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GOLD! Did It: Zero to $12k a Month While Traveling the World

GoodluckChuck

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Awesome. How do you make connection while living at new place?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
All sorts of ways...

Facebook groups was a big one. There's a "foriegners in x" group in every city I visited.
 

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GoodluckChuck

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Excellent. Thanks for showing us what's possible.
I'm only at the beginning of my web development freelancing business but I look forward to making enough money to do just that and have back my freedom and location independence.
If I can do it, anyone can.

You will alternate between really excited and unsure whether it's the right path. It's normal.

When you are taking lots of action and things don't seem to get happening, that's a good sign. It means you're getting close to a breakthrough. If you can learn to recognize these feelings and use them to give you a boost of energy and effort, you will make it.

Don't give up before you succeed! If you want to give up, do it after.

Cheers
 

Amoney21

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This thread has seriously helped me a ton and I thank you greatly for it! Would you say most of your clients are local (ish) to your area or is the bulk of your clients not remotely close to the PNW? Globalization is so crazy nowadays and it is seriously awesome as well as inspiring that you can travel the world with web design and still help out specific clients.
 

GoodluckChuck

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This thread has seriously helped me a ton and I thank you greatly for it! Would you say most of your clients are local (ish) to your area or is the bulk of your clients not remotely close to the PNW? Globalization is so crazy nowadays and it is seriously awesome as well as inspiring that you can travel the world with web design and still help out specific clients.
80% of my clients are not in my local area. In fact, I would say half of them I've never even spoken to face to face. It is incredible when you think about...

I'm glad you got something from my story. Cheers.
 

Shri Kanase

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Feb 19, 2019
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So you saw the headline and decided to click and see what this post is all about. That was literally what I did about 1.5 years ago when I saw Rob O'Rourke's (@Fox) post with a very similar title.

Back then I was looking for a way out of my 9-5 world. Don't get me wrong. I had my dream job. At least it was my dream at the time. I was working full time as a residential construction superintendent. I spent my days driving around Portland, Oregon acting as the bridge between homeowners, contractors, engineers, architects, designers, and city offices.

It was a sweet gig. I was making 52k/yr salary with full benefits, a company truck, cell phone, laptop, credit card, and 3 weeks per year of paid vacation. I was in hog heaven.

Then why did I feel so empty inside? Okay, maybe it wasn't that. Maybe it was the fact that I was removing a nasty-a$$ toilet for the third time in a week for an ungrateful homeowner who had nothing but complaints despite my constant a$$ kissing. That moment while I was hugging that grimy, stinky toilet was my F*ck this moment. You know, that moment that MJ talks about when you drop everything you're doing, turn tail, and get the F*ck out? Ya, that was it. It was the smell of shit coming from the poop stain 3 inches away from my face...

Back Up a Couple Months
The F*ck This Event came in May of 2017. 3 months earlier was when I discovered The Millionaire Fastlane. It's kind of a fun story and I'll try to make it short.

There I was home alone on a Saturday night. My girlfriend was visiting family so I was laying on the couch high out of my mind on some legal Marijuana playing video games. I was 10 hours deep into gaming when I finally turned it off and just sat there. I had a hollow feeling. One that I've had many times. "What am I doing with my life?"

This was a normal pattern for me where I would alternate back and forth between extremely unproductive behavior and the highly motivated obsessive though short lived pursuit of something more.

I decided that my time would be better spent developing a skill that was actually marketable. They always say that it takes 10000 hours to become a master at something and if you want to make a ton of money, you have to be a master, right? So I started doing some calculations to see how long it would take me to become a master at a new skill.

My thought process at the time was Master Skill > Self-Employed > More Money > More Freedom

I added up all the time I spent each week at my job, hanging with the gf, eating, working out, watching tv, etc. When it was all laid out I determined I had about 14 hours per week I could comfortably apply to the pursuit of building a new skillset. Let's see... 14 hours per week at 52 weeks per year is 728 hours per year.. carry the two.. so if I applied 14 hours a week to skill development I would be a master in...

14 years.... F*ck!!!

Holy shit I never realized how much of my time was being eaten up by things I didn't particularly care to do. 50 hours per week for a job? It was that moment that I knew something wasn't right. The seed was planted for me to scrap the old paradigm and find a new one.

After this demystifying exercise I found myself with a gigantic flush of motivation.

I didn't know what else to do so I did a google search for "Best book on being successful."

The first search result was a reddit post where some guy listed his top 10 books on being successful. #1 was TMF. I thought, "Hey it's number 1 so it must be the best." I quickly went online and picked up the digital copy and started reading it.

Needless to say it was riveting. Two days later I finished the last page and immediately had a panic attack. I knew I had to do something to change my life but I didn't know what.

The months following this revelatory learning experience were spent on this very forum obsessively consuming information about what others were doing besides slaving their lives away at a job they didn't even want to do.

This is when I discovered Rob's post about web design. He was making 10k/mo working from Columbia building websites. He also put out a course teaching others how to do it. I bought it along with another course. The total investment was $2300 which was more than I had ever invested in myself before.

There's something to be said about investing a large amount in something like a course. Whether the course is valuable or not, the very act of investing such a large amount triggers the sunk-cost fallacy and makes you feel like you have to get your moneys worth or you'll die. You HAVE to make it work. There's no other choice. This is a good place to be in when you want to achieve something. "I have no other options."

Buying these courses was the smartest things I've ever done.


With all the different business models one could choose, I chose web design and marketing for two reasons:

1. I knew that I wanted to be a businessman, so I needed to learn about business. As a freelance web designer and marketer I get the opportunity to work with businesses of all types in all locations. I get to learn what works and what doesn't straight from the source.

2. I wanted to be free to work from wherever I wanted.



The Runway
While I was taking my online courses, the construction company I was working for happened to be struggling. We had lost the only job we had going which was valued at about 200k. To top it off we had no leads in the pipeline. We were pretty much F*cked.

The owner thought I was the prodigal son and I could do no wrong. So, when I pitched to him that I would make a website and use Google Adwords to get leads, he was onboard. I saw this as an opportunity to get paid to learn a skill I could use to get me some of that sweet sweet freedom.

I threw together a shitty website and ran Google ads with the help of @Andy Black Adwords Jumpstart course. In 2 months we had jobs going and a full pipeline. Success! It was working!

