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What Did Your Beginning Look Like?

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Conquest

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Having become aware of the Unscripted lifestyle, there is a responsibility to make a choice. MJ's books remove the veil of ignorance, so all decisions thereafter are active choices to remain in or leave the script.

While this is refreshing in that all the responsibility is on oneself, I feel that the beginning is messy.
I am constantly unsure if my idea is worth pursuing. Unsure if I have enough value to offer, is my offer redundant. Still blind as to how to spot new opportunities.

Entrepreneurship seems like training a sixth sense, learning to see the ethereal- opportunities that aren't apparent. I've been more mindful of what I consume, and how much I am consuming vs producing. As well as retraining my mindset, removing limiting beliefs around money.

These are good, but I've yet to find my footing. I feel lost. I'm hoping anyone can share what their beginning looked like. Am I lost because I am action-faking, or is this part of the journey?
 
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theOfficialRJ

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Do you mean the beginning of my current (and first successful) business, or my beginning as an entrepreneur in general?

If you mean the latter, you have already begun by reading a book, coming up with ideas, and wondering if they'll work. The seed has been planted. For me, I was 20 years old and I got into stocks and bitcoin, and of course, lost a tonne of money. Over the next few years, I tried and failed at many different ventures like selling 3D printed car and motorcycle parts, Amazon FBA, photography, dropshipping etc. While I failed at all of those, I kept learning many valuable lessons that help me in my business today.

My current business started when I was quarantined for six months last year and had all the time in the world on my hands. I decided to try again at another business venture. This time though, things would be different. I had 1 simple rule for myself that I was not allowed to break under any circumstances: I will not quit. No matter how hard things got or how big a problem I faced, I will assess the situation, figure out a solution, and solve the problem. Looking back, had I applied this rule to my past businesses, most if not all of them would've eventually been successful.

What was life like during the first beginning of my current business? The business became my only focus. I was getting up early and staying up late working on the business. I became obsessed. I gave up my social life, even the hobby that this business is based around had to be put on the backburner. It began to drive my girlfriend apart. When the quarantine ended and work restarted, I could never focus on the task at hand because my mind was somewhere else. It turned me into a shitty employee. I was sneaking out for lunch 20 minutes early and coming back 20 minutes late. I had given up eating lunch (and breakfast) just so I could work on my business. I was also sneaking out at random times during the workday to squeeze in an extra 5-10 minutes of work here and there.

It wasn't healthy, but neither was my mental health at a 9-5 which I am definitely NOT meant for. What else? My girlfriend ended up cheating on me and became my ex. I quit my job prematurely because I just could not handle another day of temporal prostitution. The following month was tough. I was surviving on about $20/week worth of groceries. Mainly boiled rice and frozen veggies. But for the first time, I tasted just a small hint of the freedom that comes with being the master of your own time. I could hang out with my cat on a Wednesday afternoon. Thursday and Friday could be my weekend if I wanted them to. I could go for a walk at 2 AM on Monday if I felt like it. At this point, I still had a lot of work to do before the business could support me, but one thing was for sure: there was no going back to the 9-5 life. I worked harder than ever, took massive risks that I had never taken before, and thankfully today (two months later), I'm doing multiple five figures per month with my business, and growing steadily.

My personal growth has been the most valuable thing that I got out of this experience, not my business or the money. While it really f*cking sucked at times, I wouldn't have it any other way.
 
D

Deleted85763

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Having become aware of the Unscripted lifestyle, there is a responsibility to make a choice. MJ's books remove the veil of ignorance, so all decisions thereafter are active choices to remain in or leave the script.

While this is refreshing in that all the responsibility is on oneself, I feel that the beginning is messy.
I am constantly unsure if my idea is worth pursuing. Unsure if I have enough value to offer, is my offer redundant. Still blind as to how to spot new opportunities.

Entrepreneurship seems like training a sixth sense, learning to see the ethereal- opportunities that aren't apparent. I've been more mindful of what I consume, and how much I am consuming vs producing. As well as retraining my mindset, removing limiting beliefs around money.

