the bare minimum. In some cases, I have deals in my pipeline worth seven figures to me. Considering the stakes of these deals (not to mention how long it has taken me to get to this point), I have to make sure I play my cards perfectly in every engagement, in every meeting, on every phone call.

Both "Entering Action with Boldness" and "Crushing Your Enemy Totally" evokes thoughts of the 10X rule.


Before you assume that crushing an enemy totally necessarily involves doing something immoral, watch to 3:30 - 5:30. You have to crush your goals. You have annihilate your goals, go way past them, enter a sort of daily flow. Our brains like short-term goals, so completely nailing a goal, and then the next goal, and the next hacks into the brain's dopamine and serotonin treasure chest.

Filling the sales pipeline is the way to ensure success in sales. In any venture, the salesperson will have a closing ratio, a certain percentage of prospects that never buy, potential customers that never actually become customers.

On the other side of the coin, you have the prospects that you close, the potential customers that become actual customers. These are the signed papers that get the salesperson paid, the contracts that require companies to print checks with your name written on them, or to electronically deposit your winnings directly into your account.
 
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GMM

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Whats the best Robert Greene book to get started with. 48 Laws?

The Art of War and Book of Five Rings have both had a big influence on my business mindset so Greene should be right up my alley.
 

Ubermensch

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Whats the best Robert Greene book to get started with. 48 Laws?

The Art of War and Book of Five Rings have both had a big influence on my business mindset so Greene should be right up my alley.

If you like Musashi, make you pick up a copy of Dr. HAHA Lung's books on mind manipulation and mental dominance. Perhaps more than any other author, Lung brilliantly captures the method in the mayhem, murder and madness behind the Musashi myth and legend.

In 33 Strategies of war, Greene also has a riveting section on some of Musashi's masterful myriad of murders.

Replace "killing and crushing the enemy" with "selling and closing the customer" and you will see clear and undeniable parallels between warfare and the boardroom (and the bedroom).

If you know Sun-Tzu well, then you may not opt for the 33 Strategies of war first.

Here is a good summary of the 33 Strategies:


You likely already understand the concepts of psychological manipulation involved in warfare, and the necessity of fluidity and guerrilla-style mindset... which is the only way a small guy can slay a big industry.

If you pick up the Art of Seduction, you might want to pay particular attention to the section on The Rake. As a Rake myself, I relate very strongly with that chapter, and I believe it contains the essence of the proper attitude when selling. A Rake passionately pursues his target until submission ensues. Usually, the sheer intensity of The Rake's approach forces the seduction to a close. Grant Cardone preaches obsessing over one's product, service, offering or business. Drink the Kool-Aid. If you know in your blood, in your bones, that your service or offering fulfills a massive need, then you should rightly obsessed. You should be obsessed, because it is an opportunity to impact the world. You should be obsesses, because it is an opportunity to make tons of money. You should obsess, draw pictures and diagrams, practice your pitch, perfect your script - all of this is basically auditory, free-styled copywriting. In an extremely enthusiastic mind, no reasonable objections exist for his offer. In that mental state, you will naturally muster the necessary words and energy to ultimately shine through in the marketplace.

As with many of Robert Greene's books, you don't really have to pick one up and read it cover to cover. I have, in fact, never read any of his books in this way. You pick them up, and pick things out. At different times in life, of the year, the month, the week or day, different Laws of Power, Strategies of War, or insights from 50 Cent's life and real-life hustling apply to me.

If you feel crunched for time, understand the different sections of Greene's books, and focus only the most imperative sections. If you pick up the 48 Laws of Power, for instance, read the preface and you will see that Greene himself prescribes a kind of piecemeal way of reading the book. Focus on the Keys to Power sections, and gloss over the Transgressions and Observations of the Law. The Keys to Power will outline for you an interpretation of several historical events, yet it is mostly Greene speaking directly to you, the reader.

To be perfectly honest, it has been quite some time since I took the time to actually read a book. Every book I take in these days, I take in via audiobook.

So, on that note:

This wouldn't be much of an Official Robert Greene thread without having his work in the library!

THE 50TH LAW AUDIO, READ BY ROBERT GREENE AND 50 CENT:


First Law of Power: Never Outshine The Master

 

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GMM

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Nov 16, 2015
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If you like Musashi, make you pick up a copy of Dr. HAHA Lung's books on mind manipulation and mental dominance. Perhaps more than any other author, Lung brilliantly captures the method in the mayhem, murder and madness behind the Musashi myth and legend.

In 33 Strategies of war, Greene also has a riveting section on some of Musashi's masterful myriad of murders.

Replace "killing and crushing the enemy" with "selling and closing the customer" and you will see clear and undeniable parallels between warfare and the boardroom (and the bedroom)."

Actually Dr. HAHA Lung made his way onto my reading list last night based off your recommendation on another thread. I am also in a business that involves cold calling and the books look great for applying to that purpose.