This achievement gave me a ton of courage in terms of quitting my job to start my own business. I've always been a sink or swim type of guy. If things are comfortable I can get lazy, but if I need to perform, I always deliver. I've never missed any payment or bill in my life despite the fact that I've always been very poor.

With that said, I realized that if I kept my 9-5 job and my comfortable salary I wouldn't have the energy after work to pursue anything else. It was a scary decision to consider...

It still took me a few months to build up enough courage, and with ~3k in the bank and a laptop, I quit my job and jumped into Entrepreneurship 100%.

(Please note that I don't have any kids or debt. If I needed to, I could probably get by on less than $1000 per month.)

The First Year
During the first year I only made about $28k doing freelance web design. The cool part is that I was only working part time. I spent about 15-30 hours per week working on projects and 40 or so hours per week reading, studying, taking courses, and experimenting with online marketing on my own projects.

Around May of 2018, about 6 months after I went full time into freelance, my girlfriend quit her job and we started traveling the world. We landed in Bali, Indonesia first thanks to advice from Matt Robinson, another member of this forum. Two weeks in she got bored and quickly found a remote job doing sales for a company called Remote Year. Part of the deal was she had to go live in Mexico City for 3 months and train. I liked it a lot because we got a free condo in a really nice part of town, not to mention the constant exposure to traveling entrepreneurs. Heaven...

The girlfriend working was great for my productivity as I didn't have to put up with a constant moving distraction that seems to be a black hole for attention. You know, the typical girlfriend. Haha

Getting Smart with the Passive Income
In May of 2018 I was feeling the pain of the boom and bust business cycle of a freelance web designer. I would make a 5k sale one month, work on the project for a month, then find myself with no sales and no income the next month. It was emotional going from such highs to such lows all the time. This is when I decided to start going for MRR, or monthly reoccurring revenue.

I started selling website care plans and review funnels in addition to the websites.

A care plan basically means I take care of a client's website and provide 2 hours per month for edits. Besides never having to worry about their website being hacked or down, they get instant responses whenever they have an issue, questions, or just need service. With this I was able to turn regular web design clients into $250/mo care plan clients.

I also sold review funnels. Basically a review funnel is a one page website with a special url that makes it as easy as possible for a customer to leave a company a review on multiple sites. I was selling these for $150/mo. This is a great one because they are super low maintenance and provide a ton of value for the right kind of client. I've seen others charge a lot more but I like to keep it low key as to keep the payments coming in for long periods of time without a second glance from the client.

It only took two months for me to get to $650/mo in MRR. This was a magic number for me because this covered my living and business expenses. Got to love the low overhead of freelance web design...

This lowered my stress tremendously and gave me the breathing room to pursue more risky projects and come up with more creative deals.

The rest of 2018 was great. I spent 7 months abroad. I went to Bali twice and Mexico 3 times. I made friends everywhere and picked up clients each place I went. Now I work with clients all over the world.

2019
Now it's 2019 and business is better than ever. My conservative projection for 2019 is $140k and I'm still only working part time. The MRR is about to pass 3k/mo and only takes up about 3 hours of my time per month.

I've settled on providing complete holistic marketing services for small to medium sized businesses. You could say I'm more of a consultant. I come in and work with a client to figure out exactly what's holding them back then come up with a strategy to get them to where they want to go. Inbound marketing is my weapon of choice as I enjoy creating content that brings in large amounts of traffic which I then turn into customers and sales.

I haven't niched down into any one type of service or market which definitely has its challenges. It's definitely not a business I plan on scaling broadly in terms of quantity of clients, but perhaps in terms of magnitude, or size of projects. The sweet spot for project size for my company is 10-20k. This size project pays well and is still small enough that I don't have to work with large teams or groups of decision makers.

I like this set up because I'm still being exposed to tons of different businesses and learning a lot. It also gives me breathing room to be flexible with my direction which I'm still figuring out. Freedom and flexibility are two of my most important values.

I have a couple side projects going that have potential to earn me a lot more than my marketing agency simply because they are much more scalable. I plan on keeping my agency going if only to service my book of clients as well as market any companies I start or acquire in the future.

One of the best parts of this whole business has been the relationships I've developed with people all over the world. I have more friends than ever and everywhere I travel to I know someone who will meet up for a beer or an adventure. I've even met up with Rob a few times which is super cool because he's someone I really looked up to over the last few years.

Lessons Learned
I hope to share some things that might help others who are just getting started. This could be considered an exercise in trying to relate to myself the way I was 2 years ago before I was blessed with the curse of knowledge. Hell, 3 years ago I had to look up the term "marketing" because I didn't even know what it meant... Can you believe that?

Here is a list of 5 things I would tell my younger self.

1. Mindset is more important than anything else.

There are a lot of things that make up a mindset, for example: self esteem. Self esteem has such a huge role on how we see ourselves and others. It effects every single thing we do and every thought we have. I think the topic of self esteem is worth researching in the very beginning, or at any stage for that matter. Get in tune with where you're at and what you think of yourself. Ask yourself, "What do I need to be like in order for me to feel great about myself?"

There's three books I recommend for this:

- Awaken the Giant Within by Tony Robbins - This is like an instruction manual for your mind. Mine is full of notes... I regularly open up to a random page and read it like the Bible. (Get the old version at Goodwill or some other thrift shop. The new versions are a condensed version meant to sell his other products.)
- The Six Pillars of Self Esteem by Nathaniel Brandon - A solid presentation of what self esteem is, what it does, and how to cultivate it.
- 177 Mental Toughness Secrets of the World Class by Steve Siebold - This book is a gateway to learning how to be a world class human being. It's got tons of recommendations for other books. I can't recommend this book enough.
2. If you don't know what to do, just do something. Anything!
In today's world we have too many options. In the old days people had to find food. They had to build shelter, collect firewood, and make as many babies as they could because most of them wouldn't survive. Life was all about survival.

In today's world we don't have to worry about that kind of stuff. The result of this phenomenon is an entire population frozen in indecision because they don't know what to do. It's my belief that if you find yourself not knowing what direction to head, just start walking. Pick something and start doing it. You'll quickly discover whether it's working for you or not and then decide to continue or change direction.

