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I Am Being Blackmailed - Need Help

Roli

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If I was Nike, or Kim Kardashian, I guess I'd get my attack dog lawyers to sort this one out for me, however I'm not.

I have basically been namesquatted, I have a domain name which is identical to my name. It hasn't been connected to an actual website in quite some time, however I still used it for my email, so that I could basically have a me@me.com email addy.

Apparently in China, a popular black hat tactic with company websites, is to set notifications on various small biz website names for if they become available. Then, once they do, you buy the name and stick a load of porn up under that url. Then blackmail the poor business owner into paying you to get the site back and save their reputation.

Anyway, for whatever reason, I didn't have that domain on auto renew, and was a week or so before I got round to renewing it (I check emails about once a fortnight, if that), I simply assumed that nobody would want my name, it's pretty unique, I've searched for other people with my name and have come up with one other person on the planet, and he spells it differently.

To cut a long story short, I discovered that some random dude in China had registered my domain through a Chinese registrar. I went to buy it back and the s.o.b. is trying to charge $200 for it, which I assume will be an annual fee.

I remembered @Walter Hay's advice about allowing a Chinese person to save face, so wrote a very polite letter in which I expressed my regret at not being able to afford to buy my own name back from him, hoping that he'd come back with a reasonable offer. He ignored my little missive, so I contacted the registrar directly and stated my case.

The registrar told me that he could not get hold of the guy either, and said that there was nothing he/she could do about it and gave me the email of some regulatory body whose name I can't remember. I wrote to them and they wrote back saying there was nothing they could do.

Anyway, Even though this is entirely my fault I feel pretty violated and sad about this one, I didn't think anyone would want to squat a complete nobody, with no actual website. So I'm just wondering if there's anyone else out there in TFF land who has had a similar experience and managed to resolve it successfully?
 
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RazorCut

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Sorry @Roli, @Sebastya is right. You’ll have to suck it up and pay. However it will be a one off though as once it’s transferred back to you he/she can’t charge you an annual fee.

Just be careful how you pay. You could pay the fee and instead of getting the domain back you get another demand for more.
 

TonyStark

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Read Never Split the difference, it might give you some good negotiation tactics on how to best handle this so you get what is yours.

Just remember, you have what he wants, so make sure this transaction is done via escrow or something like that so you’ll both get paid.

$200 isn’t a lot, but open up a conversation with him to see if he’s actually serious about selling.

Do the trade your way not his way so you’re not scammed.
 

Roli

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Read Never Split the difference, it might give you some good negotiation tactics on how to best handle this so you get what is yours.

Just remember, you have what he wants, so make sure this transaction is done via escrow or something like that so you’ll both get paid.

$200 isn’t a lot, but open up a conversation with him to see if he’s actually serious about selling.

Do the trade your way not his way so you’re not scammed.

Thank you for your reply.

I actually just finished reading Never Split The Difference when this happened. In my OP I said I sent an email, however I actually sent several emails, with subject lines and content that I thought might trigger a response.

However the person is simply not answering, I'm not even sure the emails get through. I suppose I could just keep on trying, however he may not even speak English... Could try a Mandarin translator I suppose.
 

broswoodwork

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some good negotiation tactics
liam-taken.jpg
"A particular set of skills..."

@Roli In all seriousness though, sorry this is happening to you. :(

I hit snooze on tons of stuff, and it ends up biting me in the a$$. Thank you for sharing this, so we can all keep a more watchful eye on all of the smaller details.

I hope you get it back asap.
 
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GoodluckChuck

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Time to pay $200 or get a new email.

Maybe you can call a news outlet and see if they want to run a story on this. Sounds interesting. You can use this publicity to pump your brand or a new website or whatever. Then send the Chinese dude an email thanking him for giving you leverage to blow up. Ask him not to take the site down so you can keep rolling with it. Maybe they give it back. :)
 

A_Random_Guy

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On a side note, if you put up the act of not being able to afford 200$ and keep ignoring his requests to pay that amount, will he be patient enough to keep running the website for long?
Or will he just give up after some time and find another target?
As much as I know, Indian and Chinese companies with all of their scams are extremely impatient and want immediate results. I don't think he will keep it up for long. What do you think about it?
 

