The Entrepreneur Forum | Startups | Entrepreneurship | Starting a Business | Motivation | Success

BOOK REVIEW The Chimp Paradox, by Dr. Steve Peters (Review & Discussion)

  • Thread starter
  • Admin
  • #1

MJ DeMarco

Administrator
Staff member
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Jul 23, 2007
29,325
101,577
3,751
Fountain Hills, AZ
This month's new book discussion. We didn't vote on it, but this book is consistently rated highly in the vote counts and has been mentioned many times.

The Chimp Paradox, by Dr. Steve Peters

I started reading it last week and have been enjoying it, will post a full review when finished.

To review, please use the following format.

:star::star: :star::star: :star:
(The STAR/X emojis are under the emoji icon, under "commenting icons.")

Format: Audible

My thoughts/review:
Lorem Ipsum
is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book.

Favorite (or least favorite) chapter:
Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book.

Key takeaways:
  1. Key takeaway #1
  2. Key takeaway #2
  3. Key takeaway #3
  4. Key takeaway #4

27972
 

Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum. Subscribe.

  • Thread starter
  • Admin
  • #3
OP
OP
MJ DeMarco

MJ DeMarco

Administrator
Staff member
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Jul 23, 2007
29,325
101,577
3,751
Fountain Hills, AZ

Runum

Platinum Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Aug 8, 2007
5,998
4,417
1,788
DFW
Reading it myself. I tried Audible and my mind was having no part of it. I got the print and doing both at the same time has been helpful for my focus and understanding.

I deal with hundreds of people each day and can see a lot of what is in this book. Halfway through so far.
 

KAA

Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Aug 6, 2018
16
32
23
Virginia, USA
This month's new book discussion. We didn't vote on it, but this book is consistently rated highly in the vote counts and has been mentioned many times.

The Chimp Paradox, by Dr. Steve Peters

I started reading it last week and have been enjoying it, will post a full review when finished.

To review, please use the following format.

:star::star: :star::star: :star:
(The STAR/X emojis are under the emoji icon, under "commenting icons.")

Format: Audible

My thoughts/review:
Lorem Ipsum
is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book.

Favorite (or least favorite) chapter:
Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book.

Key takeaways:
  1. Key takeaway #1
  2. Key takeaway #2
  3. Key takeaway #3
  4. Key takeaway #4

View attachment 27972
I just purchased the book based on your mention of it. I've read the first couple of chapters and it's already given me some "Ah hah" moments. I look forward to reading your review.
 

Runum

Platinum Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Aug 8, 2007
5,998
4,417
1,788
DFW
:star::star::star:

Format: Audible/print

My thoughts/review:
This was a tough Audible book for me. I couldn't get the visualizations and connections the author was making. The reader did not help with the pacing and emphasis on the paragraphs. I bought the print and listened as I read. Much better for me. There are some pictures and sketches in the book you cannot see with Audible.

Favorite (or least favorite) chapter:
I really didn't look at the book that way. Overall, liked the book, not the Audible. Author could have dug in deeper in preemptive strategies for handling your chimp.

Key takeaways:
  1. Brain has 3 main parts, human, chimp, computer
  2. Emotional chimp is the strongest. He gets all inputs first and reacts emotionally. Can be beneficial or hurtful to human.
  3. Computer is next strongest of the 3. This is automated responses and tasks.
  4. Human is the real you, how you would really like to act and handle life. Intellectual. Programs the computer for the automated responses.
  5. Human must nourish and care for the chimp before crises occur so that chimp does not overreact.
 

luniac

Platinum Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Dec 7, 2012
1,692
2,592
677
29
brooklyn
This book is outdated in some very important ways.
Will post evidence in my review
 

luniac

Platinum Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Dec 7, 2012
1,692
2,592
677
29
brooklyn
halfway through but figured id post why this book is very questionable.
The book says:
A)The human mind logic,reason and is the real you
B)The chimp mind is emotional and creates thoughts and feelings that you don't want, and that's how u know it's the chimp mind doing it.

