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INTRO GOING DEEP

motocoyote

Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Jun 4, 2019
18
26
21
Dallas
Motocoyote stood and stared out at the Grand Canyon. He was almost alone on the ledge, save for a few foreign tourists with their selfie sticks that he could make out through the trees. They jabbered and shrieked and laughed, destroying the solace. But Moto was in his own world, lost in thought.

He thought back to his childhood. How many times had he told himself how great it was. His parents had set such a shining example of marital devotion, and raised their five children in a fine Christian home. But after listening to the first 8 hours of Millionaire Fastlane on the drive West, he could never think about his folks the same way again. Yes, they were good parents, but his dad hadn’t earned his keep since the 1960’s. Although now 87 and still kicking, his legacy was nothing more than that of an itinerant philosopher and professional bullshitter, a man who loathed personal effort of any kind yet spent money like a drunken sailor. Moto’s dad was the quintessential Sidewalker to a tee.

“Even if I come by it honestly,” thought Moto, “to define it is to deny it!” Moto turned and moved along the canyon rim, taking in the serene beauty, the rich haze, the deep blue sky melting into the North Rim ten miles across the way.

As for Moto’s mom, he held her in a different light. Aside from her current status as saint for the thankless and impossible service as his dad’s wife for almost 70 years, Moto had always been in awe of her selfless and giving nature. She provided value in every sense of the word. Maybe left to her own devices, they would have stayed rich.

You see, Moto’s mom had delivered five children, the last being Moto himself. Starting in the 1950’s, she devoted heart and soul to her family. She went off to work, and remained a loyal and dedicated Slowlaner, a bookkeeper to a brilliant entrepreneur who owned an emerging industrial powerhouse of a company. And then at age 44, when Moto was just 8 years old, she quit her job of 25 years to fulfill her lifelong dream of opening her own restaurant. She carried her entire family - not just her husband and younger daughter and Moto who were still at home, but all her grown kids, their spouses, her grandkids, and even some great grandkids - carried them through the restaurant business over the course of almost 30 years. Then they sold the company for $5 million at the most opportune time possible, January 2007.

But Moto’s dad’s legacy proved to be too powerful. His spendthrift ways and Sidewalker tendencies soon eroded the treasure that had been acquired over decades.

“It’s all F*cking gone!” Moto uttered out loud, just as a young couple hurried past on the pathway, averting his eyes.

Yes, just as he had thought with disgust so many times before, his parents were dead broke. Unbelievably, in 10 years they had squandered a fortune that took his mom a lifetime to acquire. Talk about Slowlane! It all made so much more sense to Moto now, but it didn't make it any easier to take. Now his elderly parents relied on the charity of friends and family to get by.

“Poor people have poor ways,” his mom would say with a look of exhausted resignation and a wry smile. Probably something heard as a child in the Great Depression, she could never fully escape the destiny of that mantra.

As Moto ambled along the trail on the South Rim, the sun was rising in the sky and the tourists were arriving in droves now. He thought about how much more impactful and special this moment, this view, would be if there were no other people around. He had always felt a little like a loner but never lonely, and enjoyed being alone with his thoughts, but Millionaire Fastlane was now swimming through his brain and his mind was racing. Truth be told, he was pissed! All the mistakes he had made, all the money earned and squandered, all the self-sabotage that had brought him to this point in his life.

Moto stopped and walked out on a rocky point that seemed suspended in mid air. He looked down into the canyon and wondered what it would be like to jump. He saw the Colorado River way down there, a tiny patch of murky green ribbon barely visible among the tans and browns and reds of the landscape.

“I have really F*cked things up!” said Moto in a low, insistent voice. “48 years old. Beautiful wife. Two teenage sons. One off to college in the fall. No money. No more savings. Slow moving deals with zero control over whether they get done. $250,000 in non-mortgage debt. And behind on all my bills!”

In that moment he remembered the $2.5 million in life insurance on his head. “I’m definitely worth way more dead than alive,” he thought. “That could cover everything and then some, pay off the mortgage, and provide a nice living for my wife and a good head start for my boys.”

Moto looked around and saw no one. He could jump and the insurance company couldn't prove it wasn’t an accident.

Just then, an older couple and their little dog rounded the corner and eyed him suspiciously. The woman smiled.

“You gonna jump?” she asked.

Moto was taken aback and took a half step away from the very edge. “Of course not!” he said convincingly and laughed.

“I was kidding,” she said with a twinkle in her eye. “I would guess that you have way too much to live for!”

The man just stared at Moto blankly, as they moved on down the path and out of view.

Moto was embarrassed now. For starters, he would never seriously consider taking his own life. He was a fighter and that had always seemed like the ultimate forfeiture, the loser’s way out.

Life was truly beautiful and amazing, for all its hardship, and he had always been one to roll with the punches and find solutions. After all, he escaped the family restaurant business, which was never his dream, and charted his own path in the rough and tumble world of commercial real estate. He loved the business, but after all these years, he had never figured out how to deal with the feast or famine nature of it.

