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NOTABLE! Had to call it quits today.

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Itizn

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Sep 25, 2019
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Well, one of those threads no one wants to make.

Basically the dream came to a sudden halt today, flew too close to the sun and got burned.

My last year plus failed to produced enough tangible success and it's time to go back to the slowlane for the time being.

General details are that I spent the last year intending to build a business within the oil and gas niche and addressed various topics but could never cross the hump of getting clients.

Savings gone, accrued debt, probably have to go live back at home on a sofa again.
I violated several basic principles we talk about a lot on here and in the books in terms of how not to approach things (not bailing early enough, letting all your cash dwindle etc.) but I do feel this was a learning experience.

If this sounds vague or all over the place, I'm in a melancholic state of mind so that's to be expected. However I'm also sort of optimistic at the same time.

P.S. I haven't quit for good of course, just for the time being.

Cheers to all you guys
 

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Damien Dev

Contributor
Mar 19, 2018
28
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Melbourne, Australia
Well, one of those threads no one wants to make.

Basically the dream came to a sudden halt today, flew too close to the sun and got burned.

My last year plus failed to produced enough tangible success and it's time to go back to the slowlane for the time being.

General details are that I spent the last year intending to build a business within the oil and gas niche and addressed various topics but could never cross the hump of getting clients.

Savings gone, accrued debt, probably have to go live back at home on a sofa again.
I violated several basic principles we talk about a lot on here and in the books in terms of how not to approach things (not bailing early enough, letting all your cash dwindle etc.) but I do feel this was a learning experience.

If this sounds vague or all over the place, I'm in a melancholic state of mind so that's to be expected. However I'm also sort of optimistic at the same time.

P.S. I haven't quit for good of course, just for the time being.

Cheers to all you guys

Well, you took a swing, missed, now you're down but not out. Life always goes on and it's never as bad as it seems. If you can handle the painful emotions associated with rejection and failure you will be better placed to succeed long term anyway.

Fine to throw a small pity party, binge, drink, smoke or whatever but set a limit on that and get going again. :)
 

robins

New Contributor
Jan 10, 2021
7
8
11
Wish to be where you are right now, and then some. Keep your head up. You have invaluable experience now.

I haven't written anything revolutionary, but in your position I would like someone to remind me of the importance of real-world practical experience, not just over a piece of paper.
 

Dora Wi

New Contributor
Aug 19, 2020
16
14
14
Hungary
It's good to see you haven't given up for good. The best you can do now is probably to grieve what happened and keep in mind the things that you know you could have done better or differently, for when you try again next time.
 

Chris_Varick

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Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Feb 8, 2021
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North Germany
Maybe you should also a bit angry with yourself instead of being melancholic. Go back to the start of your process and rund thru each step and write down - very important to write it down- where did you drift away from your original plan? what went really good? was there an external factor that you did not see coming(like covid 19)? etc . The advantage you have over many is that you have gone through the process already and this is a huge success already although you haven't made it this time. I am sure the topic comes and starts nagging in you and you will try again!
 

alexkuzmov

Silver Contributor
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Sep 20, 2019
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Well, one of those threads no one wants to make.

Basically the dream came to a sudden halt today, flew too close to the sun and got burned.

My last year plus failed to produced enough tangible success and it's time to go back to the slowlane for the time being.

General details are that I spent the last year intending to build a business within the oil and gas niche and addressed various topics but could never cross the hump of getting clients.

Savings gone, accrued debt, probably have to go live back at home on a sofa again.
I violated several basic principles we talk about a lot on here and in the books in terms of how not to approach things (not bailing early enough, letting all your cash dwindle etc.) but I do feel this was a learning experience.

If this sounds vague or all over the place, I'm in a melancholic state of mind so that's to be expected. However I'm also sort of optimistic at the same time.

P.S. I haven't quit for good of course, just for the time being.

Cheers to all you guys
Please go into details.
What was the business, how did you plan on executing, what went wrong, what troubles did you encounter, how much did you spend and so on.
Failing is a learning experience so please let us learn from yours.
 

kleine2

Bronze Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Sep 15, 2013
145
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Well, one of those threads no one wants to make.

