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OFF-TOPIC How many of us homeschool our children or plan to?

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Allthatis

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Hi there! I am just curious how many people here choose to homeschool their children and why? I have a 6 and a 1 year old. I just pulled my child out of kindergarten to homeschool and think we are going to stick with it for the long haul. I have anxieties around it because my family chimes in stating how weird she will be, unsocialized, etc. I am VERY introverted myself, but will make sure to involve my children in social activities ( co ops, martial arts, sports if they so desire, home school get togethers, any other social activities I can find) . I really want to find more secular groups, as it seems the majority are religious around here.

I am lucky enough to be able to do this. I have my own business online, and have the time to homeschool. I will get them tutors in the future for subjects that I cant teach. My reasoning is that I just honestly am not a fan of school. I think it takes the spark out of kids, and preps them for a 9-5 lifestyle or a mindset of school school school, work work work. I understand the importance of both, but I feel like they can devote more time to life experiences and focusing on their interests and passions within their education and life in general, instead of being stuck in school all day. I would be lying if I didn't say another reason was not wanting a ton of bad influences, and I know it sounds ridiculous, I feel ridiculous even typing it out, but its a true concern. I do not want to , or plan on sheltering them, but public school...ugh. I know part of this is because I went to a not so great school myself, and had a not so great experience. I just want more for my kids.

I hope I do not offend anyone, this is just my own personal belief and I know many can and do achieve great things coming out of public school.

I went to a really crappy school, but I went to a good college, and decided to quit and find a way to make money from home, because I just did not want a boss or a schedule. I am reading through the books talked about here, and want to devote more time as well to earning more and having more freedom, and teaching this to my children as well.

So I am curious if others home school, and what your experience has been like. What are you reasonings? How do you socialize the kids? What benefits do you see from it? I want to do whats best for them. I feel like I could give them so much more and they could experience so much more by not being stuck in school all day.

Also for those with kids who do homeschool, how do you save money for their futures? Both of my girls have 529s incase their passions lead them to wanting to go down a further education route, and I figure even if they dont, the money will still be there, with possibly a little extra after taxes/fees.

Thanks for reading!!
 

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Kak

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I have my first son on the way, due April 20. There is not a chance he will ever set foot in the indoctrination camp they call school.

It literally is an institution that teaches blind obedience to authority irrespective of the source. To be a cog is someone else’s wheel. To be like everyone else. To follow the official narrative.

We will teach our kids to own the wheel. To seek freedom from the status quo. To question the way the world works and to think critically. I want to do the opposite of shelter my kids. I want to show them the world and to make intelligent decisions based on it. I want to give them the understanding that they happen to the world rather than the world happening to them.

Many talk about how homeschool kids finish their daily work so much earlier in the day. That alone is reason to do this.

Homeschool. Definitely.

I am honestly pretty certain that college won’t be the same 18 years from now. I’d rather just feel it out and start them off in some way than flush money down the toilet for the advanced, 4-6 year, indoctrination intensive that is college.

I went to public school, and a private business school. I could have put the effort, money and most importantly, time, to better use.
 
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Allthatis

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I have my first son on the way, due April 20. There is not a chance he will ever set foot in the indoctrination camp they call school.

It literally is an institution that teaches blind obedience to authority irrespective of the source. To be a cog is someone else’s wheel. To be like everyone else. To follow the official narrative.

We will teach our kids to own the wheel. To seek freedom from the status quo. To question the way the world works and to think critically. I want to do the opposite of shelter my kids. I want to show them the world and to make intelligent decisions based on it.

Many talk about how homeschool kids finish their daily work so much earlier in the day. That alone is reason to do this.

Homeschool. Definitely.

I am honestly pretty certain that college won’t be the same 18 years from now. I’d rather just feel it out and start them off in some way than flush money down the toilet for the advanced, 4-6 year, indoctrination intensive that is college.

I went to public school, and a private business school. I could have put the effort, money and most importantly, time, to better use.
Ty for the reply! I really do have similar opinions. I am more open to college or some type of trade school because to me it will fully 100% be their choice to go and by that point they will have good reasoning for it beyond "its what school taught me to do". But agree who knows what it will be like further down the road!
 

Tom H.

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@Kak congrats on the baby!

My son will be one year on April 4th.

I've been planning on homeschooling for years, talked about it with my wife many, many times.