As Moto contemplated his momentary lapse of reason, Fastlane kept coming back into view. It seemed so familiar, so true, and he knew that it was the path he must follow from here on. He knew that while he had set himself apart from his father’s legacy of Sidewalker, he had also been one too. And now it was time to acknowledge that and move off the sidewalk and into the Fastlane. He was the only one who could solve this endless cycle of earning, spending, debt and struggle - and he was the one who would teach Fastlane to his kids.

Moto glanced across the canyon again, and saw how the trees on the rim framed the whole scene and put it into perspective. And he decided to go deeper.
 

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Last edited:
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OP
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motocoyote

Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Jun 4, 2019
18
26
21
Dallas
Motocoyote stood and stared out at the Grand Canyon. He was almost alone on the ledge, save for a few foreign tourists with their selfie sticks that he could make out through the trees. They jabbered and shrieked and laughed, destroying the solace. But Moto was in his own world, lost in thought.

He thought back to his childhood. How many times had he told himself how great it was. His parents had set such a shining example of marital devotion, and raised their five children in a fine Christian home. But after listening to the first 8 hours of Millionaire Fastlane on the drive West, he could never think about his folks the same way again. Yes, they were good parents, but his dad hadn’t earned his keep since the 1960’s. Although now 87 and still kicking, his legacy was nothing more than that of an itinerant philosopher and professional bullshitter, a man who loathed personal effort of any kind yet spent money like a drunken sailor. Moto’s dad was the quintessential Sidewalker to a tee.

“Even if I come by it honestly,” thought Moto, “to define it is to deny it!” Moto turned and moved along the canyon rim, taking in the serene beauty, the rich haze, the deep blue sky melting into the North Rim ten miles across the way.

As for Moto’s mom, he held her in a different light. Aside from her current status as saint for the thankless and impossible service as his dad’s wife for almost 70 years, Moto had always been in awe of her selfless and giving nature. She provided value in every sense of the word. Maybe left to her own devices, they would have stayed rich.

You see, Moto’s mom had delivered five children, the last being Moto himself. Starting in the 1950’s, she devoted heart and soul to her family. She went off to work, and remained a loyal and dedicated Slowlaner, a bookkeeper to a brilliant entrepreneur who owned an emerging industrial powerhouse of a company. And then at age 44, when Moto was just 8 years old, she quit her job of 25 years to fulfill her lifelong dream of opening her own restaurant. She carried her entire family - not just her husband and younger daughter and Moto who were still at home, but all her grown kids, their spouses, her grandkids, and even some great grandkids - carried them through the restaurant business over the course of almost 30 years. Then they sold the company for $5 million at the most opportune time possible, January 2007.

But Moto’s dad’s legacy proved to be too powerful. His spendthrift ways and Sidewalker tendencies soon eroded the treasure that had been acquired over decades.

“It’s all F*cking gone!” Moto uttered out loud, just as a young couple hurried past on the pathway, averting his eyes.

Yes, just as he had thought with disgust so many times before, his parents were dead broke. Unbelievably, in 10 years they had squandered a fortune that took his mom a lifetime to acquire. Talk about Slowlane! It all made so much more sense to Moto now, but it didn't make it any easier to take. Now his elderly parents relied on the charity of friends and family to get by.

“Poor people have poor ways,” his mom would say with a look of exhausted resignation and a wry smile. Probably something heard as a child in the Great Depression, she could never fully escape the destiny of that mantra.

As Moto ambled along the trail on the South Rim, the sun was rising in the sky and the tourists were arriving in droves now. He thought about how much more impactful and special this moment, this view, would be if there were no other people around. He had always felt a little like a loner but never lonely, and enjoyed being alone with his thoughts, but Millionaire Fastlane was now swimming through his brain and his mind was racing. Truth be told, he was pissed! All the mistakes he had made, all the money earned and squandered, all the self-sabotage that had brought him to this point in his life.

Moto stopped and walked out on a rocky point that seemed suspended in mid air. He looked down into the canyon and wondered what it would be like to jump. He saw the Colorado River way down there, a tiny patch of murky green ribbon barely visible among the tans and browns and reds of the landscape.

“I have really F*cked things up!” said Moto in a low, insistent voice. “48 years old. Beautiful wife. Two teenage sons. One off to college in the fall. No money. No more savings. Slow moving deals with zero control over whether they get done. $250,000 in non-mortgage debt. And behind on all my bills!”

In that moment he remembered the $2.5 million in life insurance on his head. “I’m definitely worth way more dead than alive,” he thought. “That could cover everything and then some, pay off the mortgage, and provide a nice living for my wife and a good head start for my boys.”

Moto looked around and saw no one. He could jump and the insurance company couldn't prove it wasn’t an accident.

Just then, an older couple and their little dog rounded the corner and eyed him suspiciously. The woman smiled.

“You gonna jump?” she asked.

Moto was taken aback and took a half step away from the very edge. “Of course not!” he said convincingly and laughed.

“I was kidding,” she said with a twinkle in her eye. “I would guess that you have way too much to live for!”

The man just stared at Moto blankly, as they moved on down the path and out of view.

Moto was embarrassed now. For starters, he would never seriously consider taking his own life. He was a fighter and that had always seemed like the ultimate forfeiture, the loser’s way out.

