The Entrepreneur Forum | Financial Freedom | Starting a Business | Motivation | Money | Success

James Webb Telescope: Pics and Discussion

Learn how to build wealth and win financial freedom the Fastlane way!

Say "NO" to mediocre living rife with jobs, ascetic frugality, and suffocating savings rituals— learn how to build a Fastlane business that pays both freedom and lifestyle affluence. Join more than 70,000 entrepreneurs who are making it happen.
Join for FREE Today
Get the books
Remove ads? Join Fastlane INSIDERS
(Registration removes this block)

MJ DeMarco

I followed the science; all I found was money.
Staff member
FASTLANE INSIDER
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
Read Rat-Race Escape!
Read Fastlane!
Read Unscripted!
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Jul 23, 2007
34,650
136,447
Utah

MTF

Never give up
FASTLANE INSIDER
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
Read Fastlane!
Read Unscripted!
Speedway Pass
May 1, 2011
6,375
28,720

Some details here:


In addition to what @MJ DeMarco said about the grain of sand:

This deep field, taken by Webb’s Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam), is a composite made from images at different wavelengths, totaling 12.5 hours – achieving depths at infrared wavelengths beyond the Hubble Space Telescope’s deepest fields, which took weeks.

The image shows the galaxy cluster SMACS 0723 as it appeared 4.6 billion years ago.

Earth formed 4.5 billion years ago so we're seeing something that existed while there wasn't even this planet. Talk about completely mind-blowing.
 

YanC

Silver Contributor
Read Fastlane!
Read Unscripted!
Speedway Pass
Sep 18, 2017
190
515
31
France
Unimaginable how “nothing” we really are… just mind boggling.

Earth formed 4.5 billion years ago so we're seeing something that existed while there wasn't even this planet. Talk about completely mind-blowing.

Remind me of this chapter from the book Four Thousand Weeks: The Liberation of Cosmic Insignificance Therapy

I have found that just realizing that we are standing on a tiny rock spinning around in a seemingly infinite universe is quite powerful to put in perspective most everyday earthly concerns...
 
Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum: Subscribe to Fastlane Insiders.

Aditya Gunjal

Bronze Contributor
Read Rat-Race Escape!
Read Fastlane!
Read Unscripted!
Speedway Pass
Jun 24, 2021
164
157
18
Maharashtra, India
Some details here:


In addition to what @MJ DeMarco said about the grain of sand:



Earth formed 4.5 billion years ago so we're seeing something that existed while there wasn't even this planet. Talk about completely mind-blowing.
Yes i think 13.5 billion or something
 

Simon Angel

Gold Contributor
Speedway Pass
Apr 24, 2016
854
2,310
James Webb's first images:

main_image_star-forming_region_carina_nircam_final-5mb.jpg

"This landscape of “mountains” and “valleys” speckled with glittering stars is actually the edge of a nearby, young, star-forming region called NGC 3324 in the Carina Nebula. Captured in infrared light by NASA’s new James Webb Space Telescope, this image reveals for the first time previously invisible areas of star birth.

Called the Cosmic Cliffs, Webb’s seemingly three-dimensional picture looks like craggy mountains on a moonlit evening. In reality, it is the edge of the giant, gaseous cavity within NGC 3324, and the tallest “peaks” in this image are about 7 light-years high. The cavernous area has been carved from the nebula by the intense ultraviolet radiation and stellar winds from extremely massive, hot, young stars located in the center of the bubble, above the area shown in this image."


main_image_galaxies_stephans_quintet_sq_nircam_miri_final-5mb.jpg


"Stephan’s Quintet, a visual grouping of five galaxies, is best known for being prominently featured in the holiday classic film, “It’s a Wonderful Life.” Today, NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope reveals Stephan’s Quintet in a new light. This enormous mosaic is Webb’s largest image to date, covering about one-fifth of the Moon’s diameter. It contains over 150 million pixels and is constructed from almost 1,000 separate image files. The information from Webb provides new insights into how galactic interactions may have driven galaxy evolution in the early universe."

main_image_stellar_death_s_ring_miri_nircam_sidebyside-5mb.jpg


"The dimmer star at the center of this scene has been sending out rings of gas and dust for thousands of years in all directions, and NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope has revealed for the first time that this star is cloaked in dust.