I'm not sure when we will even start any structured curriculum... My personal lifestyle is pretty rich with education without any outside structure, it's likely that this will spill over into my son's life, I think it already is actually.

I'm 100% willing to hire tutors for topics he can't learn on his own and I can't help with. My main philosophy right now is to find ways to bring subjects into the real world, like meeting actual mathematicians, scientists, historians, etc. And to just have lots of real world interactions in general, not living in a weird bubble of only kids the same exact age in an institution.
 

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How do you address the social aspect?

That's my only hang up. At school you learn social skills and the reality of social hierarchies very well.
 

Primeperiwinkle

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Homeschooling is awesome. I’m part of a group with almost 20,000 pl all utilizing the same curriculum (albeit in different ways).

My own journey to find a curriculum for my children is rather long and involved but suffice to say I ended up being the one who had to change, a lot.

The principles are more important than the method; the principles meant I had to become a producer, immediately.

Before I ever found TMF, I found a homeschooling community based on the works of a philosopher, a teacher, a leader who created schools all over England in the 19th century.

There is nothing new under the sun, there’s just wisdom that got buried and needs to be rediscovered.

Caring about my kids motivated me to look for alternatives to public school. Discovering SUCCESSFUL homeschoolers challenged me to stop blindly obeying the script and begin thinking for myself.

I highly recommend figuring out the WHY behind your reason to homeschool. Those who are new to homeschooling often become disappointed because their why doesn’t actually line up with their teaching methods.

For instance if you really want to have an emotional response from your kids every day, it can feel like failure if they rebel against you. Or, if you really want your children to get good grades and they figure out how to skim or cheat to accomplish that goal.. what do you do then?

Ultimately, homeschooling is about the relationship with your child. It forces you to learn how to work at that relationship, respect your child, and grow together. I’d rather take responsibility for my children’s education and make mistakes than hand that responsibility over to strangers for 40hrs a week. It is MY job to raise my children to be competent, hardworking, unselfish, virtuous, and stable.

If you’re interested in some excellent books I recommend these:


For the Children’s Sake (real book)
For the Children's Sake: Foundations of Education for Home and School: Macaulay, Susan Schaeffer: 9781433506956: Amazon.com: Books


Minds More Awake: The Vision of Charlotte Mason (free on kindle)
Amazon.com: Minds More Awake: The Vision of Charlotte Mason eBook: White, Anne E.: Kindle Store


Consider This (audible)
Amazon.com: Consider This: Charlotte Mason and the Classical Tradition (Audible Audio Edition): Karen Glass, Donna-Jean A. Breckenridge, Karen Glass: Audible Audiobooks
 

Allthatis

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Sep 18, 2020
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How do you address the social aspect?

That's my only hang up. At school you learn social skills and the reality of social hierarchies very well.
Co ops.. After school activities... Martial arts... Dance... Sports... Any kid group activities.. Homeschool groups etc is what it seems people do. I read they are more socialized often
 

Allthatis

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Sep 18, 2020
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Homeschooling is awesome. I’m part of a group with almost 20,000 pl all utilizing the same curriculum (albeit in different ways).

My own journey to find a curriculum for my children is rather long and involved but suffice to say I ended up being the one who had to change, a lot.

The principles are more important than the method; the principles meant I had to become a producer, immediately.

Before I ever found TMF, I found a homeschooling community based on the works of a philosopher, a teacher, a leader who created schools all over England in the 19th century.

There is nothing new under the sun, there’s just wisdom that got buried and needs to be rediscovered.

Caring about my kids motivated me to look for alternatives to public school. Discovering SUCCESSFUL homeschoolers challenged me to stop blindly obeying the script and begin thinking for myself.

I highly recommend figuring out the WHY behind your reason to homeschool. Those who are new to homeschooling often become disappointed because their why doesn’t actually line up with their teaching methods.

For instance if you really want to have an emotional response from your kids every day, it can feel like failure if they rebel against you. Or, if you really want your children to get good grades and they figure out how to skim or cheat to accomplish that goal.. what do you do then?

Ultimately, homeschooling is about the relationship with your child. It forces you to learn how to work at that relationship, respect your child, and grow together. I’d rather take responsibility for my children’s education and make mistakes than hand that responsibility over to strangers for 40hrs a week. It is MY job to raise my children to be competent, hardworking, unselfish, virtuous, and stable.

