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Freelance to agency > Why would people work for me?

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CopyDane

Contributor
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Jul 11, 2017
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Hey there, everyone!

Short presentation: I've been working as a freelance copywriter since 2013. I don't really like writing, but I know my way around the field by now. Recently I've been thinking seriously about stepping it up, hiring young copywriters and scaling my business into an agency that way.

Problem (my action fake): I'm really anxious about asking anyone to work for me as a copywriter. I'm thinking "Hey, why on earth would they want to do that instead of just going directly to the paying client and get the whole cake for themselves?".

For instance, I can't stop thinking about plumbing businesses. A regular, private person plumber can't just start a plumbing business over night - he would need car(s), tools, materials etc. - all of which could easily cost a couple of hundred thousand dollars. So therefore, he takes a job at an already existing plumbing business instead.

But what about my case with copywriting? Why does the young 20-yo college student need me? He doesn't need to spend several hundred thousands of dollars on cars and expensive tools; he just needs his laptop, which he already owns, by the way.

This bugs me. Because frankly, I know it's possible. I've seen a specific guy around my age who is doing exactly what I want to do, and I just keep thinking "How on earth did he manage to persuade 10 youngsters to write for him instead of going directly to the clients?". Obviously I don't want to ask that guy, as we're competitors.

Anyway, I hope this all makes sense, and I guess I was just hoping that maybe one of two of you guys out there had already gone through a scenario like mine - maybe you succeeded and want to explain to me how the above problem resolves?

Very best regards!
 
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Merging Left

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Jul 20, 2014
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It's simple, really. Many people don't have the hustle to chase clients. They are good at writing, but not at selling.

There's another thread about a guy who essentially started a Fiverr gig agency. Same answer. He teaches his employees literally everything he does, but they still don't leave to compete with him. Not everyone is wired to be an entrepreneur. Many people don't even know it's an option...
 

Sully1994

Business Development @ Sprout Social
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Nov 5, 2016
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This^ As a fairly new copywriter myself- I can say confidently that getting good gigs is hard when you are just starting out and don’t have a portfolio to leverage. And when you don’t have a portfolio, or inside connections you only have one option that will get a client’s attention..

Providing a shit ton of upfront value.

We’re talking 8 + hours of research, perhaps a few days of prep writing a targeted sample for the industry you are trying to break into.

All to maybe not even get the gig. Or a response for that matter.

Once you’ve “sealed the deal” - you’re not safe either. You only get work when the company you work for is growing and succeeding. I’ve done work for a few start ups that have floundered and disappeared shortly after I started working for them ( hopefully that’s a coincidence)

Bottom line: pitching and getting gigs ( especially long term ones) is a completely different skill set than writing copy.

And if you’ve got bills to pay - forget it. There is serious value in you providing a steady stream of work.

Now that I’ve developed a portfolio of work - getting gigs takes way less effort. I’ll be honest though - I came close to throwing in the towel more than a few times.



It's simple, really. Many people don't have the hustle to chase clients. They are good at writing, but not at selling.

There's another thread about a guy who essentially started a Fiverr gig agency. Same answer. He teaches his employees literally everything he does, but they still don't leave to compete with him. Not everyone is wired to be an entrepreneur. Many people don't even know it's an option...
 

Late Bloomer

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Apr 17, 2018
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I agree with the other answers. Finding clients, promoting a business, negotiating deals... things not everyone can do well, or wants to do. There are a lot of people who are happy when work just shows up for them to do. They're aware that someone else had to do a lot of marketing & sales and administration to make that happen. They're aware someone else is getting paid to accomplish all that. And they're glad that they can leave all that to someone else.
 
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WJK

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Oct 9, 2017
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Hey there, everyone!

Short presentation: I've been working as a freelance copywriter since 2013. I don't really like writing, but I know my way around the field by now. Recently I've been thinking seriously about stepping it up, hiring young copywriters and scaling my business into an agency that way.