If you never start moving, it's easy to wake up and realize the years have gone by but you've stood still. This was me for years. Don't let it be you! Get moving!!!
3. Read, a lot.
I know a lot of people. The ones that read are miles ahead of the ones that don't. What else can I say? From ages 18 to 28 I read maybe 10 books. From 28 to 30 I read over 100. I can't even begin to describe the difference this made for me.

Read. Listen. Expose yourself to new information in whatever way is effective for you. Just know that there's something special about reading. Your subconscious mind creates a world with the information thus making reading super effective. TV and Audio is good but your brain is much less active during these activities.
4. Be a Good Person
Good people are more successful than bad people. This might sound silly but it's true. Write a paragraph about what makes a really good person then make it your mission to be like that.

If you automatically consider other people and go out of your way to make their lives better, money will magically find its way into your pocket. It's magic. Did I say that already?
5. Get Uncomfortable
The first time you drive on the freeway it's really scary. Cars are moving fast and the stakes are high. If you mess up, you're dead. It's quite uncomfortable, no?

After a couple hundred times driving on the freeway it's just not a big deal, right? You can do it in your sleep, almost... Why do you think that is? Did driving get any easier? Or, did you just get better?

This analogy can relate to anything in life. If you are always comfortable, it means you are never getting better at anything. If you want to grow and become a better person, you have to expose yourself to situations that make you uncomfortable.

I've learned to notice when I'm getting too comfortable. That's usually the time I pack my bags and head somewhere I've never been or look for a situation that scares me. I can't even tell you how much I've grown since I realized this.
Well, thank you for reading my short progress story. I hope you found something valuable to take away and use in your own journey.

If you have any questions, ask away. I've got nothing to hide and am happy to be as transparent as possible to help others like myself who just need to see someone else do it to give them the courage to follow suit.
Your story was really an inspiration to me man because I feel as if I'm in the same situation.

I already have an online store which has done over 6 figures but is rather seasonal so most of the months, I'm just sort of floating by. Because of the marketing skills I gained from the store, I have a YouTube channel and also do mentoring for many people. In fact, I sell a course as well.

But my main goal had been an agency or something scaleable which can be scaled all the time. I'm not sure which direction to head in or what to do
 

Anakalypsi

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First of all, thank you for sharing your story here. Stories like these really motivate me a lot and give me much hope.

The girlfriend working was great for my productivity as I didn't have to put up with a constant moving distraction that seems to be a black hole for attention. You know, the typical girlfriend. Haha
Haha so true.

Getting Smart with the Passive Income
In May of 2018 I was feeling the pain of the boom and bust business cycle of a freelance web designer. I would make a 5k sale one month, work on the project for a month, then find myself with no sales and no income the next month. It was emotional going from such highs to such lows all the time. This is when I decided to start going for MRR, or monthly reoccurring revenue.
You made that move quite fast which speaks to your success!

The MRR is about to pass 3k/mo and only takes up about 3 hours of my time per month.
That is just f*cking great!

In today's world we have too many options. In the old days people had to find food. They had to build shelter, collect firewood, and make as many babies as they could because most of them wouldn't survive. Life was all about survival.

In today's world we don't have to worry about that kind of stuff. The result of this phenomenon is an entire population frozen in indecision because they don't know what to do. It's my belief that if you find yourself not knowing what direction to head, just start walking. Pick something and start doing it. You'll quickly discover whether it's working for you or not and then decide to continue or change direction.

If you never start moving, it's easy to wake up and realize the years have gone by but you've stood still. This was me for years. Don't let it be you! Get moving!!!
Found this especially appealing today.

Last, good luck and fortune on your further journey and scaling your business!
 

GoodluckChuck

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Your story was really an inspiration to me man because I feel as if I'm in the same situation.

I already have an online store which has done over 6 figures but is rather seasonal so most of the months, I'm just sort of floating by. Because of the marketing skills I gained from the store, I have a YouTube channel and also do mentoring for many people. In fact, I sell a course as well.

But my main goal had been an agency or something scaleable which can be scaled all the time. I'm not sure which direction to head in or what to do
Wow you have a lot going on. It sounds like you're on the right track.

Have you determined that what you're doing now isn't going to work? It sounds like you might be in a period of little feedback which is always a challenge to get through.

I would say double down on what you're doing and try to make it work. You might be close to pay dirt.

Agency business is good but it isn't as scalable as YouTube or selling courses.
 

Shri Kanase

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Wow you have a lot going on. It sounds like you're on the right track.

Have you determined that what you're doing now isn't going to work? It sounds like you might be in a period of little feedback which is always a challenge to get through.

I would say double down on what you're doing and try to make it work. You might be close to pay dirt.

Agency business is good but it isn't as scalable as YouTube or selling courses.
That's the thing; I'm actually a college student but I put in almost all of my free time into turning this store into a brand.

That means all of my packages get shipped with the store's logo and I also have a blog. It's more self-doubt all the time which causes me to think whether I'm in the right direction or not.

And my course doesn't sell as much right now, mainly because I rely on traffic from my Youtube channel. The Youtube channel is at 3.3k subs and growing fast.

At this point, would you recommend I go all in on what I'm already doing or try to create more opportunities? It's really hard juggling school and all this so just like you, I was planning on "leaving" school for a year meaning take a gap year. However, I'm not sure where I would be at the end of this gap year
 

Surf16

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Great post @GoodluckChuck. I loved reading your progress thread. You are a very captivating writer.
This is when I discovered Rob's post about web design. He was making 10k/mo working from Columbia building websites
Are you building them from scratch (programing/coding) or using a platform (ex.Shopify) and helping clients setting them up that way?

I have a Shopify store and when people tell me how good my website looks and that I must know a lot about computers I feel guilty that it is a template from Shopify.

But then I think about walking into local businesses and helping them get leads by upgrading their websites, social media pages and overall marketing.

A care plan basically means I take care of a client's website and provide 2 hours per month for edits. Besides never having to worry about their website being hacked or down, they get instant responses whenever they have an issue, questions, or just need service. With this I was able to turn regular web design clients into $250/mo care plan clients.
Do you target companies that have low quality websites and do not seem to be to internet save?

Thanks!
 