These are good, but I've yet to find my footing. I feel lost. I'm hoping anyone can share what their beginning looked like. Am I lost because I am action-faking, or is this part of the journey?
I was doing menial work in a small factory basically doing the cleaning. I remember the manager telling me about another similar oppoirtunity in another place an hour away. I knew that I could do much better. Someone I knew belittled this feeling that I shared with them.

Getting laid off was the best thing to happen to me. I literally then got on a bus with everything I owned in an old suitcase and wasn't sure where I would go or do for a living! It was scary. But after a week or ten days I ended up in this beautiful town on the sea.

Now I had to earn a living. I got depressed and did a lot of sleeping. Finally I called a supplier to the company that I was laid off from and asked if they had any product they could quote me. I then sold a large amount of that product to another company at a huge profit. I earned a year's pay for an hours worth of work! I remember going home that Christmas feeling so good. I bought some exepnsive gifts and my family was like "That's too much!". No it wasn't. I discovered what many people wrongly believe - that money is this totally scarce valuable, vital object only for certain people. The truth is money is in effect infinite in that it keeps rolling in when you do the right things. There are floods of money in the world!

Within months I was doing transactions with some of the largest companies in the world. Within 2 years I did deals with a billionaire.

So I would say to anyone starting out: Be focused and driven. Experiement with ideas into buying and selling. Be extremeley vigilant to cash flow and opportunities. Be honest and do what you say. Follow through on all contracts. If you can't for a legitmate reason let the other party know. Expect it to all work out and have fun doing it. Reward the people around you who give you support because while I made it sound easy there are times when it is not. It can crush you. It can take the soul out of you.
 
D

Deleted85763

Guest
I was doing menial work in a small factory basically doing the cleaning. I remember the manager telling me about another similar oppoirtunity in another place an hour away. I knew that I could do much better. Someone I knew belittled this feeling that I shared with them.

Getting laid off was the best thing to happen to me. I literally then got on a bus with everything I owned in an old suitcase and wasn't sure where I would go or do for a living! It was scary. But after a week or ten days I ended up in this beautiful town on the sea.

Now I had to earn a living. I got depressed and did a lot of sleeping. Finally I called a supplier to the company that I was laid off from and asked if they had any product they could quote me. I then sold a large amount of that product to another company at a huge profit. I earned a year's pay for an hours worth of work! I remember going home that Christmas feeling so good. I bought some expensive gifts and my family was like "That's too much!". No it wasn't. I discovered what many people wrongly believe - that money is this totally scarce valuable, vital object only for certain people. The truth is money is in effect infinite in that it keeps rolling in when you do the right things. There are floods of money in the world!

Within months I was doing transactions with some of the largest companies in the world. Within 2 years I did deals with a billionaire.

So I would say to anyone starting out: Be focused and driven. Experiement with ideas into buying and selling. Be extremeley vigilant to cash flow and opportunities. Be honest and do what you say. Follow through on all contracts. If you can't for a legitmate reason let the other party know. Expect it to all work out and have fun doing it. Reward the people around you who give you support because while I made it sound easy there are times when it is not. It can crush you. It can take the soul out of you.
 
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WJK

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These are good, but I've yet to find my footing. I feel lost. I'm hoping anyone can share what their beginning looked like. Am I lost because I am action-faking, or is this part of the journey?
It's a journey -- not a landing pad. You will have many failures and rocks on your road. I t's a lot of trial and error. You're right, it's a messy long road...
 

thechosen1

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I can't say I've made it yet, but from what I've learned so far in life about entrepreneurship, success, and wealth is that the first step is to be working.

You've got to start by working, even in a job. An empire is not born while sitting on the couch.

Take action. Learn. Repeat. Apply CENTS to your life and your work. It's a process. You need to think but for most people who hang out on forums (myself included), action is more valuable than thinking because you do plenty of the latter already.
 