Roli

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You should've gotten multiple emails about your domain expiring or being in the grace period before it going back on the market.

I did, but I don't think I'd checked my email in about a month or maybe even more.

However it will be a one off though as once it’s transferred back to you he/she can’t charge you an annual fee.

Doh! Of course, thank you.

"A particular set of skills..."

Ha, I wish I could get all Liam Neeson on his a$$!

Maybe you can call a news outlet and see if they want to run a story on this. Sounds interesting. You can use this publicity to pump your brand or a new website or whatever.

That would probably be a good idea if it was actually blocking my website, but it's not, I'm just using the domain so that I can receive emails using that address.

On a side note, if you put up the act of not being able to afford 200$ and keep ignoring his requests to pay that amount, will he be patient enough to keep running the website for long?
Or will he just give up after some time and find another target?
As much as I know, Indian and Chinese companies with all of their scams are extremely impatient and want immediate results. I don't think he will keep it up for long. What do you think about it?

It's not an act, I can't afford that at the moment, though even if I could, I doubt if I'd pay it, I don't respond to bullying favourably.

That's the advice the registrar gave me, just wait until May when it runs out and its unlikely he'll renew.

Looks like that's my only choice, I was hoping to get it back sooner, oh well, (painful) lesson learned.
 
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DevDB

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I'm not sure the possibilities, but it seems like you might be able to get ICANN involved. It may be a long shot. If you still have access to the email address, you could verify that the registrar followed requirements for notification.

Without knowing the domain, it's hard to look into it too much. Feel free to send me a message if you would like me to see what I can find out.

Most likely, it would seem like you would have to work with him, which is a scary prospect.
 

loop101

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If I was Nike, or Kim Kardashian, I guess I'd get my attack dog lawyers to sort this one out for me, however I'm not.

I have basically been namesquatted, I have a domain name which is identical to my name. It hasn't been connected to an actual website in quite some time, however I still used it for my email, so that I could basically have a me@me.com email addy.

Apparently in China, a popular black hat tactic with company websites, is to set notifications on various small biz website names for if they become available. Then, once they do, you buy the name and stick a load of porn up under that url. Then blackmail the poor business owner into paying you to get the site back and save their reputation.

Anyway, for whatever reason, I didn't have that domain on auto renew, and was a week or so before I got round to renewing it (I check emails about once a fortnight, if that), I simply assumed that nobody would want my name, it's pretty unique, I've searched for other people with my name and have come up with one other person on the planet, and he spells it differently.

To cut a long story short, I discovered that some random dude in China had registered my domain through a Chinese registrar. I went to buy it back and the s.o.b. is trying to charge $200 for it, which I assume will be an annual fee.

I remembered @Walter Hay's advice about allowing a Chinese person to save face, so wrote a very polite letter in which I expressed my regret at not being able to afford to buy my own name back from him, hoping that he'd come back with a reasonable offer. He ignored my little missive, so I contacted the registrar directly and stated my case.

The registrar told me that he could not get hold of the guy either, and said that there was nothing he/she could do about it and gave me the email of some regulatory body whose name I can't remember. I wrote to them and they wrote back saying there was nothing they could do.

Anyway, Even though this is entirely my fault I feel pretty violated and sad about this one, I didn't think anyone would want to squat a complete nobody, with no actual website. So I'm just wondering if there's anyone else out there in TFF land who has had a similar experience and managed to resolve it successfully?

I would consider it lost, and get a new "official" email address at a professional email provider like FastMail or Proton. I would never send one penny to someone extorting me.

If I was evil, I would use the email address to harass some Chinese generals and triad leaders, and threaten to expose their crimes and corruption. It wouldn't take long for the email address to become available again.
 
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Ernman

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Time to pay $200 or get a new email.

Maybe you can call a news outlet and see if they want to run a story on this. Sounds interesting. You can use this publicity to pump your brand or a new website or whatever. Then send the Chinese dude an email thanking him for giving you leverage to blow up. Ask him not to take the site down so you can keep rolling with it. Maybe they give it back. :)
Now that's thinking out of the box. Awesome idea. Even if you don't get your domain back, you've told the world there's a scum bag out there doing this crap.
 