If you’re interested in some excellent books I recommend these:


For the Children’s Sake (real book)
For the Children's Sake: Foundations of Education for Home and School: Macaulay, Susan Schaeffer: 9781433506956: Amazon.com: Books


Minds More Awake: The Vision of Charlotte Mason (free on kindle)
Amazon.com: Minds More Awake: The Vision of Charlotte Mason eBook: White, Anne E.: Kindle Store


Consider This (audible)
Amazon.com: Consider This: Charlotte Mason and the Classical Tradition (Audible Audio Edition): Karen Glass, Donna-Jean A. Breckenridge, Karen Glass: Audible Audiobooks
Thanks! Are you talking about Waldorf? Or do you do Charlotte masons? How do I join the group! Lol
 

Tom H.

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How do you address the social aspect?

That's my only hang up. At school you learn social skills and the reality of social hierarchies very well.
Learning social skills in school is like learning social skills in prison.
 

Kak

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How do you address the social aspect?

That's my only hang up. At school you learn social skills and the reality of social hierarchies very well.
I have discussed this with many homeschool parents that I respect. It was my concern as well. They have very good kids that aren’t socially awkward.

The response is always something along the lines of this:

The core reason for educating your children is to make them functional and well rounded PEOPLE... Not kids that fit in socially with other, likely dumber, kids. The social pressure to be “cool” and dumb yourself down to relate is not a good pressure.

That said, all of them have sports and activities with other kids anyway and that way they can connect, like in the real world, over something they have in common.

Just like we wouldn’t want to be forced, as adults, to hang out with 50 random people that are the average representation of the area we live in. Including losers, burnouts, propensity for violence, communists etc... We ultimately meet and grow friendships with people like us because of the settings we choose.
 
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Kak

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Learning social skills in school is like learning social skills in prison.
Lol yeah. You took the hammer approach. I expanded.
 

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Allthatis

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"
The core reason for educating your children is to make them functional and well rounded PEOPLE... Not kids that fit in socially with other, likely dumber, kids. The social pressure to be “cool” and dumb yourself down to relate is not a good pressure.

That said, all of them have sports and
activities with other kids anyway and that way they can connect, like in the real world, over something they have in common.

Just like we wouldn’t want to be forced, as adults, to hang out with 50 random people that are the average representation of the area we live in. Including losers, burnouts, propensity for violence, communists etc... We ultimately meet and grow friendships with people like us because of the settings we choose."

This hit me hard, and in a good way. Exactly how I feel, and was having trouble putting into words.
 

Primeperiwinkle

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Thanks! Are you talking about Waldorf? Or do you do Charlotte masons? How do I join the group! Lol
Charlotte Mason, but you’ll need to kinda hunt around for which groups are the best. I linked to the best books out there, they’ll lead you to the good stuff. Lol
 

eliquid

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I let my kids go to public school up until ( I think, my wife would kill me ) 5th grade.

At that time, it was mostly about time and also getting them taught things I thought I could not teach them like reading/writing.

My thought was, if they can attend normal school for the first 5 years.. that should be a good base without too much influence from the "camp".

After that, we pulled them out and have done home school. They are juniors at the high school level now.

You can buy state approved courses from 3rd parties. We did online for grades 6-7, and switched to regular books and worksheets from 8th grade on up.

This year, I took a step to make my own classes for them. Teaching them:

1. Time management
2. Decision making skills
3. Budgeting and finance
4. How to start a business
5. Etc

I used books, audio courses, and youtube videos from well known names we all know and love here at the FLF.

And to back all this up, we pay extra to send all of our grades and course material to another school in Florida that checks all the work and tests and material to ensure our kids get a diploma from a real school at the end of their senior year. I don't think there would be an issue if we didn't do this, but I took extra precaution to make sure.

We get to skip classes that I think are less then needed ( Music, PE, etc ) so the days are shorter and more productive and we are able to take them places and teach them other things instead ( see above ).

I think the last straw ( besides all the other issues of school ) was when:

1. My wife walked in on a teacher yelling at another child that if he didn't shut up she would "choke him out" ( this was in 5th grade )

2. One of my children was falling behind in class with math. Her twin was doing fine. There were multiple times the teacher or school would call us about this issue and what WE needed to do. One day I finally arrange a meeting with them and sat down and they showed me all this proof she needed to be held back. As I look over the material, I ask a ton of probing questions about if they offered her different options, explained things differently, asked her what she didn't understand, etc... The look on their face was one of bewilderment, like I asked questions I shouldn't have. Their answers were no to everything.