Two cameras aboard Webb captured the latest image of this planetary nebula, cataloged as NGC 3132, and known informally as the Southern Ring Nebula. It is approximately 2,500 light-years away.

Webb will allow astronomers to dig into many more specifics about planetary nebulae like this one – clouds of gas and dust expelled by dying stars. Understanding which molecules are present, and where they lie throughout the shells of gas and dust will help researchers refine their knowledge of these objects."

main_image_exoplanet_wasp.jpg


"NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope has captured the distinct signature of water, along with evidence for clouds and haze, in the atmosphere surrounding a hot, puffy gas giant planet orbiting a distant Sun-like star.

The observation, which reveals the presence of specific gas molecules based on tiny decreases in the brightness of precise colors of light, is the most detailed of its kind to date, demonstrating Webb’s unprecedented ability to analyze atmospheres hundreds of light-years away.

While the Hubble Space Telescope has analyzed numerous exoplanet atmospheres over the past two decades, capturing the first clear detection of water in 2013, Webb’s immediate and more detailed observation marks a giant leap forward in the quest to characterize potentially habitable planets beyond Earth.

WASP-96 b is one of more than 5,000 confirmed exoplanets in the Milky Way. Located roughly 1,150 light-years away in the southern-sky constellation Phoenix, it represents a type of gas giant that has no direct analog in our solar system. With a mass less than half that of Jupiter and a diameter 1.2 times greater, WASP-96 b is much puffier than any planet orbiting our Sun. And with a temperature greater than 1000°F, it is significantly hotter. WASP-96 b orbits extremely close to its Sun-like star, just one-ninth of the distance between Mercury and the Sun, completing one circuit every 3½ Earth-days."



Source: First Images from the James Webb Space Telescope
 

MJ DeMarco

I followed the science; all I found was money.
Staff member
FASTLANE INSIDER
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
Read Rat-Race Escape!
Read Fastlane!
Read Unscripted!
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Jul 23, 2007
34,650
136,447
Utah
I've extracted the JW Telescope pics and conversation (out of Random Chat) to its own thread.

I get the feeling we're going to be talking about a TON of these pictures ... it deserves its own thread.
 
Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum: Subscribe to Fastlane Insiders.

Simon Angel

Gold Contributor
Speedway Pass
Apr 24, 2016
854
2,310
I've extracted the JW Telescope pics and conversation (out of Random Chat) to its own thread.

I get the feeling we're going to be talking about a TON of these pictures ... it deserves its own thread.

Thanks, I somehow missed this thread.

These first images are.. mind-blowing, to say the least.

Oh, and about that last image that shows the atmosphere composition of the WASP-96 B exoplanet...

Well, let's just say that NASA managed to figure out - in great detail - what the atmosphere of a planet 1,150+ light-years away from Earth consists of.

For reference:

1 light-year = 6 trillion miles

1,150 light-years = about 6.8 quadrillion miles
 

MoneyDoc

Platinum Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Speedway Pass
Jun 24, 2014
1,490
3,929
James Webb's first images:

View attachment 44381

"This landscape of “mountains” and “valleys” speckled with glittering stars is actually the edge of a nearby, young, star-forming region called NGC 3324 in the Carina Nebula. Captured in infrared light by NASA’s new James Webb Space Telescope, this image reveals for the first time previously invisible areas of star birth.

Called the Cosmic Cliffs, Webb’s seemingly three-dimensional picture looks like craggy mountains on a moonlit evening. In reality, it is the edge of the giant, gaseous cavity within NGC 3324, and the tallest “peaks” in this image are about 7 light-years high. The cavernous area has been carved from the nebula by the intense ultraviolet radiation and stellar winds from extremely massive, hot, young stars located in the center of the bubble, above the area shown in this image."


main_image_galaxies_stephans_quintet_sq_nircam_miri_final-5mb.jpg


"Stephan’s Quintet, a visual grouping of five galaxies, is best known for being prominently featured in the holiday classic film, “It’s a Wonderful Life.” Today, NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope reveals Stephan’s Quintet in a new light. This enormous mosaic is Webb’s largest image to date, covering about one-fifth of the Moon’s diameter. It contains over 150 million pixels and is constructed from almost 1,000 separate image files. The information from Webb provides new insights into how galactic interactions may have driven galaxy evolution in the early universe."

main_image_stellar_death_s_ring_miri_nircam_sidebyside-5mb.jpg


"The dimmer star at the center of this scene has been sending out rings of gas and dust for thousands of years in all directions, and NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope has revealed for the first time that this star is cloaked in dust.