WJK

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I can't say I've made it yet, but from what I've learned so far in life about entrepreneurship, success, and wealth is that the first step is to be working.

You've got to start by working, even in a job. An empire is not born while sitting on the couch.

Take action. Learn. Repeat. Apply CENTS to your life and your work. It's a process. You need to think but for most people who hang out on forums (myself included), action is more valuable than thinking because you do plenty of the latter already.
I agree. My beginning can be summed up in one word -- work. And in my spare time, it was laced with a business leaning education. While everyone around me was partying, I was working and going to school. Those happy people told me that I should "get a life." I didn't have any fun. They felt sorry for me because I was working too hard. And they sure wouldn't want to live like me. Some days they openly laughed at me and made fun of me. Their advice didn't even make a dent. It just made me more determined to become successful. I ignored them and carried on with my program.

So, what happened to those party people and to me? Well, some who made similar decisions in their lives pay me their monthly housing rent, payments on their mortgages for their properties, and/or payments on their vehicles. And yes, I talk to them all the time -- but today it all goes differently. Now, I listen to the sad stories concerning their life disasters and misfortunes -- recited to me while they making arrangements for a rental, for financing, or when they are making their payments. They missed that break-out moment that would have made a difference for them a long time ago. Go figure.
 
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Deleted85763

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I agree. My beginning can be summed up in one word -- work. And in my spare time, it was laced with a business leaning education. While everyone around me was partying, I was working and going to school. Those happy people told me that I should "get a life." I didn't have any fun. They felt sorry for me because I was working too hard. And they sure wouldn't want to live like me. Some days they openly laughed at me and made fun of me. Their advice didn't even make a dent. It just made me more determined to become successful. I ignored them and carried on with my program.

So, what happened to those party people and to me? Well, some who made similar decisions in their lives pay me their monthly housing rent, payments on their mortgages for their properties, and/or payments on their vehicles. And yes, I talk to them all the time -- but today it all goes differently. Now, I listen to the sad stories concerning their life disasters and misfortunes -- recited to me while they making arrangements for a rental, for financing, or when they are making their payments. They missed that break-out moment that would have made a difference for them a long time ago. Go figure.
I have found that one should qualify the idea of "work". I worked crumby jobs for very little pay. These were very hard work. But when I found that I could broker products from anywhere there was a computer that "work" was very easy. I could literally make in an hour what took me all year to earn at a "hard" job. I think it's better to say "Be engaged in selling" rather than "work". All profit in business comes from selling goods and/or services.
 

Conquest

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Looking back, had I applied this rule to my past businesses, most if not all of them would've eventually been successful.

What was life like during the first beginning of my current business? The business became my only focus. I was getting up early and staying up late working on the business. I became obsessed. I gave up my social life, even the hobby that this business is based around had to be put on the backburner. It began to drive my girlfriend apart.

I worked harder than ever, took massive risks that I had never taken before, and thankfully today (two months later), I'm doing multiple five figures per month with my business, and growing steadily.


My personal growth has been the most valuable thing that I got out of this experience, not my business or the money. While it really f*cking sucked at times, I wouldn't have it any other way.

Great stuff RJ. Massive point on the turning point being that you never allowed yourself to quit. It makes a lot of sense to me that if you have an unshakable will, the universe will bend to you. A lot of words for saying tenacity is rewarded. I am wondering, did you become obsessed with the act of building, creating something new that solves problems (your business)? Or was it easier to become obsessed, because you were already excited by doing something related to your hobby?

I'm also curious as to how massive were these risks? Would your entire business be in jepordy if it failed? What was at stake?

I'm noticing that business growth is tied directly in proportion with personal growth. This is a really exciting discovery for me!
 

Conquest

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It's a journey -- not a landing pad. You will have many failures and rocks on your road. I t's a lot of trial and error. You're right, it's a messy long road...
Yeah.. I'm quite convinced that this is the only way of life for me. Pursuing anything else besides entrepreneurship will lead to me having crippling levels of regret. In you saying its a journey-- not a landing pad, it makes me reconsider a few things.

