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Financial analysis: Do I buy this Tesla Powerwall system?

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MJ DeMarco

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So I'm considering getting solar panels on my home, the Tesla Powerwall.

Doing so will cut my electric bill by about 30%, which is about $300 in savings, and it will also give me some emergency back-up power in combination with a gas generator already tied into my home. It is in my understanding that if the power grid goes down, this system will give us about 14 hours of power daily. We also have a backup gas generator, but it depends "on the grid" gas service.

The total cost of the system is about $55K, but with tax credits it will be a net cost of $38.3K.

Naturally for me to make this decision, I like to put things to numbers.

So here are the factors that I find relevant to the decision...
  • Return on Investment ($300/mo return on $38.3K = 9.3% yield, with inflation, yield will increase with time)​
  • Breakeven, Nominal [not using discounted cash flow models] (how long to recoup my money?) = Breakeven, 7.9 years (average savings $400 monthly) - Not sure we will be here for 8 years, but we do plan on staying for a good amount of time.​
  • Inflation protection (the unit can save me $300 today, but it might save me $600 in a few years as electric costs rise)​
  • Intangibles: Having back up power in the case of a longer-duration power failure. Although I'm not sure this system would work if we have one of these solar events @Bing mentioned, since batteries and components are electrical.​
  • Resale considerations: Having a backup system like this is appealing to home buyers in this particular market (they tend to focus on apocalyptic scenarios), should we sell this house down the road.​
  • Aesthetics: Not sure I like the idea of having panels on the roof (see pic) as I worry it will cheapen the look of the house, although many of my neighbors who have big multimillion dollar houses also have them, color-wise, they match the roof about as nice as they can

    solarpanels.jpg1650735295742.png

Your thoughts? Am I missing any financial considerations? Another thing I remind myself is this: In 5 years, there might not be tax credits and with inflation, this system won't be $38.3K net, but $100K.

I like the idea of having backup power, but I fear how it might look on the house. The $38K also is not really a consideration, it's just sitting in a bank somewhere earning .000001% interest and losing 10% annually in inflation.

@biophase , thoughts? This numerical analysis is always up your alley.
 
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door123

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So I'm considering getting solar panels on my home, the Tesla Powerwall.

Doing so will cut my electric bill by about 30%, which is about $300 in savings, and it will also give me some emergency back-up power in combination with a gas generator already tied into my home. It is in my understanding that if the power grid goes down, this system will give us about 14 hours of power daily. We also have a backup gas generator, but it depends "on the grid" gas service.

The total cost of the system is about $55K, but with tax credits it will be a net cost of $38.3K.

Naturally for me to make this decision, I like to put things to numbers.

So here are the factors that I find relevant to the decision...
  • Return on Investment ($300/mo return on $38.3K = 9.3% yield, with inflation, yield will increase with time)​
  • Breakeven, Nominal [not using discounted cash flow models] (how long to recoup my money?) = Breakeven, 7.9 years (average savings $400 monthly) - Not sure we will be here for 8 years, but we do plan on staying for a good amount of time.​
  • Inflation protection (the unit can save me $300 today, but it might save me $600 in a few years as electric costs rise)​
  • Intangibles: Having back up power in the case of a longer-duration power failure. Although I'm not sure this system would work if we have one of these solar events @Bing mentioned, since batteries and components are electrical.​
  • Resale considerations: Having a backup system like this is appealing to home buyers in this particular market (they tend to focus on apocalyptic scenarios), should we sell this house down the road.​
  • Aesthetics: Not sure I like the idea of having panels on the roof (see pic) as I worry it will cheapen the look of the house, although many of my neighbors who have big multimillion dollar houses also have them, color-wise, they match the roof about as nice as they can

    View attachment 43127View attachment 43128

Your thoughts? Am I missing any financial considerations? Another thing I remind myself is this: In 5 years, there might not be tax credits and with inflation, this system won't be $38.3K net, but $100K.

I like the idea of having backup power, but I fear how it might look on the house. The $38K also is not really a consideration, it's just sitting in a bank somewhere earning .000001% interest and losing 10% annually in inflation.

@biophase , thoughts? This numerical analysis is always up your alley.
I recently (2 months) bought a house with rooftop solar panels in California. It was definitely a plus factor when making the purchase decision for this home.

Since we don't have battery storage, We sell a large portion of our unused electricity to our local utility.
 