Two cameras aboard Webb captured the latest image of this planetary nebula, cataloged as NGC 3132, and known informally as the Southern Ring Nebula. It is approximately 2,500 light-years away.

Webb will allow astronomers to dig into many more specifics about planetary nebulae like this one – clouds of gas and dust expelled by dying stars. Understanding which molecules are present, and where they lie throughout the shells of gas and dust will help researchers refine their knowledge of these objects."

main_image_exoplanet_wasp.jpg


"NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope has captured the distinct signature of water, along with evidence for clouds and haze, in the atmosphere surrounding a hot, puffy gas giant planet orbiting a distant Sun-like star.

The observation, which reveals the presence of specific gas molecules based on tiny decreases in the brightness of precise colors of light, is the most detailed of its kind to date, demonstrating Webb’s unprecedented ability to analyze atmospheres hundreds of light-years away.

While the Hubble Space Telescope has analyzed numerous exoplanet atmospheres over the past two decades, capturing the first clear detection of water in 2013, Webb’s immediate and more detailed observation marks a giant leap forward in the quest to characterize potentially habitable planets beyond Earth.

WASP-96 b is one of more than 5,000 confirmed exoplanets in the Milky Way. Located roughly 1,150 light-years away in the southern-sky constellation Phoenix, it represents a type of gas giant that has no direct analog in our solar system. With a mass less than half that of Jupiter and a diameter 1.2 times greater, WASP-96 b is much puffier than any planet orbiting our Sun. And with a temperature greater than 1000°F, it is significantly hotter. WASP-96 b orbits extremely close to its Sun-like star, just one-ninth of the distance between Mercury and the Sun, completing one circuit every 3½ Earth-days."



Source: First Images from the James Webb Space Telescope
That “mountainous” looking picture is just unbelievable… I thought it was a book cover or a “fantasy” image created to compare to the actual photos.
 

MJ DeMarco

I followed the science; all I found was money.
Staff member
FASTLANE INSIDER
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
Read Rat-Race Escape!
Read Fastlane!
Read Unscripted!
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Jul 23, 2007
34,650
136,447
Utah

iivalky

Contributor
Jul 9, 2022
52
74
Canada
Thanks, I somehow missed this thread.

These first images are.. mind-blowing, to say the least.

Oh, and about that last image that shows the atmosphere composition of the WASP-96 B exoplanet...

Well, let's just say that NASA managed to figure out - in great detail - what the atmosphere of a planet 1,150+ light-years away from Earth consists of.

For reference:

1 light-year = 6 trillion miles

1,150 light-years = about 6.8 quadrillion miles
If they could get decent images of an exoplanet 1,000+ ly, what would Proxima Centauri b look like!? ('only' 4 ly, closest known exoplanet). Possibly view it's surface?
 

Simon Angel

Gold Contributor
Speedway Pass
Apr 24, 2016
854
2,310
If they could get decent images of an exoplanet 1,000+ ly, what would Proxima Centauri b look like!? ('only' 4 ly, closest known exoplanet). Possibly view it's surface?

They're probably doing that shit as we speak. Hopefully, they'll throw us a bone as well soon...
 
Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum: Subscribe to Fastlane Insiders.

AceVentures

Platinum Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Unscripted!
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Apr 16, 2019
689
2,754

MJ DeMarco

I followed the science; all I found was money.
Staff member
FASTLANE INSIDER
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
Read Rat-Race Escape!
Read Fastlane!
Read Unscripted!
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Jul 23, 2007
34,650
136,447
Utah

Mathuin

Provide Relative-Value or Die Trying
Read Rat-Race Escape!
Read Fastlane!
Read Unscripted!
Speedway Pass
Dec 20, 2020
619
2,061
22
Belfast, Northern Ireland
Y'all are really buying this NASA propaganda?