That's not how it works.
Your "human" mind is creating the thoughts and feeling you don't want as well, there may not be any such thing as a chimp mind at all, at least not in the sense that it's creating your thoughts and feelings of "anxiety" or "fear", "anger", etc...

So how much of the book can really be useful? ill finish reading because it's entertaining, but the framework suggested in the book is a no go for me.

Here's the proof.


View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQGZPVMsZ28

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6tHb_GoSFeM


Also,
the book says its the logical "Human" mind that is responsible for creating life purpose, but i beg to differ.
In my personal experience, life purpose is not thought, its FELT. its an emotional thing.
If you start thinking about it logically, you arrive at the inevitable conclusion that there's no known meaning or purpose to anything.
Emotionally though, you can FEEL purpose very strongly, and i think depression and apathy is when you lose touch with that feeling maybe.
But that's just my thoughts on the subject based on personal experience.


EDIT:
Recommending to add this book to the list:

 
Last edited:

FMJJ

New Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Dec 26, 2017
7
9
26
20
Long Island, New York
5/5 Stars
:star::star::star::star::star:

Format: Paperback

My thoughts/review:
This book was recommended to me by @MJ DeMarco in the thread I made: Yesterday Was The Lowest I Ever Reached Mentally. When I made that post, I was determined to never reach such a low mental state again. I finished the book yesterday. I marked it up and read it very thoroughly. I wanted to get the most out of reading it the first time. With this said, I have to say that I'm really impressed with this book. I'll definitely be referring back to it often. I discovered that I was unnecessarily beating myself up. I was facing enormous mental suffering from traumatizing events. I was not dealing with my emotional state properly (my Chimp). I was inadvertently dragging myself deeper and deeper into the depths of darkness and despair. My mind was abundant with negativity and hopelessness. I had consistent anxiety attacks everyday. I was not getting any quality sleep. I felt overwhelming sadness. I was stressing out real bad. Without getting into the details, I had quite the rough night before I made that thread. After reading this book, I now know that there is no way I'm going to reach such a low again. I'm utilizing the skill of managing my emotions constructively. I know that I can reach my full potential as long as I preserve my mental health going forward. I could keep improving in my ability to manage my emotional state (my Chimp). I will maintain this skill because this book demonstrated to me how important it is to do so. I resonate so much with this book that I feel confident in applying the knowledge I gained from it throughout the rest of my life. So far, I am benefitting significantly from this read. I've been more productive, assertive, and clear thinking. I've been able to manage my emotions quite well, especially when it comes to dealing with other people in my life. The Chimp Paradox is a beautiful read. I'm so glad to have taken the opportunity to dive into it.

Favorite chapter:
My favorite chapter is Chapter 3. It's where Dr. Peters goes over the "how to" of managing my Chimp (my emotional state of mind). There is a tendency for negative emotions to hijack behavior, so it is important to combat that with skillful management of such emotions. I find that the methods described are VERY effective when applied in managing my negative emotions. Among anxiety, some negative emotional states to manage are anger, sadness, laziness, and impatience.

Key takeaways:
  1. "You can't change the nature of your Chimp, BUT you are responsible for managing it."
  2. "If your Chimp is agitated or upset about something, the first thing it has to do is to release this emotion" This is a key because I find this to be surprisingly effective. As of right now, I've exercised my "Chimp" by rambling a bunch of nonsense onto either a voice memo, piece of paper, or typed document. This makes it incredibly easier to think logically and truthfully. It makes it much easier to take action consciously and responsibly. I take action on the basis of facts after recognizing the absurdity of my negative emotional thinking.
  3. Gremlins (unnecessary negative beliefs) are to be replaced with Autopilots (necessary and constructive beliefs).
  4. Using the word "could" in thought and writing is more encouraging to myself than using the words "should" or "must."
  5. It's important to CONSTRUCTIVELY deal with people who are being hijacked by their Chimp.
  6. Looking at the top of the mountain is exhausting if I overdo it. I know where I'm headed. My focus needs to be in the now and the near future. I could move forward as fast as appropriate. I could go step by step. I could maintain my mental health and get a lot done in terms of achieving goals.
  7. I could be confident in giving my very best effort while also being vigilant of complacency.
  8. Life is not fair. I could make the most of my situation and do well for myself.
 