Life was truly beautiful and amazing, for all its hardship, and he had always been one to roll with the punches and find solutions. After all, he escaped the family restaurant business, which was never his dream, and charted his own path in the rough and tumble world of commercial real estate. He loved the business, but after all these years, he had never figured out how to deal with the feast or famine nature of it.

As Moto contemplated his momentary lapse of reason, Fastlane kept coming back into view. It seemed so familiar, so true, and he knew that it was the path he must follow from here on. He knew that while he had set himself apart from his father’s legacy of Sidewalker, he had also been one too. And now it was time to acknowledge that and move off the sidewalk and into the Fastlane. He was the only one who could solve this endless cycle of earning, spending, debt and struggle - and he was the one who would teach Fastlane to his kids.

Moto glanced across the canyon again, and saw how the trees on the rim framed the whole scene and put it into perspective. And he decided to go deeper.
As I re-read my post, it occurred to me that maybe the short-story format is a little too obscure. So here is a little more color on me and my journey that may be a little easier to understand:

I spent 10 years in the family restaurant business out of college, and considered myself an entrepreneur. While I was "my own boss" in my 20's and had higher than average income for someone my age, I found it difficult to unlearn the poor spending habits that had been demonstrated to me by my family, especially my father. Due to lack of savings and the external forces of market cycles and 9-11, and thus not being able to weather the storm, this business (1 unit out of 5 family-owned units) ended in relative failure at the age of 31. My family would go on to sell the mini-chain a few years down the road, but it was my cue to leave and strike out on my own.

In 2002 I followed my heart and entered commercial real estate as a leasing and tenant representation broker. This was a Life Changing Event. I loved real estate from the beginning, and found great success. I developed new clients and enjoyed providing value, and enjoyed the creative and non-routine nature of the business. One thing in particular from Millionaire Fastlane that resonates with me a lot is providing value. I take my role as fiduciary to my clients very seriously. However, the nature of brokerage with tenant or buyer clients is such that they may not always recognize the value and dedication and service you are providing because they are not paying you directly for your services. Nonetheless, I continued on and became a consistent "top producer" within my company. With more income came more stuff: bigger home, private school for the kids, nicer cars, motorcycles, travel, etc. When 2008 hit - again, no real savings.

Out of the blue in early 2010, I received a call from a recruiter, offering a job with a global wealth management firm. I had always been interested in this business, and being the true Sidewalker that I was (though did not know it at the time!), I chased the money. They offered me a salary plus benefits (!) which I had never had in my life. I accepted the job, went off to New York for 10 weeks of training (which was a pretty phenomenal experience, actually), returned home and obtained my Series 7and 66 licenses. As I began to do the job, reality set in: F*cking mind numbing routine, dickhead boss (which I had also never had in my life), and I realized that I really missed real estate. However, I did not want to be flaky and had already put it the training, so I said I would give it a full year of business development. Fast forward 12 months to the Summer of 2011, and I had been given $70 million of Assets Under Management, and had raised another $10 million on my own. I was on my way, but still hated it. I had a mini-F*ck This Event, and returned to my old company in real estate, where they accepted me back with open arms.

When I returned, I realized that if I had stayed, I would have become a partner. But starting over at now 41, I dove back into developing clients and rebuilding a pipeline. After a couple of years, I was back in the "top producer" category! More cash flow, more expenses! (When would I ever learn?) In 2015, my company was purchased by the largest global real estate company in the world. I received a retention bonus and signed a contract to stay for a period of years. Where do you think that retention bonus went? It took a year or so, but it was spent on shit that did not earn a return! During the next 2 years, I shifted my business into investment sales to earn higher commissions, but with the new regime, a series of events unfolded that precipitated my exit in 2017.

Along with some personal issues such as 2 deaths in my immediate family, I found myself 2 years ago with no savings, lots of debt, and no business pipeline. However, I joined a small entrepreneurial development and brokerage firm and began rebuilding yet again. While brokerage has been a little slower to build, the development side has been a steady climb, and I had a milestone in August of 2018 when we closed on a parcel of land that we are developing for a national retailer, and it is a property that I sourced and received sweat equity in - so my first property investment that will yield passive income, after 17 years in the commercial property business! There are 3 more development deals behind this one and more to come.

While I still have a pretty huge hole to dig out of, I can count my blessings and opportunities:

* I discovered Millionaire Fastlane 3 weeks ago and my eyes have been opened!
* My immediate resolve is to eliminate debt as fast as possible, and the wheels are in motion
* My lovely wife is still by my side, and my 2 teenage boys are good kids with libertarian/ entrepreneurial leanings, so the time is ripe for me to expose them to MFL/ Unscripted (THIS IS MY BIG "WHY" - to break the decades-long cycle of spending and debt addiction that has plagued my family literally forever)
* I am starting my own real estate syndication company to invest in retail and multifamily properties. With Fastlane Forum and some other "aces in the right places" I am excited and taking action each day towards this goal

Thank you, thank you, thank you MJ DeMarco for your book!

Will report back soon.....
 

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