5ux40iyyfhb91.jpg
 
Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum: Subscribe to Fastlane Insiders.

Andreas Thiel

Bronze Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Rat-Race Escape!
Read Fastlane!
Read Unscripted!
Speedway Pass
Aug 27, 2018
466
487
41
Karlsruhe, Germany
If they could get decent images of an exoplanet 1,000+ ly, what would Proxima Centauri b look like!? ('only' 4 ly, closest known exoplanet). Possibly view it's surface?
Would love to read more about the limits of the JW Telescope. I think I remember that (years ago) people were complaining about the range of the wavelength coverage.
I suppose interesting wavelengths could be missing that are relevant for the use case.

Not sure I understand that correctly, but it seems to be optimized for looking further back into the past because hubble could not pick up important information due to the cosmological redshift.
There might be other optimizations that render the JW Telescope suboptimal for looking at younger and closer objects, but this is just speculation.
 
Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum: Subscribe to Fastlane Insiders.

iivalky

Contributor
Jul 9, 2022
52
74
Canada
Would love to read more about the limits of the JW Telescope. I think I remember that (years ago) people were complaining about the range of the wavelength coverage.
I suppose interesting wavelengths could be missing that are relevant for the use case.

Not sure I understand that correctly, but it seems to be optimized for looking further back into the past because hubble could not pick up important information due to the cosmological redshift.
There might be other optimizations that render the JW Telescope suboptimal for looking at younger and closer objects, but this is just speculation.
Yes, basically the more distant the object the further back in time it appears, having to do with the way light travels.
Due to the hypothetical expansion of the universe, galaxies are moving further and further away from each other (the most common example it dots on a balloon - while deflated the dots are close, but as the balloon expands the dots separate - the dots being galaxies. Because JW uses infrared I think can pick up objects that are normally out of reach. According to NASA, "Infrared energy can also reveal objects in the universe that cannot be seen in visible light using optical telescopes" and "have longer wavelengths than visible light and can pass through dense regions of gas and dust in space with less scattering and absorption". Pretty cool stuff.

This means that we can detect much more faint and distant objects: for instance, this image of a nebula directly imaged vs infrared; Notice you can see stars and galaxies in the background of the 2nd one rather than the first.
9511009080_60294d285f.jpg

I heard that they are developing more space observatories for finding distant exoplanets, and high speed lightweight spacecrafts to fly between star systems!

In fact, this will sound crazy but NASA is also working on a warp drive - Yes, like the ones in Star Wars! (probably won't happen for a long long time but they've started with some concepts)
I'm not sure how exactly it will work (I'm not a rocket scientist) but from what I understand it creates some kind of bubble in space time to ignore the universal speed limit of light.
I look forward to seeing what comes next!
 

Bones81

Bronze Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Fastlane!
Read Unscripted!
Speedway Pass
Jul 29, 2019
108
193
It's eerie to think that given the rate at which the universe is continuing to expand, objects in space will be so far apart, there will be no light from other stars. You will look up at the sky, and it will just be emptiness.
 

Andreas Thiel

Bronze Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Rat-Race Escape!
Read Fastlane!
Read Unscripted!
Speedway Pass
Aug 27, 2018
466
487
41
Karlsruhe, Germany
Yes, basically the more distant the object the further back in time it appears, having to do with the way light travels.
Due to the hypothetical expansion of the universe, galaxies are moving further and further away from each other (the most common example it dots on a balloon - while deflated the dots are close, but as the balloon expands the dots separate - the dots being galaxies. Because JW uses infrared I think can pick up objects that are normally out of reach. According to NASA, "Infrared energy can also reveal objects in the universe that cannot be seen in visible light using optical telescopes" and "have longer wavelengths than visible light and can pass through dense regions of gas and dust in space with less scattering and absorption". Pretty cool stuff.

This means that we can detect much more faint and distant objects: for instance, this image of a nebula directly imaged vs infrared; Notice you can see stars and galaxies in the background of the 2nd one rather than the first.
9511009080_60294d285f.jpg

I heard that they are developing more space observatories for finding distant exoplanets, and high speed lightweight spacecrafts to fly between star systems!

