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GOLD! An AMAZING thing happened to my INCOME when I traded-in my rusty Honda for a Viper

RazorCut

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I think this H2 has probably cost me more jobs than I got. 50% of the time I would meet a potential client they would see the H2 and tell me that they can't afford me by the type of car I drive.
I know that feeling. When I had the pizzeria we had 5 children. I bought a brand new Chrysler Grand Voyager as we had always struggled every where we went trying to cram all 7 of us into vehicles designed for less. (The Voyager maybe not the sexiest beast but here in the UK it stuck out like a sore thumb with all the dark glass and the size of a tank).

Anyway when I had a Video Rental Library (showing my age :D) I remember one of the reps telling me the story of a woman who had a successful retail shop and her one ambition in life was to own a Mercedes Benz. When she finally fulfilled that ambition she parked it right outside the shop where she could keep an eye on it. In no time at all her sales slumped. A great deal of the British mentality is sadly that of jealousy and loathing. Rather than celebrate someone's success and think 'if they can do it so can I' its a case of 'why should they have that and I don't?'

As soon as I got the car I would park it out the back out of sight to avoid the issue. If you can afford a nice car you must be ripping them off right? Whereas if you are driving some beat-up wreck they don't mind paying exactly the same price. Human nature I guess.

A friend of mine owns a very successful tyre/exhaust(muffler?)/servicing station. He provides an excellent service and has a great personality. A great front of desk sort of guy. Always mega friendly and upbeat, remembering everyone's name, making you feel special even though most people hardly know him and see him only once or twice a year. He had become very successful over the years from building up this rapport and can afford some very nice toys but I notice that within a year he is driving the works van to work rather than his Range Rover. I think he must have learned the hard way its not good to flaunt your wealth.

That's one of the reasons why I love online businesses. I can drive into my local town and not care if people see an 80k Beemer. But when old customers and friends do their first question is 'so what are you doing these days then? lol

More smoke and mirrors.
 

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liquidglass

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This is an awesome thread and I completely agree our society is consumed by consumption instead of value production, great thread OP, LIkes/rep given!

I will make a small contrary point however. It may not be popular but it's something I personally experienced. When getting into sales which is what helped me break into the fastlane I had a 12 yr old car (paid for) and planned on keeping it until it wasn't worth fixing. One day I was hit on the left rear which resulted in it being totaled according to the insurance company. I decided the payments I could afford and went with the insurance check in hand for a down payment on another car.

I looked and looked and finally decided on the car I loved. It would be the first car-love of my life the other cars I had owned up until that point were a means to an end that I had no interest in enjoying. However the car was $100 more per month than the budget I had decided on. It was a big stretch for me to say that an extra $100 a month was no big deal at that point in my fiances. (I was in sales and I sucked haha)

note: it wasn't a brand new car, it was over a year old but it was the newest car I had ever owned and the lowest miles of any I had bought (it also wasn't a BMW, mercedes, etc)

I called my mentor and explained the situation and asked for guidance. Given his experience in my line of work I wanted to ask someone smarter than me what he would do. He didn't tell me what he would do, which was all I wanted.
I simply asked:

"That's an extra $100 per month, do you think I can afford it?" (he knew how my finances were)
His reply is one that will always stick with me:
"I'm not sure. Do you THINK you can?" (the equivalent of "CAN YOU")

Which doesn't seem revolutionary on the surface but he wasn't asking about what I had in my bank account. He was asking if I believed I would be able to afford it long term and be willing to stretch my goals and work harder to have it. (The wonderful thing about sales are that you can make what you want (same with fastlane ventures) and you can always sell yourself out of any financial situation)

I said "thank you for that eye opener" hung up, went back into the dealership, and signed the papers. I never defaulted, lost the car, or had to scrape money together to pay for it after that day.

All because I used it as a tool to STRETCH my goals to EXPAND my belief in myself that I could be free of the "get-by" mentality I grew up in. It wasn't to impress anyone else or live up to a certain standard. It was proof that I could see myself as wealthy and obtain whatever goals I set forth in my mind.

