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What Qualities to Look for in a Manager?

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amp0193

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My business is at a point where I need to hire a full-time operations manager.

I've never hired anyone before, except for temporary contract/day-labor type stuff, where the only requirement was basically just to show up on time.

I will be working side-by-side with this person for 2 months, before leaving the country for the 10 weeks. They will not be managing employees (yet), just the day to day operations of the warehouse.

Priority 1, it needs to be someone I trust. How do you determine trustworthiness in an interview? Or is the best way to try and find someone in my network... a friend of a friend that someone I know can vouch for?

Priority 2 is the ability to solve problems independently, and to determine creative solutions to new problems.


What are the most important qualities that you look for in a manager?

When you've determined those qualities, what is your process for identifying someone with those qualities? What are your interview or training tactics that are effective at weeding out those not suited for the job?

Compensation: I'm considering doing a position that is full-time with benefits. Am I asking for a world of headaches in doing this? Would it be better to do a 35-hour a week type position and avoid the full-time status if I can? Will doing less than 40-hour full-time affect the quality of the candidate pool?


Just some things I'm thinking about. I'm curious to hear from those with hiring experience.

@MidwestLandlord
 

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Argue

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I’m no expert. But these qualities matter:
  • Communication
  • Clarity
  • Practical experience
1. Manager needs to communicate effectively. If he/she is too wishy-washy, that’s a no.

2. Clarity is important. The manager needs to be organized. Understands the business and is clear on what needs to get done. The manager can execute well.

3. Practical experience. Can find solutions to problems in an easy manner. Takes on a leadership role. Humble enough to receive constructive feedback.

Final thoughts: I’m interested in other ideas on what makes a manager qualified. Great thread.

(P.S. this is my humble opinion. Take with a grain of salt. Food for thought.)
 
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amp0193

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1. Manager needs to communicate effectively. If he/she is too wishy-washy, that’s a no.

2. Clarity is important. The manager needs to be organized. Understands the business and is clear on what needs to get done. The manager can execute well.

3. Practical experience. Can find solutions to problems in an easy manner. Takes on a leadership role. Humble enough to receive constructive feedback.
All good qualities.

I would think that you could tell someone's communication skills just through your initial contact with them and how they respond to you. Seems easy enough.

How organized someone is definitely important, but seems like a tough thing to deduce without giving them a chance to do the job first. This might be something you'd have to learn from one of their reference or a referral that you trust.

Ability to receive feedback is huge. I think the best teams are when the manager and the employees are both open to improving themselves. In this case me as the owner, and my manager.
 
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amp0193

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Attention to detail, time management are both incredibly important.
What's a good way to determine if someone has attention to detail?

Any good ideas for some sort of "test" to put the candidate through?

Maybe putting some small details in the job description, and seeing if the applicant took the time to read and respond to the small things I put in there?


Time management seems like it'd be hard to determine prior to having them work for you on a trial basis first.
 

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What's a good way to determine if someone has attention to detail?

Any good ideas for some sort of "test" to put the candidate through?

Maybe putting some small details in the job description, and seeing if the applicant took the time to read and respond to the small things I put in there?


Time management seems like it'd be hard to determine prior to having them work for you.
That is a common one. Have them use particular words or phrases in their application. That honestly will weed out a ton of people.
 

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I have a background in HR so my opinions might be a little different than other people. For the interview, I would suggest situational based questions. For example, how would they handle a shipment that was held up in customs?
How do they handle customer complaints?
Any important situations that you handle with should be asked

You also want to confirm that they have the knowledge in any programs they need. QB, Amazon, etc

I would also do a reference check and confirm employment on previous jobs. This is a double edge sword though because many companies won't comment if they have negative things to say because they don't want to be held liable. You can also do a background check but make sure you do it following the rules of the FCRA. This is my specialty so I can help if you need more info.

Don't be afraid to have multiple interviews. This way when you narrow it down to let's say the top 3 candidates, you can have 3 one-hour more personal interviews which will help you get a feel for their personality.
 