Basically the dream came to a sudden halt today, flew too close to the sun and got burned.

My last year plus failed to produced enough tangible success and it's time to go back to the slowlane for the time being.

General details are that I spent the last year intending to build a business within the oil and gas niche and addressed various topics but could never cross the hump of getting clients.

Savings gone, accrued debt, probably have to go live back at home on a sofa again.
I violated several basic principles we talk about a lot on here and in the books in terms of how not to approach things (not bailing early enough, letting all your cash dwindle etc.) but I do feel this was a learning experience.

If this sounds vague or all over the place, I'm in a melancholic state of mind so that's to be expected. However I'm also sort of optimistic at the same time.

P.S. I haven't quit for good of course, just for the time being.

Cheers to all you guys
Good for you for your healthy attitude and mental toughness.
Failure is a given along the way hopefully you learnt some things and you move to your next opportunity when ready.
 

Ninjafaceplant

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I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Mar 2, 2020
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UK
Well, one of those threads no one wants to make.

Basically the dream came to a sudden halt today, flew too close to the sun and got burned.

My last year plus failed to produced enough tangible success and it's time to go back to the slowlane for the time being.

General details are that I spent the last year intending to build a business within the oil and gas niche and addressed various topics but could never cross the hump of getting clients.

Savings gone, accrued debt, probably have to go live back at home on a sofa again.
I violated several basic principles we talk about a lot on here and in the books in terms of how not to approach things (not bailing early enough, letting all your cash dwindle etc.) but I do feel this was a learning experience.

If this sounds vague or all over the place, I'm in a melancholic state of mind so that's to be expected. However I'm also sort of optimistic at the same time.

P.S. I haven't quit for good of course, just for the time being.

Cheers to all you guys

Maybe you should also a bit angry with yourself instead of being melancholic. Go back to the start of your process and rund thru each step and write down - very important to write it down- where did you drift away from your original plan? what went really good? was there an external factor that you did not see coming(like covid 19)? etc . The advantage you have over many is that you have gone through the process already and this is a huge success already although you haven't made it this time. I am sure the topic comes and starts nagging in you and you will try again!

Please go into details.
What was the business, how did you plan on executing, what went wrong, what troubles did you encounter, how much did you spend and so on.
Failing is a learning experience so please let us learn from yours.
I'm with Chris and Alex on this one.
Obviously if you feel comfortable, go back through the missteps one by one, and take us on the journey also.
 

jpanarra

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Hate to sound cliche but a failure is a failure only when you give up.

Its ok to chalk up a loss, learn from it and apply it to the next thing .

Share as much as you can because the more you give, the more you can get.
 

Formless

Gold Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
Oct 27, 2013
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Right now, you will be feeling deflated and defeated.

Give yourself some time to go through that sadness. But make sure to schedule some post-mortem time within the next 2 weeks. Put it in your calendar.

In 2 weeks, your emotions won't be so intense, and you should be more willing to process all of your painful, but (extremely) valuable lessons. Do it by yourself, or on the forum - it doesn't matter.

Just make sure to learn your lessons and get back to it - it ain't over until your body is bug food!
 

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Kevin88660

Gold Contributor
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Feb 8, 2019
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Well, one of those threads no one wants to make.

Basically the dream came to a sudden halt today, flew too close to the sun and got burned.

My last year plus failed to produced enough tangible success and it's time to go back to the slowlane for the time being.

General details are that I spent the last year intending to build a business within the oil and gas niche and addressed various topics but could never cross the hump of getting clients.

Savings gone, accrued debt, probably have to go live back at home on a sofa again.
I violated several basic principles we talk about a lot on here and in the books in terms of how not to approach things (not bailing early enough, letting all your cash dwindle etc.) but I do feel this was a learning experience.

If this sounds vague or all over the place, I'm in a melancholic state of mind so that's to be expected. However I'm also sort of optimistic at the same time.

P.S. I haven't quit for good of course, just for the time being.

Cheers to all you guys
Live to fight another day.

You only need to succeed once.

Take care!
 