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MB Burnette

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I have a brother that is very skilled and very unsuccessful at web development. I sent him the link to this thread.
This quote has described me up to this point!

Self-talk, self-esteem...self-confidence is so important. And positive action-movement.

Thank you GoodluckChuck for your post. Inspirational brother.
 

GoodluckChuck

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That's the thing; I'm actually a college student but I put in almost all of my free time into turning this store into a brand.

That means all of my packages get shipped with the store's logo and I also have a blog. It's more self-doubt all the time which causes me to think whether I'm in the right direction or not.

And my course doesn't sell as much right now, mainly because I rely on traffic from my Youtube channel. The Youtube channel is at 3.3k subs and growing fast.

At this point, would you recommend I go all in on what I'm already doing or try to create more opportunities? It's really hard juggling school and all this so just like you, I was planning on "leaving" school for a year meaning take a gap year. However, I'm not sure where I would be at the end of this gap year
It's hard for me to give super specific advice without knowing the details but I can say with confidence that building on current and past success is easier than starting over.

It's easy to get shiny object syndrome when you see others killing it in different areas, but you have to take that into account.

You say you make sales for your course through YouTube and your following is growing fast. So, why not focus on that?

Have you created your own progress thread for these projects? I'm sure if you gave everyone more details you would get good feedback.
 

GoodluckChuck

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Great post @GoodluckChuck. I loved reading your progress thread. You are a very captivating writer.

Are you building them from scratch (programing/coding) or using a platform (ex.Shopify) and helping clients setting them up that way?

I have a Shopify store and when people tell me how good my website looks and that I must know a lot about computers I feel guilty that it is a template from Shopify.

But then I think about walking into local businesses and helping them get leads by upgrading their websites, social media pages and overall marketing.


Do you target companies that have low quality websites and do not seem to be to internet save?

Thanks!
Let me ask you, if you could bake a delicious, great looking cake with any oven, then how important is the oven?

I use WordPress to build 99% of the websites I build. I use page builders which make it easier.

My clients don't hire me for the tools, they hire me for the results I get.

What goes on the website and how it fits in with their sales system, business, and customers experience is where I add the real value.

Business is all super simple. People will pay for what they want or need, so if you can deliver that, they will pay you for it.

People don't come to me for websites. They come to me to help them sell more product and acquire more customers.
 

Shri Kanase

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Feb 19, 2019
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It's hard for me to give super specific advice without knowing the details but I can say with confidence that building on current and past success is easier than starting over.

It's easy to get shiny object syndrome when you see others killing it in different areas, but you have to take that into account.

You say you make sales for your course through YouTube and your following is growing fast. So, why not focus on that?

Have you created your own progress thread for these projects? I'm sure if you gave everyone more details you would get good feedback.
Yes, I'm currently already focusing on that and am posting on a consistent basis. The only issue is, I also wanted some extra sources of income to be on the safe side.

But you think working on my personal brand and trying to grow that should be my #1 priority? I was also planning on opening more websites to sell other things but not sure whether it's worth spreading out my focus or not.
 
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Shri Kanase

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Feb 19, 2019
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Helping others and providing value should be your #1 priority.

You also need to be monogamous with your business. I like to quote Ron Swanson here:

"Don't half-a$$ two things, whole-a$$ one thing"
But how do I know it's the business which will take me to the next level and not something I'm just wasting time on?

I mean, it has shown positive results but its not consistent..
 

Young Money

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Apr 27, 2018
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But how do I know it's the business which will take me to the next level and not something I'm just wasting time on?

I mean, it has shown positive results but its not consistent..
So much self doubt.. you’re gonna have to change your mindset before you hope to succeed.

No one here can tell you if your business will succeed or fail, but if you don’t try then you are guaranteed to fail.
 

Maxboost

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Incredible story and I find myself in your position.
 

demirciler

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Feb 2, 2019
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The most inspirational thing I read in 2019 so far. Thank you for sharing this epic story.

Your mindset is very similar to me, and I am also o huge fan of Tony Robbins. Awaken the giant within is the first self-help book I read and it literally has blown my mind.

I had a question about sales. How do you know if you actually can't help a client or you think in that way because you are afraid of something or avoiding pushing your comfort zone?

How you can be sure you will get real results to your client, and you are a great fit for the job?
 

RayofLight00

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Amazing story. The part where you questioned yourself after having played ten hours of video games did it for me, along with making moves and actually deciding to be a better person. I saw a lot of myself there, except the making moves part Lol.

I'm really interested in doing business online and providing a service for people. Something that can help another person with a project or something they care about. I enjoy helping people and want to take an online approach.

Are there any resources you can link to that can be utilized by beginners/entry level computer users to learn web design/marketing skills? Thank you again for the inspiring story.
 

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GoodluckChuck

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The most inspirational thing I read in 2019 so far. Thank you for sharing this epic story.

Your mindset is very similar to me, and I am also o huge fan of Tony Robbins. Awaken the giant within is the first self-help book I read and it literally has blown my mind.

I had a question about sales. How do you know if you actually can't help a client or you think in that way because you are afraid of something or avoiding pushing your comfort zone?

How you can be sure you will get real results to your client, and you are a great fit for the job?
I base decisions off too main things.

1. Past results

Have I done this before? Based on past results can I expect to get the desired results?

A lot of marketing and sales is numbers and probabilities. With a big enough pool of prospective customers I can be reasonably certain to make some sales.

2. My time constraints.

Like it or not, time is always a factor in this type of service, whether it's mine or someone else's that I'm paying for.

When I sell a project the main thing I'm selling is my commitment to produce the results. This is where the confidence comes from. I am certain that I can do it, it's just a matter of how long it will take.

I weigh time with other more subjective factors like:

Do I like this client?
Do I like this project?
Do I like this market?
Is this a bite I can chew?

In the beginning I asked questions just like this. "How do you know if you can get results?"

You can know with your conscious brain by learning how others do it.

You can learn with your sub conscious brain and nervous system by doing it.

In the end, you never know for sure. You just get more confident in your ability.

If you can manage to commit 100% to it, then you know you'll either make it happen or die. Of you die, then who cares? :)
 

triodine

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GoodluckChuck

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As a newbie getting started/ getting used to how this forums interface/search works. Thank you for doing the legwork!
These are great resources...