If its a journey then I suppose it's fine if I don't know where I am going at first. Just need to start walking, and keep walking. Can't get to the highway while in the forest.

Also from your posts @WJK you seem like an extremely resilient person. As you grew into this type of person, did you decide to become obsessed about whatever you pursue, or decide to simply never quit showing up?
 
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Conquest

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I can't say I've made it yet, but from what I've learned so far in life about entrepreneurship, success, and wealth is that the first step is to be working.

You've got to start by working, even in a job. An empire is not born while sitting on the couch.

Take action. Learn. Repeat. Apply CENTS to your life and your work. It's a process. You need to think but for most people who hang out on forums (myself included), action is more valuable than thinking because you do plenty of the latter already.
You are unquestionably right. The difficulty at first, is understanding what constitutes as action. When everything is new, and unsure of what route to blaze down, it feels like spinning in circles and getting no where. But here is what your post has helped me realize.

Not knowing where to go is a problem. The essence of being an entrepreneur is problem solving.

Of course, you need to help yourself before helping others. And we only solve problems through action.
So I've actually been troubleshooting this problem, by daily brainstorming 5 Problems I could solve.

I was getting nowhere trying to identify products on amazon I could slightly modify for proft. The more I listened, the more I realized this only works short-term and helps no one.

Everything changed I began using @biophase post as a template. By considering "Who is this business for," "Why do I want to create a business," and "What business do I want to start" the idea faucet has started to run. I'll make a separate post as I get more results with this.

 

jdm667

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Having become aware of the Unscripted lifestyle, there is a responsibility to make a choice. MJ's books remove the veil of ignorance, so all decisions thereafter are active choices to remain in or leave the script.

While this is refreshing in that all the responsibility is on oneself, I feel that the beginning is messy.
I am constantly unsure if my idea is worth pursuing. Unsure if I have enough value to offer, is my offer redundant. Still blind as to how to spot new opportunities.

Entrepreneurship seems like training a sixth sense, learning to see the ethereal- opportunities that aren't apparent. I've been more mindful of what I consume, and how much I am consuming vs producing. As well as retraining my mindset, removing limiting beliefs around money.

These are good, but I've yet to find my footing. I feel lost. I'm hoping anyone can share what their beginning looked like. Am I lost because I am action-faking, or is this part of the journey?
The beginning looks like working on your business for $0 per hour - for weeks, months, or even years.

Most people will refuse to do that out of principle. That's a good thing, since it creates a strong barrier to entry for others.

Later, when you start to have success, everyone will say you are lucky and that everything works out for you.

They don't see the failures, and it's the classic case of the overnight success 5 years in the making.

But after all those trials, you know that it's Lady Probability, not Lady Luck, that helped you out.
 

Mainstream7

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Beginning entrepreneurs want to climb Mount Everest from the beginning.
But in actuality it always requires small steps one after another.
 
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theOfficialRJ

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Great stuff RJ. Massive point on the turning point being that you never allowed yourself to quit. It makes a lot of sense to me that if you have an unshakable will, the universe will bend to you. A lot of words for saying tenacity is rewarded. I am wondering, did you become obsessed with the act of building, creating something new that solves problems (your business)? Or was it easier to become obsessed, because you were already excited by doing something related to your hobby?

I'm also curious as to how massive were these risks? Would your entire business be in jepordy if it failed? What was at stake?

I'm noticing that business growth is tied directly in proportion with personal growth. This is a really exciting discovery for me!

I'd be lying if I said I didn't begin to hate my hobby at times when I was sure my business was going to fail. I remember there were times when I got so sick of my hobby that I wanted to give it up. On the flip side though, basing your business around something you love definitely makes it easier to get your a$$ to work on those days when you lack motivation.

At the time, I was obsessed with building a community around my brand. The community has been important in the success of my product. My biggest driving factor was the fact that I could not stand another minute at my day job. It made no sense to me how my colleagues could just accept slaving away and looking forward to the weekend as their life for the next 30-40 years.