Not exactly rusty honda to Viper
more like rusty Alero to Charger
 

RazorCut

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I agree a man's reach should always exceed his grasp but I now prefer to pay cash wherever possible. Have had enough of debt and my reach is focused on creating passive income rather than material things these days.

Actually sometimes NOT having a high status car can hold you back. I remember years ago when I had a Web Site promotion business I was approached out of the blue to meet a select group of entrepreneurs who had found my site via a web search and were impressed with what I was doing and wanted me to be a part of a new start-up. The meeting was in a high status country club and I got spotted parking my old Mitsubishi Shogun in between all the Beemers and Mercs. You only have one chance to make a first impression. Suffice to say it didn't pan out. Now if I had rolled up in MJ's Lambo I'm sure they would have been all over me like a rash. Looks like I'm developing a tag line ....More Smoke & Mirrors. :D
 
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RogueInnovation

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I've got that want to spend haha.
I'll only spend it as part of a plan though.
And my plans go through a lot of revision and reiteration for the sake of removing stupid XD.

Freedom to me is not worrying in this moment.
Biz gave me that, cuz biz is a lot about doing nothing, to get stuff done haha.

I do want to get monkeys off my back, but its best you calm them down first or you'll get bit.
 
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ddall

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Op's advice is the type of wisdom more often adhered to after being personally experienced. It's the type of insight one only truly gains after walking the sidewalk, and being a perpetual consumer. You can try explaining this to young cats, but it's a safe assumption to believe they will nod and agree with you while at the same time discreetly reaching into their pocket to procure a credit card and handing it to a travel agent for a trip to Cancun. And really, can you blame them? For most young men they are governed by their hormones, manipulated endlessly by media and expert advertisers constantly apply the latest psychological discoveries, to part with every dollar they earn.

Some people, it must be understood, literally cannot conceptualize delayed gratification. Delving into the topic deeper, whether the behavioural origin of this mindset is genetic, environmental or more than likely, both--many people simply DO NOT WANT to delay consumption and would rather pursue a hedonistic spending binge. (here is a breakdown of the famous Marshmallow Experiment on the concept of delayed gratification: http://jamesclear.com/delayed-gratification) It must be considered however, that the entrepreneurial mentality and internal motivation of most on this forum is in fact not appealing to many. Money is appealing sure, but the road to it is not. You can't cheat the grind, its agreed. The path to success for most is paved with continual, consistent applied effort and lifetime learning. Yuck, to that is what many think. I have cousins for example, who are utterly content working in the tourist district of Montreal, earning low wages, but spending their afternoons and evenings sipping coffee, playing music and their nights drinking wine with friends and watching indie films. Life to them is about relationships (and really, isnt this the truth?). To them, my mindset is off, my life philosophy is contaminated, exchanging precious, fleeting youth and free time at the alter of the entrepreneurial gods can be a fruitless sacrifice, true. The road is too risky and payoff is not assured. You could die tomorrow they argue. Perhaps indeed.

The point is, patting ourselves on the back for our producer mentality insight is OK, and quite relevant in fact to the purpose of this forum, but it is important to remember this: our wants are not other peoples wants. Feeling superior for possessing a different life philosophy, does not make it necessarily better. Money can equal freedom, can allow for amazing experiences, but just ask the recently departed Felix Dennis (of How To Get Rich) if money is happiness. It isnt. I recall him writing (paraphrasing here) he would exchange every dollar of his near billion $ fortune to be young and sleeping on the couch of his old flat. Some people will always be consumers, and some, the few, will choose to be net producers.
 

LeftBench

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Great post and very true. While I aspire to one day own a high end vehicle, I want to own it because I can buy it in cash outright.... without it even making a dent in my pocket.
 

