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juresesko

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Every day since I joined the forum the first page gets more and more filled with Web Design and Coding threads as it is the only way to succeed in this times.

Me myself I can't stare at small words and numbers on a black screen for longer than 5 minutes before my head starts hurting so I simply shifted my focus away from making SaaS businesses myself.

Nothing is perfect so there will always be chances to improve, change and lover the cost of production of different physical products. So don't bust your head open if you don't want to type all day.
I still get fascinated when I meet a particular guy that comes to a cafe I work in and starts typing away on his laptop while I wonder if he's just a programmer or an entrepreneur but it doesn't spark a want to learn so I won't.

I like dealing with people and physical stuff not with lines of code, if you do as well don't try to change who you are just shift your focus from "how am I going to learn Python, C#, Ruby, Java, HTML even though I can't stand it" to "how can I prevent theft of clothes in shopping malls or socks that prevent or weaken the pain of wearing new leather shoes or stubbing your toes.

But I'm sure that down the road I will get my hands on SaaS businesses just not by making them but by buying them.

Every time I talk to programmer I get hyped, because I like to know at least something about it but when it comes to technical stuff I'll pass.
 

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Every day since I joined the forum the first page gets more and more filled with Web Design and Coding threads as it is the only way to succeed in this times.

Me myself I can't stare at small words and numbers on a black screen for longer than 5 minutes before my head starts hurting so I simply shifted my focus away from making SaaS businesses myself.

Nothing is perfect so there will always be chances to improve, change and lover the cost of production of different physical products. So don't bust your head open if you don't want to type all day.
I still get fascinated when I meet a particular guy that comes to a cafe I work in and starts typing away on his laptop while I wonder if he's just a programmer or an entrepreneur but it doesn't spark a want to learn so I won't.

I like dealing with people and physical stuff not with lines of code, if you do as well don't try to change who you are just shift your focus from "how am I going to learn Python, C#, Ruby, Java, HTML even though I can't stand it" to "how can I prevent theft of clothes in shopping malls or socks that prevent or weaken the pain of wearing new leather shoes or stubbing your toes.

But I'm sure that down the road I will get my hands on SaaS businesses just not by making them but by buying them.

Every time I talk to programmer I get hyped, because I like to know at least something about it but when it comes to technical stuff I'll pass.
You may hate coding, but remember that the market does not care about what you like and what you don't like. The fact is that tech businesses are at the moment by far the fastest way to build a HUGE fortune. You could be a billionaire in 5 years - that's how fast it can be (there are people who have achieved this). Tech has disrupted gigantic industries and has led to newly minted empires - think hotels with Airbnb, taxis with Uber, commerce with Amazon, automation with companies like UI Path, and so on.

In today's age, the only companies that get funded at exorbitant valuations are tech companies. And the fastest way to make a TON of money is to do it with investors' money. That money becomes yours to one extent or another since you control it, AND on top of that investors have connections that are almost guaranteed to get you some big fat contracts - that's why they're investing in the first place.

If your goal is to be the world's richest man, then you're literally wasting your time every second you spend outside of tech. And I'm saying this as someone who does not own a tech business (I run a marketing/ biz dev agency). It will take you DECADES to build the kind of wealth that others can achieve in even less than 2 years by using other people's money and connections, in an industry that the market is currently going crazy for.
 

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I feel the same way, I'm in a product based biz and dislike even building up a shopify store :rofl:

It's boring work, and alot of people I'd guess want to build websites or code whatever to make money by living the laptop lifestyle dream.
 

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Sorry I don't have any proof myself but here I will link to some profiles who found success in ways that don't include professional coding knowledge.
@biophase (still online but e-commerce)
@MitchM ( created his own Planner how about that? )
@Johnny boy ( I'm sure you know )

Just to name a few
I know the basics of html, php. I know how to use photoshop. I know a bunch of basic technical stuff.

What it comes down to is that either you do it yourself or you pay someone to do it. If you want your add to cart button changed from orange to blue. You can figure out how to do it or pay someone $30 every time you have a small change.

