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BOUNCE RATE: Why are people leaving my order page while already filling in their info?

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DreamUnionBeats

New Contributor
Jul 5, 2021
3
2
Hey there folks!

I am new to this forum and I have a question that maybe some of you can answer that are more experienced than me in driving traffic to funnels/shopify-pages and generating + optimizing conversions. :)

So, I have a funnel that is starting with a landing page describing and selling the product with text and video. On there, there is a button where people can click on if they are convinced and will get to the 2 step order page (1 step shipping - 1 step billing / Clickfunnels)


First test campaing with super targeted traffic:
120 people were on the landing page (Page#1), 20 people were on the order form page (Page#2).
> 4 people were about to purchase but they only filled the shipping fields (Step#1) - and left while / after they filled in their credit card info (Step#2),so unfortunately no one purchased.

Why would those 4 people stop at the billing point and not make the purchase after they already fulfilled their shipping info? And what can I do about this problem now?

Payment was running fine in test mode, so the technical side is not the problem.


_____________________________________

Maybe you had / have similar experiences and are able to help me with advice!

Thanks for all your time and support upfront! :)

- Martin from DreamUnionBeats
 
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Bekit

Platinum Contributor
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Speedway Pass
Aug 13, 2018
951
4,423
Hey there folks!

I am new to this forum and I have a question that maybe some of you can answer that are more experienced than me in driving traffic to funnels/shopify-pages and generating + optimizing conversions. :)

So, I have a funnel that is starting with a landing page describing and selling the product with text and video. On there, there is a button where people can click on if they are convinced and will get to the 2 step order page (1 step shipping - 1 step billing / Clickfunnels)


First test campaing with super targeted traffic:
120 people were on the landing page (Page#1), 20 people were on the order form page (Page#2).
> 4 people were about to purchase but they only filled the shipping fields (Step#1) - and left while / after they filled in their credit card info (Step#2),so unfortunately no one purchased.

Why would those 4 people stop at the billing point and not make the purchase after they already fulfilled their shipping info? And what can I do about this problem now?

Payment was running fine in test mode, so the technical side is not the problem.


_____________________________________

Maybe you had / have similar experiences and are able to help me with advice!

Thanks for all your time and support upfront! :)

- Martin from DreamUnionBeats
Sometimes people fill in their shipping information in an effort to find out how much the shipping cost is.

Does your site prominently display the shipping price or offer a shipping cost calculator?
 

DreamUnionBeats

New Contributor
Jul 5, 2021
3
2
Sometimes people fill in their shipping information in an effort to find out how much the shipping cost is.

Does your site prominently display the shipping price or offer a shipping cost calculator?
Hey Bekit,

Thanks for your response on this thread.

Since my product is digital there is no shipping cost charged. "shipping" is only step 1 where they fill in their name, email and address.

I think your point is good, that I should display "shipping = 0.00 $" so they know that they only have to pay the displayed price for my product from the start.

Any other suggestions or things I could implement?

Thanks so much for your time and help
 

Metz

Bronze Contributor
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Speedway Pass
Apr 12, 2019
88
142
30
NW Washington
Hey Bekit,

Thanks for your response on this thread.

Since my product is digital there is no shipping cost charged. "shipping" is only step 1 where they fill in their name, email and address.

I think your point is good, that I should display "shipping = 0.00 $" so they know that they only have to pay the displayed price for my product from the start.

Any other suggestions or things I could implement?

Thanks so much for your time and help
Yeah, what @Bekit said. Though my question is.. if the product is digital, why is there a need to collect shipping information at all? That's just one extra barrier before the purchase.

Another factor to consider is how's the value proposition for your products? Going off your website, you have a list of music beats and samples but price each one at €29.99 - €199.99. Right away, I'm unsure why one beat would have a price range rather than a specific price based on what's presented on the homepage. Depending on when someone determines the actual value of their purchase (sounds like that's happening at checkout where they might expect €29.99 but then €199.99 pops up), that could be causing the bounces.

Now, if someone scrolls down, they'll see you offer different kinds of licenses at €29.99, €69.99, and €199.99. Might be good to get rid of the €29.99 - €199.99 range on the product list and then explain pricing at the bottom so it's much more obvious. OR move that pricing chart at the top, tighten it up so it doesn't take up as much space vertically, and *then* present the products if there's no current workaround for the price range displaying next to each song on the list. Either way, clarity will definitely help you out there.