My suggestion is to split your time in half between doing and studying.

My approach to trying new things had changed a lot.

I start by writing down what I know now. I make a list of questions as thorough as I can and I answer them with my present knowledge.

Let's use surfing as an example since I'll be trying that soon.

I have never surfed or taken a lesson. I've spent a lot of time thinking about it though and applying my knowledge of snowboarding to what I expect surfing to be like.

Next, I'll rent a board and go give it a try. I'll probably struggle at some parts and be pretty good at others.

Then I'll go get a lesson. By this time I'll already have some working knowledge and experience to use as a foundation for learning the details. I'll likely have some questions and be able to get more out of the lesson than I would have with zero foundation.

This is what I recommend for people starting something like web design.

First, write down the steps you'll take the best you can with your current knowledge. Then, go find a YouTube video and follow along in buying a domain, setting up hosting, and start in on building the site.

See how far you can get. It will be a struggle and that's GOOD.

If you reach points you can't progress past, use Google to help. You can literally Google your way to building anything online...

Once you have a website live and you have produced something, then go find a course.

You will have a solid foundation of experience to build your knowledge on.

Without the foundation the knowledge will have no leg to stand on.

Ive learned to use courses as a boost rather than a foundation.

I'm sure will disagree, but one thing we can all agree on is that it's really easy to get into the trap of taking tons of course and feeling like you're taking action even though you aren't actually producing anything.

Producing vs Consuming 101.
 

JohnD Realestate

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While I build websites for clients I also build them for myself. Most of them are simply a hand full of articles about a certain topic that I have expertise in.

I use a tool called Ahrefs to research what websites are out there, what keywords they rank for, and roughly how much traffic those keywords generate. This way, if there's a topic I want to write about, I can do research and know how to make my content get found by more people.

The techniques I use branch into many different disciplines such as SEO, content marketing, email marketing, as well as web design.

Once the content is written, I promote it through various channels like Facebook, Medium, etc.


A good way to start is to write things about your local area. Local topics are typically easier to rank for because they are more niched.


I understand where you are coming from when you say "but I don't want it to get lost" but you have to get rid of that mindset. This tiny sentence turned an actionable idea into a non-actionable idea.

If you want to start making content, do it. Focus on helping people and you seriously can't go wrong. Once you have 20 pieces of valuable content I can almost guarantee it will be found by someone. Even if it doesn't, you've already taken care of the hard part. Attracting eyeballs is easy when you have something of value.


Wowza. That’s good stuff. Thanks for dropping this valuable info.
 

GoodluckChuck

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Since I started this thread I've been trying to think of more valuable experiences I could share that would be helpful to you guys and gals.

One thing I think we all struggle with, especially in the beginning is getting overwhelmed.

In the beginning of 2018 I was constantly feeling like I was barely keeping my head above water. My mind was plagued with doubts of whether or not I was making the progress I desired.

The solution I found helped a lot. It's possible that the method I'm about to share is one of the main reasons I've had the success I've had.

It's called the Power List method. The power list is a concept made popular by a man named Andy Frisella. Hid podcast The MFCEO Podcast was a great source of inspiration and motivation for me during this time.

The power list concept is simple. You start every day by writing down the 5 more important things you have to do that day. No matter what happens, you make sure those 5 things get done. Even if you don't do everything on your agenda, if you do this 5 things, you win the day.

What isn't immediately apparrent about this productivity method is how effective it is at negating feelings of being overwhelmed.

The way I see it, even if I can't get to everything I want to do, or even remember everything, as long as I do those 5 things every day, I am headed in the right direction.

Frisella did a podcast about this. I think it was called "trust your instruments."

He likened being an entrepreneur to being an airplane pilot flying through fog. You can't see where you're going, but you have instruments that guide you one mile at a time and you have to trust they will take you in the right direction.

The power list is my instrument and I know that as long as I keep doing those 5 things each day, I will get to where I want to go. It's inevitable.

This takes a lot of the pressure off and let's me relax and enjoy the process.

A tool I use for my power list is called Trello. I create a card for each day and have 30+ days of cards made ahead of time.

I use these cards as my schedule. If I have an appointment or a sales call coming up, it goes on my power list.

If I'm working on a project, I break it into pieces and put those pieces on various power lists.

I start each day by opening up Trello and looking to see what I have on the list. I complete everything on there and I move the card to the 2019 folder.

I don't worry about what's on the list tomorrow or next week. I don't dwell on the mountain ahead of me. I just focus on what is on my plate today.

This breaks the gigantic process of building a multi-million dollar lifestyle into tiny bite sized chunks that are easy to swallow.

This keeps me from getting overwhelmed and even allows me to enjoy the process.

I can look in the 2018 Trello board and see 365 cards with completed power lists. The life I'm enjoying today is a result of the work that is displayed on those cards.

With this method literally anyone can do anything one power list at a time.

Thank you Andy Frisella for this awesome podcast. If you want to learn more about this concept you can listen to the episode here: Trust Your Instruments, with Andy Frisella - MFCEO183A

If you are feeling overwhelmed about the mountain of work you see in front of you, try the power list method. I promise it will change your life.
 

ChristopherK

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Mar 25, 2019
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Since I started this thread I've been trying to think of more valuable experiences I could share that would be helpful to you guys and gals.

One thing I think we all struggle with, especially in the beginning is getting overwhelmed.

In the beginning of 2018 I was constantly feeling like I was barely keeping my head above water. My mind was plagued with doubts of whether or not I was making the progress I desired.

The solution I found helped a lot. It's possible that the method I'm about to share is one of the main reasons I've had the success I've had.

It's called the Power List method. The power list is a concept made popular by a man named Andy Frisella. Hid podcast The MFCEO Podcast was a great source of inspiration and motivation for me during this time.

The power list concept is simple. You start every day by writing down the 5 more important things you have to do that day. No matter what happens, you make sure those 5 things get done. Even if you don't do everything on your agenda, if you do this 5 things, you win the day.

What isn't immediately apparrent about this productivity method is how effective it is at negating feelings of being overwhelmed.

The way I see it, even if I can't get to everything I want to do, or even remember everything, as long as I do those 5 things every day, I am headed in the right direction.

Frisella did a podcast about this. I think it was called "trust your instruments."