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amp0193

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I have a background in HR so my opinions might be a little different than other people. For the interview, I would suggest situational based questions. For example, how would they handle a shipment that was held up in customs?
How do they handle customer complaints?
Any important situations that you handle with should be asked
This is great, I can see how these types of questions would be really insightful. Especially in a management type job... new situations can show up every week that there isn't a "script" for.

I would also do a reference check and confirm employment on previous jobs. This is a double edge sword though because many companies won't comment if they have negative things to say because they don't want to be held liable.
At least when I was a teacher, I know that my principal/team-leads would give positive references just to get that disliked employee out of there and hired someone else.

Maybe this practice is more common in jobs where it can be challenging to fire someone (like in teaching).

You can also do a background check but make sure you do it following the rules of the FCRA. This is my specialty so I can help if you need more info.
I'll definitely message you in a month or two when I get to that point. Background check is essential, and I don't know anything about the legal issues.

Don't be afraid to have multiple interviews. This way when you narrow it down to let's say the top 3 candidates, you can have 3 one-hour more personal interviews which will help you get a feel for their personality.
Good idea!
 

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Stressful, situational interview w/ lots of distractions.
Talk philosophy. Talk failures.
Credit check.
Get them in and try them for a week as a 1099 to see if you can work with each other.
Clear procedures. FAQ. Craft both as you go.
Read 'Emyth revisited' by Gerber. That will help.
 

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I've never hired anyone, so other opinions are likely more valuable, however I'll throw my hat into the ring:

There's a great management book called "First, Break All The Rules: What The Worlds Greatest Managers Do Differently". The book is the result of 80,000 interviews with managers over 25 years.

Here's the short version: Almost without exception, people are going to keep behaving in the future how they've behaved in the past.

Have you ever considered what the phrase "If you want something done, give it to a busy person" actually means? It sounds funny but it's 100% true. Busy people are busy because they're working. No matter how much you pile onto their plates, they're going to be working (until they break, anyway). They'll complain and tell you they can't and tell you it's impossible and that they need more money and that you should find someone else to do it but if you give it to them, they'll get it done.

Consider instead you give your important work to the lazy guy who needs some more work on his plate. Guess what lazy guy is going to do? Keep being lazy. They'll tell you they can do it and that it's no trouble at all and they were looking for something interesting to work on but the fact is they're lazy and they aren't going to do it. It will be like pulling teeth.

This is also why it's almost always a terrible idea to promote a fantastic worker into a management position. 99 times out of 100 you've just taken the person out of the environment they've thrived in and told them to do something they're totally out of their element on. Sure they SAID they wanted to be a manager and WANTED the higher pay and WANTED the higher responsibility but it's like giving a monkey a hammer and telling him to build a house. How excited the monkey gets when you show them the hammer doesn't really tell you anything about their house building skills.

Sooooooooooo

To answer your question: If you would like to hire an operations manager with the ability to solve problems independently then you should hire someone who previously worked as a successful operations manager with a proven history of solving problems independently...

Maybe it's not QUITE that easy but you get the idea.
 

Daniel...D

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Important are the professional skills, as well as the ability to communicate with the team and with you. Most likely, in an interview you immediately understand whether you can work with this person or not
 

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Since this is your own business and you're hiring for the first time, I think it is more important to ask these questions:

1) what are your values and what criteria is a must to you? For example, for some business owners punctuality is extremely important and they won't tolerate people who are late. They fire people who turn up late after a few warnings. Whereas for other bosses it's not too big of a deal as long as the job is done. You need to know what is tolerable and what is not, and find candidates that fit your requirements. Asking a few situational questions during the interview will reveal this to you.

2) what kind of personality are you looking for? It is often said that people leave managers and not their jobs. Think about your personality, and look for people who are a match to your personality. It will save you a lot of headache in the future.

3) what are your expectations for this manager? Do you expect them report to you every 5 minutes? (this is not a joke, I've dealt with managers like that and it drove me crazy) or do you expect them to take care of everything and work out some miracles for you if need be?

If you communicated these in your search the chances of you finding the right candidate will be higher.
 