Antifragile

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It looks hideous, but here is the thing. You won’t be looking at your roof when you are enjoying living in your house.

My vote would be a resounding “yes! Do it!”
 

Ing

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Solar power is supported in Germany since more than 20 years.
Break even is about 9 years. I considered it long time ago.

But
A friend has sheep. A lot of sheep. When the solar boom started, there were built many of them on fields and meadows. The sheep were sent on the meadows under the solar panels.
After some months, my friend recognized, that the sheep had no lambs. They got no lambs as long they were under the solar panes.

It may be wrong, but thats the reason, why I don’t put solar panels on my house roof. On a garage ok, but not the house I or my loved sleep in. Only the chance to have any health issues any time.
 
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As you know @MJ DeMarco I live just 30 min north of you (I'm in Sandy), and we just installed solar on our house last month. The reason we did it was because of RIO and inflation-proofing. We have NOT done the battery walls YET, partly because we don't have any electric vehicles (yet).

Additionally, if I REALLY wanted to go crazy I have been considering supplementing our furnace with A/C power. In our case we use about 8-9kWh/month, but had a "green" evaluation done on our house which should reduce us to about 6kWh. Then we installed a 12kWh system, what with a kid on the way (wife due in Sept) and energy concerns I figured better to shoot high. I can always run a bitcoin farm if I have excess electricity.

(FWIW I used Greenify (out of Sandy) if you're looking.)
 

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Have you considered the Tesla solar roof? The panels looks like shingle. Cost would be bit more. Since they would tear off the shingles.

 

Ing

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All:
Btw. If you want to analyze, dont throw any physical units together.
The amount of electricity is in kwh, for the rate of consumption you need to give rhe time. FE.

The size of a solar plant is given in kw, not in kwh!
To size the total amount electricity you get from the roof in a time is kwh per time.

So for calculation: how many kwp (kw you get max) has the tesla thing?

Is your 300usd saving a month or year?
 
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Aditya Gunjal

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So I'm considering getting solar panels on my home, the Tesla Powerwall.

Doing so will cut my electric bill by about 30%, which is about $300 in savings, and it will also give me some emergency back-up power in combination with a gas generator already tied into my home. It is in my understanding that if the power grid goes down, this system will give us about 14 hours of power daily. We also have a backup gas generator, but it depends "on the grid" gas service.

The total cost of the system is about $55K, but with tax credits it will be a net cost of $38.3K.

Naturally for me to make this decision, I like to put things to numbers.

So here are the factors that I find relevant to the decision...
  • Return on Investment ($300/mo return on $38.3K = 9.3% yield, with inflation, yield will increase with time)​
  • Breakeven, Nominal [not using discounted cash flow models] (how long to recoup my money?) = Breakeven, 7.9 years (average savings $400 monthly) - Not sure we will be here for 8 years, but we do plan on staying for a good amount of time.​
  • Inflation protection (the unit can save me $300 today, but it might save me $600 in a few years as electric costs rise)​
  • Intangibles: Having back up power in the case of a longer-duration power failure. Although I'm not sure this system would work if we have one of these solar events @Bing mentioned, since batteries and components are electrical.​
  • Resale considerations: Having a backup system like this is appealing to home buyers in this particular market (they tend to focus on apocalyptic scenarios), should we sell this house down the road.​
  • Aesthetics: Not sure I like the idea of having panels on the roof (see pic) as I worry it will cheapen the look of the house, although many of my neighbors who have big multimillion dollar houses also have them, color-wise, they match the roof about as nice as they can

    View attachment 43127View attachment 43128

Your thoughts? Am I missing any financial considerations? Another thing I remind myself is this: In 5 years, there might not be tax credits and with inflation, this system won't be $38.3K net, but $100K.

I like the idea of having backup power, but I fear how it might look on the house. The $38K also is not really a consideration, it's just sitting in a bank somewhere earning .000001% interest and losing 10% annually in inflation.

@biophase , thoughts? This numerical analysis is always up your alley
So I'm considering getting solar panels on my home, the Tesla Powerwall.

Doing so will cut my electric bill by about 30%, which is about $300 in savings, and it will also give me some emergency back-up power in combination with a gas generator already tied into my home. It is in my understanding that if the power grid goes down, this system will give us about 14 hours of power daily. We also have a backup gas generator, but it depends "on the grid" gas service.

