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Invent Right Program... Yes or no?

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B_Mac

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Can I help you a little?

It appears you’re new, and the way to get ahead here is help others out where you can, even if it’s only in a small way.

If you can’t, and you just have to ask a question now, at least put some thought and research into your question.

What do you think of it? What’s the cost? What do you see as the pros and cons? What are the reviews of people who have actually used it? What is your idea (in general)? How do you think such a service will help you? What have you done so far? Why do you think you need this?

Come back with all of that and some others may jump in. There are inventors on here that will be helpful, but you have to show some initiative on your own.
 

Rawseed

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Hello @awsamro!

I haven't done his program and I don't know anybody who has. But, I have read his book 'One Simple Idea' multiple times. I also read 'One Simple Idea for Startups and Entrepreneurs' once. I also read 'Four Hour Work Week' multiple times and Tim Ferris was one of his students.

I would suggest you read and reread his inexpensive books. Then execute. If you stumble or get stuck, then consider paying for some of his more expensive stuff.
 

InnovateDesign

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I did their course/counseling about 5 years ago. They really are great and helpful. Though I have changed the direction of what I want to do, I cannot recommend them enough! Their course helped me kickstart an unrelated venture.

I can only assume they have improved and expanded their team by now.
 
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B. Cole

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I’m going out on a limb and say nope. I can sum up the invention process for you, you don’t need to spend thousands of dollars to have somebody else tell you. You will learn a lot and become much more resilient holding your own hand and walking solo, because you’ll learn a lot of not-to-do’s and discover other entrepreneurial opportunities along the way.

1. Identify the problem you are solving, quite sharply and specifically.

2. Weigh all possible solutions to this problem, make sure your solution is the most efficient, effective way. Do not make a product if you don’t need to, failure will result. Also, look deeply for other solutions to this problem, including patent searching. No sense in moving forward with somebody else’s patented idea. The dominant commandments right now are control and need. How safe is your solution against outside factors (regulation changes, dependency on another product to stay around, etc.)? Do people need this product to solve their problem? Can they solve it another way?

3. Create some prototypes, as finished and professional as feasible. If you can’t do it, find folks that can. Once you’ve tested and feel good about your prototype, research and file a provisional patent. Starting to work on entry.

4. Get your product in front of people that suffer from the problem you’re solving and sell them. If you have a hard time selling them, find out why. Talk to people, take their suggestions. Be direct, ask what they would change and how much they would pay. Do not proceed until you have validated your market by selling prototypes. Family and friends don’t count. Still working on the commandment of need here.

5. Take your customer’s feedback and begin the long, painstaking design/manufacture process. Most of us aren’t engineers or have factories at our disposal, so draft an NDA and start reaching out to manufacturers. Research, research, research with an open mind. Look at other products for ideas on manufacturing techniques. Getting a manufacturer that partakes in product development is hard, but golden when you find them. I contacted over 50 manufacturers trying to have my product made. You’ll likely spend 1-2 years in this stage, depending on your product. Build some users along the way to pitch changes and solicit feedback. Everything from the design to the name should be approved by your customers. Remember - it’s for them, not you. The only thing in this that belongs to you is the money at the end. Your manufacturing processes are the beginning of time and scale. It must be efficient, affordable and scaleable.

6. Land at the point of vetted/tested materials and design - finished product. You’ve likely re-filed your provisional patent several times and hopefully decided whether you want to build a business around your invention, or sell off the idea (license). If you’re going to manufacture and build a business, you don’t need to wait on patents. Get that thing in the market. Once you feel 100 percent comfortable with your finished product and have tested and sold (hopefully many) finished units, move toward a full non-provisional patent. You should also have design drawings, cad/specs if applicable, and manufacturing specifications/instructions by now.

If you choose to build a business around it, you’ve got a lot of work ahead (hopefully done most of this already) to build solid supply, marketing and distribution chains. You’ll know if you want to do this by the time you get there.