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Stressful, situational interview w/ lots of distractions.
Talk philosophy. Talk failures.
Credit check.
Get them in and try them for a week as a 1099 to see if you can work with each other.
Clear procedures. FAQ. Craft both as you go.
Read 'Emyth revisited' by Gerber. That will help.

Great post. Ordered the book.


What's the purpose of a credit check?
 

becks22

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Not @ZCP but credit checks are usually used to check someone's financial status. You don't want to hire someone who manages your business funds who has declared bankruptcy and is in foreclosure, do you? Credit checks have certain requirements though depending on where you live (at least in the US). For example in Washington State, you can't really do credit checks unless the job is for a financial position with a certain salary.
 
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amp0193

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There's a great management book called "First, Break All The Rules: What The Worlds Greatest Managers Do Differently". The book is the result of 80,000 interviews with managers over 25 years.
Ordered it, thanks.

To answer your question: If you would like to hire an operations manager with the ability to solve problems independently then you should hire someone who previously worked as a successful operations manager with a proven history of solving problems independently...

Maybe it's not QUITE that easy but you get the idea.
Haha, the logic seems to make sense.
 
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amp0193

amp0193

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If you communicated these in your search the chances of you finding the right candidate will be higher.
I like this. Making sure I know exactly what I want, and what I value, before ever talking to someone.

Makes total sense, thanks.
 
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MJ DeMarco

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What are the most important qualities that you look for in a manager?
Aside from what's already been stated, someone "Slowlane" and just wants a safe, secure job.

Credit check.
I think this is important, if legal. Shows discipline, trustworthiness, and the ability to recognize deadlines.

@amp0193 BTW, are u going to the Summit? We have a presentation on hiring great people.
 
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amp0193

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Aside from what's already been stated, someone "Slowlane" and just wants a safe, secure job.
Haha, yes, good point!


@amp0193 BTW, are u going to the Summit? We have a presentation on hiring great people.
Yes, I'll be there! I haven't kept up with who all is presenting. I can't wait for that session!

I'm looking to have a manager start in April, so that presentation is very timely for me.
 

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My business is at a point where I need to hire a full-time operations manager.

I've never hired anyone before, except for temporary contract/day-labor type stuff, where the only requirement was basically just to show up on time.

I will be working side-by-side with this person for 2 months, before leaving the country for the 10 weeks. They will not be managing employees (yet), just the day to day operations of the warehouse.

Priority 1, it needs to be someone I trust. How do you determine trustworthiness in an interview? Or is the best way to try and find someone in my network... a friend of a friend that someone I know can vouch for?

Priority 2 is the ability to solve problems independently, and to determine creative solutions to new problems.


What are the most important qualities that you look for in a manager?

When you've determined those qualities, what is your process for identifying someone with those qualities? What are your interview or training tactics that are effective at weeding out those not suited for the job?

Compensation: I'm considering doing a position that is full-time with benefits. Am I asking for a world of headaches in doing this? Would it be better to do a 35-hour a week type position and avoid the full-time status if I can? Will doing less than 40-hour full-time affect the quality of the candidate pool?


Just some things I'm thinking about. I'm curious to hear from those with hiring experience.

@MidwestLandlord
I've probably hired 1,500 people or so.

One restaurant group I helped hire 200 people in 30 days...talk about intense.

I teach others to hire too, so I'll type all that training material up in a way that makes sense and post it here probably tomorrow.

In a nutshell though, most people, even those that make logical decisions everywhere else in business, throw rational thought out the window and hire based on "feels"

It's a process like any other for sure.

It starts with knowing exactly what it is you are hiring for (most business owners don't have a clue), then deciding which position, level of experience, and industry your job offer would realistically attract an employee away from.
 

MidwestLandlord

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This is a hybrid of the training I use to teach regional managers/store managers on how to hire, and what I used to use for consulting with new restaurant owners. Keep in mind 99% of my experience is in retail and food service, so adjust this for your business type. I think (hope) it will give you a good starting point for building a process.