If you pick up the Art of Seduction, you might want to pay particular attention to the section on The Rake. As a Rake myself, I relate very strongly with that chapter, and I believe it contains the essence of the proper attitude when selling. A Rake passionately pursues his target until submission ensues. Usually, the sheer intensity of The Rake's approach forces the seduction to a close. Grant Cardone preaches obsessing over one's product, service, offering or business. Drink the Kool-Aid. If you know in your blood, in your bones, that your service or offering fulfills a massive need, then you should rightly obsessed. You should be obsessed, because it is an opportunity to impact the world. You should be obsesses, because it is an opportunity to make tons of money. You should obsess, draw pictures and diagrams, practice your pitch, perfect your script - all of this is basically auditory, free-styled copywriting. In an extremely enthusiastic mind, no reasonable objections exist for his offer. In that mental state, you will naturally muster the necessary words and energy to ultimately shine through in the marketplace.

Will definitely pick this up. Obsession resonates with me and that sounds like the mindset I am trying to develop.

To be perfectly honest, it has been quite some time since I took the time to actually read a book. Every book I take in these days, I take in via audiobook.

Have you ever read Noble House by James Clavell? It's a novel about 60's business in Hong Kong. If your ever looking for fiction that shows some of the concepts from these books in action you might enjoy it. I loved the feel of the business culture and it made me consider moving to Hong Kong. It's so long though...
 

Ubermensch

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Actually Dr. HAHA Lung made his way onto my reading list last night based off your recommendation on another thread. I am also in a business that involves cold calling and the books look great for applying to that purpose.

You probably already know about Nietzsche, Robert Greene, and the concept of the Ubermensch.

On the first page of Dr. HAHA Lung's Mind Control, he writes: Before Nietzsche, philosophy was only philosophy. After Nietzsche, philosophy became dangerous...

Dr. HAHA Lung talks about the Will to Power. Greene quotes Nietzsche multiple times - perhaps even as much as he quotes Sun-Tzu, King Alexander and Napoleon - in every single one of his books.

Nietzsche knew that we would speak of him this evening. He knew that the words he left behind would imbue men with an unbeatable power, a burning energy within that can force and bend reality.

I can count on one hand the authors that allowed me to alter my mindset so dramatically that I do not even recognize the old me. Lung helped me get through a breakup with my sort of girlfriend of several years; it helped me sever ties with a business partner that used to call me his best friend; it helped me cut ties with family members that just wanted to borrow money; helped me cut ties even with my parents, and eventually nearly all of my family.

I think that you will appreciate Lung's visceral verbiage; you'll find pages full of invigorating stories about enemies eviscerated by the swords and strategies of Musashi, Spartacus, Atilla the Hun, et al.

Will definitely pick this up. Obsession resonates with me and that sounds like the mindset I am trying to develop.


Jordan Belfort (in)famously described the telephone as an M-16, and termed the phone wielder as a warrior. With incorruptible determination, you must bring a relentless onslaught of noise to the marketplace. Go for broke, especially if you Glen Gary Gordon Gekko money.

How does Belfort put it: Ah, yes... deal with your problems by becoming RICH!

Say what you will about Belfort, but he proved the power of the phone when he hit almost a million a week.

That level of production is possible without screwing over customers, by offering a legitimate service that addresses a specific niche.
 
G

GuestUser450

Guest
Appreciate the information but some if it reminds me that there's a wide, rational middle ground between conformity and conspiracy.
 
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Ubermensch

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If you make at least $1,000,000 in a year, you can do the Grant Cardone Milly dance: 7:15 - 7:45.

"Milly, Milly, Milly..."

Grant Cardone's story deserves repeating.

Whom warrior among the Fastlane clan will crush the enemy totally?

The enemy? The enemy is the day, the time that begs you to waste it. The enemy is all of the distractions, all of the normal a$$ people, distracting you with their normal a$$ people shit.

The enemy is the action of mindlessly checking your Facebook.

To fully bridge the gap between my potential and my reality, I have to rely upon the love of what I do to get me through. I have endured hours, days, and nights of pain, of

I feel numb, because of the $HINE of the hustle. I now see the logical, unbreakable, inescapable connection between the level of effort I expend and the results I receive back from the universe.

Fate is kind of a misunderstood phenomena. People think that you have to chase fate. You don't. Every man and woman has his own fate in his hand, like a boomerang that they can either do nothing with, or throw.

That boomerang is all of your uniqueness as a person, everything genetically, spiritually, and philosophically that makes you who you are.

Most people waste their boomerangs.

Most people use their boomerangs as coat hangers for their work uniforms.

Some people have rusty boomerangs that don't shine, due to lack of use.

Some people have lost their boomerangs.

Some of us, however, have put our hearts and souls into the ricochet. The thrower's act of throwing reverses fate, especially when he slings it with the rage of 1,000 suns.

King Alexander's shot ricochet with enough force to etch his name in history forever, as if Zeus himself set off an eternal lightening storm in the appropriate formation.


Marshall Mathers' ricochet became Eminem.

David's ricochet - or did he use a slingshot? - dropped Goliath with one shot.

MJ DeMarco's ricochet spawned the Fastlane.

Nietzsche ricochet is the uprooting of all that is weak, and cementing forever in the soul only the most supremely dominant of virtues.

 

Ubermensch

Bronze Contributor
Speedway Pass
Jul 7, 2008
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He started World War 2.

hopefully white text works, I'm just joking of course.

Lol... tell me this isn't the classic Nazi-myth...?

Then again, Dr. HAHA Lung tells us that before Nietzsche, philosophy was only philosophy.

After Nietzsche, philosophy became dangerous.

Kind of like @Ubermensch and deleteduser396.
 

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