If you know anything about "common core" versus regular math, you might see where I am coming from.

Essentially the teaching was like watching a pre-recorded webinar in the class. You hear and see everything they want to present to you and you only get 1 time to see it/hear it. There is no replay, no questions answered, no alternative storyline, no asking if you understood. The teachers are just there to go through the motions and get from a-b and call it a day.

Well, that ain't what I pay taxes for and that certainly ain't what I put my kids in school for.

Bringing them home, helping them 1x1, getting a tutor that will actually "teach", and being able to teach them things they won't learn in school has been the best thing I ( or any parent ) could do to ensure success for their child.

And on the social questions.. don't get me started.

Everyone screams how much more "social" someone will be if they go to school. Where is the proof?

I went to public school for 12 years. I am a INTP and very anti-social. So where is the excuse for this? Most of the people I went to school with that i see on FB are also very socially awkward and have proven they have weak social skills/constructs as well. Looks like this is some kind of myth everyone dreams up.
 
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Kak

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I went to public school for 12 years. I am a INTP and very anti-social. So where is the excuse for this? Most of the people I went to school with that i see on FB are also very socially awkward and have proven they have weak social skills/constructs as well. Looks like this is some kind of myth everyone dreams up.

This is a fantastic point.

The worst is when a kid is considered socially awkward for being smarter than an adult. There is no shortage of adults I would consider of below average intelligence coming out of the woodwork to proclaim that homeschool makes kids socially awkward.

I wonder if the kids are smarter than them and they view that as an impossibility.... Basically the narrative, that intelligence is not “normal” behavior for a child. They are supposed to be idiots. Therefore there is something wrong here.
 

Primeperiwinkle

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Yeaaa.. my 10 yr old is legit reading Hamlet this year and discussing Plutarch. My 7yr old is learning how to sketch portraits and use Canva.. oh and they’ve listened to a total of four novels this year already, on their own time.

But if I say that outside of homeschooling groups ppl are all “oh you MuSt bE reALly SmArT, tHaT sOunDs So HaRd!”

It isn’t hard. We adapted and pushed ourselves and read retellings and found other parents doing it WAY better than I ever could. We have to Google shit, a lot. I had to go back and reteach myself math.. and that is humbling let me tell you what. But it’s not hard.

You know what’s hard? Finding out your 8yr old is in a class with a kid whose parents decided to reassign their gender and start chemically castrating them.

THATS f*cking hard.
 

mattierocks

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My kids are 9, 6, and 3. I started suggesting homeschool to my wife shortly after the first one was born. We’re both from very “traditional” educational background (public school, college, etc).

It takes getting used to, and every child is different, but it’s more than worth it to know that you’re providing a useful, worthwhile educational experience.

And regarding socialization... many of the homeschool children I’ve met are better able to interact with peers AND adults than most school children of similar ages. That’s a completely false argument (that uniformed people will make all the time).
 

Madame Peccato

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Thanks everyone. This topic almost made me shed a tear. Almost.

I'm 28 and I don't have children nor plan to have one anytime soon. But you people seem to be among the few who have respect for kids and their intelligence.

I get genuinely upset when adults tell children to "stop dreaming" and "to be real", as if being real worked out well for them.

Good luck in your mission. I can't even begin to imagine how hard it is to be a parent.
 

Kak

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And regarding socialization... many of the homeschool children I’ve met are better able to interact with peers AND adults than most school children of similar ages. That’s a completely false argument (that uniformed people will make all the time).
I am glad to see that others have observed the same thing I have.
 

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I'm years away from this, but I intend to pay a few bright people to teach my kids and my friends' kids.

When my formal education ended at 22 I was a fat, neurotic, debt-laden mess and I've spent most of the last decade unlearning the garbage from my early life. It wasn't all bad since they taught me well enough to unlearn their shortcomings; but my kids will get a better education than I did.

There are some amazing ideas and brilliant teachers out there and the idea of finding some Aristotle to teach my kids greatly excites me.

And regarding socialization... many of the homeschool children I’ve met are better able to interact with peers AND adults than most school children of similar ages. That’s a completely false argument (that uniformed people will make all the time).

Does it not occur to people that you could be friends with other people who homeschool their kids and that your kids could be friends?
 

BizyDad

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From Socrates to Cicero to Simon, complaints about school are practically timeless. I applaud those who aspire to more for their children.