Job Description

Step #1 is to know exactly what it is you are hiring for. Have you put a pencil to this? Most biz owner's have an idea of what they need, but don't take the time to write it out.

What duties will they perform? Why?
What duties will they not perform? Why?
What does their day-to-day look like? Why?
What hours do you need them for? Why?
How much authority will they have? Why?
Heavy lifting?
Will they be working alone?
Customer service?
Social Media?
When do they take lunch? Breaks? Vacations?
Do you need availability outside of normal business hours? Why?

By writing it out, you should get a better idea of who it is you are looking for, what exactly they will be doing, and this will show you any weakness you have in your processes that they will follow.

By the end of this exercise you should be able to explain the job in great detail, and you'll know exactly which qualities you need to find.

Willing and Able

The goal is to find someone that is BOTH willing and able to do the work. Some will be willing, some will be able, but few will be both.

By writing out what exactly the job entails, you should have a list of what they need to be willing and able to do.

Someone that is willing to do the work has the right mental attitude towards the job you are offering. An ex-bank VP is likely not willing to clean toilets for example.

Do you need them after hours? Are they willing to do that?
Will they be working alone? Are they willing to do that? (lot's of people aren't)

Etc for each item on your list.

Are they able to do the work?

This goes beyond physical ability.

Do they have the skills you need? Easy to find this out, just ask.

But beyond that:

Are they able to work the schedule you set? Or do they have to take every other Thursday afternoon off for their kids' national Zumba competition?

Are they divorcing their husband and plan to move across the country in the summer? (real example)

Do they have non-refundable plane tickets to Hawaii for a 2 week vacation next month? (real example)

Use your list from the job description exercise, and create interview questions that correspond to those, to find past experiences that prove willingness and ability to do the work. Make them prove it in the interview through specific examples. Otherwise, they will just tell you what you want to hear.

Interview questions:
"Are you OK working alone?"
"Tell me about a time you completed a project while working alone with no direct oversight"
"Tell me about a time you had to make an important decision without your bosses approval"
"Is there anything that would keep you from working the hours I mentioned?"
"Tell me about a time you had to solve an important problem after hours"
"Tell me about the last time you missed work. How did you and your boss handle it?"
"Tell me how you used excel/office/whatever in your last job"

Proper Fit

It is YOUR job to find a candidate that fits into your organization. It is NOT the applicants job to do this. Why? Because employee's think about everything else except the actual day-to-day grind and WILL take a job that is a bad fit for them.

Maybe the benefits are better, it's closer to home, they need a "change", the pay is better, they got layed-off and are desperate...etc. But they almost never think about the actual work they will be doing.

So using your job description list and your list of what they must be willing and able to do, who would be a good fit?

This is where biz owners usually go wrong, and hire based off "feels". Everyone wants the best employee's, of course we do. But there is a big difference between a good interview, and a good interview with someone that would also be a good fit. Don't have wishful thinking and convince yourself that someone whom you liked would be a good fit, for no reason other than you like them.

Realistically, who will be attracted to this job and why?

Is this a c-suite level position?
A middle management level position?
An entry level management position?

White collar? Blue collar?

Would you be after someone with warehouse experience? Office management experience?

Say this to yourself: "I am in the business of hiring a warehouse operations manager" (change the title to whatever you need)

Does a lifelong accountant fit that role?
A high school teacher?
An office manager accustomed to filing endless TPS reports?
A retail manager?
A food service manager?
A legit c-suite operations manager/COO? (does the pay, benefits, authority, and day-to-day work FIT this?)

Which industry, which position, and what sort of experiences gets you the closest to fuliflling "I am in the business of hiring a warehouse operations manager"?

High school teachers for example. Honorable profession for sure. But. They are used to policies, politics, paperwork, and formalities for EVERYTHING. They are used to lot's of holidays, no interruptions after hours, working with lot's of people. They are used to having very good benefit packages.

This person may interview well. BUT, is it really a good fit?

How about an ex-entrepreneur? They almost always interview extremely well. But they are also some of the worst employees I've ever had. Why? If they were even remotely successful in their entrepreneurial endeavors, they always try to work "on" the business and working "in" the business is "beneath" them. Do you want someone that will change your processes?