Black_Dragon43

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If I was Nike, or Kim Kardashian, I guess I'd get my attack dog lawyers to sort this one out for me, however I'm not.

I have basically been namesquatted, I have a domain name which is identical to my name. It hasn't been connected to an actual website in quite some time, however I still used it for my email, so that I could basically have a me@me.com email addy.

Apparently in China, a popular black hat tactic with company websites, is to set notifications on various small biz website names for if they become available. Then, once they do, you buy the name and stick a load of porn up under that url. Then blackmail the poor business owner into paying you to get the site back and save their reputation.

Anyway, for whatever reason, I didn't have that domain on auto renew, and was a week or so before I got round to renewing it (I check emails about once a fortnight, if that), I simply assumed that nobody would want my name, it's pretty unique, I've searched for other people with my name and have come up with one other person on the planet, and he spells it differently.

To cut a long story short, I discovered that some random dude in China had registered my domain through a Chinese registrar. I went to buy it back and the s.o.b. is trying to charge $200 for it, which I assume will be an annual fee.

I remembered @Walter Hay's advice about allowing a Chinese person to save face, so wrote a very polite letter in which I expressed my regret at not being able to afford to buy my own name back from him, hoping that he'd come back with a reasonable offer. He ignored my little missive, so I contacted the registrar directly and stated my case.

The registrar told me that he could not get hold of the guy either, and said that there was nothing he/she could do about it and gave me the email of some regulatory body whose name I can't remember. I wrote to them and they wrote back saying there was nothing they could do.

Anyway, Even though this is entirely my fault I feel pretty violated and sad about this one, I didn't think anyone would want to squat a complete nobody, with no actual website. So I'm just wondering if there's anyone else out there in TFF land who has had a similar experience and managed to resolve it successfully?
Do you really need the email at the me@me.com domain?
 

Choate

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I did, but I don't think I'd checked my email in about a month or maybe even more.

What are you worried about then? You had no actual website for the domain and an email that you check less than once a month. Get yourself a free one through Gmail or any of the other options here that you don't have to worry about paying for, since it sounds like it's for casual use and the sake of having one.
 
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Walter Hay

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I would register a new domain name that is a small variation on the one you have been using. Then simply ignore the scum bag, and if your current domain name is not renewed, acquire it again.

Walter
 

Roli

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I'm not sure the possibilities, but it seems like you might be able to get ICANN involved

That was the organisation I couldn't remember, they basically said they don't deal with this type of thing. They gave me some more documentation which I need to read properly, but none of it seemed promising after a relatively quick scan.

1. Register me-biz.com or me-official.com
2. Proactively upload porn
3. Immunity achieved

Lolz. That's one way to do it.

If I was evil, I would use the email address to harass some Chinese generals and triad leaders, and threaten to expose their crimes and corruption. It wouldn't take long for the email address to become available again.

Hmm, take on China in a cyber attack. Doesn't sound like I'd have any chance of winning that one. Lol :)

Do you really need the email at the me@me.com domain?

Yes, simply because that email address is tied to many accounts, therefore I'm stuck in a catch 22 whereby in order to unlink that particular address and use a new one, I need access to it for when they send the confirmation.

This is just one of several reasons why I want that email back.

What are you worried about then? You had no actual website for the domain and an email that you check less than once a month. Get yourself a free one through Gmail or any of the other options here that you don't have to worry about paying for, since it sounds like it's for casual use and the sake of having one.

That email address is tied to many accounts, therefore I'm stuck in a catch 22 whereby in order to unlink that particular address and use a new one, I need access to it for when they send the confirmation.

This is just one of several reasons why I want that email back.
 
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Black_Dragon43

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Yes, simply because that email address is tied to many accounts, therefore I'm stuck in a catch 22 whereby in order to unlink that particular address and use a new one, I need access to it for when they send the confirmation.

This is just one of several reasons why I want that email back.
This is a sensitive situation. You should ask him "How do I know that you'll give me back access to the account if I pay you?"

This is an important question - he needs to figure out a way for you to be sure that you'll get your account back if he wants the money. Let him figure it out first.