Andy Black

Making a nuisance of himself on Twitter
Staff member
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May 20, 2014
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Well, one of those threads no one wants to make.

Basically the dream came to a sudden halt today, flew too close to the sun and got burned.

My last year plus failed to produced enough tangible success and it's time to go back to the slowlane for the time being.

General details are that I spent the last year intending to build a business within the oil and gas niche and addressed various topics but could never cross the hump of getting clients.

Savings gone, accrued debt, probably have to go live back at home on a sofa again.
I violated several basic principles we talk about a lot on here and in the books in terms of how not to approach things (not bailing early enough, letting all your cash dwindle etc.) but I do feel this was a learning experience.

If this sounds vague or all over the place, I'm in a melancholic state of mind so that's to be expected. However I'm also sort of optimistic at the same time.

P.S. I haven't quit for good of course, just for the time being.

Cheers to all you guys
Good for you posting this.

Lots of people leave jobs, work for themselves a little while, then go back to jobs to regroup. Nothing wrong with that.

It would be nice if more people spoke about it to help others who maybe feel they're not cut out for business when actually they're just on the journey, same as everyone else.
 

Andy Black

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Good for you posting this.

Lots of people leave jobs, work for themselves a little while, then go back to jobs to regroup. Nothing wrong with that. It would be nice if more people spoke about it to help others who maybe feel they're not cut out for business when actually they're just on the journey, same as everyone else.
Just to add my story:

I was a self-employed IT contractor for about 10 years before I fell into Google Ads in 2009. I quickly decided to switch from IT to Google Ads and took on a few small clients.

I figured it would take too long to get revenue up enough to get a mortgage so took on a couple of jobs where I could reskill and get the salary history the banks needed. In those 2.5 years I also had a few clients on the side.

After 2.5 years I went back to being fully self-employed. In those two jobs I got experience I'd have never had otherwise.
 

The-J

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How is that quitting? Quitting is saying "this entrepreneur stuff isn't for me, I'm going to go back to my job and investing into the stock market for my retirement plan".

Several people on this forum had to take jobs while they were building their business. That's completely normal. Many people here kept their jobs until their business far outstripped their job income. Are they Slowlane? Certainly not.

You fail one business and go back to work, that's not going back to the Slowlane, that's going back to a job. Big difference.

If what I'm doing fails, you bet I'm going to look for a job. I don't mind: it's temporary. Whatever is needed to get my plan working.
 

LukeLukeLuke

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@Itizn as Alex said it will be very interesting to know more details. I am coming from O&G background myself (10 yrs until mid 2020). Last year was probably the worst year for O&G industry with a lot of companies going bust, lot of layoffs and everyone cutting their budgets for everything. Perhaps the choice of industry (plus COVID) was the main problem?
 

Itizn

Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Sep 25, 2019
65
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I began by planning on helping tooling manufacturers in the oil and gas space with their supply chain. For those unfamiliar with o&g(as is the case with virtually every industry) there are a few titans, several mid sized guys and a plethora of tiny ones. This means anyway that the mid sized or small guys can keep up is valuable. There's also a high premium placed on safety and efficiency within the tools used out in the oilfield, and I was intending on addressing that need with my collective background. One more note about the industry is that it is notoriously old fashioned and stuck in their ways, and of course the pandemic didn't make things any easier.

My initial objective (and where maybe the first half or so of my timeline was spent) was to intertwine 3D printing, big data, and manufacturing within o&g by connecting the dots among the various companies I figured could help each other out. Essentially act as a consultant/broker. This proved to be a bit too complex for someone in my position and with a lack of connections or funding.

However along the way, and after talking to enough people, it occured to me how there were several "non-titan" companies who were still doing quite well despite the low demand for oil. I tried picking their brain to see what they were doing differently and perhaps pivot my approach, but I didn't quite get a concise answer to that.