The biggest risk was quitting my job when my business showed absolutely no promise of being able to support me, or even itself. I was $40K in debt and I had no source of income. My business was making maybe $200/week in REVENUE. I had a little bit of cash saved for emergencies, which I used to stock up on cat food (because I didn't want my loyal companion to suffer in case things went south), I bought a bag of rice and some frozen veggies for myself, and the rest I put into my business for inventory and marketing. Although it showed signs of failing at first and I almost had a heart attack, I didn't pull out. A few days later I saw the light at the end of the tunnel.

My whole life was at stake. If I couldn't pay my mortgage and bills, eventually I would've been on the streets. I risked EVERYTHING. It was a tough time to go through, but I needed to go through it. I learned a lot about myself, about life, and about the universe.
 
D

Deleted85763

Guest
The beginning looks like working on your business for $0 per hour - for weeks, months, or even years.

Most people will refuse to do that out of principle. That's a good thing, since it creates a strong barrier to entry for others.

Later, when you start to have success, everyone will say you are lucky and that everything works out for you.

They don't see the failures, and it's the classic case of the overnight success 5 years in the making.

But after all those trials, you know that it's Lady Probability, not Lady Luck, that helped you out.
Very true! I'm not prejudiced at all (I'm postjuiced) but I have found that many women (wives, girlfriends, sisters, mothers) will be totally against the entrepreneurial lifestyle. "We need money now!" they exclaim. When the fact is often it takes time to take an idea to financial success but when it does "come together" instead of ending up with a two week vacation at the shore every year you are spending the entire summer in Europe!

Some people will betlittle you for not even being middle class but when you "make it" they have no problem staying at your place in Tuscany and eating your food. This I know from experience.

Now, on the flipside being in ones own business is a tremendous risk and it may not work out at all. It may work out for some years then not. It can be miserable. So having a regular job with a rergular salary can be very good for some people. Just don't expect to be finding real happiness in that rut of convention that turns into a grave.
 

WJK

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I have found that one should qualify the idea of "work". I worked crumby jobs for very little pay. These were very hard work. But when I found that I could broker products from anywhere there was a computer that "work" was very easy. I could literally make in an hour what took me all year to earn at a "hard" job. I think it's better to say "Be engaged in selling" rather than "work". All profit in business comes from selling goods and/or services.
From the time I was 11 years old, I spent all of my spare time cleaning houses, mucking horse stalls, babysitting, ironing shirts, mowing lawns, etc. My Grandmother died at that time and I had to learn to be very independent. When I was 16, I went to work every afternoon in a dry-cleaning shop. I made $1.35 per hour -- student's minimum wages. When I turned 18, it was upped to $1.65 per hour.

I was in my mid-30s when I got my first computer. It was an Apple IIE with a green screen -- completely new technology. It was before spell check was invented. There was no opportunity to broker products on a computer when I was young. The internet that we know now was invented a lot later. And I was female, which totally limited what I was allowed to do. Women had jobs -- not careers.

Now I can do just about anything that I want. WOW!
 
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WJK

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Yeah.. I'm quite convinced that this is the only way of life for me. Pursuing anything else besides entrepreneurship will lead to me having crippling levels of regret. In you saying its a journey-- not a landing pad, it makes me reconsider a few things.

If its a journey then I suppose it's fine if I don't know where I am going at first. Just need to start walking, and keep walking. Can't get to the highway while in the forest.

Also from your posts @WJK you seem like an extremely resilient person. As you grew into this type of person, did you decide to become obsessed about whatever you pursue, or decide to simply never quit showing up?
I never quit until exhausting every way I can figure out to solve the presented problem. Usually, one thing leads to another. I find elegant answers in my failures. I, and Edison, generally have found just another way that doesn't work. It's not an ending.