Realistically, who is a good fit?
Who do you sell this job to?
From where do you steal an employee?

Interview questions:

"What do you think this job is like?"

(I love to ask this question before telling them about the job. It tells you what their preconceived notions of the job are. If those ideas are close to what the job actually is, it's likely they will be a good fit. If they are way off the mark, then you need to find out why. Is their past background a poor fit? Also, this question will let you start to see a trend with what types of people you are attracting. If you consistently attract the wrong people, you need to adjust the title, pay, advertising method, etc)

"If you were me, what kind of person would you look for?" (you'll get a lot of BS like "works hard", "punctual" etc, but they should also tell you more specific things, which again, shows you what their preconceived notions of the job are)

"Tell me about the worst part of your last job"
"Tell me about the best part of your last job"
"Tell me about your day-to-day activity in your last job"

"Have you applied anywhere else?" (Don't ask where, just ask if they have. They'll likely tell you where. Did they apply at 5 waitress jobs, but then applied with you to run a warehouse? Does that tell you they'd be a good fit? But if the other places they've applied are in the same general theme and skill level of your job, then you've found someone that might be a good fit for you)

Loyalty Versus Trust

We "earn" trust. We "break" trust. We don't have trust given to us automatically. So stop looking for someone you can trust, and instead focus on propensity for loyalty.

Were they loyal to their old employers? What's the longest they've held a job?

How do they speak of their prior employer and co-workers? Did they really like their old boss, even if they sometimes didn't see eye-to-eye, or was their boss a flaming a**hole?

It amazes me how many people are disparaging to their old boss (especially if you keep the interview casual), and that tells me everything I need to know about them. Was their boss a jerk? Maybe. But does it matter? Nope.

If the old boss was a jerk, you will be a jerk in their eyes as well.

A loyal person will instead say "Yeah, you know, my boss was in a little bit over his head. But together we got that department up to par, and really made it something to be proud of. Me and [old boss] didn't see eye-to-eye all the time, but we worked through any issues and overall worked well together. Overall I enjoyed my 8 years there" (or something to that effect)

Find someone that showed a bit of loyalty, and you are much more likely to find someone you can trust.

Interview questions:

"Tell me about a time you and your boss didn't agree on something, and how you resolved it"
"What's the longest you've ever held a job?"
"Why did you leave your last job?" (or any job they've had)
"Ever worked for a boss that was just an incompetent pain in the a$$? How did you get through it?" (I love this question. It sort of baits them into opening up about a boss they may not have liked. How they handle answering this says a LOT about them)
"What was the worst thing about your last boss/employer?"

Protection

Have a witness or install cameras to monitor interviews, especially when interviewing any protected classes such as, women, older folks, disabled, or racial minority.

Don't compliment any part of the appearance.

Don't let them talk about discrimination with you. If they complain that they "felt uncomfortable" during their last job due to any discriminatory reasons, just give them a canned response of "I can appreciate your troubles, but I'd rather not talk about anything related to past issues with your employer" (this happens A LOT)

Be aware of federal and state level discrimination laws. Be aware of questions you cannot legally ask. Basically anything related to a protected class is off limits, but there are unusual ones as well. You can't ask if someone own's a car for instance (transportation discrimination is against the law), but you can ask "do you have a reliable way to get to work?"

I'm not a lawyer, so do some due diligence on this and take it seriously.

Benefits and Pay

Providing health insurance and the like is expected and it is unusual if you do not offer this.

Since it is expected, you do not get any brownie points for having it, but you get huge negative points if you don't.

I could never afford most benefits. So I went the Aflac route (still section 125 eligible health insurance, but still "less" than a full health insurance program)

Aflac does not get me a positive when hiring, but it gets me less negative than no insurance at all.

Benefits > Pay

People will pass up higher pay for better benefits, especially health insurance.

People aren't chasing money with a job, they are chasing security. A job with no health insurance, even if the pay is much higher than other options, feels less secure than a job that has health insurance.