Good luck!
 

Xeon

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Honestly, if I could rewind time, I would probably take a industrial/product design degree.
I can see how it actually helps when it comes to making products.
 

B. Cole

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Honestly, if I could rewind time, I would probably take a industrial/product design degree.
I can see how it actually helps when it comes to making products.

I always prided myself for being hands on, figured a former carver and custom woodworker could just about figure out anything. After getting my a$$ beat for 2 years designing this simple little product, I agree with you. Or at least team up with somebody that has ind. design under their belt.
 
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D

Deleted50669

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I would say no, you shouldn't. Instead, embrace ambiguity and find a problem to solve. Then solve it, through whatever means necessary. Won't cost you much to do this, and will teach you all you need to know, even if you fail. That program will do two negative things; take money from your pockets and waste time you could be using way more productively.
 
D

Deleted50669

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Honestly, if I could rewind time, I would probably take a industrial/product design degree.
I can see how it actually helps when it comes to making products.
Unrelated, but I like that quote about branding in your footer. It's a lesson in one line.
 

awsamro

New Contributor
May 28, 2019
24
18
Can I help you a little?

It appears you’re new, and the way to get ahead here is help others out where you can, even if it’s only in a small way.

If you can’t, and you just have to ask a question now, at least put some thought and research into your question.

What do you think of it? What’s the cost? What do you see as the pros and cons? What are the reviews of people who have actually used it? What is your idea (in general)? How do you think such a service will help you? What have you done so far? Why do you think you need this?

Come back with all of that and some others may jump in. There are inventors on here that will be helpful, but you have to show some initiative on your own.
I don't have an opinion of it... the cost is $3000, The pros is that it might open my eyes on things I don't know yet so I might not know what the pros are. Every time you learn something you grow and see the world differently and this might change the way I look at the things. I do not have an idea or a product in mind so that might be a con because you have 6 months of counselling within the program and I might waste that if I don't have an idea or a product....
 
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MJ DeMarco

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I do not have an idea or a product in mind

Then I would avoid it. You're solving problems you don't have.

Find a market need then move from there.

It's kinda like reading books for the sake of reading books... when you should be reading them to solve your problems and immediate challenges.

 

RazorCut

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As MJ says if you don't have an idea or a product in mind avoid it.

What attracted you to it? Was it shiny and new or did you seek it out because it is the path you really want to take?

Have you read Stephens book(s)? 'One Simple Idea' will give you food for thought and will open up your mind to the possibilities around you in the field of licensing ideas.

If then you think you need hand holding and some form of accountability partner/mentor to get you through the process have a chat with them (they are very approachable) and discuss it.

Just don't lay down $3k on a whim unless you are certain it is right for you and you will follow through.
 

BrianLateStart

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I looked into InventRight at one point. I started out thinking I was going to design and manufacture my own product. I got so overwhelmed trying to find someone that would quote my parts, needed to figure out the packaging design, how to get it in stores, market it, etc, etc. I stumbled onto InventRight and was sure that was the solution to my problems. My product is a companion to an existing product so I was sure they would want to license my design. Because I was considering licensing my design I made a modification, CIP (Continuation In Part) to my utility patent I had already filed. I wanted to also patent a universal method of attaching my product to the existing companion device.

I read Stephen Key's book, watched countless hours of their youtube videos and tried to license my product. It was very difficult to find contacts to call to even talk to anyone. Most of the people that answer the phones at larger companies are trying to filter out calls like mine so that the people I wanted to talk to could get work done and not talk to people like me all day.

The more I researched these companies (there's over 50 brands that make a product mine could pair with) only a couple actually do any manufacturing. It's a couple of large manufactures that make all the products and put the other companies names on them.

I didn't get anywhere trying to license. That was my experience, but there are a lot of open innovation (google for it if you haven't already), inventor friendly companies that welcome ideas from the outside. The kitchen gadget industry is big on this. It wasn't so much in the area I was looking into.