The total cost of the system is about $55K, but with tax credits it will be a net cost of $38.3K.

Naturally for me to make this decision, I like to put things to numbers.

So here are the factors that I find relevant to the decision...
  • Return on Investment ($300/mo return on $38.3K = 9.3% yield, with inflation, yield will increase with time)​
  • Breakeven, Nominal [not using discounted cash flow models] (how long to recoup my money?) = Breakeven, 7.9 years (average savings $400 monthly) - Not sure we will be here for 8 years, but we do plan on staying for a good amount of time.​
  • Inflation protection (the unit can save me $300 today, but it might save me $600 in a few years as electric costs rise)​
  • Intangibles: Having back up power in the case of a longer-duration power failure. Although I'm not sure this system would work if we have one of these solar events @Bing mentioned, since batteries and components are electrical.​
  • Resale considerations: Having a backup system like this is appealing to home buyers in this particular market (they tend to focus on apocalyptic scenarios), should we sell this house down the road.​
  • Aesthetics: Not sure I like the idea of having panels on the roof (see pic) as I worry it will cheapen the look of the house, although many of my neighbors who have big multimillion dollar houses also have them, color-wise, they match the roof about as nice as they can

    View attachment 43127View attachment 43128

Your thoughts? Am I missing any financial considerations? Another thing I remind myself is this: In 5 years, there might not be tax credits and with inflation, this system won't be $38.3K net, but $100K.

I like the idea of having backup power, but I fear how it might look on the house. The $38K also is not really a consideration, it's just sitting in a bank somewhere earning .000001% interest and losing 10% annually in inflation.

@biophase , thoughts? This numerical analysis is always up your alley.
Sir please check the "type" of the panels because efficiency of the panels depend upon their type. Some have lower energy conversion ratio while some have greater. This will affect your calculations.
And your house ,not house your mansion, looks beautiful and same as what i have dreamt of. A place with trees and open environment (not these cement jungles). One day we will surely meet at your house.
Sir i am not able to attach any sort of files (i wanted to share the types of cells) please help i will "contact us" for the same
 
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biophase

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So I'm considering getting solar panels on my home, the Tesla Powerwall.

Doing so will cut my electric bill by about 30%, which is about $300 in savings, and it will also give me some emergency back-up power in combination with a gas generator already tied into my home. It is in my understanding that if the power grid goes down, this system will give us about 14 hours of power daily. We also have a backup gas generator, but it depends "on the grid" gas service.

The total cost of the system is about $55K, but with tax credits it will be a net cost of $38.3K.

Naturally for me to make this decision, I like to put things to numbers.

So here are the factors that I find relevant to the decision...
  • Return on Investment ($300/mo return on $38.3K = 9.3% yield, with inflation, yield will increase with time)​
  • Breakeven, Nominal [not using discounted cash flow models] (how long to recoup my money?) = Breakeven, 7.9 years (average savings $400 monthly) - Not sure we will be here for 8 years, but we do plan on staying for a good amount of time.​
  • Inflation protection (the unit can save me $300 today, but it might save me $600 in a few years as electric costs rise)​
  • Intangibles: Having back up power in the case of a longer-duration power failure. Although I'm not sure this system would work if we have one of these solar events @Bing mentioned, since batteries and components are electrical.​
  • Resale considerations: Having a backup system like this is appealing to home buyers in this particular market (they tend to focus on apocalyptic scenarios), should we sell this house down the road.​
  • Aesthetics: Not sure I like the idea of having panels on the roof (see pic) as I worry it will cheapen the look of the house, although many of my neighbors who have big multimillion dollar houses also have them, color-wise, they match the roof about as nice as they can

    View attachment 43127View attachment 43128

Your thoughts? Am I missing any financial considerations? Another thing I remind myself is this: In 5 years, there might not be tax credits and with inflation, this system won't be $38.3K net, but $100K.

I like the idea of having backup power, but I fear how it might look on the house. The $38K also is not really a consideration, it's just sitting in a bank somewhere earning .000001% interest and losing 10% annually in inflation.

@biophase , thoughts? This numerical analysis is always up your alley.
One of the houses down the street here in AZ just got solar panels installed a few days ago. They put it on the front roof and honestly, it looks ugly and I immediately noticed it. But we have light terra cota colored roof tiles and black solar panels here.