Now I'm going to have Kodachrome stuck in my head the rest of the day...

"When I think back
On all the crap I learned in high school
It's a wonder
I can think at all
And though my lack of education
Hasn't hurt me none
I can read the writing on the wall..."
 

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Jon L

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If you can homeschool, do so.

My 8th grader's principal sent this out as his 'welcome back to school' email at the start of the year:
"Let us take a moment to reflect on the land occupied by our school and the native inhabitants we took it from ..."

What the real fcuk.

First...

Well, I'm not even sure what my first point about this ridiculousness should be. So, in no order of importance:
  • Do you (the principal) not understand that if you teach your students to hate where they came from, bad things will happen? Do you not know history? Do you not understand the positives the US way of life brought to our world? Clearly, you don't or you wouldn't emphasize such idiocy.
  • Do you (the principal) believe that the people we took this land from TWO CENTURIES AGO didn't take the land from someone else?
  • Do you (the principal) believe that those native americans would have created a better country than our founders did?
I could go on.

I'd love to be able to homeschool, but for various reasons, we can't. Instead, I talk to both my kids about what they learn in school and ask probing questions. I think both my kids will turn out to be Democrats. That's fine. This is a free country (or has been, anyway). They will go into it eyes wide open though. My older daughter makes fun of the race baiters, and other stupidity in her school and in our society. "You're using a white piece of paper? You racist!" ... There's still hope for her :)
 

Allthatis

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Thank you so much for all of the replies! It really helps to talk with like minded people and there were so many good points here. I also went to school and am extremely anti social introverted, yet I am a hard/smart and motivated worker and I do better than the majority of people who I went to school with. I created a life where I have no boss, no schedule and enough money to be comfortable with hopes of being way more comfortable with what I learn here ;) this knowledge and experience will be passed on.I just don't enjoy being around most people lol.

I love the point of kids being able to choose who they socialize with VS being stuck in a building with a ton of people they would rather not be around.

The gender stuff and race issues concern me as well. It's just a mess right now and I hope to do and give better to my children. Thanks everyone!
 

ShepardHumphries

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Hi there! I am just curious how many people here choose to homeschool their children and why? I have a 6 and a 1 year old. I just pulled my child out of kindergarten to homeschool and think we are going to stick with it for the long haul. I have anxieties around it because my family chimes in stating how weird she will be, unsocialized, etc. I am VERY introverted myself, but will make sure to involve my children in social activities ( co ops, martial arts, sports if they so desire, home school get togethers, any other social activities I can find) . I really want to find more secular groups, as it seems the majority are religious around here.

I am lucky enough to be able to do this. I have my own business online, and have the time to homeschool. I will get them tutors in the future for subjects that I cant teach. My reasoning is that I just honestly am not a fan of school. I think it takes the spark out of kids, and preps them for a 9-5 lifestyle or a mindset of school school school, work work work. I understand the importance of both, but I feel like they can devote more time to life experiences and focusing on their interests and passions within their education and life in general, instead of being stuck in school all day. I would be lying if I didn't say another reason was not wanting a ton of bad influences, and I know it sounds ridiculous, I feel ridiculous even typing it out, but its a true concern. I do not want to , or plan on sheltering them, but public school...ugh. I know part of this is because I went to a not so great school myself, and had a not so great experience. I just want more for my kids.

I hope I do not offend anyone, this is just my own personal belief and I know many can and do achieve great things coming out of public school.

I went to a really crappy school, but I went to a good college, and decided to quit and find a way to make money from home, because I just did not want a boss or a schedule. I am reading through the books talked about here, and want to devote more time as well to earning more and having more freedom, and teaching this to my children as well.

So I am curious if others home school, and what your experience has been like. What are you reasonings? How do you socialize the kids? What benefits do you see from it? I want to do whats best for them. I feel like I could give them so much more and they could experience so much more by not being stuck in school all day.

Also for those with kids who do homeschool, how do you save money for their futures? Both of my girls have 529s incase their passions lead them to wanting to go down a further education route, and I figure even if they dont, the money will still be there, with possibly a little extra after taxes/fees.

Thanks for reading!!
I applaud you! Thanks for either home-schooling or un-schooling your children!

I hope your children are NOT obedient rule-followers, and that instead, they are brilliant little independent thinkers who create value and don't accept rulers! Schools are for fish, not awesome little kiddos! :)


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