He likened being an entrepreneur to being an airplane pilot flying through fog. You can't see where you're going, but you have instruments that guide you one mile at a time and you have to trust they will take you in the right direction.

The power list is my instrument and I know that as long as I keep doing those 5 things each day, I will get to where I want to go. It's inevitable.

This takes a lot of the pressure off and let's me relax and enjoy the process.

A tool I use for my power list is called Trello. I create a card for each day and have 30+ days of cards made ahead of time.

I use these cards as my schedule. If I have an appointment or a sales call coming up, it goes on my power list.

If I'm working on a project, I break it into pieces and put those pieces on various power lists.

I start each day by opening up Trello and looking to see what I have on the list. I complete everything on there and I move the card to the 2019 folder.

I don't worry about what's on the list tomorrow or next week. I don't dwell on the mountain ahead of me. I just focus on what is on my plate today.

This breaks the gigantic process of building a multi-million dollar lifestyle into tiny bite sized chunks that are easy to swallow.

This keeps me from getting overwhelmed and even allows me to enjoy the process.

I can look in the 2018 Trello board and see 365 cards with completed power lists. The life I'm enjoying today is a result of the work that is displayed on those cards.

With this method literally anyone can do anything one power list at a time.

Thank you Andy Frisella for this awesome podcast. If you want to learn more about this concept you can listen to the episode here: Trust Your Instruments, with Andy Frisella - MFCEO183A

If you are feeling overwhelmed about the mountain of work you see in front of you, try the power list method. I promise it will change your life.
This year after every quarter i take a few days off and review what has happened so far. I set new goals, plan the next 3 months and ask myself what can i optimize about my business. I see it like a software version, so after this quarter, my business is V1.1

Today was the day where i tried to find a way to keep track of the most important stuff that needs to get done every day. Just now, i see this wonderful post from you with this neat technique.

I'm by no means a religious person, but i think that at some point, the universe is trying to tell you something... :D

Nice post Chuck, please please please share more of those valueable experiences you had so far in your journey!
 

Maxboost

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What is your sales process and sales turn around look like? Do you do the majority of your sales accessing your network or is it cold email/phone call? What is your success rate if you were to approach 100 businesses? I find most people that get into digital marketing are very secretive (no idea why) about their success or failures.
 

GoodluckChuck

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What is your sales process and sales turn around look like? Do you do the majority of your sales accessing your network or is it cold email/phone call? What is your success rate if you were to approach 100 businesses? I find most people that get into digital marketing are very secretive (no idea why) about their success or failures.
Sales is a numbers game.

In the beginning I did a bit of networking. Networking events were not very lucrative as they were mostly made up of insurance salesmen and mortgage brokers.

The kind of networking that worked for me was reaching out to other web designers and marketers. The fact is people don't have a ton of friends so if you call them up and offer to buy them lunch, they usually say yes.

With a hand full of people referring me work about 50% of new projects come from this channel.

The other 50% comes through my website.

I don't do any cold outbound but I would if I had no clients.

Sales process is simple.

1. First touch to schedule a longer call.
2. Second touch I'll try and get as many details as I can about their challenges and goals.
3. Third touch is about reviewing their pain points and presenting a solution to their problems while informing them about what I discovered while researching their business/market. I always try and close them on the phone at this point before I send any kind of proposal.
4. When they soft close on the phone I'll send a proposal/invoice. If they don't immediately pay then I follow up weekly until they pay or ask me to stop. Sometimes I have to follow up 10+ times. People are weird and they have their own reasons for not responding right away.

Another good % of work comes from past clients and their referrals.

As for secrets, there's no need to be secretive. There are a bajillion businesses out there that need marketing and a shortage of good people to give it to them.

People who think the market is saturated are making excuses why they dont have success in the industry.
 

Kruiser

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Chuck! I just saw this. This is awesome! Congratulations! It seems like yesterday you were showing me your first couple of one page sites when we met up for coffee at the New Seasons in Orenco Station (remember that place?). Your story is a great lesson on how quickly things can change if you manage your mindset and take massive action.
 

hydemx

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What an amazing story, I've felt like that so many times: I want to do a billion things but end up not doing any. Thanks for sharing your journey and if you ever come back to Mexico City, let me know, I'll gladly invite you some rounds of beers, or I can show you around the city!
 

mercenariez

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Hi @GoodluckChuck ,

Thank you for sharing. Some questions if you don’t mind answering:

1. You state that you are now working “part-time hours” for your 12k/mo (revenue?). Would you say you are on the low end or high end of the “part-time range” in terms of hours worked at present (e.g. 5hrs per week vs 25).

Do you have any plans to make this 100% passive or do you see yourself as always doing part time hours here and there indefinitely?

2. What were some of the biggest and most difficult obstacles you encountered during this process? From your post you made it really sound like a walk in the park (e.g. you travelled the world whilst doing this).

Do you see yourself as relatively talented at learning new things? You seemed to have been able to distinguish yourself as a website creator in the website market after only 2 years, when many website creators probably have trained for many more years than that yet probably still make much less income than you do.
 

BigDaddyKane

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Doing something allows the rest of your brain and body to know it as well.
Immersion.

Once you have 20 pieces of valuable content I can almost guarantee it will be found by someone. Even if it doesn't, you've already taken care of the hard part. Attracting eyeballs is easy when you have something of value.
I've always pictured this in an abstract kind of way. I call it the "Hello World" model which I've written about. Basically when I approach "creating content" I start by writing or speaking (audio record) an idea. This gets archived and published in one way or another onto the internet. Someone will find it. And so I rinse and repeat - each time refining the strategies behind it. But ultimately, it's about having something valuable to say to your audience. Like you said the hard part is done.

As for secrets, there's no need to be secretive. There are a bajillion businesses out there that need marketing and a shortage of good people to give it to them.
Yup.
 

GoodluckChuck

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Chuck! I just saw this. This is awesome! Congratulations! It seems like yesterday you were showing me your first couple of one page sites when we met up for coffee at the New Seasons in Orenco Station (remember that place?). Your story is a great lesson on how quickly things can change if you manage your mindset and take massive action.
Thanks man! Long time no see. We should catch up sometime. Would love to hear how you're getting along.
 

