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WEB SCHOOL No experience developing apps, where to start?

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Jdes91

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Hi guys I am interested in developing apps which address unmet needs, should I look into learning how to code first? Or outsource app development to eastern Europe or meet with senior app developers and pitch my ideas?
 

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maikooo

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Hey - it depends if you are already technical - e.g. in electrical engineering or so - then it might be easier for you. If you are non-technical and your affinity towards coding is not great then I'd suggest you go to find the developers to build you an MVP so you can test the ideas with the market. Depending on your budget and potential size of the biz I wouldn't spend more than $2-10k on the MVP.

If you decide to go the route of outsourcing the MVP, make sure to read/learn about Product Management and writing specs, use cases, scenarios, journeys, workflows, etc. That will help you immensely when briefing and managing the devs.

To clarify - I have been in a situation where I learned to code to build my MVP but took too long to market. At this point, I'd invest in outsourcing the MVP to prove the problem/solution/market fit and take it from there.
 

Jdes91

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Hey - it depends if you are already technical - e.g. in electrical engineering or so - then it might be easier for you. If you are non-technical and your affinity towards coding is not great then I'd suggest you go to find the developers to build you an MVP so you can test the ideas with the market. Depending on your budget and potential size of the biz I wouldn't spend more than $2-10k on the MVP.

If you decide to go the route of outsourcing the MVP, make sure to read/learn about Product Management and writing specs, use cases, scenarios, journeys, workflows, etc. That will help you immensely when briefing and managing the devs.

To clarify - I have been in a situation where I learned to code to build my MVP but took too long to market. At this point, I'd invest in outsourcing the MVP to prove the problem/solution/market fit and take it from there.
What does an MVP stand for? (sorry im such a noob lol)
 

MJ DeMarco

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Maybe this can serve your needs?

 

Charly Brown

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Hello, nice to meet you?
So let me know if I understand you, do you mean that you want to create a software development company without knowing how to code?

What is it that attracted you to the idea of developing apps? is it something that is truly right for you? what are your thoughts, let me know more I am really interested.
 

Hadrian

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Hi guys I am interested in developing apps which address unmet needs, should I look into learning how to code first? Or outsource app development to eastern Europe or meet with senior app developers and pitch my ideas?
Hi Hi ok my two cents and I'm still a noob so "Caveat emptor ":

I'm an indie app dev who made every mistake in the book regarding outsourcing.... so please check out my previous threads for a few hard learned tips. Short answer don't trust ANYONE and use a site called called Upwork.com (Fixed Payment Option) as they use an escrow milestone payment option... its the only safe way to deal with devs. And build a fully interactive prototype first using software like proto.io or similar...

In a nutshell if you're going to be into apps for the medium/long term and have the time then learn to code yourself... if its small front end (no server/database) app follow the tips above and/or try to get an MVP made for 1/2k... I'd start off with a small app anyway as there is SO much to learn re. Apple iTunes/Google Play developer consoles etc....

One of the bigger software devs posted some sage advice saying don't make an app... instead try to fully validate your market need first... I'd listen to him!

Remember 90% of the game is marketing, the Queen of MJ's chessboard, and one that still eludes me...

Feel free to PM if you need any noob starting out advice... and for the love of Hades don't make an app that needs an audience from the get go... like a dating app!

Ice Box.jpg
 
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AidenRafi

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Getting someone in another country to build your app can be a huge money pit dude.

Like the guys here have suggested, learn the basics of coding or use a no-code solution like bubble.

Third case is find someone nearby that is a coder and get him on board as a partner.
 

404profound

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Either learn to code, or go find something easy. Good luck to you if you always turn up your nose to the hard shit, that's where the money is. If you think coding is hard, good luck when you need your outsourced dev who barely speaks English to rearchitect your UI for a new user type.
 

maikooo

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Hi Hi ok my two cents and I'm still a noob so "Caveat emptor ":

I'm an indie app dev who made every mistake in the book regarding outsourcing.... so please check out my previous threads for a few hard learned tips. Short answer don't trust ANYONE and use a site called called Upwork.com (Fixed Payment Option) as they use an escrow milestone payment option... its the only safe way to deal with devs. And build a fully interactive prototype first using software like proto.io or similar...

In a nutshell if you're going to be into apps for the medium/long term and have the time then learn to code yourself... if its small front end (no server/database) app follow the tips above and/or try to get an MVP made for 1/2k... I'd start off with a small app anyway as there is SO much to learn re. Apple iTunes/Google Play developer consoles etc....

