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O/T: HEALTH Has anybody had this issue (sleep related)

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Itizn

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Every morning when I awake, I almost feel completely paralyzed for a period of time before I can physically get out of bed and start my day. This morning was one of the longer ones, maybe 60 minutes. I'm not actually asleep at this time, and I can still toss and turn and adjust my covers, but my body getting out of bed is out of the question. It feels like physical fatigue but I don't really suffer from anything AFAIK, as I'm a healthy person who doesn't partake in poor diet or drugs. I exercise as well.

If I have an alarm clock set, I can wake up, walk over, and shut it off, but will instantly climb back into bed, fall asleep and have the pattern continue.

This is very bizarre and I'm positive a psychological factor is to blame, as there are a couple of things in my life stressing me out (something many can relate to these days) but I'm still struggling to get out of this rut.

Any thoughts?
 

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LionMarketing

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Every morning when I awake, I almost feel completely paralyzed for a period of time before I can physically get out of bed and start my day. This morning was one of the longer ones, maybe 60 minutes. I'm not actually asleep at this time, and I can still toss and turn and adjust my covers, but my body getting out of bed is out of the question. It feels like physical fatigue but I don't really suffer from anything AFAIK, as I'm a healthy person who doesn't partake in poor diet or drugs. I exercise as well.

If I have an alarm clock set, I can wake up, walk over, and shut it off, but will instantly climb back into bed, fall asleep and have the pattern continue.

This is very bizarre and I'm positive a psychological factor is to blame, as there are a couple of things in my life stressing me out (something many can relate to these days) but I'm still struggling to get out of this rut.

Any thoughts?
Dude. Google sleep inertia. Pretty much everyone has that.

Caffeine helps. Drink some black coffee. Don't drink it all at once if you're sensitive to it because then it'll have a counter productive effect and tire you out. Drink a little at a time.

Good job with the nice health habits. Keep exercising. If you continually have problems with sleep and tried all the natural remedies with thorough effort, go ahead and try an over the counter sleep aid from CVS or Amazon or something.

You're all good man. You got this. Don't stress too much about these little problems.
 

sparechange

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Every morning when I awake, I almost feel completely paralyzed for a period of time before I can physically get out of bed and start my day. This morning was one of the longer ones, maybe 60 minutes. I'm not actually asleep at this time, and I can still toss and turn and adjust my covers, but my body getting out of bed is out of the question. It feels like physical fatigue but I don't really suffer from anything AFAIK, as I'm a healthy person who doesn't partake in poor diet or drugs. I exercise as well.

If I have an alarm clock set, I can wake up, walk over, and shut it off, but will instantly climb back into bed, fall asleep and have the pattern continue.

This is very bizarre and I'm positive a psychological factor is to blame, as there are a couple of things in my life stressing me out (something many can relate to these days) but I'm still struggling to get out of this rut.

Any thoughts?
You could be dehydrated? How many hours of sleep do you get per night?
 
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Itizn

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You could be dehydrated? How many hours of sleep do you get per night?
This is a question that kind of requires me to peel back another layer of what might be a greater problem than my post suggested.

I basically have a hard time sleeping right away no matter what my day is like, and this been the case for quite some time. Except for rare occasions when I'm really tired, I'll fall asleep anywhere from 1.5 hours to 4 hours after I go to bed on any given night. This has been going on for quite some time now with a reprieve on rare occasions.

All that said, I'll say regardless of how out of the loop my sleep schedule is, I get about 6-8 hours per night. Water is what I drink the most, probably 4 out of every 5 beverages. I don't drink coffee cause I can't stand it. Other beverages would be milk, diet soda, or carbonated water. Maybe a juice here and there.
 

sparechange

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This is a question that kind of requires me to peel back another layer of what might be a greater problem than my post suggested.

I basically have a hard time sleeping right away no matter what my day is like, and this been the case for quite some time. Except for rare occasions when I'm really tired, I'll fall asleep anywhere from 1.5 hours to 4 hours after I go to bed on any given night. This has been going on for quite some time now with a reprieve on rare occasions.

All that said, I'll say regardless of how out of the loop my sleep schedule is, I get about 6-8 hours per night. Water is what I drink the most, probably 4 out of every 5 beverages. I don't drink coffee cause I can't stand it. Other beverages would be milk, diet soda, or carbonated water. Maybe a juice here and there.
Maybe try cutting out diet soda? Some have caffeine in it I think and is overall bad for you anyways, do you eat before bed? That could be another cause, or using computers/phones before bed.
 