Personally, I like to do it myself because it gets gone immediately and done correctly.
 
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juresesko

juresesko

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You may hate coding, but remember that the market does not care about what you like and what you don't like. The fact is that tech businesses are at the moment by far the fastest way to build a HUGE fortune. You could be a billionaire in 5 years - that's how fast it can be (there are people who have achieved this). Tech has disrupted gigantic industries and has led to newly minted empires - think hotels with Airbnb, taxis with Uber, commerce with Amazon, automation with companies like UI Path, and so on.

In today's age, the only companies that get funded at exorbitant valuations are tech companies. And the fastest way to make a TON of money is to do it with investors' money. That money becomes yours to one extent or another since you control it, AND on top of that investors have connections that are almost guaranteed to get you some big fat contracts - that's why they're investing in the first place.

If your goal is to be the world's richest man, then you're literally wasting your time every second you spend outside of tech. And I'm saying this as someone who does not own a tech business (I run a marketing/ biz dev agency). It will take you DECADES to build the kind of wealth that others can achieve in even less than 2 years by using other people's money and connections, in an industry that the market is currently going crazy for.
If you want to be the biggest and the best, tech is the way to go.
I'm amazed how tech has been revolutionized over the past 10 years

But I still believe you don't have to be the one coding to have a business.
Lets take Brian Chesky (Airbnb) for example I'm sure he didn't wrote the code himself completely he was more focused on what people get and how the company will get communicated to the outside world.

Or Amazon, Jeff Bezos didn't build the website that we use today and probably doesn't have the skill to do so. His main goal is giving people what they want and he is going massive lengths to get there. (But lets forget him, he's a few billion steps ahead comparing to our journey)

I feel the same way, I'm in a product based biz and dislike even building up a shopify store :rofl:

It's boring work, and alot of people I'd guess want to build websites or code whatever to make money by living the laptop lifestyle dream.
I wouldn't say no to living on a beach with a lap top on my lap as well.

But we all know how true that is.

Once you have created a product or a service you have just started now you have to create a brand, gain trust, make sales and expand.
Some people have problems with creating products due to lack of knowledge while others have problems with getting the company into the world due to the lack of confidence.
So why not outsource the work you can't do yourself right? If you're gonna be a billionaire in 5 years there's no problem with spending some money for a programmer.

I know the basics of html, php. I know how to use photoshop. I know a bunch of basic technical stuff.

What it comes down to is that either you do it yourself or you pay someone to do it. If you want your add to cart button changed from orange to blue. You can figure out how to do it or pay someone $30 every time you have a small change.

Personally, I like to do it myself because it gets gone immediately and done correctly.
Every great entrepreneur should have some basic knowledge in any industry that is somehow connected with your company, by having that you know where to look for solutions when a problems occurs.


So how can I have an online business if I don't know how to code?
First by saying that you don't know how to code I mean that you couldn't write a program and not that you don't know how to use a computer.​
If you get the idea of a Software business find a programmer (if you have some basic knowledge about his profession it will be easy to build rapport) and start making your vision into reality one step at a time.​
He will be dealing with codes and you will deal with everything else.​
Of course he will get his share and it won't be small.​
 

Andy Black

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The drag and drop systems available today are amazing. I use Thinkific, Mailchimp, ActiveCampaign, Canva, Bannersnack, Substack, Wix etc. I can get something working really fast without coding, and then release it quickly to see if it gets any traction. If I get profitable fast then I can always get an expert to tidy it up and make better use of the system.

I have a developer and a graphic designer in my team. Yet, as the business owner I find it handy sometimes to be able to turn something in my head into a working version. Me being able to do it on my own as an iterative process is so much faster than getting someone else to make a change, me looking at the result and asking for another change, repeat.


I agree that you don’t have to code to build a business. I’d say you’re better off getting better at building businesses if your goal is to get better at building businesses. (That seems obvious but many seem to get distracted.)

@MTF has a publishing business and has never mentioned coding. @Lex DeVille is about to start a shed making business.