However, those same conversations ultimately placed me in the position of locating buyers and sellers of heavy equipment and products used in the oilfield. People I spoke with specifically mentioned they were in the market for abc or that they wanted to get rid of xyz. Similarly, my plan at this point was to get a percentage of the deals from any transaction I brokered. Again I tried connecting the dots to see who would be able to benefit from said equipment, but after several months of no tangible results, i.e. clients, I ended my pursuit of doing this full time. I actually considered investing in a google ad campaign after talking with @Andy Black . That's likely something to implement next go round.

Fwiw, Technically I'm still in the middle of attempting to sell a $50,000 piece of equipment. I'll be making an execution thread on that.

To conclude this thread I'll list my pros and cons from the last year and a parting piece of insight.

Pros:
- I don't suffer from a lack of confidence or imposter syndrome anymore, not that I did all that much early on.
- was able to acquire quality pieces of information, technical drawings, product quotes, and of course insight. Basically convincing people I wasn't a time waster or not serious.
- got very comfortable over the phone, "promoting" myself to get out of obscurity, and not being hesitant about my intentions during my outreach.
- built up a fair amount of contacts within the industry all across the country and even in Canada.
- learned a lot about the industry as I was pretty much a novice when I began my journey.
- despite the geopolitics heavily attached alongside o&g, and with talks of the planet transitioning away, from what I've gathered, it's still here to stay. This makes me comfortable in keeping within the niche.

Cons
- got zero clients or pay during my entire time
- a lot of the time, especially early on, I had a hard time verbalizing my intentions and desires during conversations.
- feel like I wasted a lot of people's (the contacts I've built) time, as I was ultimately unable to close any piece of business.
- failing to reach a goal is never any fun
- smalll part of me feels like my current plan that's been left in limbo isn't worth continuing and I should bow out of trying to get that piece of equipment sold.

Parting piece of insight for this thread: (probably more useful for people who are still starting out/ have yet to take the first steps)

Once you have your niche and industry in mind, talk to as many people within that niche as you can. Ask good questions, and share any insight you yourself might have heard along the way. That Gordon Gekko line applies here "the most valuable commodity I know of is information".
People like to help out and share what they can, and if you can reciprocate in any manner, you have a relationship built. That becomes key down the road.
Also, when people aren't giving you the time of the day, find a way to make more noise.

See you all in my upcoming thread.
 

WJK

Platinum Contributor
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Oct 9, 2017
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I began by planning on helping tooling manufacturers in the oil and gas space with their supply chain. For those unfamiliar with o&g(as is the case with virtually every industry) there are a few titans, several mid sized guys and a plethora of tiny ones. This means anyway that the mid sized or small guys can keep up is valuable. There's also a high premium placed on safety and efficiency within the tools used out in the oilfield, and I was intending on addressing that need with my collective background. One more note about the industry is that it is notoriously old fashioned and stuck in their ways, and of course the pandemic didn't make things any easier.

My initial objective (and where maybe the first half or so of my timeline was spent) was to intertwine 3D printing, big data, and manufacturing within o&g by connecting the dots among the various companies I figured could help each other out. Essentially act as a consultant/broker. This proved to be a bit too complex for someone in my position and with a lack of connections or funding.

However along the way, and after talking to enough people, it occured to me how there were several "non-titan" companies who were still doing quite well despite the low demand for oil. I tried picking their brain to see what they were doing differently and perhaps pivot my approach, but I didn't quite get a concise answer to that.

However, those same conversations ultimately placed me in the position of locating buyers and sellers of heavy equipment and products used in the oilfield. People I spoke with specifically mentioned they were in the market for abc or that they wanted to get rid of xyz. Similarly, my plan at this point was to get a percentage of the deals from any transaction I brokered. Again I tried connecting the dots to see who would be able to benefit from said equipment, but after several months of no tangible results, i.e. clients, I ended my pursuit of doing this full time. I actually considered investing in a google ad campaign after talking with @Andy Black . That's likely something to implement next go round.

Fwiw, Technically I'm still in the middle of attempting to sell a $50,000 piece of equipment. I'll be making an execution thread on that.

To conclude this thread I'll list my pros and cons from the last year and a parting piece of insight.