LionMarketing

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This is a question that kind of requires me to peel back another layer of what might be a greater problem than my post suggested.

I basically have a hard time sleeping right away no matter what my day is like, and this been the case for quite some time. Except for rare occasions when I'm really tired, I'll fall asleep anywhere from 1.5 hours to 4 hours after I go to bed on any given night. This has been going on for quite some time now with a reprieve on rare occasions.

All that said, I'll say regardless of how out of the loop my sleep schedule is, I get about 6-8 hours per night. Water is what I drink the most, probably 4 out of every 5 beverages. I don't drink coffee cause I can't stand it. Other beverages would be milk, diet soda, or carbonated water. Maybe a juice here and there.
There's so many different types of coffee though!! Have you tried iced coffee? I can barely stand hot coffee, but getting coffee iced makes it so much more bearable.

Also, do you have a wind down routine?
 

sparechange

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There's so many different types of coffee though!! Have you tried iced coffee? I can barely stand hot coffee, but getting coffee iced makes it so much more bearable.

Also, do you have a wind down routine?
Recommending coffee for someone with sleep problems is like telling a fat person to eat donuts.

Here are 9 side effects of too much caffeine.
  • Anxiety. Caffeine is known to increase alertness. ...
  • Insomnia. Caffeine's ability to help people stay awake is one of its most prized qualities. ...
  • Digestive Issues. ...
  • Muscle Breakdown. ...
  • Addiction. ...
  • High Blood Pressure. ...
  • Rapid Heart Rate. ...
  • Fatigue.

I used to drink coffee at work but began experiecing sleep problems and slowly cut it out, improved my quality of sleep 100x
 
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Itizn

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There's so many different types of coffee though!! Have you tried iced coffee? I can barely stand hot coffee, but getting coffee iced makes it so much more bearable.

Also, do you have a wind down routine?
I have not, but I have not liked coffee since I was a kid. My parents foolishly gave it to me as a child quite often and that probably turned me off. Haven't had any since I was like 17.

A wind down routine has been implemented before, usually computer off by 10 p.m., then some housework, reading, or writing. I think it can help and I should utilize it more consistently. Thanks

I should note when I do drink diet soda, it's very rare, maybe twice or three times a month at best? Just tossed it in for transparency's sake.

It's just bizarre I've never had this happen in such a fashion. I'm aware a lot of people struggle to get out of bed in the mornings, but this feels like something else. Almost like sleep paralysis when I'm awake.
 

sparechange

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I have not, but I have not liked coffee since I was a kid. My parents foolishly gave it to me as a child quite often and that probably turned me off. Haven't had any since I was like 17.

A wind down routine has been implemented before, usually computer off by 10 p.m., then some housework, reading, or writing. I think it can help and I should utilize it more consistently. Thanks

I should note when I do drink diet soda, it's very rare, maybe twice or three times a month at best? Just tossed it in for transparency's sake.

It's just bizarre I've never had this happen in such a fashion. I'm aware a lot of people struggle to get out of bed in the mornings, but this feels like something else. Almost like sleep paralysis when I'm awake.
Talk with a sleep doctor, I've exhausted my arm chair doctor abilities !
 

Walter Hay

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@Itizn I have one multi-barreled question for you:

a) Do you dream?
b) Do you remember your dreams?
c) Do you dream in technicolor?

If your answer to all three parts is "NO" I can offer two suggestions, but I am not a medically qualified person.

Walter
 

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Itizn

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@Itizn I have one multi-barreled question for you:

a) Do you dream?
b) Do you remember your dreams?
c) Do you dream in technicolor?

If your answer to all three parts is "NO" I can offer two suggestions, but I am not a medically qualified person.

Walter
a)technically everybody does, don't they?
b)I'd say on average I remember one of my dreams per week. Very inconsistent though.
c)when I do dream, color isn't part of the details that I recall most vividly. So I guess the answer is no.

I'd love to hear your suggestions regardless.
 

WJK

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This is a question that kind of requires me to peel back another layer of what might be a greater problem than my post suggested.

I basically have a hard time sleeping right away no matter what my day is like, and this been the case for quite some time. Except for rare occasions when I'm really tired, I'll fall asleep anywhere from 1.5 hours to 4 hours after I go to bed on any given night. This has been going on for quite some time now with a reprieve on rare occasions.