MJ DeMarco

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-Freedom from bosses
-Freedom from government
-Freedom from anti-depressants, stimulants, and anything else big pharma pushes to make people "feel better"
-Freedom to go anywhere in the world anytime I want
-Freedom from debt and no dependency from family
-Freedom from selfishness, which is obtained by offering value to others
-Freedom from mindless consumerism
-Freedom from false societal programming
Freedom from desire you can add as well.

My gym is about 1000 yards from Lamborghini Scottsdale. Every time I pass, I have to see Gallardos, Porsches, Murcis, etc. -- there is an incredible freedom in knowing that I can buy whatever I want there. On the flip side, there is an incredible freedom in knowing that I don't desire anything from there. The desire to own does not exceed the desire to maintain. Of course lets be honest: Had I not the experienced 10+ years of Lambo ownership, I might be singing a different tune. Like anything in life, certain things can get old.
 
OP
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Magik

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$800 oil changes.
And you make a good point that sidewalkers don't think about when they buy (or should I say, finance) these cars. It's not just the payment you have to worry about: insurance, maintenance (tires, oil change, ect.), repairs, plus the risk of someone breaking into your car or damaging it just because.
 

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Justin079

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Back when i had my small plastering business in construction, there was a builder (Developer) i did work for who used to wear torn overall's tied with a piece of string around his waist, a beat up truck he used to tear around in and a scrappy looking dog that he had. At the end of his work day (1pm most days), he would go home to his wife in their £1.1 million home he built in peak country side in norfolk uk where film stars buy property.

He was a diamond to work for, always organized on site and the only customer to offer payment before you had even finished a project. I did work for an accountant who knew this guy and lived in the same village. He estimated he was worth 15 million+, yet he was completely down to earth and other than his house you'd be forgiven for thinking he was homeless if you saw him on site.

The builder that i lost a load of money and basically cost me my little business had a BMW land cruiser, exotic holidays nearly monthly and all the usual trappings. Hence looks mean nothing!

A brilliant post enaeka. Thank you!
 

Tick

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Awesome thread! I was literally talking about this yesterday.

From my facebook yesterday afternoon: "***Attention bro-truckers, crotch rocket boyz, Fast-N-Furious wannabe's, and middle managers posing as rebels on Harley Davidsons***. This is the cold hard truth but you need to know. Brace yourself..... No one, and I mean no one thinks you're cool as you blast past my house. I know you think I'm looking at you yearning for the kind of no money down easy low-low payment plan lifestyle you command, but I am not. I am simply trying to figure out how I could put a .338 Win Mag bullet through your engine block without getting caught. The street behind my house is not Le Mans, nor Talladega, nor the streets of Monaco. It is simply a residential drive. I did not mistake you and your Volkswagen Jetta for Vin Diesel running from the law. No, you're just another F*cktard on your way back to your shitty apartment after cleaning tables at Applebees. You can stop now. Go home, turn off your TV, read a book, and someday you might drive something worth listening to. Just remember, if it has less than 10 cylinders and it doesn't come from Germany, Italy, or Great Britain you haven't gotten there yet, so quiet down and slow down poser."
 

MisterBHZ

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Awesome thread! I was literally talking about this yesterday.

From my facebook yesterday afternoon: "***Attention bro-truckers, crotch rocket boyz, Fast-N-Furious wannabe's, and middle managers posing as rebels on Harley Davidsons***. This is the cold hard truth but you need to know. Brace yourself..... No one, and I mean no one thinks you're cool as you blast past my house. I know you think I'm looking at you yearning for the kind of no money down easy low-low payment plan lifestyle you command, but I am not. I am simply trying to figure out how I could put a .338 Win Mag bullet through your engine block without getting caught. The street behind my house is not Le Mans, nor Talladega, nor the streets of Monaco. It is simply a residential drive. I did not mistake you and your Volkswagen Jetta for Vin Diesel running from the law. No, you're just another F*cktard on your way back to your shitty apartment after cleaning tables at Applebees. You can stop now. Go home, turn off your TV, read a book, and someday you might drive something worth listening to. Just remember, if it has less than 10 cylinders and it doesn't come from Germany, Italy, or Great Britain you haven't gotten there yet, so quiet down and slow down poser."
I can smell the burning souls from all the types of ether you poured.
 