Pros:
- I don't suffer from a lack of confidence or imposter syndrome anymore, not that I did all that much early on.
- was able to acquire quality pieces of information, technical drawings, product quotes, and of course insight. Basically convincing people I wasn't a time waster or not serious.
- got very comfortable over the phone, "promoting" myself to get out of obscurity, and not being hesitant about my intentions during my outreach.
- built up a fair amount of contacts within the industry all across the country and even in Canada.
- learned a lot about the industry as I was pretty much a novice when I began my journey.
- despite the geopolitics heavily attached alongside o&g, and with talks of the planet transitioning away, from what I've gathered, it's still here to stay. This makes me comfortable in keeping within the niche.

Cons
- got zero clients or pay during my entire time
- a lot of the time, especially early on, I had a hard time verbalizing my intentions and desires during conversations.
- feel like I wasted a lot of people's (the contacts I've built) time, as I was ultimately unable to close any piece of business.
- failing to reach a goal is never any fun
- smalll part of me feels like my current plan that's been left in limbo isn't worth continuing and I should bow out of trying to get that piece of equipment sold.

Parting piece of insight for this thread: (probably more useful for people who are still starting out/ have yet to take the first steps)

Once you have your niche and industry in mind, talk to as many people within that niche as you can. Ask good questions, and share any insight you yourself might have heard along the way. That Gordon Gekko line applies here "the most valuable commodity I know of is information".
People like to help out and share what they can, and if you can reciprocate in any manner, you have a relationship built. That becomes key down the road.
Also, when people aren't giving you the time of the day, find a way to make more noise.

See you all in my upcoming thread.
Go to work as a salesman in the O&G or related businesses. Or any job you can get in that industry to buy some time and make some money. You've laid the groundwork. You have the contacts. You have acquired a body of knowledge. If you walk away now, you'll lose a lot of your work from this last year -- that is if you want to stay in that industry...
 

MJ DeMarco

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Not a failure, just a setback and a learning experience.
 

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Process

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Jul 19, 2017
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Solving Pain
Dont sweat it I’ve failed lots of ventures. Each taught me a lot and I know how to get things going on a shoestring.

get a sales or marketing job to gain more of these skills on someone else’s dime in the meantime.

You’ll learn to do things faster and be more direct.

Look back to Unscripted and see if it was execution mistakes or a missed principle like need or control.

All you need is a phone a landing page and a modest ads budget to test the marketability of an idea 90% of the time.
 

BizyDad

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I began by planning on helping tooling manufacturers in the oil and gas space with their supply chain. For those unfamiliar with o&g(as is the case with virtually every industry) there are a few titans, several mid sized guys and a plethora of tiny ones. This means anyway that the mid sized or small guys can keep up is valuable. There's also a high premium placed on safety and efficiency within the tools used out in the oilfield, and I was intending on addressing that need with my collective background. One more note about the industry is that it is notoriously old fashioned and stuck in their ways, and of course the pandemic didn't make things any easier.

My initial objective (and where maybe the first half or so of my timeline was spent) was to intertwine 3D printing, big data, and manufacturing within o&g by connecting the dots among the various companies I figured could help each other out. Essentially act as a consultant/broker. This proved to be a bit too complex for someone in my position and with a lack of connections or funding.

However along the way, and after talking to enough people, it occured to me how there were several "non-titan" companies who were still doing quite well despite the low demand for oil. I tried picking their brain to see what they were doing differently and perhaps pivot my approach, but I didn't quite get a concise answer to that.

However, those same conversations ultimately placed me in the position of locating buyers and sellers of heavy equipment and products used in the oilfield. People I spoke with specifically mentioned they were in the market for abc or that they wanted to get rid of xyz. Similarly, my plan at this point was to get a percentage of the deals from any transaction I brokered. Again I tried connecting the dots to see who would be able to benefit from said equipment, but after several months of no tangible results, i.e. clients, I ended my pursuit of doing this full time. I actually considered investing in a google ad campaign after talking with @Andy Black . That's likely something to implement next go round.

Fwiw, Technically I'm still in the middle of attempting to sell a $50,000 piece of equipment. I'll be making an execution thread on that.

To conclude this thread I'll list my pros and cons from the last year and a parting piece of insight.