Moreover, I don't know too much about the market for music licensing like this so take my opinion with a grain of salt but how do you account for competition that provides license-free beats for free? Even if they're not a business making money from selling beats, they still affect how you need to market yourself, hence why your value proposition needs to be really compelling. What's your answer to "why should I pay 200 euros for something I can get for free?"

You also offer 17 free beats so you're also adding competition to your paid stuff. Free stuff can be good to attract people to check out your brand and what you're offering, but what if I'm a musician starting off and 17 beats are more than enough for me to get started? Then by the time I've built myself up, I'm either making beats myself (because I'm skilled enough to do so) or working with someone directly to make the beats I want (from the networking I've done) instead of buying pre-made ones?

I don't want to sound harsh; you have a pretty cool idea and I understand why you've structured it this way. But to me, if the site is technically sound, bounces come down to a value proposition that was *just* enough to get them to the end point, but not enough to cross over and convert into customers. Hopefully, some of this will give you some ideas when you head back to the drawing board.
 
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Last edited:

DreamUnionBeats

New Contributor
Jul 5, 2021
3
2
Yeah, what @Bekit said. Though my question is.. if the product is digital, why is there a need to collect shipping information at all?

Another factor to consider is how's the value proposition for your products? Going off your website, you have a list of music beats and samples but price each one at €29.99 - €199.99. Right away, I'm unsure why one beat would have a price range rather than a specific price based on what's presented on the homepage. Depending on when someone determines the actual value of their purchase (sounds like that's happening at checkout where they might expect €29.99 but then €199.99 pops up), that could be causing the bounces.

Now, if someone scrolls down, they'll see you offer different kinds of licenses at €29.99, €69.99, and €199.99. Might be good to get rid of the €29.99 - €199.99 range on the product list and then explain pricing at the bottom so it's much more obvious.

Moreover, I don't know too much about the market for music licensing like this so take my opinion with a grain of salt but how do you account for competition that provides license-free beats for free? Even if they're not a business making money from selling beats, they still affect how you need to market yourself, hence why your value proposition needs to be really compelling. What's your answer to "why should I pay 200 euros for something I can get for free?"

You also offer 17 free beats so you're also adding competition to your paid stuff. Free stuff can be good to attract people to check out your brand and what you're offering, but what if I'm a musician starting off and 17 beats are more than enough for me to get started? Then by the time I've built myself up, I'm either making beats myself (because I'm skilled enough to do so) or working with someone directly to make the beats I want (from the networking I've done) instead of buying pre-made ones?

I don't want to sound harsh; you have a pretty cool idea and I understand why you've structured it this way. But to me, if the site is technically sound, bounces come down to a value proposition that was *just* enough to get them to the end point, but not enough to cross over and convert into customers. Hopefully, some of this will give you some ideas when you head back to the drawing board.
Hey there Metz, thank you so much for your extremely detailed response.

The site you were seeing is my actual online store which is constantly bringing in sales, but not the numbers that I want to achieve, which is why I decided to go with clickfunnels to also sell packages of multiple beats there, beside my main instrumental store.

The license models and the price ranges and the product itself is a proven market, but your suggestions and thoughts on it are totally valuable. But it's not the discussion for this thread.

So the 2 step order Form on clickfunnels is just the basic placeholder name step1 for shipping called "where to send your beats?" (name, email, Adress) and step 2 for billing (credit card) "your billing info".

I've already reworked the order Form and put everything (personal data and credit card info) in a single section of the page, so visitors see that they have to fill in credit card info from the start. Hopefully that makes them purchase.

So to get you informed further about my product. It's a special offer, which is giving artists 11 beats for 11 €. I wanna convert cold traffic and built my email list by doing such an underpriced offer for a certain period of time and getting them up sold on the backend of the funnel.

By now you know the situation better, maybe you have some further advice of how to keep them on the order page and make them purchase?

Very special thanks to you again for your help
 

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Metz

Bronze Contributor
Read Fastlane!
Read Unscripted!
Speedway Pass
Apr 12, 2019
88
142
30
NW Washington
Hey there Metz, thank you so much for your extremely detailed response.

The site you were seeing is my actual online store which is constantly bringing in sales, but not the numbers that I want to achieve, which is why I decided to go with clickfunnels to also sell packages of multiple beats there, beside my main instrumental store.