You don’t need to code, even if your business is creating websites or code for other businesses.
 

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What’s worse is when is when you waited 2 months for it and it’s done wrong and you paid $5000 for it!
es, thats what I mean
 

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lowtek

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This. One of the biggest mistakes I've made in my journey was trying to follow in the footsteps of others who were more successful, simply because of their success.

You really need to stick to what you're good at and have an aptitude for. Trying to shoehorn in a new skill set that is simply outside your natural talents is only going to slow you down and make you miserable in the process.

However, there is a nuance there. Don't confuse something that is inherently difficult to learn / do (and thus has a steep learning curve) with something that simply isn't for you. Difficulty and struggling aren't the real indicator of whether or not something is for you. I can't give a hard or objective metric on what indicates something isn't for you, but I think the decision to abandon a path requires some careful self reflection and analysis beyond "oh gee this is hard, guess I better give up".
 

eliquid

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I think there is a misunderstanding here.

There are a lot of generalities getting thrown around here.

1. I don't feel the forum has become filled with threads that say coding or building websites or having a SaaS is the only way to be successful. As those threads have popped up, you might have interred that is the new trend, but none of those threads has anyone really pushed "this is the only way".

2. The post about Bezos or the AirBnB founder not coding and being successful is not a "coding vs non-coding" to be successful debate, it's a entreprenuer filling a need debate. At the end of the day, how do you fill the need the market wants? Some of us sell blue widgets, some of us sell Adwords ( leads ), some of us ship code ( SaaS ), and some of us tell stories ( books ). Don't look at it like "so and so didn't do code", look at it as "what need do you fill that the market wants and how do you accomplish that".

While I know everyone might think this thread is only helpful for those who are depressed ( see my below linked thread ), it's also a thread about finding out "where you fit" and to help you align your goals.

Doing the exercises in this thread helped me ( and countless others ) figure out what projects I'm actually good for, which includes writing books and coding.

It might help you to figure out you don't like to code ( you already know this ) and here is what you might be better at instead.


.
 

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You are oversimplifying it.

There are 1,000 ways to offer value online without being good at code.

If you can see an opportunity there don't let lack of coding hold you back.

There are many people on here doing very well online with limited coding skills.
 
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juresesko

juresesko

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The drag and drop systems available today are amazing. I use Thinkific, Mailchimp, ActiveCampaign, Canva, Bannersnack, Substack, Wix etc. I can get something working really fast without coding, and then release it quickly to see if it gets any traction. If I get profitable fast then I can always get an expert to tidy it up and make better use of the system.

I have a developer and a graphic designer in my team. Yet, as the business owner I find it handy sometimes to be able to turn something in my head into a working version. Me being able to do it on my own as an iterative process is so much faster than getting someone else to make a change, me looking at the result and asking for another change, repeat.


I agree that you don’t have to code to build a business. I’d say you’re better off getting better at building businesses if your goal is to get better at building businesses. (That seems obvious but many seem to get distracted.)

@MTF has a publishing business and has never mentioned coding. @Lex DeVille is about to start a shed making business.

You don’t need to code, even if your business is creating websites or code for other businesses.
That's what I had in mind as well.

Having your website or your SaaS business written from scratch on a programming language is becoming less used at the start. I see it as just another way of gaining control and there is no need to spend countless hours or a lot of money for something you are still not sure if the market will use or not.

The main goal is to succeed and to never work again right? So why should any one have the right answer to this, there were so many different success stories.

"You don’t need to code, even if your business is creating websites or code for other businesses."
I agree with you 100% if you buy a big coding business you don't have to be the part of the coding team. If the previous owner was a good businessman he probably got himself out of the equation right.