Pros:
- I don't suffer from a lack of confidence or imposter syndrome anymore, not that I did all that much early on.
- was able to acquire quality pieces of information, technical drawings, product quotes, and of course insight. Basically convincing people I wasn't a time waster or not serious.
- got very comfortable over the phone, "promoting" myself to get out of obscurity, and not being hesitant about my intentions during my outreach.
- built up a fair amount of contacts within the industry all across the country and even in Canada.
- learned a lot about the industry as I was pretty much a novice when I began my journey.
- despite the geopolitics heavily attached alongside o&g, and with talks of the planet transitioning away, from what I've gathered, it's still here to stay. This makes me comfortable in keeping within the niche.

Cons
- got zero clients or pay during my entire time
- a lot of the time, especially early on, I had a hard time verbalizing my intentions and desires during conversations.
- feel like I wasted a lot of people's (the contacts I've built) time, as I was ultimately unable to close any piece of business.
- failing to reach a goal is never any fun
- smalll part of me feels like my current plan that's been left in limbo isn't worth continuing and I should bow out of trying to get that piece of equipment sold.

Parting piece of insight for this thread: (probably more useful for people who are still starting out/ have yet to take the first steps)

Once you have your niche and industry in mind, talk to as many people within that niche as you can. Ask good questions, and share any insight you yourself might have heard along the way. That Gordon Gekko line applies here "the most valuable commodity I know of is information".
People like to help out and share what they can, and if you can reciprocate in any manner, you have a relationship built. That becomes key down the road.
Also, when people aren't giving you the time of the day, find a way to make more noise.

See you all in my upcoming thread.

Gosh I really feel like you have the potential for a nice O&G Equipment Brokerage. Start off facilitating the deals, get a cut. Build a website that allow you to add items for sale with details about the equipment. People will need to register a free account for more info, and call for the asking price.

You can make calls to see who has equipment they are trying to unload. And calls to see who wants to acquire what kind of equipment. The website profile should keep track of that. Then when you get a new "listing" you can email interested parties.

Eventually you develop the rep for helping make this process easier.

I don't know how private O&G folks want to be with their sales, but be sensitive to that need and structure the transaction accordingly.

Eventually this can scale to where you help with the logistics/transport and make a vig off that too.

Just some thoughts...
 

KTudor

New Contributor
Feb 20, 2021
4
4
11
Oyster Bay, NY
Well, one of those threads no one wants to make.

Basically the dream came to a sudden halt today, flew too close to the sun and got burned.

My last year plus failed to produced enough tangible success and it's time to go back to the slowlane for the time being.

General details are that I spent the last year intending to build a business within the oil and gas niche and addressed various topics but could never cross the hump of getting clients.

Savings gone, accrued debt, probably have to go live back at home on a sofa again.
I violated several basic principles we talk about a lot on here and in the books in terms of how not to approach things (not bailing early enough, letting all your cash dwindle etc.) but I do feel this was a learning experience.

If this sounds vague or all over the place, I'm in a melancholic state of mind so that's to be expected. However I'm also sort of optimistic at the same time.

P.S. I haven't quit for good of course, just for the time being.

Cheers to all you guys
This is all just temporary. Bumps in the road are expected. It's time to learn from your mistakes. and ask yourself questions

- What could you have done better?
- Where do you feel you could improve?

In time things will change. All the best to you in the future.

~ Kristin
 

Seniorpreneur

New Contributor
Aug 4, 2007
61
19
24
Edmonton, AB Canada
Well, one of those threads no one wants to make.

Basically the dream came to a sudden halt today, flew too close to the sun and got burned.

My last year plus failed to produced enough tangible success and it's time to go back to the slowlane for the time being.

General details are that I spent the last year intending to build a business within the oil and gas niche and addressed various topics but could never cross the hump of getting clients.

Savings gone, accrued debt, probably have to go live back at home on a sofa again.
I violated several basic principles we talk about a lot on here and in the books in terms of how not to approach things (not bailing early enough, letting all your cash dwindle etc.) but I do feel this was a learning experience.