If you can afford it, do it.

Also, pay, benefits, full-time vs part-time, etc...all go into the "fit" category above.

It would be a "bad fit" for a COO level employee to take a job with no health insurance and less than full-time for example. Someone in a job that's a bad fit will in turn have no loyalty.

Use your imagination

Here's a great way to hone your gut, and find a good fit.

1) imagine them doing the work. Imagine them doing the day-to-day grind. Imagine directing them in person and over the phone.

Can you see them doing it? Can you pinpoint areas where they might not be a good fit?

2) Imagine them interviewing for jobs after they have already worked for you

Say they worked for you a couple of years. When interviewing with someone else, what would they say about you?

They would say the same things about you as they've said about other prior employers. Would they say good things? Bad things? Hate your guts just because they have a victim mentality? Would they say "yeah, we had our disagreements, but overall it he was a good boss"?

Did they get bored at their last job? Would they say the same about your job a few years from now?

Etc...

This is NOT a reflection of you, but a reflection of how they conduct themselves, and the lens through which they view the world. This ties in directly to both FIT and LOYALTY.

Where do I find these people?

Linkedin
Newspaper ads (believe it or not this still works well)
Monster
Indeed
Word of mouth

I've never used professional recruiters, so I don't have any advice there.

I have used staffing services though (different from recruiters), and they are a complete waste of time and money.


.....................................................

Overall, just find a good fit in regards to actual work performed, and pay/benefits, and it should be pretty simple (note, I didn't say "easy")

Process Summary:

1) Thorough Job Description
2) Find Willing & Able
3) Find Good Fit
4) Find Loyalty
5) Protect Yourself

Hope that helps!
 

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Hope that helps!
Dude drops 2000+ words of pure "How to hire" GOLD!.....um, ya I think that will help. LOL. Bookmarked!!
 

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RobD88

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I would agree with Beks22 in that you should use situational questions to see how the person would handle things. Give them real world examples you face daily.

As a hiring manager for a large corporation I find this to be the best determination of a person's abilities. It will also give you a read on their communication skills.

If your business is something you can teach them experience is a little less important than creative thinking and the ability to solve problems. They will make mistakes no matter how experienced. Nobody can run your business like you can.

As for trust...only time can build that. Ask for references and follow through with checking them.
 

xmartel

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I haven't read all of the responses, some of this may be a repeat, but I'll just drop my 2 cents here.

I've done dozens of interviews for management type positions and hired numerous people.
I've also spent many hours studying the topic in order to perfect my hiring systems.

In a general order:

1. Create a great ad. Use copy writing skills. Engage your prospects. Write with strong, but fair language so that you scare away the weaker prospects from ever applying, and attract the type of person you want.

And be specific with what you are looking for. It's a waste of your time to have every Tom and Dick apply for the position. Quality over quantity is the name of the game.

Also include specific instructions on how to apply. "Reply with resume and salary expecations" etc. This will not only give you the info you need to do an initial vetting. But you'd be surprised at the number of people that respond and don't include a resume because they didn't read the instructions. Instant delete on those people as you've just weeded out those that don't have attention to detail or a desire to look professional.

2. Do an extensive google search and creep on them on social media. Most people don't have their privacy settings on.

3. At the interview start with small casual conversation just to help put them at ease a bit. It also helps to break down barriers and get more honest answers if they feel comfortable around you. I've had people confide some pretty personal things to me.

4. Ask situational questions. Ask probing ethical questions. Ask them about times they failed, or what their weaknesses are. And ask them multiple times in multiple ways. Ask them random questions that don't seem to mean anything.

Some of my favourites:

Is there intelligent life in outer space? (the answer doesn't matter, but you can gauge their personality by how they react. This question throws them off, how do they recover? Ask it early on)

What is your dream car? (the type of car is often associated with a personality type, it also helps to throw them off again)

What is the last book you read? (the type of reading someone does, tells a lot about who they are)

I've got about 10 pages of questions. Some mundane. Some very unique and situational.