When done wrong, At least you can blame The guilty one immediately!:)
What’s worse is when is when you waited 2 months for it and it’s done wrong and you paid $5000 for it!
If I'm honest I think that entrepreneurship is just a high risk high reward game while you can lower the risk by doing all the work yourself but still by then you could be spending countless hours on something that won't be successful.
I think there should always be a good balance between doing the work yourself and hiring others. Especially at the start. All of us could probably write an outline of a program ourselves with help of youtube and maybe some programming guys around you just to test the market.
Or just find out if what you want to do is actually possible, and get the audience upfront before even hiring a team of coders to see if they want to use it and how much they are prepared to pay for it.

No code is great, but buying and growing a SaaS product/business is fun to me. I’m looking at both with something I am cooking up.

I read a stat that 80%+ of all SaaS company owners are non technical. Flipped my perception upside down.
I did some research about the website flipping but I still wonder, how do you grow the business you buy?
SEO? Changing the design of the website? Or changing the roots completely. There are many ways to make an online business grow but I think that the end of the day the job it gets done will get done the same way right?

Really 80% Do you maybe know how many of them build the business from scratch and how many just bought it after it was built.

This. One of the biggest mistakes I've made in my journey was trying to follow in the footsteps of others who were more successful, simply because of their success.

You really need to stick to what you're good at and have an aptitude for. Trying to shoehorn in a new skill set that is simply outside your natural talents is only going to slow you down and make you miserable in the process.

However, there is a nuance there. Don't confuse something that is inherently difficult to learn / do (and thus has a steep learning curve) with something that simply isn't for you. Difficulty and struggling aren't the real indicator of whether or not something is for you. I can't give a hard or objective metric on what indicates something isn't for you, but I think the decision to abandon a path requires some careful self reflection and analysis beyond "oh gee this is hard, guess I better give up".
All of us should always listen to ourselves first but not take everything as completely true we don't notice how many times we lie to ourselves when we get to THE HARD work. (running another mile, getting up at 5 am or programming an online business).


I think there is a misunderstanding here.

There are a lot of generalities getting thrown around here.

1. I don't feel the forum has become filled with threads that say coding or building websites or having a SaaS is the only way to be successful. As those threads have popped up, you might have interred that is the new trend, but none of those threads has anyone really pushed "this is the only way".
There are a lot of people going through this forum everyday and some of them won't think the same as you do.
If I felt the pressure I'm sure other people do as well and maybe not everyone is so sure in himself at the start to keep on looking for the business model where their current skills will actually be useful.

2. The post about Bezos or the AirBnB founder not coding and being successful is not a "coding vs non-coding" to be successful debate, it's a entreprenuer filling a need debate. At the end of the day, how do you fill the need the market wants? Some of us sell blue widgets, some of us sell Adwords ( leads ), some of us ship code ( SaaS ), and some of us tell stories ( books ). Don't look at it like "so and so didn't do code", look at it as "what need do you fill that the market wants and how do you accomplish that".
Yes, I agree I have been pretty blunt on this one but maybe you understood it a little different than I tried to tell. By mentioning them I wanted to tell that you can play a mayor part in an online business even if you didn't build the program that the business is based on yourself.

You are oversimplifying it.

There are 1,000 ways to offer value online without being good at code.

If you can see an opportunity there don't let lack of coding hold you back.

There are many people on here doing very well online with limited coding skills.
I see there is some misunderstanding here.

Anyone can bring value to any business. Just in different ways.

"If you can see an opportunity there don't let lack of coding hold you back."

This phrase should be visible at all times because for some people the lack of computer knowledge and lack of coding is the impenetrable wall.
 

VicFountain

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If you want to make money, choose a path and stick with it.
If you change idea every 2 weeks you will not go far.

I too took a pause from coding, but I believe this stems not from "It's not for me" but from lack of discipline.

Anyone can learn anything given the discipline to do it. Everything else are just excuses.
 

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Yeah, there's tons of different businesses and markets.

I believe seeing more coding related talk on the forums is likely due to these types of business owners being online throughout the day. But, maybe there's other reasons as well. Regardless, it does not mean we can't discuss something like "how to start a geothermal installation business."

But, I do slightly disagree with the premise one should not do what they hate or don't know enough about.