Then you will discuss the money. You will say that unfortunately you cannot pay more than $30 to get it back, since for you it just has sentimental value and that's it. It's not useful at all. He will probably not agree. So then you will ask "Why isn't $30 enough?". Just keep pursuing him with questions. The more questions you ask, the more he will be encouraged to lower his price to close the deal. Give him the illusion of control by asking him and putting him in charge.
 

loop101

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Hmm, take on China in a cyber attack. Doesn't sound like I'd have any chance of winning that one. Lol :)

No, you just tell them your domain was hijacked, and some guy in China is threatening them. They would then handle it internally.
 

GIlman

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If it was me I would try an escrow transaction and get it back. Sorry but $200 is a drop in the bucket compared to the value of consistency to your customers. Assuming this business has considerable value.

I will not ever take a principled position that forces me to take cut off my nose to spite my face If the value of getting it back far exceeds the cost, just do it and learn a lesson. How much is your time worth? Don’t waste time value just because you don’t like the situation.

As a good backup and leverage point, I would do as @Walter Hay said and register and start using it in the meantime.

One last suggestion. I register lots of domains, some I develop into products or businesses, others I don’t. When I have a domain that actually is starting to become valuable, just suck it up and buy 10 years of renewal. Then reup every couple years. All my important domains are locked down for 8-10 years at all times. For $100 a domain it’s the cheapest insurance you can get.
 
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PedroG

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is trying to charge $200 for it, which I assume will be an annual fee.

It won't be an annual fee. It's a one-time fee to have the domain transferred to you. After that, you'll pay the registrar directly the $10 every year or whatever it is.

EDIT: I see someone already beat me to it.
 

tjwor5

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Your only option is to play on his terms or wait it out. You can try to negotiate with him, or you can pay his fee.

He didn't steal this domain, or do anything illegal to obtain it. He is the rightful owner of the domain because you let it expire to the free market. Sure there are some rules about squatting, but you're not going to get the domain back based on those.

So, either find an agreeable amount to buy it back from him, or wait for renewal with hopes that he gives up on the domain and you can snag it back.
 

Bud Fox

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I'm surprised to see all the people here chime in with the "welp, time to move on" advice...SMH

There are a ton of laws now governing things just like this and, although progressive, are providing a clearer and clearer avenue to handle things like this.

You said your name was unique; how unique? If it were me, I definitely would not just walk away, especially if you are your brand, or expect it to be in the future. As for registering a new domain, and a hyphenated one as suggested by one of the members here, that's sort of bush league. Of course if you get something that is maybe your full name with middle initial included, uninterrupted, no hyphens, then maybe that would work..But still, why TF would you want your name [dot] com to populate porn?

First of all, a 'quick scan' of the ICANN stuff, in my opinion, is a half-assed attempt at solving the problem. If you REALLY care about the domain name (which maybe you don't care THAT much) then spend a few hours, or at least one, researching the various laws internationally and in Asia and China that might help. That's basically step one...And go through and file all of the various complaints with as many self-regulatory bodies as you can, ICANN, etc...Yes this will take time, but it's also likely free, and if you actually care, why wouldn't you do this opposed to a 'quick review' of what may be your legal remedy here...

Although...You say that you 'assume' that the $200 is a yearly fee? Why not actually find out? And don't just ask "Is it yearly or one time fee," because what do you expect the answer to be to that question??? Tell the guy that you have a friend who is willing to lend you the money, but that you're going to have to pay it back with high interest, and so you need to go over exactly how the transfer works so you don't get scammed. Instead of assuming it's a yearly fee, assume it's not!! Go over the steps with the guy, "Okay I put the money in escrow, then you send me the activation codes or domain transfer info, then escrow will release the money to you" or whatever...

If what you're assuming isn't true (which it's usually not) then your problem might just cost $200 fix...pretty cheap IMHO, but again, make sure these are the terms. If your name is so unique, what else does he plan on doing with it anyways?

End rant. Sorry to see so many members give you the advice to 'give up' LOL wtf?