Don't just determine skills. Every company has a culture, know what yours is and make sure you only hire people that fit your culture.
I've hired some very good people, but they didn't fit the culture and it resulted in a poor fit and me having to let them go.

Don't rush the interview. A good interview with someone that looks promising will easily last 1.5-3 hours.

If I can tell early on they won't be a good fit, I keep it quick and simple and get them out in under 20 min.

5. Always call references and do a background and credit check if possible.

6. Always conduct interviews with multiple different candidates. Don't waste your time, but also don't limit your options too much.

7. Never ever hire someone after only 1 interview. I always conduct a follow up with the strongest 2-3 candidates. You'd be surprised how people change from one interview to another. Also get other people you trust in on the 2nd interview so you can get multiple perspectives. And if you need a 3rd interview, do it.

Remember: Hire slow, Fire fast.

8. Always follow up with people you do an interview with, even if you will not be hiring them. They gave you their time, respect that. A simple email thanking them will suffice.

9. On boarding them is very important as well. So many people put effort into hiring, and then throw the new hire to the wolves without an onboarding process.

Culture is important. Help them integrate into the team. Even if so far the "team" is only you.

One thing to do, after having a formal orientation, is getting them to solve a problem or task that has been outstanding for some time. This makes them part of the team quicker and helps them develop loyalty to you quickly. They taste success early on. Success breeds success.



I'm sure I'm missing some things, but that's the basics of what I do. And it works very good for me.
 
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amp0193

amp0193

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This is a hybrid of the training I use to teach regional managers/store managers on how to hire, and what I used to use for consulting with new restaurant owners.
This post is why I tagged you in the OP, and why I started this thread.

Thank you.


Next step, clarifying exactly what I need.
 

thefastroad

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I work in a convenience store with a bad boss/manager. What she's missing, is that she does not put a proper work environment in place and has a bad mindset towards mistakes/failure. For example, when i sometimes make a mistake she gives me a look, and complaining about me not knowing my job. This ruins my mood and productivity. Therefore i am not very fond of asking her questions, because she will complain that i don't know my job (my work partners think i'm doing good).

These attributes are very bad to have as a manager, because they hinder growth in their employees. Mistakes and questions lead to more knowledge, and if your employees are scared of these things, then they will not develop themselves to their potential. We find this even in entrepreneurship, you have to fail yourself to success.
 
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amp0193

amp0193

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Is that she does not put a proper work environment in place and has a bad mindset towards mistakes/failure.
The best job I had was when it was a total open street between me and the boss, with both of us being open to healthy constructive criticism. The power of having a boss who values your opinion can not be understated. Who values personal growth and the growth of his employees. He had me drinking the koolaid and it was the one time in life I was enthusiastic about a job.
 

Eisenstein

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Hey amp0193! I bookmarked the thread a while ago und read it yesterday. I'm curious: How did everything turn out? Did you find someone trustworthy? Hope, everything went well!

I'm also impressed with @MidwestLandlord and @xmartel posts! Wow! Thank you for sharing your experience! Thumbs up for so much value!
 

Yzn

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One thing which I see important is trust. You need someone who you already have as an employee or a relative - bottom line someone you trust.

Because I've seen a multi-billion retail brand which has a local chain store here have a manager that used to sell millions of dollars worth of items to wholesalers when he's not allowed to. But he found a way to do it through the cash registers.

He got caught eventually but after what lol - millions of dollars of items sold - i mean the store didn't lose any money since it's "discounted" items - but the manager made tons of it since he was able to to sell it with a higher margin to other wholesalers.
 

Yzn

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One thing which I see important is trust. You need someone who you already have as an employee or a relative - bottom line someone you trust.

Because I've seen a multi-billion retail brand which has a local chain store here have a manager that used to sell millions of dollars worth of items to wholesalers when he's not allowed to. But he found a way to do it through the cash registers.

He got caught eventually but after what lol - millions of dollars of items sold - i mean the store didn't lose any money since it's "discounted" items - but the manager made tons of it since he was able to to sell it with a higher margin to other wholesalers.
 

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