Overcoming that resistance and learning how to do things that the majority won't is what will better your odds for success. You don't have to be an expert with 20+ years experience to do great things. This is your own business and not the unrealistic expectations of some HR job post.

Myself, I'm building websites for numerous clients. I don't "tap dance" to my desk everyday. I don't like having to email questions in simplified terms to non-technical people. I don't like when I spend time on one problem only to discover the solution was dead simple. I don't like a lot of things about it. But, you know what I do like...?

Money and also delivering ethical results to people that will refer me to people in their networks that require such a service.

Also, my head is currently hurting trying to better understand real estate in my province. But, that's not going to stop me from investing in real estate here.
 

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Yeah, there's tons of different businesses and markets.

I believe seeing more coding related talk on the forums is likely due to these types of business owners being online throughout the day. But, maybe there's other reasons as well. Regardless, it does not mean we can't discuss something like "how to start a geothermal installation business."

But, I do slightly disagree with the premise one should not do what they hate or don't know enough about.

Overcoming that resistance and learning how to do things that the majority won't is what will better your odds for success. You don't have to be an expert with 20+ years experience to do great things. This is your own business and not the unrealistic expectations of some HR job post.

Myself, I'm building websites for numerous clients. I don't "tap dance" to my desk everyday. I don't like having to email questions in simplified terms to non-technical people. I don't like when I spend time on one problem only to discover the solution was dead simple. I don't like a lot of things about it. But, you know what I do like...?

Money and also delivering ethical results to people that will refer me to people in their networks that require such a service.

Also, my head is currently hurting trying to better understand real estate in my province. But, that's not going to stop me from investing in real estate here.
Let`s face it, only a few industries are fastlane, virtually every other business except tech/real estate is slowlane. We all want to earn money while we sleep, how are you going to do that
in any blue collar profession? There are only few options available: Real Estate investing,
franchising & licensing, selling your product online, becoming a business owner, and have employees do the work (takes a lot of time though, as owner/ceo you still have tons of obligations). I recently did an internship as systemadmin and I could instantly tell, I have not
an aptiti ude for that. Ive been floating around for years, the only job I could hold was in a flower
shop, I have only been drawn t aesthetic beauty nothing else. So I guess I cannot participate
in tech trends like AI. I hate coding but I want to be a person who is technical by nature.
 

Devampre

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Let`s face it, only a few industries are fastlane, virtually every other business except tech/real estate is slowlane. We all want to earn money while we sleep, how are you going to do that
in any blue collar profession? There are only few options available: Real Estate investing,
franchising & licensing, selling your product online, becoming a business owner, and have employees do the work (takes a lot of time though, as owner/ceo you still have tons of obligations). I recently did an internship as systemadmin and I could instantly tell, I have not
an aptiti ude for that. Ive been floating around for years, the only job I could hold was in a flower
shop, I have only been drawn t aesthetic beauty nothing else. So I guess I cannot participate
in tech trends like AI. I hate coding but I want to be a person who is technical by nature.
I would argue you could make a lemonade stand a fastlane business, although it wouldn't get a perfect CENTS score. But, I wouldn't scrutinize a lemonade stand business model so deeply.

Eventually you can exit the operation of a service based business. I would argue that to be fastlane. Perhaps a counter argument is that one would still be thinking about their business and reiterating it in such a way that would classify as work. I understand that, but I don't think that one can simply stop thinking about a business they are involved in.

Even if you have a product, such as an app that you sell. Part of you will likely want to find ways to make it better, or more profitable, or even start another app.

And if your into real estate investing (which I am quite fresh too) you are going to think about your property. Why? Because negligence could mean disaster and you likely want to get the best return possible if you are selling or collecting rent.

Maybe, the stress of having a business only goes away when you sell your business? But, some part of me knows, I'd just be stressing about what to do with the money I got for it. And even if I figure out what to do and perhaps I get dividends that would allow me to never have to do anything ever again. How long could I enjoy doing nothing?