GoodluckChuck

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I've always pictured this in an abstract kind of way. I call it the "Hello World" model which I've written about. Basically when I approach "creating content" I start by writing or speaking (audio record) an idea. This gets archived and published in one way or another onto the internet. Someone will find it. And so I rinse and repeat - each time refining the strategies behind it. But ultimately, it's about having something valuable to say to your audience. Like you said the hard part is done.
I recently met someone who lives off an affiliate website and uses the funds to not only pay his bills but travel the world. He works only a few hours a week and has for the last few years.

His strategy?

Post and pray.

He has posted around 1000 articles with no other strategy than sheer numbers and it worked.
 

GoodluckChuck

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Hi @GoodluckChuck ,

Thank you for sharing. Some questions if you don’t mind answering:

1. You state that you are now working “part-time hours” for your 12k/mo (revenue?). Would you say you are on the low end or high end of the “part-time range” in terms of hours worked at present (e.g. 5hrs per week vs 25).

Do you have any plans to make this 100% passive or do you see yourself as always doing part time hours here and there indefinitely?

2. What were some of the biggest and most difficult obstacles you encountered during this process? From your post you made it really sound like a walk in the park (e.g. you travelled the world whilst doing this).

Do you see yourself as relatively talented at learning new things? You seemed to have been able to distinguish yourself as a website creator in the website market after only 2 years, when many website creators probably have trained for many more years than that yet probably still make much less income than you do.
Happy to answer these questions. You caught me as I just woke up with a cup of coffee in my hand so prepare for some long-winded answers. :)

1.High end or low end for part time work... It varies. I say part time but to be honest I don't really know how much time I spend working. To be clear, when I saw work part time I mean work part time on paying projects. The amount of time I've spent reading, taking courses, practicing on my own projects, etc. would account for much more than full time hours if I added them all up. It's been an obsession for me.

Did any of this feel like work to me? No, because not only do I enjoy learning but the idea of taking action now that will pay off later is extremely motivating to me.

So, when I say I work part time, I mean I work part time on acquiring and delivering client projects. The rest of my time is spent working on myself and my own projects. Without the second part, the first part wouldn't be paying so much after 2 years. To quantify it with a guess, I would say I've spent about 15 focused hours per week average on client projects over the last 2 years.

The way I work is not focused so I quantify this by thinking "If the client was standing there watching me how much time would I bill them for." It's not uncommon for me to be doing research on how to do something while I'm doing it. Learning on the fly.

1.2 Do I plan to make it 100% passive? No. This model can't be 100% passive. Even if I hire someone to manage it all for me, I have to manage them so it will take some of my time. The MRR part of this model suffers from client turnover meaning some clients drop out after a while so in order to keep the income the same I have to be making constant sales.

My plan for the marketing agency is to keep it going organically as I focus my power on things that can be either more passive or bring in exponentially more income.

If I created something that was 100% passive I might sell it for a lot of $. I'm a busy body and the idea of 100% passive doesn't seem all that sustainable to me. The world changes as do the markets in it so nothing lasts forever.

2. Most difficult obstacles... To put it in a ratio I attribute my success 3:1 mindset to skillset. In the beginning I was terrified of selling because I was unsure of what I could deliver. I learned to rely on my commitment rather than track record because I didn't have one. I told myself, "If I get this job I will not sleep until I get the results I promised."

After a few projects, I realized this was a good way to go about things because it allowed me to take on projects I was under-qualified for while being confident enough to sell them. Don't get me wrong, it was still difficult to sell because I still lacked confidence. I would find a million reasons why not to get on the phone. This resulted in me taking lots of courses... (Action faking)

As my skillset grew from the courses and practice, my confidence did as well and I was better able to take bigger bites and be more ambitious with my endeavors.

When I look back now I can see it is mostly mindset and self esteem that separates me now from me then. I have experience but I'm not doing things a whole lot different than I was then. If I could have been more courageous a year ago I could have probably been making a lot more money then. On the same token, I could probably be making 5x what I am now just by having a more advanced mindset...

This is the way it goes. We see things from the perspective of the place we're at. That's why I spend most of my free time now working on understanding mindset and how to shape that. The difference between someone with 100k in the bank and 100b in the bank is the way they view themselves and the world.

Another huge obstacle for me was comfort. When I'm comfortable I get lazzyyyyy. Traveling helped get me out of my comfort zone where I perform much better and with more vigor and endurance. Being in a new place where nobody speaks the language or gives 2 shits about me made me feel like I had to work a lot harder to survive. This made me work a lot harder. This is why Mexico City will always hold a special place in my heart. It's where I found my inner strength and courage and built the momentum that carried me to where I am today.

2.2 Am I good at picking up new skills? Yes. I've always been really good at developing new skills. It's a strength of mine. As a kid I was always better than my peers at skate boarding, baseball, subjects in school that interested me (I almost flunked out of high school). On the flip side my weakness is that I have a hard time sticking with things once I break past the initial difficulty phase. I just get bored. Maybe that's why I run a marketing agency with no niche. I like to learn new things then move on. :) Discipline is a challenge for me.

As for why I can charge more than other web developers and designers... That's just because I choose to. Pricing in this industry is incredible arbitrary. In the Fox Web School gang we focus on value pricing because it allows us to create win-win deals with every client. If I can make someone 100k with a new website then charging 20k is still a no brainer for everyone.

Do I get a knot in my stomach when I throw out a high price tag? Yeah... When they say yes immediately I wonder if I could have asked for more... I get about 50% of the projects I propose so I think that's okay.

A lot of web developers and coders don't understand why they can't make as much. A lot of them are self-proclaimed "bad at dealing with people". That's just a mindset + skillset thing. It takes practice like everything else as well as the courage to suck at it for a while.

My message to anyone in this industry that wants to make more is this: Work on your people skills and sell your own projects. You can ask for as much as you want. If you have a full time job then ask for a high amount that you feel like you probably won't get. An amount that if you did get it, you could quit your job and start freelance full time. After enough sales calls you will eventually find someone willing to pay this... It truly is a numbers game.
 

Crazy GG

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Hi @GoodluckChuck

Read you story - pretty amazing :)

Wanted to ask - how did you manage to get clients while travelling? Did you find that not being able to meet them made it harder for you to sell it?