On smaller homes, the electric savings will be considered by someone buying a normal sized home. However, the person that is going to buy your home in the future probably isn't caring about a $300/mo difference in electric bill. But that person could be environmentally conscious.

Personally, I wished I had put solar on my home and upgraded the windows years ago. I have a flat roof so the panels are invisible from the street. So looks wouldn't have been an issue at all.

You never know how long you will stay in a particular home. Now I've been in my home for 15 years, solar panels would have definitely been a positive investment for me. I get the feeling that you will be staying in your house a long time.

The problem with the 8 year pay off, is that you starting making money in year 8, maybe year 6-7 with inflation. However, the technology of solar panels and batteries will be much better by then, so the actual equipment won't be worth that much. If I'm buying a house, and the solar system is 8-10 years old, I wouldn't pay a premium for them.

Now you got me thinking about putting solar on my Sedona house. This is because it's an STR investment and I do think I'll have it a long long time. And also my tenants tend to crank up the AC in the summer time so it could be a much faster break even than yours.
 

Noo

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I guess it is a good investment, especially because of the resale projections, and inflation. I also think that those solar events, will not be a significant problem (probably, of course, there isn't such thing as a 0% risk on anything).

I don't think it will be so much significant that will alter the conclusions, but it would be good to consider maintenance costs (small parts that need to be replaced, for instance).
Just to confirm everything up, I would also see if the product is being delivered on time, and as marketed (as a precaution) - what other consumers are saying.
 
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lludwig

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My comments.

  1. Not sure about Tesla's setup and if the power were to fail. Though my inlaws have solar panels and still needed a gas-based generator for backup. Most solar panels cannot work with a power outage.
  2. Over time solar panels lose their efficiency. About 20 years the lifespan. So at some point they will have to be replaced and in your calculations should estimate less power output per year.
  3. What is the cost per KwH in your neck of the woods? Shouldn't you be comparing the cost to the cost of just using electricity from the grid? I know where you live is much better for solar than where I live (in NY).
In previous years when I looked into it, I determined it was a wash and there were other items within the house to make the house more efficient that made more economic sense than going with solar. That might be different today.
 
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Kak

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So I'm considering getting solar panels on my home, the Tesla Powerwall.

Doing so will cut my electric bill by about 30%, which is about $300 in savings, and it will also give me some emergency back-up power in combination with a gas generator already tied into my home. It is in my understanding that if the power grid goes down, this system will give us about 14 hours of power daily. We also have a backup gas generator, but it depends "on the grid" gas service.

The total cost of the system is about $55K, but with tax credits it will be a net cost of $38.3K.

Naturally for me to make this decision, I like to put things to numbers.

So here are the factors that I find relevant to the decision...
  • Return on Investment ($300/mo return on $38.3K = 9.3% yield, with inflation, yield will increase with time)​
  • Breakeven, Nominal [not using discounted cash flow models] (how long to recoup my money?) = Breakeven, 7.9 years (average savings $400 monthly) - Not sure we will be here for 8 years, but we do plan on staying for a good amount of time.​
  • Inflation protection (the unit can save me $300 today, but it might save me $600 in a few years as electric costs rise)​
  • Intangibles: Having back up power in the case of a longer-duration power failure. Although I'm not sure this system would work if we have one of these solar events @Bing mentioned, since batteries and components are electrical.​
  • Resale considerations: Having a backup system like this is appealing to home buyers in this particular market (they tend to focus on apocalyptic scenarios), should we sell this house down the road.​
  • Aesthetics: Not sure I like the idea of having panels on the roof (see pic) as I worry it will cheapen the look of the house, although many of my neighbors who have big multimillion dollar houses also have them, color-wise, they match the roof about as nice as they can

    View attachment 43127View attachment 43128

Your thoughts? Am I missing any financial considerations? Another thing I remind myself is this: In 5 years, there might not be tax credits and with inflation, this system won't be $38.3K net, but $100K.

I like the idea of having backup power, but I fear how it might look on the house. The $38K also is not really a consideration, it's just sitting in a bank somewhere earning .000001% interest and losing 10% annually in inflation.

@biophase , thoughts? This numerical analysis is always up your alley.
I would do it. I think your analysis is spot on. $38k seems like a downright bargain for your size of home. You can also usually finance stuff like this so it cash flows positive in the first month. Assuming you plan to stay a while that’s an option I’d consider. Interest rates basically just let you steal from the bank at the moment. Might as well.