Lastly, I do want to say that agree that it is substantially more difficult to scale or exit certain businesses. But, that shouldn't deter one from getting started. If you are looking for the perfect business to get started it doesn't exist and will only waste one's own time.
 

whyphilip

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You definitely don't need to code to make money, even with SaaS. I'm a consulting CTO, so non-technical founders and business managers hire me to get that built for them. You could also hire an agency if that fits within your risk profile and budget.

My clients tend to be technical minded, but with little (or ancient) coding experience. Even though they are not building the software or managing the development, they have absolutely no shortage of work.

There is simply so much to be done to vet the idea, get it funded, get it sold (marketing, sales, etc), and support it. They typically have other lines of business they have to manage for income while waiting for the software to be built. Paul Graham said of software startups that the CEO will likely spend half his/her time just pursuing funding.
 

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Let`s face it, only a few industries are fastlane, virtually every other business except tech/real estate is slowlane. We all want to earn money while we sleep, how are you going to do that
in any blue collar profession? There are only few options available: Real Estate investing,
franchising & licensing, selling your product online, becoming a business owner, and have employees do the work (takes a lot of time though, as owner/ceo you still have tons of obligations). I recently did an internship as systemadmin and I could instantly tell, I have not
an aptiti ude for that. Ive been floating around for years, the only job I could hold was in a flower
shop, I have only been drawn t aesthetic beauty nothing else. So I guess I cannot participate
in tech trends like AI. I hate coding but I want to be a person who is technical by nature.
Fast lane or not I would rather have a business than having no business.
I don't care what I would as long as it's mine and that I have control over it.
I would rub shit of other people toilets myself if I my business would do that.
I would do this for as long as I have to before hiring others. Then I would slowly get myself out of the primary work and only focus on customers and marketing after that if the business would grow I would start to hire managers. Step by step until the only work you have to do is count the dolla.
But the only way you won't have no work is selling.
Yesterday I talked with friend of mine
He told me that his father had an BMW M6 competition an 80-90k car
I had to ask him what he did.
He said he built few of the biggest and still successful bars around our city.
But he started with pressure washing houses (just like one guy from this forum I can't remember his name) .
You can't believe how fast you get dragged into making money. Usually if a businessman meets a businessman they find something to talk about right? Connections start to happen ideas start coming up and maybe just in a few minutes you will find a new business partner.

Maybe, the stress of having a business only goes away when you sell your business? But, some part of me knows, I'd just be stressing about what to do with the money I got for it. And even if I figure out what to do and perhaps I get dividends that would allow me to never have to do anything ever again. How long could I enjoy doing nothing?
Stress is a killer of your mind and body.
I am almost never stressed. Try working in a cafe, bar or a restaurant. When a group 50 people comes all at once while you have to take care of normal walk in guests while there are only two guys working. If you get just a little stressed everything falls apart you forget or mix up the orders you become more stressed you spill something on yourself you get more stressed you start breaking stuff you bring from the kitchen your boss get angry you want to quit but you still have to take care of other 30 people that just walked in, you're hungry, thirsty, sleepy, angry, you start to question your life decisions why am I here while the stress builds up just to wake up the next day and do the same thing all over again but you come to work stressed already and screw everything up even more so you get fired soon after that.
Simply said, stress will eat away your focus, energy and everything else that is good in you.
 

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There are many ways to skin a cat.

Tech is a very good one, but just one among plenty.
 

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how do you eat an elephant? one byte at a time, yeah just code for less than 5minutes a day, if that is your current threshold. it is pretty hard yes, but remember letter e on cents business framework.
 

theag

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I'm pretty happy with my coding skills and enjoy it.

Lots of other businesses that don't require it though. Basically the only case where you need to learn to code yourself is if you want to bootstrap a tech or tech-enabled business. If you have the capital, you can just hire for it, although thats becoming harder with the lack of really good tech people.

The knowledge is definitely giving me an edge in my industry, which is still dominated by big companies with bad tech.

I also strongly believe that the founder(s) should be competent in the core competencies of the business. This only becomes less relevant with maybe 50+ employees where you can truly be in a strategic level CEO role. But of course that believe is debatable.
 