All that said, I'll say regardless of how out of the loop my sleep schedule is, I get about 6-8 hours per night. Water is what I drink the most, probably 4 out of every 5 beverages. I don't drink coffee cause I can't stand it. Other beverages would be milk, diet soda, or carbonated water. Maybe a juice here and there.
So, you have sleep problems. Talk to a health professional who helps with this type of problem. I started to say "doctor", but a lot of doctors don't specialize in sleep disorders.
 

Walter Hay

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a)technically everybody does, don't they?
b)I'd say on average I remember one of my dreams per week. Very inconsistent though.
c)when I do dream, color isn't part of the details that I recall most vividly. So I guess the answer is no.

I'd love to hear your suggestions regardless.
Everyone should dream, but if they don't or as in your case only do so infrequently, they need help to have normal sleep.

I have two suggestions:
1. Although eating some foods immediately before going to bed can inhibit sound sleeping, eating a protein snack shortly before retiring can be very beneficial. Don't eat a protein bar, just eat a handful of nuts or a small amount of chicken - maybe a leg or equivalent amount of another part of the chicken.
2. If that doesn't help, try L-Tryptophan, 500 mg 1/2 hour before bed time. Many supplement suppliers instead of L-Tryptophan are selling 5HydroxyTryptophan which crosses the blood-brain barrier faster, but for most people L-Tryptophan offers better sleep.

Caveats: Do not take L-Tryptophan if you are taking SSRi's for depression.
Do not take more than one 500mg L-Tryptophan at night. If you do it can produce nightmares instead of pleasant dreams.
Finally, I am not a medical professional and can only speak from experience in helping others. Sweet dreams.

Walter.
 

LionMarketing

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Try some iced coffee-- just drink it carefully and slow. Nice and slow wins the race :D Start drinking as early as possible. If you want, put in some almond milk or something. I would pay for it for you if I knew you in real life so you could try it out :rofl: Maybe get a nice refreshing shower in the morning asap. Setup the shower before you get up. Keep using your wind down routine as effectively as you can. Try it out man. I think you'll be surprised. I recommend Dunkin, but you can go anywhere really. If the whole iced coffee thing works, you can start making your own like Graham Stephan :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
 

Oscar100

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Every morning when I awake, I almost feel completely paralyzed for a period of time before I can physically get out of bed and start my day. This morning was one of the longer ones, maybe 60 minutes. I'm not actually asleep at this time, and I can still toss and turn and adjust my covers, but my body getting out of bed is out of the question. It feels like physical fatigue but I don't really suffer from anything AFAIK, as I'm a healthy person who doesn't partake in poor diet or drugs. I exercise as well.

If I have an alarm clock set, I can wake up, walk over, and shut it off, but will instantly climb back into bed, fall asleep and have the pattern continue.

This is very bizarre and I'm positive a psychological factor is to blame, as there are a couple of things in my life stressing me out (something many can relate to these days) but I'm still struggling to get out of this rut.

Any thoughts?
Yeah, I got that a while ago. It was called depression for me. It was also called lazy and being unmotivated. It took a while to get rid of it and find my WHY, The WHY I get up. Good luck.
 

Bekit

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Every morning when I awake, I almost feel completely paralyzed for a period of time before I can physically get out of bed and start my day. This morning was one of the longer ones, maybe 60 minutes. I'm not actually asleep at this time, and I can still toss and turn and adjust my covers, but my body getting out of bed is out of the question. It feels like physical fatigue but I don't really suffer from anything AFAIK, as I'm a healthy person who doesn't partake in poor diet or drugs. I exercise as well.
When you feel like this, are there any emotions attached? E.g. fear or anxiety or pleasantness or indulgence or just a "blank" feeling?

Does this get triggered by a certain type of day you know you're going to have, or is there any pattern you can detect around when this happens? (E.g. "I can get up just fine if I'm going to hike in the mountains, but not if it's a workday" or "This seems to be worse on the days when I have to do X.")

For practical advice from a sleep doctor without actually seeing one, you might want to check out the book "The power of when" and take the chronotype quiz. Chronotype Quiz | Discover the Right Time to Do Everything!
 

peterb0yd

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Sleep doctor. Schedule an appointment today. Don't wait. Do it now.
 
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Itizn

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When you feel like this, are there any emotions attached? E.g. fear or anxiety or pleasantness or indulgence or just a "blank" feeling?