I looked into the full Tesla roof a few years back and wished I had gone that route. It was still pretty new and finding someone that would do it was tough and I had better things to do than chase down the right contractors and lobbying my neighborhood to let me do it, so I just went with a traditional roof.

We are talking about building a home on some land and a Tesla roof is near the top of my list for wants.
 

thechosen1

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Yours seems like a good deal, but be sure to verify the energy savings.

A friend of mine recently got suckered into taking out a *loan* to get solar on his house and the monthly payments cost more than what he gets back on the electricity.

They have a lien on his property.

I imagine that’s what’s happening to most consumers. Since you’re in the position to pay cash... it’s a better deal.
 
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Solar is spectacular.
Been living with it in various forms for a good few years.

BUT
I would say that the Tesla systems are quite expensive for what they offer.

Some useful info:

All batteries will have an AH (Amp Hour) Rating system
BUT, Not all AH ratings are the same:

Old Solar systems are based on Lead Acid batteries.
LA batteries will have about 50% usable capacity; if the battery is 100AH, you can safely use 50AH before doing damage to the battery.
They are BIG, BULKY and a ROYAL PITA
After approx 1000 charge/discharge cycles (to 50% capacity) , the batteries will only have 80% capacity left and rapidly decline

Young solar systems are based on Li-Ion (Lithium Ion) Technologies.
This is the same battery tech used in electric cars.
Li-Ion has the highest energy density of any cell, but with high density comes high explosive potential.
It's used where extremely high amperage (power) is needed, hence in cars
They are small, lightweight and usually have thousands of cells in one install
If one cell goes bad, it can affect others around
After approximately 1500-2000 charge/discharge cycles to 80%, the batteries will have 80% capacity remaining

NEW solar systems are based on LiFePo4 (Lithium Iron Phosphate) Tech
This is the same tech used in medical devices AND some cars.
It does not pack as much of a punch as Li-Ion, which is why its usage in cars is not that high.
LiFePo4 is quite high in density, but was not widely used due to price per KWH of storage.
This price has dropped significantly in recent years!!!
They are sold as raw cells or ready made packs that can fit into a server rack. If one cell goes bad, it can be replaced easily
After 4-5000charge/discharge cycles to 90% the batteries will have 80% capacity remaining. (some Grade A+ even up to 7000 cycles)

------

For complete off grid

(a lot of assumptions here - but they are educated guesstimates rather than random numbers)

You're in the US, and so you can get 5.4KWh of LiFePo4 storage from the US with US companies for about $1500

Calculating the size of your house and electricity, you might need 75kwh of storage @ $23k
You showed 12 panels on your roof - a Sharp NUJC370 (great panel, great performance) at $200 per would cost $2.4k and give you a solar capacity of 375w * 12 = 4500w or 4.5kw
(I would suggest adding more capacity to about 10-15KW so that during the day you're only using solar with enough extra to charge batteries)

For a house that size you'd probably need 15kw inverter - wide open market but you're looking at about $7000
Cost of cables etc can be expected to be $1-2000

Installation.... depends, no idea how much things cost in arizona

So for
75KWh of storage at $23k
15KW of solar at $7.5k
15KW of inverters at $7k
Other materials at $2k
Installation of..... No Idea (Maybe $5-10k)
Total $40k materials - you could be totally off grid with a system that would last more than 20 years before needing anything done to it.

Your ROI for the same investment is significantly different.
Going off grid means that you don't need to pay any electricity to the state/suppliers.
You are immune to random price hikes because something happening somewhere far away.
You have full control! and when rolling blackouts start to happen you'll be the only one immune.


Before you go with a Tesla system (Great systems), get some quotes for a full solar system.
Solar systems are not rocket science, there's a lot of great reputable installers all over the world.
 

MJ DeMarco

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Going off grid means that you don't need to pay any electricity to the state/suppliers.

Going completely "off the grid" for the house of my size (13,000 square feet) is probably near impossible as I would need several acres for solar panels.

no idea how much things cost in arizona

I'm in Utah now, but shockingly, is really sunny here too. The power rates are about the same, but the "sell the power back to the electric company" is a rip off. They buy it from you at 50% off rates, and sell it back at double.