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Kevin88660

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Every day since I joined the forum the first page gets more and more filled with Web Design and Coding threads as it is the only way to succeed in this times.

Me myself I can't stare at small words and numbers on a black screen for longer than 5 minutes before my head starts hurting so I simply shifted my focus away from making SaaS businesses myself.

Nothing is perfect so there will always be chances to improve, change and lover the cost of production of different physical products. So don't bust your head open if you don't want to type all day.
I still get fascinated when I meet a particular guy that comes to a cafe I work in and starts typing away on his laptop while I wonder if he's just a programmer or an entrepreneur but it doesn't spark a want to learn so I won't.

I like dealing with people and physical stuff not with lines of code, if you do as well don't try to change who you are just shift your focus from "how am I going to learn Python, C#, Ruby, Java, HTML even though I can't stand it" to "how can I prevent theft of clothes in shopping malls or socks that prevent or weaken the pain of wearing new leather shoes or stubbing your toes.

But I'm sure that down the road I will get my hands on SaaS businesses just not by making them but by buying them.

Every time I talk to programmer I get hyped, because I like to know at least something about it but when it comes to technical stuff I'll pass.
“Tech” is a misnomer. Coding and web design are not everything too.

The big thing is really the internet. e-commerce, saas, digital marketing. These new business have their dna mostly tied to internet.

There are also promising business that are simply using a new way (internet) to do the old thing. Radio show is old business. Podcast is a new thing. Newspaper are old. Blogs are new. Books are old. Kindle books are new. Independent content creators are just eating the lunch of the old monopolies who own newspaper and TV. Advertising revenue just switch pockets between old and new players.

My point of view is no matter what you do your business is best to have a clear “internet driven strategy”. If I am going to open a fast food outlet, I will be thinking about delivery strategy in a post-covid19 world and how to Best work with the biggest online delivery Service company in the country. I will be thinking about how to market on Tiktok since the young people Who order suppers are there.
 

Rammsteinfanboy

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“Tech” is a misnomer. Coding and web design are not everything too.

The big thing is really the internet. e-commerce, saas, digital marketing. These new business have their dna mostly tied to internet.

There are also promising business that are simply using a new way (internet) to do the old thing. Radio show is old business. Podcast is a new thing. Newspaper are old. Blogs are new. Books are old. Kindle books are new. Independent content creators are just eating the lunch of the old monopolies who own newspaper and TV. Advertising revenue just switch pockets between old and new players.

My point of view is no matter what you do your business is best to have a clear “internet driven strategy”. If I am going to open a fast food outlet, I will be thinking about delivery strategy in a post-covid19 world and how to Best work with the biggest online delivery Service company in the country. I will be thinking about how to market on Tiktok since the young people Who order suppers are there.
Yes, basically the Internet enables you to distribute your physical product in numerous ways.
Perhaps you guys are interested in some reading material of Futurist Kevin Kelly to this:

 
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juresesko

juresesko

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“Tech” is a misnomer. Coding and web design are not everything too.

The big thing is really the internet. e-commerce, saas, digital marketing. These new business have their dna mostly tied to internet.

There are also promising business that are simply using a new way (internet) to do the old thing. Radio show is old business. Podcast is a new thing. Newspaper are old. Blogs are new. Books are old. Kindle books are new. Independent content creators are just eating the lunch of the old monopolies who own newspaper and TV. Advertising revenue just switch pockets between old and new players.

My point of view is no matter what you do your business is best to have a clear “internet driven strategy”. If I am going to open a fast food outlet, I will be thinking about delivery strategy in a post-covid19 world and how to Best work with the biggest online delivery Service company in the country. I will be thinking about how to market on Tiktok since the young people Who order suppers are there.
Yes, basically the Internet enables you to distribute your physical product in numerous ways.
Perhaps you guys are interested in some reading material of Futurist Kevin Kelly to this:

I can't agree more.
There is no excuse to not spread your business to the net.
 

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