Does this get triggered by a certain type of day you know you're going to have, or is there any pattern you can detect around when this happens? (E.g. "I can get up just fine if I'm going to hike in the mountains, but not if it's a workday" or "This seems to be worse on the days when I have to do X.")

For practical advice from a sleep doctor without actually seeing one, you might want to check out the book "The power of when" and take the chronotype quiz. Chronotype Quiz | Discover the Right Time to Do Everything!
I'd say most times its a blank emotion and it's only on days when I have important things to do.

The quiz was interesting, wasn't aware this was a field of study, thanks for sharing.
 

Johnny boy

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I'm surprised no one hinted at this yet...

What do the people listed below all have in common?

-A 9 year old on Christmas morning
-A guy who is on the second day of his 3 day summit attempt of a large mountain
-A girl who has a 6am flight to Bali for her first time visiting somewhere out of her country
-A husband who heard a loud sound downstairs in the middle of the night
-A navy seal

They all had absolutely no problem jumping out of bed without a moments hesitation, likely at 3-4 in the morning.

3 got up because they had incredible amounts of excitement
1 got up because they had to
1 got up because of dicipline

Which reasons are you missing from your life?

Are you missing excitement?

Are you missing "need"?

Are you missing dicipline?

Life should be like going to bed on Christmas eve. You can't sleep because you've got something amazing going on tomorrow. It doesn't need to be unique. Nearly everyone gets a Christmas. It just needs to excite you. And when tomorrow morning comes, you jump out of bed because you're so excited. I hold that as a standard to how I should live every day.
 

sparechange

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I'm surprised no one hinted at this yet...

What do the people listed below all have in common?

-A 9 year old on Christmas morning
-A guy who is on the second day of his 3 day summit attempt of a large mountain
-A girl who has a 6am flight to Bali for her first time visiting somewhere out of her country
-A husband who heard a loud sound downstairs in the middle of the night
-A navy seal

They all had absolutely no problem jumping out of bed without a moments hesitation, likely at 3-4 in the morning.

3 got up because they had incredible amounts of excitement
1 got up because they had to
1 got up because of dicipline

Which reasons are you missing from your life?

Are you missing excitement?

Are you missing "need"?

Are you missing dicipline?

Life should be like going to bed on Christmas eve. You can't sleep because you've got something amazing going on tomorrow. It doesn't need to be unique. Nearly everyone gets a Christmas. It just needs to excite you. And when tomorrow morning comes, you jump out of bed because you're so excited. I hold that as a standard to how I should live every day.
Good way of looking at it......#yolo lifes pretty short
 

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MattR82

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Sounds more like stress and some depression to me. If you can get out of bed and walk to an alarm clock then it's not really paralysis is it.

My tip would be to go immediately to the shower. If you're not a coffee drinker then for Christ's sake don't start now. I wish I never did.
 
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Itizn

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This forum is something else, a lot of good posts.
I'm already pretty sure it's stress at this point. I was looking up other side effects from being stressed which apply to me (body aches, random appetite patterns, etc.).

I do need to find that thing to get me excited for every day, which is funny because I'm naturally an optimistic and cheerful personality. Bizarre times for sure.
 

Johnny boy

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This forum is something else, a lot of good posts.
I'm already pretty sure it's stress at this point. I was looking up other side effects from being stressed which apply to me (body aches, random appetite patterns, etc.).

I do need to find that thing to get me excited for every day, which is funny because I'm naturally an optimistic and cheerful personality. Bizarre times for sure.
When I climbed Mt. Rainier I was very, very stressed. I still jumped right out of my sleeping bag to start our summit approach in the middle of the night while sleeping at 11,000 feet elevation. It seems like the more stress in my life it's easier to get out of bed. In my opinion it's the excitement that you should change. Although I have never met you so any personal advice is pretty mediocre.
 

Jemmalee

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Everyone should dream, but if they don't or as in your case only do so infrequently, they need help to have normal sleep.

I have two suggestions:
1. Although eating some foods immediately before going to bed can inhibit sound sleeping, eating a protein snack shortly before retiring can be very beneficial. Don't eat a protein bar, just eat a handful of nuts or a small amount of chicken - maybe a leg or equivalent amount of another part of the chicken.
2. If that doesn't help, try L-Tryptophan, 500 mg 1/2 hour before bed time. Many supplement suppliers instead of L-Tryptophan are selling 5HydroxyTryptophan which crosses the blood-brain barrier faster, but for most people L-Tryptophan offers better sleep.