OP
OP
MJ DeMarco

MJ DeMarco

Administrator
Staff member
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Jul 23, 2007
29,325
101,577
3,751
Fountain Hills, AZ
This book was recommended to me by @MJ DeMarco in the thread I made: Yesterday Was The Lowest I Ever Reached Mentally. When I made that post, I was determined to never reach such a low mental state again. I finished the book yesterday. I marked it up and read it very thoroughly. I wanted to get the most out of reading it the first time. With this said, I have to say that I'm really impressed with this book. I'll definitely be referring back to it often. I discovered that I was unnecessarily beating myself up.
Awesome, glad to hear the book has helped you. When you described your state, I knew that you were getting hijacked and killed by your chimp. :thumbsup:
 

Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum. Subscribe.

luniac

Platinum Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Dec 7, 2012
1,692
2,592
677
29
brooklyn
:star::star: :star:


My thoughts/review:
Didn't realize its a self help book, not really interested in those.
That being said, the first third is reasonably entertaining with the whole human chimp computer model explanation.
The next two thirds however are seriously just a whole bunch of common sense.

But you know what, sometimes we need to hear the obvious to refresh it in our minds so im not gonna hate too much.

Thing is though im not sure if this whole model hold water.
As i've posted earlier in this thread, the human/chimp distinctions posited by the author may not be that clear cut and dry.
The book says that if you are having thoughts/emotions that you don't want, that's definitely the chimp.
However scientific evidence has shown that the "Human" creates the consciously perceived anxiety and fears that we feel.

The real life experiment that provides this evidence is when test subjects were shown a fear inducing image subliminally, as in the image flashed so fast that the conscious mind didn't notice it. However biological sensors detected things like sweat, adrenaline, and other physiological factors of threat response.

These physiological threat response didn't result in any conscious feeling of fear or anxiety because the subject didn't consciously experience the fear inducing image. The test subject was completely unaware of the physiological reaction.

This really makes me question the validity of the Chimp/Human model.

If we look at it in a VERY loose way however, it does seem pretty useful to make sense of why we think/feel certain ways in daily life.
But in a nutshell it all really boils down to staying calm and collected. This seems to be the trend in all the psychological books we've had so far.
If you get agitated you lose control, which is common sense. If you can stay calm, relaxed, cool, etc than you can be the "real" you.

Favorite (or least favorite) chapter:
The confidence chapter is good cause its true.
If you base your confidence on doing your best, then you can be 100% confident all the time, because it's not based on your skills.
Easier said than done though of course.

Key takeaways:
  1. do you best is the best advice.
  2. understand yourself to figure out how to be in control
  3. i dont know... nothing comes to mind even though the book has so many little tidbits. oh well...
 

GB81

New Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Oct 17, 2019
5
7
17
Uk
I enjoyed this book. The piece that always stuck with me was that if somethings gone wrong look at what you could have done differently rather than blame others. The example in the book is getting stuck in traffic. Is it the other drivers fault or should you have set off earlier.
 

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.


Fastlane Insiders

View the forum AD FREE.
Private, unindexed content
Detailed process/execution threads
Monthly conference calls with doers
Ideas needing execution, more!

Join Fastlane Insiders.

Sponsored Offers

Lex DeVille's - Advanced Freelance Udemy Courses!
-- HALLOWEEN SPECIAL STARTS TODAY! Get any of my courses at Udemy's current best price through Friday! Use code: HALLOWEEN Use any of the links...
Top Bottom