And I have a rule -- I finish my projects. If it is worth starting, it is worth finishing. I call it being "done-done." When I ask people, are you done, they sometimes say, "Yes, but..." then the unfinished details come out. No one around tells me "Yes, but...". It's become a joke because everyone around me already knows my lecture on being "done-done".

Now, I have a visual for you. You do not need a green light in every intersection that you must transverse to start your journey. Can you imagine going from California to New York? What if you couldn't leave until every light on that trip turns green at the same time? You'd never be able to start. You need one green light to start. You need to know what you must do first. When you complete that, then you can figure out your second step. Even big goals can be broken down into actionable baby steps...
 
D

Deleted85763

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From the time I was 11 years old, I spent all of my spare time cleaning houses, mucking horse stalls, babysitting, ironing shirts, mowing lawns, etc. My Grandmother died at that time and I had to learn to be very independent. When I was 16, I went to work every afternoon in a dry-cleaning shop. I made $1.35 per hour -- student's minimum wages. When I turned 18, it was upped to $1.65 per hour.

I was in my mid-30s when I got my first computer. It was an Apple IIE with a green screen -- completely new technology. It was before spell check was invented. There was no opportunity to broker products on a computer when I was young. The internet that we know now was invented a lot later. And I was female, which totally limited what I was allowed to do. Women had jobs -- not careers.

Now I can do just about anything that I want. WOW!
There were much better opportunities to broker products before the internet! This was because all the markets were "hidden" from everyone - exxept those that put in the substantial effort to find out who had what. There was also a high cost of telephone calls back then. So one had to make this count! Today anyone can send emails that cost virtually nothing and it's no sweat if you don't get results. Even when you do buyers and sellers often know the market. On the other hand today the reach of the markets to anyone is vast so there are still brokering opportunities.
 

WJK

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There were much better opportunities to broker products before the internet! This was because all the markets were "hidden" from everyone - exxept those that put in the substantial effort to find out who had what. There was also a high cost of telephone calls back then. So one had to make this count! Today anyone can send emails that cost virtually nothing and it's no sweat if you don't get results. Even when you do buyers and sellers often know the market. On the other hand today the reach of the markets to anyone is vast so there are still brokering opportunities.
That's why I became a real estate agent in 1976. I was the youngest person in my office. I was a leggy kid and I looked like I was 16. There was no training at that time and it was a really tough thing to do. But, I became very successful at that and investing. It led to me being a commercial real estate appraiser. I didn't know that girls "couldn't do it" because of the math. There were only 7% women in the field. Then I to law school around the time I was 40. I became an expert witness and litigation specialist in Federal and State courts in real estate matters. There were a lot of hidden opportunities that I ferreted out for myself.
 
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Conquest

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That's why I became a real estate agent in 1976. I was the youngest person in my office. I was a leggy kid and I looked like I was 16. There was no training at that time and it was a really tough thing to do. But, I became very successful at that and investing. It led to me being a commercial real estate appraiser. I didn't know that girls "couldn't do it" because of the math. There were only 7% women in the field. Then I to law school around the time I was 40. I became an expert witness and litigation specialist in Federal and State courts in real estate matters. There were a lot of hidden opportunities that I ferreted out for myself.
Awesome. Awesome. Awesome!
This reminds me of a revelation I had recently regarding failure and pass/fail rates.

A failure rate is not representative of the difficulty of accomplishing a goal.
A failure rate represents the portion of people not willing to put in the work.

It's amazing. The core tenets of success have remained unchanged for years and years. It's easier now than ever to be successful, so why not choose to be on the winning team? I think it's difficult to move oneself out of ignorance, but afterward, I am noticing, there is an answer for every problem (especially on this forum).
 

WJK

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Awesome. Awesome. Awesome!
This reminds me of a revelation I had recently regarding failure and pass/fail rates.

A failure rate is not representative of the difficulty of accomplishing a goal.
A failure rate represents the portion of people not willing to put in the work.