The license models and the price ranges and the product itself is a proven market, but your suggestions and thoughts on it are totally valuable. But it's not the discussion for this thread.

So the 2 step order Form on clickfunnels is just the basic placeholder name step1 for shipping called "where to send your beats?" (name, email, Adress) and step 2 for billing (credit card) "your billing info".

I've already reworked the order Form and put everything (personal data and credit card info) in a single section of the page, so visitors see that they have to fill in credit card info from the start. Hopefully that makes them purchase.

So to get you informed further about my product. It's a special offer, which is giving artists 11 beats for 11 €. I wanna convert cold traffic and built my email list by doing such an underpriced offer for a certain period of time and getting them up sold on the backend of the funnel.

By now you know the situation better, maybe you have some further advice of how to keep them on the order page and make them purchase?

Very special thanks to you again for your help
To clarify a little bit about what I was saying earlier:

I know the license models, price ranges, and products are within a proven market. I know a few friends who do the same thing. But my comments were on how they're presented and how that might affect visitor => customer conversion.

The goal of any sales funnel is to help customers make an informed purchase by determining product value (i.e. "Should I buy this at this price?" and the myriad questions that stem from it) and compelling them to buy the product (i.e. "Yes, this is definitely a good deal") as efficiently as possible. So you've addressed efficiency with combining the order form into one section/page as that eliminates one more page between "what's this" and "I've bought it." If there are other ways you can do that on different parts of your site (like making pricing a bit more clear to expedite a visitor's decision to buy), my suggestion was based on that. Sell it at whatever price and model make sense, but then it comes down to presentation. Since I didn't know you were talking about a special offer or know what to go off of, I went off what information I was given.

But now we're talking about your offer, not the site itself. So about that:

Given the current pricing for the offer, there's a lot of questions that come to mind that customers could potentially be asking:
  • If the base price of a beat is €29.99, why are these at €1 each?
  • How does the customer know these specific beats are of value to them, especially at such a low price?
  • Does the customer get to choose their own beats for the 11 for €11 deal or are they a pre-selected group? If it's pre-selected, do they get to listen to samples of them or do they have to trust your judgment?
  • Is pricing arbitrary ("They usually start at €29.99 but he's selling these at just €1 a beat.. is he still making a profit off the €1? How inflated is his other pricing then? Is this even worth it?")? What's the difference between a €1 beat and a €30 beat (or a €200)?
  • Do these beats have the same licensing rules? Regardless, is that explained somewhere clearly?
  • If you're giving everyone the same set of beats, how does that help the musician develop their own sound? Just in my Spotify discover playlist every week, I hear a lo-fi song from a different artist using the same beat sample with different stuff thrown in. A musician who's trying to sound unique might be dissuaded from the purchase.
If you want to make a special offer, make it special, sure, but don't make it appear cheap, you know? If a big flatscreen TV usually retails for $700 and a special promo is "Buy this TV for $7," even if the TV is completely fine, the ad seems too good to be true. Is it broken? Inferior? Something wrong with these models? Is the store going out of business? Is this a move out of desperation?

You're exchanging €330 - €2,200 worth of music for €11. You want the deal to be good, not unbelievable or questionable.

It might also be something as simple as localization. I noticed the "email address" section in the screenshot of your form you attached above is spelled "Email-Adress". If you're marketing in North America or even the UK or other English-speaking Europeans, I know that improper localization can make them wonder about the legitimacy of the business (I know in the U.S. there are plenty of stories I've heard from friends and other businesses looking for B2B services that have turned down companies/stores/providers because of poor formatting, grammatical errors, spelling, etc. not because of those issues themselves but because of foreign scammers trying to take advantage of people and that's usually a sign). Not saying you're a scammer, obviously, but if I were to try to sell something to a Spanish-speaking audience (or really any other language), I need to make sure everything's written to the quality they expect in their language. Especially since your drop-off is happening during the checkout phase too, something as minor as that could be enough of a reason for them to stop because it just seems a little off.

And like I said, I'm just making estimated guesses based on the information you're sharing. But hopefully it provides some food for thought. Either way, the market is trying to tell you something; beyond actual feedback from the people who ditched your site at checkout, these are just a few hypotheses that you can test and go from there.
 

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