If this sounds vague or all over the place, I'm in a melancholic state of mind so that's to be expected. However I'm also sort of optimistic at the same time.

P.S. I haven't quit for good of course, just for the time being.

Cheers to all you guys
Don't go back home to slouch on your parents sofa again. You made the decision to go on your own so there are no excuses. Get over to the hospital wound care center and heal yourself. Then get some financial and/or digital education before you start over again. If entrepreneurship is not for you when your young then go out and get a job and find some sidelines to earn some rent and food money. Research more business opportunities as you go and select something only if it fits your lifestyle.
 

WJK

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Don't go back home to slouch on your parents sofa again. You made the decision to go on your own so there are no excuses. Get over to the hospital wound care center and heal yourself. Then get some financial and/or digital education before you start over again. If entrepreneurship is not for you when your young then go out and get a job and find some sidelines to earn some rent and food money. Research more business opportunities as you go and select something only if it fits your lifestyle.
Amen to that! You'd be amazed what you can do when you must!

I moved myself and my childhood sweetheart husband to Los Angeles when I was 19 years old. We had enough money to get an apartment for one month, a tank of gas for my husband to go find a job, a one-month bus pass for me to go to college, and we only had $1 in cash left. We had almost no food left after our move. The night before we got our first paycheck, I made up the chocolate cake mix for dinner. The cupboards & fridge were bare. That cake was rather flat since we were out of eggs to put into it, but we had something to eat that night.
We both found jobs within the first couple of days. I started school, found a job, and we survived.
 

Seniorpreneur

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Amen to that! You'd be amazed what you can do when you must!

I moved myself and my childhood sweetheart husband to Los Angeles when I was 19 years old. We had enough money to get an apartment for one month, a tank of gas for my husband to go find a job, a one-month bus pass for me to go to college, and we only had $1 in cash left. We had almost no food left after our move. The night before we got our first paycheck, I made up the chocolate cake mix for dinner. The cupboards & fridge were bare. That cake was rather flat since we were out of eggs to put into it, but we had something to eat that night.
We both found jobs within the first couple of days. I started school, found a job, and we survived.
Good job WJK! A positive attitude will go a long way. Thanks for the comment. Good luck with your life journey!
 

WJK

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Good job WJK! A positive attitude will go a long way. Thanks for the comment. Good luck with your life journey!
Like you, I have had a long life. Lots of successes and lots of failures over the years. I went to Los Angeles and started college in 1973. Those early years of scraping-by really taught me how to work and work smart. People asked me at that time, why I worked so hard. I would blandly explain that I didn't want to go hungry again. They'd laugh and think it was a joke. It wasn't.

Also, I just wanted more -- more security -- more quiet moments -- more resources to help the people around me... It was never about stuff nor flashy possessions. It was all about personal comfort.
 

monfii

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Gosh I really feel like you have the potential for a nice O&G Equipment Brokerage. Start off facilitating the deals, get a cut. Build a website that allow you to add items for sale with details about the equipment. People will need to register a free account for more info, and call for the asking price.

You can make calls to see who has equipment they are trying to unload. And calls to see who wants to acquire what kind of equipment. The website profile should keep track of that. Then when you get a new "listing" you can email interested parties.

Eventually you develop the rep for helping make this process easier.

I don't know how private O&G folks want to be with their sales, but be sensitive to that need and structure the transaction accordingly.

Eventually this can scale to where you help with the logistics/transport and make a vig off that too.

Just some thoughts...

Most definitely something to seriously consider

Edit: I agree with the rest of the people that commented: you didn't fail, but went through a painful learning experience. Looking forward to reading your next thread, you have proven you could take action, talk to people, and learn. What else do you need, really?
 

Giftedlilly

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Jan 26, 2018
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If this sounds vague or all over the place, I'm in a melancholic state of mind so that's to be expected. However I'm also sort of optimistic at the same time.
Dear Optimism: "I earned a PhD in street cred that I can take to the bank when the right opportunity comes."

No situation is ever wasted. Keep your head up, and when a negative thought hits your head, counter it with a thought of gratitude and thankfulness.
 

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