In fact, this will sound crazy but NASA is also working on a warp drive - Yes, like the ones in Star Wars! (probably won't happen for a long long time but they've started with some concepts)
I'm not sure how exactly it will work (I'm not a rocket scientist) but from what I understand it creates some kind of bubble in space time to ignore the universal speed limit of light.
I look forward to seeing what comes next!
I am always trying to understand next steps and appreciate that we get a glimpse in the longer term plans of some people. But I think the warp drive is mostly a thought experiment for now, which I will worry about if Elon manages to speedrun Factorio in real life ;-). Would love to read more about how a space industry and economy could develop. Feels like we have to turn to 80s literature to rediscover the state of the art ... which worries me a little.

Quite the ups and downs in the news. Damage more severe than initially expected, announced right after they celebrated that there is enough fuel for 20 years. Now we have to hope that it was inital bad luck and not an indicator for what is to come. Otherwise the JW Telescope might be rendered more and more useless faster than expected.
 
Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum: Subscribe to Fastlane Insiders.

iivalky

Contributor
Jul 9, 2022
52
74
Canada
It's eerie to think that given the rate at which the universe is continuing to expand, objects in space will be so far apart, there will be no light from other stars. You will look up at the sky, and it will just be emptiness.
Luckily, our galaxy's starlight will probably always be there for us to see, as all the stars we see when we look up with the bare eye are confined to our own galaxy. However, what will disappear is the light of stars from other, distant galaxies. But an even scarier thought is that the universe is thought to stop expanding one day and begin retracting back to singularity!
 

iivalky

Contributor
Jul 9, 2022
52
74
Canada
I am always trying to understand next steps and appreciate that we get a glimpse in the longer term plans of some people. But I think the warp drive is mostly a thought experiment for now, which I will worry about if Elon manages to speedrun Factorio in real life ;-). Would love to read more about how a space industry and economy could develop. Feels like we have to turn to 80s literature to rediscover the state of the art ... which worries me a little.

Quite the ups and downs in the news. Damage more severe than initially expected, announced right after they celebrated that there is enough fuel for 20 years. Now we have to hope that it was inital bad luck and not an indicator for what is to come. Otherwise the JW Telescope might be rendered more and more useless faster than expected.
I first learned about it while listening to a space documentary and did a bit more research - the warp drive seems to be entirely a concept at the moment, however there is science behind it and I want to see Star Wars tech IRL one day!

Intergalactic space, here we come!

I do hope we can colonize Mars one day though - it would be so cool to see Mars in the sky knowing there's a civilization on there!
 

Zardiw

New Contributor
Read Fastlane!
I first learned about it while listening to a space documentary and did a bit more research - the warp drive seems to be entirely a concept at the moment, however there is science behind it and I want to see Star Wars tech IRL one day!

Intergalactic space, here we come!

I do hope we can colonize Mars one day though - it would be so cool to see Mars in the sky knowing there's a civilization on there!
F*ck Mars.........until it's terra formed you'll be living in a bubble...or underground....and have to wear a suit whenever you go outside. Put on some scuba gear and go visit a desert to see what it would be like......lol.......

OH and it's a one way trip.........does anybody really want to live and die on Mars? And never see a meerkat again?

I say colonize the Moon first........Then you can visit and come back........

Outstanding Mars Video:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3IT_rnV1LBw


Z
 

Zardiw

New Contributor
Read Fastlane!
I first learned about it while listening to a space documentary and did a bit more research - the warp drive seems to be entirely a concept at the moment, however there is science behind it and I want to see Star Wars tech IRL one day!

Intergalactic space, here we come!

I do hope we can colonize Mars one day though - it would be so cool to see Mars in the sky knowing there's a civilization on there!
I DO love the idea of a warp drive...........FTL is the future.............Z
 

Post New Topic

Please SEARCH before posting.
Please select the BEST category.

Post new topic

Latest Posts

New Topics

Fastlane Insiders

View the forum AD FREE.
Private, unindexed content
Detailed process/execution threads
Ideas needing execution, more!

Join Fastlane Insiders.

Must Read Books...

Explore books recommended by MJ DeMarco and other members of the Fastlane entrepreneurial community.
Fastlane Bookstore
Top