Tick

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I remember being a young 1st Lt in my tiny apartment in a dumpy midwestern city. I was mired in misery. I had a job I hated that I couldn't quit, was stuck in a city I loathed, no girlfriend and really no plans for the future. My only respite was walking out to my 100% financed 2000 BMW M-Roadster and slipping off the car cover. When I was driving that I "knew" everyone around me thought I was wealthy. After all, I was making 44K a year.

Then I'd come back home to my shitty apartment off a service road of I-44 and go right back to being miserable.

Fast forward a couple years and I'd bought my first house. 1250 newly constructed square feet of debt slavery. I reasoned that I could rent it out someday, so really I was being a smart investor and somehow superior to those around me. The roadster now had a stable next to the Tacoma in a garage but I was still miserable.

One morning we all got called in to the auditorium. The commander stood in front of us and explained that the Air Force no longer needed so many lieutenants and captains in our career field. In their infinite wisdom and compassion, they were going to allow us to separate voluntarily, rather than kick us out. That afternoon I caught an airplane to Colorado for some leave and was walking the path next to my entrepreneur step dad's giant home with my Mom.

As we walked the path next to his I whined, "This is F*cking bullshit Mom! 4 years of getting my a$$ kicked in ROTC, 8 months of waiting to start school, then 2 years of intense training and now this!!! Not they're just going to kick us out if we don't volunteer!"

She was very quiet then said: "You know, you just don't seem happy. Why don't you get out?"

It hit me like a ton of bricks. I would lose my identity. I had so much of my personal identity wrapped up into my job. I was an air force aviator. I brought the full brunt of U.S. airpower down upon our enemies, yet I was MISERABLE. I never really liked my job yet could never leave and now I was staring opportunity in the face and spitting on it.

6 months later I was out. I was on the road to Alaska with my soon to be wife. No job offers, and only 10K saved up over the last few months. Everything I owned was in the back of my truck and trailer, to include our bed for the 6 day drive to Alaska. Everyone told me I was nuts to get out. I'd had it all. The car, the house, the truck, the job, and the "money" and was walking away from it all.

I'm not going to lie, it was tough. Throwing newspapers at 3am in winter in Alaska on icy roads is no treat but I WAS FREE. And it felt great. A year later I relapsed and joined the air guard, but the money earned was now being used to buy property and build businesses. I'm now just days from completing my last day in the guard and savoring every drop of freedom I get in a swiftly growing business and learning everyday.

As a fellow property management business owner once told me "You never know how hard you can work until you have to"
 
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s168

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Great thread.

What I've observed is that those who spend money they don't have on things they don't need to impress people they don't care about, are generally suffering from a self-esteem or self-confidence issue. These outwardly things are just a desperate attempt to get attention, admiration and respect... all at the cost of living the big lie as they struggle to pay the bills to maintain that faked lifestyle. The media does a great job of that, encouraging us all to buy things and follow the endless consumerist lifestyle.

The moment I was able to see that we had six figures in the bank in cash, no consumer debt, investment properties bringing in positive monthly cashflow and appreciating in value over the years, was the moment I realised that I didn't care about these fancy trophies. I know many people with Porsches, Audi's, BMW's etc. They are great cars and I've owned some of them in the past when I was naive, but would I rather own something that makes me poorer by the day or would I rather put money into something that allows me to work less, give me income / increase in value, and allow me to sleep at night at ease?

When you own a nice expensive car, you're always concerned about the attention it gets, whether the place you parked it is safe, whether someone will scratch or dent it, that if something goes wrong with it what the bill will be, etc. The moment you have reached a point where you don't even worry about these things is the moment you truly can afford it.

My current car is an old Japanese everyday car. It's simply unassuming, reliable and quite economical to run. I like it that way. I'd rather invest the money I'd otherwise waste in maintaining a more expensive vehicle into business ventures.
 