It's amazing. The core tenets of success have remained unchanged for years and years. It's easier now than ever to be successful, so why not choose to be on the winning team? I think it's difficult to move oneself out of ignorance, but afterward, I am noticing, there is an answer for every problem (especially on this forum).
I have learned that IF anything is too easy, everyone tries it -- making it a worthless pursuit.

I like entry barriers that look insurmountable to the inexperienced. I like lots of rocks and problems strewn in my road -- especially at the beginning where most people quickly turn tail and quit. I choose the more difficult paths on purpose. I like to find no one, or very few others, at the end of my journey. That space means that it is much easier for me to succeed in the long run.
 

Itizn

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The beginning looked like me being subservient, asking for permission, thinking I'd "get in trouble" for things, feeling shy, to list a few examples.

The beginning was necessary, but man do I look back and facepalm at a lot.
 
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Conquest

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I have learned that IF anything is too easy, everyone tries it -- making it a worthless pursuit.

I like entry barriers that look insurmountable to the inexperienced. I like lots of rocks and problems strewn in my road -- especially at the beginning where most people quickly turn tail and quit. I choose the more difficult paths on purpose. I like to find no one, or very few others, at the end of my journey. That space means that it is much easier for me to succeed in the long run.
You're metal. I'm not sure why I never thought of it like this before.
This is EXACTLY where I will head next. Growing into having an almost perverse enjoyment in the most difficult tasks, seemingly impossible and incomprehensible to the average.

It starts by intentionally doing the most annoying and difficult tasks every day I'm sure. Thanks for the help.
 

WJK

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The beginning looked like me being subservient, asking for permission, thinking I'd "get in trouble" for things, feeling shy, to list a few examples.

The beginning was necessary, but man do I look back and facepalm at a lot.
I did in trouble often. I got fired a few times for being too bold and doing it my way.
 

WJK

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You're metal. I'm not sure why I never thought of it like this before.
This is EXACTLY where I will head next. Growing into having an almost perverse enjoyment in the most difficult tasks, seemingly impossible and incomprehensible to the average.

It starts by intentionally doing the most annoying and difficult tasks every day I'm sure. Thanks for the help.
Here's one of my rules: I solve problems before they ever happen. I examine everything that can go wrong with my plan. I assess the odds for each of them so I know what to fix and what to avoid. Then I plan my journey around, through, and over those anticipated problems. People can't figure out how I can get through difficult situations without stumbling. It's simple. I clear the path before I get there. I have a Plan B ( if this happens, then I do X) for each step. Yes, I have problems to solve -- I just don't have the normal chaos.
 
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Conquest

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Here's one of my rules: I solve problems before they ever happen. I examine everything that can go wrong with my plan. I assess the odds for each of them so I know what to fix and what to avoid. Then I plan my journey around, through, and over those anticipated problems. People can't figure out how I can get through difficult situations without stumbling. It's simple. I clear the path before I get there. I have a Plan B ( if this happens, then I do X) for each step. Yes, I have problems to solve -- I just don't have the normal chaos.
Solving problems before they happen.. Hmm.

I am trying to wrap my head around this. Are you this meticulous in every part of your life?
If you are trying to discover the road to a new project- what is your methodology for making it as actionable as possible?

Correct me if I'm wrong.
Say you decided to open an E-commerce store around an existing product to a relatively underserved market.

Would your planning would look like this:

0) Pre-requisites for generating capital
1) Determine Product USP
2) Determine platform/methodology for generating sales for said product
3) Design Product and find manufacturer
4) Determine Fulfillment services
5) Deliver to market

In each section, you would learn what steps are necessary to accomplish. Assess potential problems through your own, and other peoples' experiences. Read/learn to better the necessary skills for each current task.

I am trying to understand and copy your diligence and planning skills.
 

MJ DeMarco

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It's baseball and any other expectation will find you disappointed, and ultimately, a quitter.

So expect the first few times in the batter's box to result in strike outs, foul balls, and little to no contact.

This is when people quit ... they expect to go pro after a few swings.
 