Oh ya, btw, one Google search on the topic showed me this site, and it looks like they even do a free analysis of your namesquatting issue...Is this worth your time? A FREE consultation by an attorney who specializes in this stuff...think about it. What is the best way to address Cybersquatting in China? | Domain Name Management | Online Brand Protection
 
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BoldBridge

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There are folks with a particular set of skills here who can help ;) However, if the party that purchase the domain is outside the US or Europe, there won't be much those folks can do for you. Best bet is to take your lumps, fork over the $$ and take this forward as a lesson learned (being sure to set your domain to auto renew next time).
 

rollerskates

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Apparently in China, a popular black hat tactic with company websites, is to set notifications on various small biz website names for if they become available. Then, once they do, you buy the name and stick a load of porn up under that url. Then blackmail the poor business owner into paying you to get the site back and save their reputation.

This is why I pay for a domain renewal for a domain I haven't needed in 6 years. It's still attached to a previous business name.
 
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Roli

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I'm surprised to see all the people here chime in with the "welp, time to move on" advice...SMH

There are a ton of laws now governing things just like this and, although progressive, are providing a clearer and clearer avenue to handle things like this.

You said your name was unique; how unique? If it were me, I definitely would not just walk away, especially if you are your brand, or expect it to be in the future. As for registering a new domain, and a hyphenated one as suggested by one of the members here, that's sort of bush league. Of course if you get something that is maybe your full name with middle initial included, uninterrupted, no hyphens, then maybe that would work..But still, why TF would you want your name [dot] com to populate porn?

First of all, a 'quick scan' of the ICANN stuff, in my opinion, is a half-assed attempt at solving the problem. If you REALLY care about the domain name (which maybe you don't care THAT much) then spend a few hours, or at least one, researching the various laws internationally and in Asia and China that might help. That's basically step one...And go through and file all of the various complaints with as many self-regulatory bodies as you can, ICANN, etc...Yes this will take time, but it's also likely free, and if you actually care, why wouldn't you do this opposed to a 'quick review' of what may be your legal remedy here...

Although...You say that you 'assume' that the $200 is a yearly fee? Why not actually find out? And don't just ask "Is it yearly or one time fee," because what do you expect the answer to be to that question??? Tell the guy that you have a friend who is willing to lend you the money, but that you're going to have to pay it back with high interest, and so you need to go over exactly how the transfer works so you don't get scammed. Instead of assuming it's a yearly fee, assume it's not!! Go over the steps with the guy, "Okay I put the money in escrow, then you send me the activation codes or domain transfer info, then escrow will release the money to you" or whatever...

If what you're assuming isn't true (which it's usually not) then your problem might just cost $200 fix...pretty cheap IMHO, but again, make sure these are the terms. If your name is so unique, what else does he plan on doing with it anyways?

End rant. Sorry to see so many members give you the advice to 'give up' LOL wtf?

Oh ya, btw, one Google search on the topic showed me this site, and it looks like they even do a free analysis of your namesquatting issue...Is this worth your time? A FREE consultation by an attorney who specializes in this stuff...think about it. What is the best way to address Cybersquatting in China? | Domain Name Management | Online Brand Protection

Thanks, I didn't see this reply at the time. I'll definitely check out the link, even if their not attorneys, they have more expertise than I do.

You're right, it's time to bring the other half in and get full assed about this issue :)
 

50x

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Sorry to hear about the problem, I haven't experienced that, but I have some experience on domains. There are some preventive actions to take... but that'd be hindsight now. These guys that snatch expired domains don't do ethically right, but they still may stay in the frame of legality and comply to ICANN rules, especially if your domain expired due to a missed reneweal.

ICANN is the authority of the domains worldwide. But they have their rules, for example:

I'm sorry, but you might as well eat the humble pie, and get a new domain name. Fortunately there are number of top level domain suffixes available, like .email .net .biz .io .info .me .tel .vip .inc .ltd ... so you could try to get "me@me.email" for example. Also, in order to mark your claim in Internet well, you may want to buy the similar domains with different suffixes, like "me.net", "me.biz", "me.me" etc.

The choice to give in extorsion is yours, as it means some extra trouble. You may want to print a refreshed set of business cards as well and contact your contacts.

The legal path, however exists, but I doubt that at the moment there are any agreements with Chinese: Cybersquatting - Wikipedia
 
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