OP
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Actually sometimes NOT having a high status car can hold you back. I remember years ago when I had a Web Site promotion business I was approached out of the blue to meet a select group of entrepreneurs who had found my site via a web search and were impressed with what I was doing and wanted me to be a part of a new start-up.
This was my one quibble with ATW's recent and very good "Be-Do-Have" thread. I guess you can argue that I already "was" mentally in the following instances, but I can think of a couple of good business war stories where I "had" (got the trappings of something) then used the appearance they projected to do something that was facilitated by people's perception, and then when they perceived me in the way I wanted, I got their business, and actually became the thing I had "pretended" to be from the outset.

A great example of this is Barbara Corcoran, who bought herself a ballin' top-coat from Chanel or something when she first started her real estate company in New York. She wore it almost every time she had an initial meeting with a client for years. That polished appearance gave her the look of wild success that she had no true claim to, and because of that, she got treated as an expert, got real business, and became every bit as successful as she looked. This sort of social proof is devastatingly effective in many situations. If I was going to star an MLM, you bet your a$$ the first thing I'd do is go down to a Rolls Royce dealer, buy a used 04 Phantom for $120,000 (finance all but $15-20K of it, of course), then plaster my picture with that car everywhere. Regardless of whether I "earned" that car or not, if I played my cards right, I bet I'd rapidly be able to pay for the car in cash.

Don't blow your money on frivolous stuff, or be the idiot that convinces him or herself that the frivolous stuff they want is actually essential. That said, be aware the usefulness of projecting a facade to get ahead in business. It can be really, really powerful.
 
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MJ DeMarco

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A great example of this is Barbara Corcoran, who bought herself a ballin' top-coat from Chanel or something when she first started her real estate company in New York. She wore it almost every time she had an initial meeting with a client for years.
A great example of the "fake it until you make it" creedo. I think in her case, she wanted her clients to think "she's one of us" so she fit the role. This is just simple a psychological sales tactic of reciprocity. If you are trying to sell something, the closer you reciprocate your prospect's disposition, mannerisms, and dress, the more they will identify with you.
 

tivobaker18

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Thank you for this post. I'm 21 years old and I've learned this advice from reading books years ago. My first car is a 2002 Honda Civic (188,000 miles) and still going strong. However, it's hard going to work everyday seeing people my age driving newer cars? I work at the post office. The younger crowd think it's okay to make payments, but they live with their mom and have a cosign. Yet I still have to sustain myself from making that same MISTAKE. This forum keeps me on track I swear.
 

Franky Neizer

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True story. Nowadays is all about status and looking for the best photo to put in the social media.

People forget that after the excitment of having a new toy pass, nobody cares about your fancy car and you will not care either, but you still have to worry about paying the car or sustain the car.

People focus less in being good at socializing with people, and focus more in appearing awesome to other people and telling those amazing stories about their toys and trips and other consuming stories.

And then they go home, spend another week slaving themselves in a job they probably dont like , waiting for a weekend to show their friends their new planned consuming aquisition.

Everybody have their own preferences on how to spend their resources and we should not judge them, but the fact is, most people dont see any advantage in having that lifestlye, they feel bad, and they still continue with that rat race, because is what other people see as a "success".
Real talk... ;)
 

Franky Neizer

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Great post bruv, I can relate to the flashy stuff and expensive meals. I've gone broke a couple of times living above my means even when I was doing very well in business. I am more of an introvert type so I do things just to please myself (celebrating my success).

Though one needs to celebrate his success, one ought to live within his means or if possible below his means to help solidify his wealth for the future.
 