After months of trying to go the license route, I'm glad I decided to go back to manufacturing it myself. It's a very hard way to go, but you gain the "C" in C E N T S by doing this. At the time I was looking to license, I hadn't read FastLane. I would have given up my control had I gone with licensing. So glad I didn't.
 
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Mhinto

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I went through the invent right program and I have only positive things to say about it. That being said I wouldn’t do it again. I created a prototype, sell sheet, ppa, video and started marketing my product to potential companies from what I learned from the books alone. My coach actually told me to just keep doing what I was doing when I signed up.

I signed up for the course because I wasn’t gaining much ground and wanted help if I were to need it with a contract. I never made it that far. If at some point I do find a company that wants to sign a contract for one of my ideas I would consider hiring them to help me with that. Being an alum of the invent right course will give me a large discount.

As for what I’ve learned from the course... it’s all in Stephens Books and videos. A coach is great if you need an accountability partner but often times my coach would just refer me back to the books when I had questions. My coach is great. I’m just saying the information is out there without forking over $3,000.

I say read the books and follow them to the “T.” That’s basically what the course is. The one thing that’s missing in Stephen’s books are how to make it through a licensing contract.

I definitely don’t think it’s a scam or completely useless but geared towards people that would like the books broken down into easier to read chunks and need a coach for accountability.
 

Rearden

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Great program, I went through it and signed a couple of deals.
Took me a couple of years to do it though so be ready for the long runway.

I was a coach in the program....If you have more question about it I may be able to help.
 

awsamro

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May 28, 2019
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I went through the invent right program and I have only positive things to say about it. That being said I wouldn’t do it again. I created a prototype, sell sheet, ppa, video and started marketing my product to potential companies from what I learned from the books alone. My coach actually told me to just keep doing what I was doing when I signed up.

I signed up for the course because I wasn’t gaining much ground and wanted help if I were to need it with a contract. I never made it that far. If at some point I do find a company that wants to sign a contract for one of my ideas I would consider hiring them to help me with that. Being an alum of the invent right course will give me a large discount.

As for what I’ve learned from the course... it’s all in Stephens Books and videos. A coach is great if you need an accountability partner but often times my coach would just refer me back to the books when I had questions. My coach is great. I’m just saying the information is out there without forking over $3,000.

I say read the books and follow them to the “T.” That’s basically what the course is. The one thing that’s missing in Stephen’s books are how to make it through a licensing contract.

I definitely don’t think it’s a scam or completely useless but geared towards people that would like the books broken down into easier to read chunks and need a coach for accountability.
Thanks man! That was really helpful. Cheers!
 
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antonio30

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Mar 23, 2021
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Great program, I went through it and signed a couple of deals.
Took me a couple of years to do it though so be ready for the long runway.

I was a coach in the program....If you have more question about it I may be able to help.
hi my name is antonio hutcherson an i was trying to see can you help me bring my idea to life
 

thechosen1

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Honestly, if I could rewind time, I would probably take a industrial/product design degree.
I can see how it actually helps when it comes to making products.
I know this is a very old post, but I just want to say this combo makes the design part pretty straightforward:
Engineering + drafting experience

For me, marketing is the hardest part.
 
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petproducts

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Mar 24, 2021
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Great program, I went through it and signed a couple of deals.
Took me a couple of years to do it though so be ready for the long runway.

I was a coach in the program....If you have more question about it I may be able to help.
Hello Rearden, I am seriously considering joining the InventRight program. That said, I have already gotten my trademark accepted by USPTO, I have filed a non-provisional patent application and filed a PPA to cover design adjustment and built a fully functional prototype. I have read the books which I found very educational and inspiring. Some questions I was asked by potential licensee's were (what is the cost of materials), all materials I used where off the shelf, retail priced parts so I do not know the costs at manufacturing. Any advise you could give me?

Thanks,
Toni Catterton
410-913-7117
pulse4paws@gmail.com
 

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