$38k seems like a downright bargain for your size of home.

It would not produce a lot of savings, few hundred bucks at most. I'm just looking at it from various investment perspectives: tax credits, appreciation on the house, ROI of $38K in solar VS $38K sitting in a bank.

I ultimately did sign the papers to move forward.
 

Kak

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Does it have a load shed so you can run a little something off of it if the power was out? Curious. That’s pretty easy to set up with the back up generator ATS.

You could probably run a few rooms on that output which would be helpful if the natural gas lines are overwhelmed during an outage.
 
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I'm leaning heavily towards solar before the credit steps down at the end of the year, and I'm probably going to get some battery backup. I'm not sure that financially it's the best, but the peace of mind is invaluable to me. We're on well water and have a deep freezer, no other generator at the moment. Losing that much food and not being able to have access to water would put a serious dent in my life.
Everything else we can accomplish without power - including heat and cooking.

I figure if I get the right batteries, I also have portable power.
Something like this as an example, though I haven't comparison shopped yet: BLUETTI AC300 + 1*B300 | Home Battery Backup

I got quite angry this morning because I checked the price of the solar system I've been eying up, and the price went up 10%.
But then a couple hours later I got the email from our electric provider that our cost is going up 25% in June. Suddenly, 10% doesn't seem so bad.

If I self-install, my ROI is over 16% for the solar panels after factoring in the solar credit, but without factoring in the cost of the battery backup (since I haven't priced that out yet). That seems like a pretty good return to me.
Plus it insulates me from future increases since it would cover over 100% of my current use. By the time things get bad enough that I consider going full off-grid, I'm assuming battery tech will be better/cheaper.
 

McAdam

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I ultimately did sign the papers to move forward.
Congratulations!

I would love an update thread! Will be great to see how it works out!

Something like this as an example, though I haven't comparison shopped yet: BLUETTI AC300 + 1*B300 | Home Battery Backup
The Bluetti system is very nice - seriously considered it for a small project, but decided to DIY it all instead.
And you can add on more batteries (not sure if just 1 or several). Based on LiFePo4 tech so should last a very very long time!
 

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Wow, what a racket. Looks like we won't be doing this after all and we were thwarted by the power company, a Warren Buffett owned enterprise.

Tesla probably has already spent a dozen hours on our system.

However, in order for us to go through with the installation, the power company wants US to upgrade their equipment, namely, they want us to upgrade their transformer up the street. Why? Turns out, another neighbor has solar panels and has already taken a large share of the kilo-wattage. So, the next neighbor (us) has to pay the power company to upgrade the transformer, to the tune of $3K-$9k. And then--get this--the next person in our neighborhood who wants solar panels gets to use the transformer for free. In other words, the people with solar BEFORE and AFTER us get free use of the transformer upgrade... but WE pay for it.

Worse, since my house is 13,000 square feet with plently of power consumption, the transfomer upgrade is pointless. We will use every k-watt of power we generate and will send NOTHING back to the power company.

Amazing! This is how big companies stop you from "going green" and keep you on grid -- and if you do go solar, they get YOU to upgrade their equipment for free.

Jesus FN Christ, what a FN racket.
 
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Antifragile

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We have this in development often. We upgrade services and then next developer plugs into it. But it’s not free - there’s typically something called “late comer agreement” with the municipality, and we would get a refund within x years if the next guy uses what we installed (because municipalities would charge them this late comer fee). I don’t know if it’ll apply to you, but may be worth a look.


Edit; typically development upgrades cost hundreds of thousands or millions and are worth the legal paperwork cost! This may not be worth it for a simple transformer.
 

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I don’t know if it’ll apply to you, but may be worth a look.


Edit; typically development upgrades cost hundreds of thousands or millions and are worth the legal paperwork cost! This may not be worth it for a simple transformer.

It doesn't. And the whole principle of the thing will cause us to drop the entire project. A bit miffed that Tesla didn't give us any warning, "BTW, there's a 33% chance you'll need to pay $5,000 to upgrade the public transformer up the street."
 

Ing

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What about using it without the possibility to send any kwh to the transformator? Only use, what you need, the west will be burned?
It similar here, I would use every photovoltaic produced kwh with the mining equipment, so no need to give something to the net.
Up to 10 kWp I can do that legally.
So Use the net only for voltage and phase regulations.
 
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