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Saynotostatusquo

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Hey Man, thanks for this post! I needed that at this point in my life. It's just sometimes silly when you think about it, that there are many biases in human thinking and most of them we carry on with us because of the simple reason - that we take things for granted. ;S I rarely go to Facebook because I'm working most of the time, but I went to check what's new out there today and I saw an acquitance, who was the same age as me, but looked better and had more things to show for the world. Of course I got jealous at first and felt miserable, but just like you say : " One of the biggest deceptions ever perpetrated on the public is the persistent notion that your value can be gauged by what you consume ". Thanks!
 

s168

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Anecdotal story:



One of my old friends called me the other day. He accidentally poured petrol (gasoline) into his car, an Audi A4 S-Line Diesel (FYI for non-Europeans, in Europe diesel passenger cars are quite common). He had to call out a specialist breakdown company to flush out the fuel tank and refuel the car. That cost £250 (about $420). Then the next day, his tenants at the property that he lives in complained that they saw rodents in the kitchen. A pest control company quoted him another £250 ($420) to deal with the problem and give a 3-months pest-free guarantee otherwise they'll fix any problems for free.

Problem is, he called me to ask to borrow the money because he said he didn't have that kind of money available at short notice. I was thinking, WTF??!! You're driving a pristine 4 year old Audi A4, wear designer clothes, own a Rolex watch, go on good holidays abroad a few times a year, go to the gym many times a week, regularly go to the tanning salons and have your teeth professionally whitened, and in all appearances you look the part of a successful person. But to find a few hundred bucks and you don't have that available??!!

I realise that many many people in the Western world live like this. When I was a poor kid, I used to wonder how they can afford all of this and how their lifestyle appeared to be amazing. Fast forward a few years, and I see it for what it really is... a SHAM. Of course if you spend all the money that you have, plus all the money that you can borrow off loans, bank overdrafts, multiple credit cards, and even equity release from your own property, then sooner or later you'll hit the ceiling which is the point where your outgoings exceed your available access to funds. Never mind the point where your outgoings exceed your income, as that was surpassed a long time ago when you started borrowing.

I'd have sympathy if he'd borrowed the money to invest in a calculated venture with good risks vs rewards ratios, but to blow the lot on consumerist nonsense to perpetuate a faked lifestyle is utterly insane. Much like you cannot borrow your way out of debt, neither can you spend your way to true wealth either.

Some of the richest people I've come across actually drive very ordinary but reliable cars. You only get to have a glimpse of how wealthy they are when you see the real stuff, like the values and incomes they have from their businesses and investments, the home(s) they own and more importantly how little they owe if any on those homes. But that's the thing... you almost never get to see that info. And because of that, many people are able to appear to have similar things but not the real deal of hidden income and assets to back that up.
 

s168

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Hey Man, thanks for this post! I needed that at this point in my life. It's just sometimes silly when you think about it, that there are many biases in human thinking and most of them we carry on with us because of the simple reason - that we take things for granted. ;S I rarely go to Facebook because I'm working most of the time, but I went to check what's new out there today and I saw an acquitance, who was the same age as me, but looked better and had more things to show for the world. Of course I got jealous at first and felt miserable, but just like you say : " One of the biggest deceptions ever perpetrated on the public is the persistent notion that your value can be gauged by what you consume ". Thanks!
Facebook is really Fakebook. It's an outlet that ordinary people can use to broadcast and brag. And they do that all the time.

Have you actually noticed the discrepancy between the people you know and meet, compared to the same types of people and their FB postings? It's as if online they appear to have such an amaaaazing life, and everything is simply awesome all the time? Seriously, what BS.

I hardly ever go on FB anymore for personal use, logging in at best once every 1-2 months. It's one of the biggest time wasting activities you can engage in, aside from watching TV. The only times I go on FB are to advertise and monitor my ad spend, click through rates, conversions, etc, and I have a separate account just for that purpose. It's a business tool for me.
 

MJ DeMarco

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Facebook is really Fakebook.
I realise that many many people in the Western world live like this. When I was a poor kid, I used to wonder how they can afford all of this and how their lifestyle appeared to be amazing. Fast forward a few years, and I see it for what it really is... a SHAM.
Yup. Rep++

Where I live, 99% of the cars are newer than mine and more expensive. Which is part of the reason why I live like the 1%.
 

s168

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Another anecdotal story...