Problem (my action fake): I'm really anxious about asking anyone to work for me as a copywriter. I'm thinking "Hey, why on earth would they want to do that instead of just going directly to the paying client and get the whole cake for themselves?".

For instance, I can't stop thinking about plumbing businesses. A regular, private person plumber can't just start a plumbing business over night - he would need car(s), tools, materials etc. - all of which could easily cost a couple of hundred thousand dollars. So therefore, he takes a job at an already existing plumbing business instead.

But what about my case with copywriting? Why does the young 20-yo college student need me? He doesn't need to spend several hundred thousands of dollars on cars and expensive tools; he just needs his laptop, which he already owns, by the way.

This bugs me. Because frankly, I know it's possible. I've seen a specific guy around my age who is doing exactly what I want to do, and I just keep thinking "How on earth did he manage to persuade 10 youngsters to write for him instead of going directly to the clients?". Obviously I don't want to ask that guy, as we're competitors.

Anyway, I hope this all makes sense, and I guess I was just hoping that maybe one of two of you guys out there had already gone through a scenario like mine - maybe you succeeded and want to explain to me how the above problem resolves?

Very best regards!
There's a lot to be said for working for an established business. For the worker, it sure is a lot easier. The owner has to worry about the details of running a business as well as keeping the work flow coming.

It comes down to the worker does his work, he get his coat on and he goes home. The owner of the business has to make sure that the worker has everything that he needs to do his job, the place to do it, the cash flow to pay him, enough and the right kind of clients and a future in the business. That inequity in responsibilities is the reason that there is an owner and workers.
 

ay47

Bronze Contributor
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Speedway Pass
Mar 29, 2018
59
101
Hey there, everyone!

Short presentation: I've been working as a freelance copywriter since 2013. I don't really like writing, but I know my way around the field by now. Recently I've been thinking seriously about stepping it up, hiring young copywriters and scaling my business into an agency that way.

Problem (my action fake): I'm really anxious about asking anyone to work for me as a copywriter. I'm thinking "Hey, why on earth would they want to do that instead of just going directly to the paying client and get the whole cake for themselves?".

For instance, I can't stop thinking about plumbing businesses. A regular, private person plumber can't just start a plumbing business over night - he would need car(s), tools, materials etc. - all of which could easily cost a couple of hundred thousand dollars. So therefore, he takes a job at an already existing plumbing business instead.

But what about my case with copywriting? Why does the young 20-yo college student need me? He doesn't need to spend several hundred thousands of dollars on cars and expensive tools; he just needs his laptop, which he already owns, by the way.

This bugs me. Because frankly, I know it's possible. I've seen a specific guy around my age who is doing exactly what I want to do, and I just keep thinking "How on earth did he manage to persuade 10 youngsters to write for him instead of going directly to the clients?". Obviously I don't want to ask that guy, as we're competitors.

Anyway, I hope this all makes sense, and I guess I was just hoping that maybe one of two of you guys out there had already gone through a scenario like mine - maybe you succeeded and want to explain to me how the above problem resolves?

Very best regards!


I'm trying to find good freelance writers. How would you decide whether a writer is good enough to join your agency?
 

BD64

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Jul 26, 2017
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People crave simplicity, ease, security and routine. Working for someone else satisfies those cravings for most people (not us!).
 
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Late Bloomer

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Apr 17, 2018
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I'm trying to find good freelance writers. How would you decide whether a writer is good enough to join your agency?

That question seems really, really easy to me!

Writing samples show the quality of their work.

Reviews, referrals, and testimonials, from previous clients, show that the freelancer is easy to work with, timely and shows professionalism.

If a freelancer lacks these, but seems eager and likely competent? Then send them a small, paid initial project. One both sides agree is a test, that will lead to bigger projects if the first one goes well. If it doesn't go well, you can afford to get the small project redone by someone else, no big deal for you.

If the freelancer has good samples and testimonials, your first project for them will be a medium size one... big enough to substantially make their day if they rock on this one and you use them again... but still survivable for you if they screw it up.
 

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