D

Deleted85763

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Here's one of my rules: I solve problems before they ever happen. I examine everything that can go wrong with my plan. I assess the odds for each of them so I know what to fix and what to avoid. Then I plan my journey around, through, and over those anticipated problems. People can't figure out how I can get through difficult situations without stumbling. It's simple. I clear the path before I get there. I have a Plan B ( if this happens, then I do X) for each step. Yes, I have problems to solve -- I just don't have the normal chaos.
The problem with problems are the "unknowns"! By unknown I mean things that are unknown that can't be anticipated. It's a crazy world out there. I thought I had a very specialized market all to myself. I knew everything that could go wrong and planned well and far in advance. I was an expert. I was a pro. I was doing great. Then out of the blue like a lightning strike the market shut due to bizarre circumstances.
 
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WJK

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The problem with problems are the "unknowns"! By unknown I mean things that are unknown that can't be anticipated. It's a crazy world out there. I thought I had a very specialized market all to myself. I knew everything that could go wrong and planned well and far in advance. I was an expert. I was a pro. I was doing great. Then out of the blue like a lightning strike the market shut due to bizarre circumstances.
I've had those moments too. I've been wiped out more than once. I don't risk all my chips on one thing anymore. One thing will be down while another carries along. I'm a lot more conservative than I was when I was younger. I too have expertise. And I have expanded it so I have more than one lane available to use it.

I didn't see the Covid coming either. BUT, because of the market cycles, I knew that something was coming... so, I was preparing when everyone else was carrying on like nothing was out there. This is my 5th business cycle during my adult life. I have learned that history repeats itself over and over again. Those events visit like the same man dressed in different clothes.
 

WJK

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Solving problems before they happen.. Hmm.

I am trying to wrap my head around this. Are you this meticulous in every part of your life?
If you are trying to discover the road to a new project- what is your methodology for making it as actionable as possible?

Correct me if I'm wrong.
Say you decided to open an E-commerce store around an existing product to a relatively underserved market.

Would your planning would look like this:

0) Pre-requisites for generating capital
1) Determine Product USP
2) Determine platform/methodology for generating sales for said product
3) Design Product and find manufacturer
4) Determine Fulfillment services
5) Deliver to market

In each section, you would learn what steps are necessary to accomplish. Assess potential problems through your own, and other peoples' experiences. Read/learn to better the necessary skills for each current task.

I am trying to understand and copy your diligence and planning skills.
Yes. But, I start with the concept first. I start with checking out the market and how my business idea fits. I need to understand the nuts and bolts of what and where I'm going to be putting my heart and all of that work. That takes gathering a LOT of information and understanding. I talk to everyone. I try to find people doing what I want to do so I can ask them all of my questions. I ask what they would have done differently if they were to start the same business today. What are their strengths and weaknesses? I try to find the people who have failed so I can ask why. I read everything that I can about my target business and that industry.

These are my basic questions to answer:
Who am I going to serve?
Do they need new products?
Who is serving them now?
Are those sources doing a good job?
Does the market need a new source for products?

When I determine that the market is "deep" enough, I then must decide that I still want to jump in. After doing my research, does it still feel like a good idea? I examine how I feel in my gut. If the answer is yes, I can then start checking out what is going to take to make my idea work.

I know that most businesses that fail in the first 5 years, simply run out of operating money. The business owner cannot support himself and the new business during the start-up phase. Do I want to take the financial risks that come with a new startup? Do I want to work that hard? Do I still think I will create a profitable business? Will I still love it in 5 years? 10 years? What level of success do I need to achieve in order to feel it was all worth it?

And this is only a thumbnail version of how I vet a new business idea... Does it help you?

You ask, "Are you this meticulous in every part of your life?"

The answer is no longer. I created habits and ways of thinking a long time ago. I no longer must think through every move that I make in my daily life. Compared it to being a professional athlete. They practice every little move that they make in their chosen sport until those moves become a part of them. Business and healthy living are the same way. In time, those decisions and ways of thinking become part of who you are. Decisions become intuitive rather than deliberate. They are effortless.
 

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