Last year I was on a flight to the Far East. I happened to sit next to a guy in his early 20's, so we started chatting and soon talked about business stuff and so on. He told me an interesting story which is in the spirit of this thread.

This guy used to go to school or college with another guy, who I can't recall the first name of, but let's call him 'Mark' for now. So his buddy's name is 'Mark' Johnson. They were quite good friends at school, and one day his friend 'Mark' asked him to pop by his place at the weekend to hang out for a bit and then they'd go out somewhere else afterwards.

So this guy makes his way to Mark's house following the directions given. It was a bit further out into the countryside a bit. When he arrived at the entrance to the house, it was securely gated and he was only allowed in after being verified that his visit was expected that day. He then walked several hundred metres to the house, which was an absolutely massive house. Clearly it was worth many many millions.

At the main front door waiting for him was his friend Mark. He was really surprised that Mark lived in such a huge and expensive house, but had never ever mentioned the wealth he had come from nor has he ever displayed anything that screamed bling bling at school. On the huge front drive, he sees a handful expensive cars but nothing too 'flashy'... a Mercedes or two and maybe a Rolls Royce.

So this guy, being curious and astounded by what he's seeing around him, ask his friend Mark what line of work his family does to live in such wealthy surroundings.

Mark replies "Oh, my family have always had some business interests... I don't really get involved with it."

This guy asks "So, what kind of businesses?"

Mark replies "Well, have you heard of the company Johnson & Johnson?"
 

Mattie

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When someone hits your car it doesn't look like any other car smashed up. It's plastic, metal, rubber. While it may be designed to be a nice car, really I'd be happy with any car as well as it drives nice, feels comfortable, and gets through terrain and bad weather. Someone just decided to mold plastic and metal differently, put a brand on it, it became a trend, and you decided you had to have it for a high price.
 

Worldisyours

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you can be a multi millionare and then on top of that have the car and home you want.

money management, thats all
 

Jakeeck

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Facebook is really Fakebook. It's an outlet that ordinary people can use to broadcast and brag. And they do that all the time.

Have you actually noticed the discrepancy between the people you know and meet, compared to the same types of people and their FB postings? It's as if online they appear to have such an amaaaazing life, and everything is simply awesome all the time? Seriously, what BS.

I hardly ever go on FB anymore for personal use, logging in at best once every 1-2 months. It's one of the biggest time wasting activities you can engage in, aside from watching TV. The only times I go on FB are to advertise and monitor my ad spend, click through rates, conversions, etc, and I have a separate account just for that purpose. It's a business tool for me.
Agreed 100%. Me and a couple of my friends always used to say how so many people try to make it look like they're having a good time, instead of actually trying to have a good time. Mostly we were referring to the girls that take their cameras to every night out and snap 50-100 pics.
 

Ninjakid

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Seeing as you mentioned Lil Bow Wow, I want to make another hip hop reference here:

Hip hop fans will notice how Lil Bow Wow is only famous because he was promoted by Snoop Dogg at a young age and used the "kid rapper" gimmick. He makes sub-par music, rarely releases an album, and his only other ventures are some silly movies. I've never heard of him being called a hard worker.

Jay-Z on the other hand, made his first album without a major label to back him, continuously puts out albums, and actually makes good hip hop records. He could quit rapping if he wanted to not just because he's loaded, but he's a businessman as well. He's started many successful businesses such as a clothing line and a record label; plus he's the manager for many other artists. He's a busy guy and probably spends more time in a boardroom than nightclub. Even when he lost a bunch of money because he wanted his label to become independent from their distributor (I think it was Def Jam, but can't remember), he kept working to his empire more successful and made him self wealthier than before.

So people, it's all about your focus. If your focus is your business or your craft, you will get more out of your business or your craft. If your focus is cars and other materialistic sedatives, you will get more of that; but they will suck your money.
If you focus on your S.O., you will get more from your S.O. If you didn't give your partner attention, how well would you expect your relationship to go?
 

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