Caveats: Do not take L-Tryptophan if you are taking SSRi's for depression.
Do not take more than one 500mg L-Tryptophan at night. If you do it can produce nightmares instead of pleasant dreams.
Finally, I am not a medical professional and can only speak from experience in helping others. Sweet dreams.

Walter.
L-Tryptophan is something that is recommended for the ADHD brain too.
 

GatsbyMag

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I'm positive a psychological factor is to blame, as there are a couple of things in my life stressing me out (something many can relate to these days) but I'm still struggling to get out of this rut.
Maybe start addressing the couple of things stressing you out and that will make you sleep better.

Drinking coffee, doing meditative exercises, sleeping routines and taking medicine seem like solutions for the symptom rather than the actual cause of the problem, which as you've said, is a stressful life.

Maybe try airing out some of those problems here? Lots of adults and experienced people on this forum, so I'm sure people here can add some value in helping you address those problems.
 

Fr33zerPop

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Before committing to the idea that it's a medical problem to solve, make sure this is true:
- I have an urgent reason to get up.

Remove the world's demands on me and suddenly I see how much discipline I really have!
I have lots of important things I want to do, but sometimes I need to manufacture some urgency just to get myself moving. (e.g. accountability group, partnering with someone, publicly stating a release date)
 

Dark Water

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I had sleep paralysis around a dozen times when I was 19-20, but this doesn't sound like this is it. For me, it was usually a few minutes but interrupted sleep could extend that, maybe 20 minutes at the most. It was also accompanied by intense fear, a sense that something was in the room with me, and one or two times hallucinations (of like spiders, dark shadows, etc). I chalked it up to poor sleeping habits, too much stress from uni, drinking, and maybe even that one time I tried salvia around that time.

Are you sleep deprived? The biggest thing about sleep deprivation is you can't tell if you are. So consider that, see if you can catch up on some sleep and go to bed earlier a few nights or sleep in on the weekend.
 

Harry61

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Everyone should dream, but if they don't or as in your case only do so infrequently, they need help to have normal sleep.

I have two suggestions:
1. Although eating some foods immediately before going to bed can inhibit sound sleeping, eating a protein snack shortly before retiring can be very beneficial. Don't eat a protein bar, just eat a handful of nuts or a small amount of chicken - maybe a leg or equivalent amount of another part of the chicken.
2. If that doesn't help, try L-Tryptophan, 500 mg 1/2 hour before bed time. Many supplement suppliers instead of L-Tryptophan are selling 5HydroxyTryptophan which crosses the blood-brain barrier faster, but for most people L-Tryptophan offers better sleep.

Caveats: Do not take L-Tryptophan if you are taking SSRi's for depression.
Do not take more than one 500mg L-Tryptophan at night. If you do it can produce nightmares instead of pleasant dreams.
Finally, I am not a medical professional and can only speak from experience in helping others. Sweet dreams.

Walter.
I also had issues with falling asleep some time ago. Already in bed, but with eyes wide open for an hour or longer. There was a thread on this forum about adrenal fatigue (I'm not 100% sure that was the case and can't find it right now) in which suggestions were to fix your: hydration, nutrition, sleep and exercise. After dealing with other 3, sleep was the last thing to manage and L-Tryptophan really helped me (500 mg/ twice a week, 30 min before going to bed), but i highly recommend to drop any alcohol in two days before taking a pill (it stimulates your brain during sleep phases, also makes you dehydrated - after all, i quit drinking completely what is quite impressive in Poland :) ). Moreover, i found it effective to clear your schedule for next morning. Falling asleep without sense of urgency gives you confidence that you control things that happen in your life, not the opposite.

Take care and sweet dreams!
 

RoadTrip

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as there are a couple of things in my life stressing me out
Are you mentally tired when you wake up? Normally, when you have had a good night's rest you will wake up with a lot of energy and the mood to get up and get things done.

If you are tired it could be due to some stress adding up in your life. If so, do something about it right now. The best remedy I can suggest you, and I know because I've been in a burnout for 2 years, is to start breathing exercises. At least one time before bed. Ideally 2-3 times a day.

You can download any meditation app or lookup some relaxation and breathing exercises on Youtube. Don't expect a result the first day and give it at least a week.
 

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