One of the bigger software devs posted some sage advice saying don't make an app... instead try to fully validate your market need first... I'd listen to him!

Remember 90% of the game is marketing, the Queen of MJ's chessboard, and one that still eludes me...

Feel free to PM if you need any noob starting out advice... and for the love of Hades don't make an app that needs an audience from the get go... like a dating app!

View attachment 35193
100UP - validate the market with whatever prototype does it
100UP - marketing
 

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Jon L

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Software development is an immensely difficult undertaking. I run a small software development company, and I struggle to keep up with everything. I don't consider myself a programmer, but I've developed some stuff before on my own. I know enough to be dangerous. I do know database design decently well, so that is how I keep my developers in line. I will take a look at the database calls, the structure of the tables, etc., and from that can get a pretty decent idea of what is going on in their code. I rely on my lead developer to manage everything else. I do look at the code periodically. I've helped debug stuff and on occasion am even useful in my efforts.

All that said, what I do have is an ability to think logically, from the big picture to the small details. I know generally what software can do: what is easy for it, and what is difficult. I use this knowledge to design products that meet clients' needs without breaking their budget.

A number of years ago, IBM and a couple other companies did a study where they looked at the custom software market. Projects under $20m, they considered small. Small development projects failed, outright, 2/3 of the time. By 'failed,' they meant, 'the system was never put into long-term use.' What accounted for the vast majority of those failures? Poor system design. NOT poor coding. It was a lack of understanding of the problem they were trying to solve that directly caused the failure.

Why do I say all this? Most people get software development backwards: they Google "How to code," and get started on their project. This is a great way to learn to code. Its is NOT a great way to build a successful project, unless you like rewriting software for years on end.

The way to build a successful project is to:

1) pick the right problem to solve (easier said than done)
2) Fully understand the problem and its solution (also easier said than done)
2b) Figure out how to market the solution - marketing influences design and vice versa
3) Design a solution to the problem that is easy to code and that makes good choices about where to spend development effort
4) Do the actual coding
5) Test & release the product
6) Market
7) Build support systems around the product
8) Learn from your mistakes and iterate

As you think about your project, make sure you spend enough time on steps 1-3.

I typically rely on my clients to be experts in steps 1-2, so I'm not the best person to ask about what to do there. Maybe other people can chime in on that?

Edit: it occurs to me that steps 1-3 are interdependent. Picking a problem that will cost at least $100M to solve using software isn't good. Designing a marketing strategy that relies on code that is expensive to build/maintain isn't good. Designing a solution that can't be marketed easily isn't good either. You have to either be really good at all those things, or work closely with people that are.
 

Echni

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Hi everyone,

following this very interesting discussion - great posts. I am in a similar position like you Jdes91 - very ambitious about app development as well and having a couple of ideas but don't know how to code.

From my research it seems like coding is pretty much a commodity these days thanks to freelancer platforms. However, as the other say there is much more to successfully delivering an app-based solution to the market.
I think it is critical to have a basic understanding of development part considering it as a kind of core competency. Otherwise, as Hadrian said, how can you make sure that those guys don't fool you? Or how can you manage the project properly?

I started with an udemy course on Flutter a while ago and worked so far 3/4 quarters through it. However, I got stuck a while and had a number of technical issues which lead to some frustration. Now I feel ready to roll up the sleeves again. However, this time I am looking for some fellows who are ready to go through the same struggle in order to be a catalyst to each other.

For the moment I just want to get a simple app placed in oder to understand the process. Once that is achieved there might be room to think bigger. Please see my post

Are you interested Jdes91 on joining forces?

Best wishes,
Echni
 
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sfarieri

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normalfree

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I run an existing business in the early childhood industry that has error-prone operations. We relied on a workforce that isn't well-trained but we have little choices to choose from due to the limited salary that we can offer and certifications required by the Government on our workforce.

I had a real problem that I need to solve in my business, mainly a "warning and reminder" solution to my workforce, and with this, I want to include other elements of Machine Learning to further solve other issues in my business, some of which is not validated yet.

So basically I have a need for a solution that solves my immediate operational/workforce problems as well as a want for a solution that might change how education/communication is being done in the industry.

Having our cash tied up, I decided to learn enough to build out the MVP for my first problem. I think the distinction (I'm not even sure if this perspective is valid) is to build a fast and good enough app and not to be the best coder in the world.

Perhaps I can hack together a Frankenstein, or maybe I'm overestimating myself with this task.
 

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