Thanks in advance,
 

WillHurtDontCare

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These are great resources...

My suggestion is to split your time in half between doing and studying.

My approach to trying new things had changed a lot.

I start by writing down what I know now. I make a list of questions as thorough as I can and I answer them with my present knowledge.

Let's use surfing as an example since I'll be trying that soon.

I have never surfed or taken a lesson. I've spent a lot of time thinking about it though and applying my knowledge of snowboarding to what I expect surfing to be like.

Next, I'll rent a board and go give it a try. I'll probably struggle at some parts and be pretty good at others.

Then I'll go get a lesson. By this time I'll already have some working knowledge and experience to use as a foundation for learning the details. I'll likely have some questions and be able to get more out of the lesson than I would have with zero foundation.

This is what I recommend for people starting something like web design.

First, write down the steps you'll take the best you can with your current knowledge. Then, go find a YouTube video and follow along in buying a domain, setting up hosting, and start in on building the site.

See how far you can get. It will be a struggle and that's GOOD.

If you reach points you can't progress past, use Google to help. You can literally Google your way to building anything online...

Once you have a website live and you have produced something, then go find a course.

You will have a solid foundation of experience to build your knowledge on.

Without the foundation the knowledge will have no leg to stand on.

Ive learned to use courses as a boost rather than a foundation.

I'm sure will disagree, but one thing we can all agree on is that it's really easy to get into the trap of taking tons of course and feeling like you're taking action even though you aren't actually producing anything.

Producing vs Consuming 101.
You would probably enjoy Peak by Anders Ericsson. He is a professor of psychology who specializes in the study of expertise.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/1531864880/?tag=tff-amazonparser-20

Quotes:

“You seldom improve much without giving the task your full attention."

“What works? What doesn’t? And why?"

"But if math works the same way as chess, then we have lost a whole collection of children who might eventually have become quite accomplished in these areas if only they hadn’t been labeled as “no good at math” in the very beginning."

"The regular cycle of try, fail, get feedback, try again, and so on is how the students will build their mental representations."

"I would argue that we humans are most human when we’re improving ourselves. We, unlike any other animal, can consciously change ourselves, to improve ourselves in ways we choose. This distinguishes us from every other species alive today and, as far as we know, from every other species that has ever lived."

"You don’t build mental representations by thinking about something; you build them by trying to do something, failing, revising, and trying again, over and over. When you’re done, not only have you developed an effective mental representation for the skill you were developing, but you have also absorbed a great deal of information connected with that skill."

"I get it. People want to believe that there is magic in life, that not everything has to abide by the staid, boring rules of the real world. And what could be more magical than being born with some incredible ability that doesn’t require hard work or discipline to develop? There is an entire comic-book industry built on that premise—that sometimes something magical happens, and you suddenly acquire incredible powers. Unbeknownst to you, you were actually born on the planet Krypton and you can fly. Or you were bitten by a radioactive spider and you can cling to walls. Or you were exposed to cosmic radiation and now you can become invisible. But my decades of research in the area of expertise have convinced me that there is no magic. By examining the case of someone with exceptional abilities through the lens of those two earlier questions I posed—What is the talent? What practice led to the talent?—you can pull back the curtain and find what is really going on."

Make It Stick is also a great book on the science of learning. It goes through why most study strategies yield mediocre results and how you can learn more effectively. It was written by a novelist & 2 psychology researchers (a storyteller & 2 scientists, so ideas that have merit and are well written).

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0674729013/?tag=tff-amazonparser-20

Quotes

"Learning is stronger when it matters, when the abstract is made concrete and personal."

"In other words, the elements that shape your intellectual abilities lie to a surprising extent within your own control."

"Mastering the lecture or the text is not the same as mastering the ideas behind them."

"Trying to solve a problem before being taught the solution leads to better learning, even when errors are made in the attempt."

"The good news is that we now know of simple and practical strategies that anybody can use, at any point in life, to learn better and remember longer: various forms of retrieval practice, such as low-stakes quizzing and self-testing, spacing out practice, interleaving the practice of different but related topics or skills, trying to solve a problem before being taught the solution, distilling the underlying principles or rules that differentiate types of problems, and so on."

"Had he used the set of key concepts in the back of each chapter to test himself? Could he look at a concept like “conditioned stimulus,” define it, and use it in a paragraph? While he was reading, had he thought of converting the main points of the text into a series of questions and then later tried to answer them while he was studying? Had he at least rephrased the main ideas in his own words as he read? Had he tried to relate them to what he already knew? Had he looked for examples outside the text? The answer was no in every case."

"Many people believe that their intellectual ability is hardwired from birth, and that failure to meet a learning challenge is an indictment of their native ability. But every time you learn something new, you change the brain—the residue of your experiences is stored. It’s true that we start life with the gift of our genes, but it’s also true that we become capable through the learning and development of mental models that enable us to reason, solve, and create. In other words, the elements that shape your intellectual abilities lie to a surprising extent within your own control. Understanding that this is so enables you to see failure as a badge of effort and a source of useful information—the need to dig deeper or to try a different strategy. The need to understand that when learning is hard, you’re doing important work. To understand that striving and setbacks, as in any action video game or new BMX bike stunt, are essential if you are to surpass your current level of performance toward true expertise. Making mistakes and correcting them builds the bridges to advanced learning."
 

GoodluckChuck

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Hi @GoodluckChuck

Read you story - pretty amazing :)

Wanted to ask - how did you manage to get clients while travelling? Did you find that not being able to meet them made it harder for you to sell it?

Thanks in advance,
I've never met most of my clients face to face. Only phone calls and some video calls.

So, my clients come from all over.

While traveling I've met a lot of entrepreneurs and business people. I've got a lot of new jobs through contacts made while traveling. I have clients all over the world and tend to pick up work everywhere I go. Even if it's not immediate, it's not uncommon for someone to reach out to me 6 months later and ask if I can do something.
 

GoodluckChuck

Grateful Member
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Feb 2, 2017
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"Trying to solve a problem before being taught the solution leads to better learning, even when errors are made in the attempt."
This 100%. When people ask me how to get into something I tell them to try before they take any courses. I also suggest to write down what they know about the subject already. It's surprising how much you can guess about something and be pretty accurate. The more you do this, the better you get at guessing.
 

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