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OFF-TOPIC A discussion about quantum physics...

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MJ DeMarco

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It never ceases to amaze me how much quantum physics blows my mind just trying to conceptualize it, much less understand it.

Read this page and try to grasp it all.

How Quantum Physics Explains the Invisible Universe

Some excerpts...

In the realm of quantum physics, observing something actually influences the physical processes taking place. Light waves act like particles and particles act like waves (called wave particle duality). Matter can go from one spot to another without moving through the intervening space (called quantum tunnelling).

Information moves instantly across vast distances. In fact, in quantum mechanics we discover that the entire universe is actually a series of probabilities.

The idea that observation changes a particle is really, well, odd.

In our world, we just achieved teleportation thru quantum entanglement...

Off-Topic - Beam me up Scotty! (We have teleportation/quantum entanglement! )

If you're in the mood for this...



Start reading!

Feel free to discuss!
 

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socaldude

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When I first dove into physics the hardest thing for me to overcome was the inadequacy of our optical properties of our senses. Yes basically our eyes.

The reason is because our eyes only capture a small portion of the electromagnetic filed of light hence not giving us perfect information or access to reality so to speak. And because our body is limited only to this dimension.

The reason being is that in physics there is a lot of evidence that there is "something" beyond our dimension. The big bang theory for example strongly suggest that our universe is actually expanding. But it's not expanding into "nothing space" it's expanding into a higher dimensional space that is coddling our universe so to speak.

The other day I was reading how if you split two particles and separate them with a tremendous distance one of those particles automatically "knows" what the other is doing and what is happening to that other particle. Incredible and fascinating.
 
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MJ DeMarco

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lowtek

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When I first dove into physics the hardest thing for me to overcome was the inadequacy of our optical properties of our senses. Yes basically our eyes.

The reason is because our eyes only capture a small portion of the electromagnetic filed of light hence not giving us perfect information or access to reality so to speak. And because our body is limited only to this dimension.

The reason being is that in physics there is a lot of evidence that there is "something" beyond our dimension. The big bang theory for example strongly suggest that our universe is actually expanding. But it's not expanding into "nothing space" it's expanding into a higher dimensional space that is coddling our universe so to speak.

The other day I was reading how if you split two particles and separate them with a tremendous distance one of those particles automatically "knows" what the other is doing and what is happening to that other particle. Incredible and fascinating.

The big bang model of cosmology does not require any extra dimensions. It is not that the "boundary" of the universe is expanding, it's that the space between galaxies is expanding. We know this is happening from the redshift of galaxies.

The universe, in the broadest sense of the word, does not have a bound. If you could instantaneously teleport to the furthest galaxy 13.5 billion light years away, you would see that the universe expands 13.8 billion years in all directions - you would see all new galaxies that are hidden from the milky way.

As far as we can estimate, the universe is about 45 billion light years across. Only 13.8 billion light years is within our cosmic horizon (i.e. what we can see). This is because space-time itself expanded faster than the speed of light in the first fractions of a second following the big bang. We know this from the homogeneity of the cosmic microwave background radiation. The radiation is the same temperature on either "side" of the universe. Impossible unless the universe inflated at some point in the past.

With respect to entanglement, this is often romanticized, but really it's quite mundane. It happens when a particle is produced in a reaction that has to conserve some quantity. If a spin 0 particle decays into two spin 1/2 particles, they must have opposite spins ( because total angular momentum is conserved and spin, a type of angular momentum, is additive) -one is spin +1/2 and another is spin -1/2.

If you separate these by a vast distance, and measure one of them, you instantly know the spin of the other particle (assuming the entanglement was preserved). But so what? The particles don't know anything, in any real sense of the word. You can't influence the outcome of the measurement, because it is fundamentally random. It's therefore useless as a form of communication.

Quantum mechanics is super cool, but unfortunately it serves as the basis for lots of "woo" out there. Since it's a difficult topic, and only understood by so few (and dimly at that), it is often misrepresented by new age gurus to spout whatever twist they have on the law of attraction.
 

lowtek

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Damn, you're right. It's mush now after trying to figure that out.

The resolution to this, I believe, is that the particles are represented by some wave function. The wave function can be peaked around some average value (meaning, that's where you're most likely to find it), but it has some tails out to infinity. That means there is still "some part" of the particle that is behind the slit even though its' average velocity (how that peak travels through space) suggests it should have hit the detector already.
 

socaldude

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Quantum mechanics is super cool, but unfortunately it serves as the basis for lots of "woo" out there. Since it's a difficult topic, and only understood by so few (and dimly at that), it is often misrepresented by new age gurus to spout whatever twist they have on the law of attraction.

Yeah that's totally right.

I think a better question to ask is if it's being misunderstood then how do we better understand it?

When I take time to read about this I try to understand the evidence involved because "proof" is only in mathematics and logic.

When someone yells out "there's no proof for the big bang!" then they show that they don't know what they are talking about because there is no such thing as 100% for sure proof.

But to answer my own question I think this is better understood when we better understand our own limitation and we answer the question how is it possible for a human to even understand something in the first place.

Because afterall at the end of the day we are the focal point of intelligence.

The particles don't know anything, in any real sense of the word. You can't influence the outcome of the measurement, because it is fundamentally random. It's therefore useless as a form of communication.

Yeah true but then they wouldn't satisfy the criteria of being independent. Quarks can't do that, they can't exist apart from the particles they constitute.

If we create a powerful magnetic field and we get positrons and electrons we simply decreased the amount of energy equal to the particle (e=mc2). So the thing that ever really remains constant is energy.

It's like if we ask the question how does DNA "know" how to give which instructions to make something happen. Or how does you immune system "know" which molecules are foreign. Is it random? :jawdrop:
 

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