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Business aren't good, could be my final months. Help me flawlessly execute my final plan

gallagher99

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Feb 18, 2015
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Hey guys. I'd like to focus this discussion on the plan, the strategy on what I think would be a good guideline for the next few months, and NOT on the reasons why business aren't well.

Long story short;

> I'm from Brazil
> I have a denim/jeans shop AND a denim/jeans manufacture/industry (so I create and sell the denim/jeans). I buy the cloth and make it to a nice jeans pant.
> After lots of decisions (which aren't the discussion here) I decided that I have to sell UNIFORM for industries. I came with the conclusion that this segment is good.
> In my opinion we are in one of the worst time in the history of our country to make business with final clients, or consumers. BUT it is STILL good to sell to industries, since they always need to buy uniforms for their workers, AND they have to buy like every 3 months or 6 months top.
> I won't change who my company is, I'll just put like 30~50% of my manufacture power in the uniform market. Would be like a SIDE job (depending how my final plan works). Industry and store WILL still function 100% normal.
> We are in business since 1979, we were insanely famous on the region. But times are gone.
> When I say final months, I mean that if next 2 or 3 months are good for sales (the store), let's just say that I'll be in a very tough position.


Anyway.
I came up with a list of 100 industries that I CAN attack, that COULD buy from me.
My question is: How to procede? What would be the optimal strategy to make most deals and sell most uniforms?

I could send a letter to those industries.
I could send an e-mail.
I could telephone to them.
Like I said, I have all the machinary, I have the brand (for selling jeans B2C on a LOW price, I never sold uniforms), and I have the price.


I have some ideas on the marketing, for example, I could send a nice letter and talk about WHY they should buy uniform from a really nice company from 1979 that have expertise and know-how from decades. I could attach a piece of cloth with the logo of their company in it, OR some famous names on the cloth (because some companies like to have their logo or the name of the worker)

I'd highly appreciate ideas on execution of this.
Thanks
 

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Arun Siva

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I came up with a list of 100 industries that I CAN attack, that COULD buy from me.
have you reached out to people in this niche? have you done ample reserach? you need to hone in on one industry tackling 100 industries is mindlessness.

cold calling may work, but perhaps go out and actually talk to some people in where you want to position your product(s) in front of.

You have the right idea by first giving them something, but first you need to really have a good presentation ready for WHY they should select you. Even though you have been in business since 1979 doesnt mean a thing to them. they may have A B C supplier that is next in line that has been in business since 1978.... etc.

I would reach out to them personally and maybe get a face to face if you already know of some targeted companies you want to do business with.

When you say uniforms, are you targeting,

SCHOOL uniforms,
sports teams uniforms
unisex uniforms
nurse/ scrubs
manufacturing worker uniforms
police/military
etc etc

also you say that this is one of the worst periods, have you seen if there are any "wastage" in your facility? are you lean or how are your manufacturing methods/costs?
 
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gallagher99

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Feb 18, 2015
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About the 100 list.
I honestly didn't give that much thought. I mean, I tracked down industries nearby, and industries that USE uniforms, and industries that have above 20 workers.




I can manufacture pretty much any uniforms that I want.
School would be a little too hard since we are in July.

Some industries just like every worker using the same uniform.
So would be like:

 
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gallagher99

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Feb 18, 2015
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at this is one of the worst periods, have you seen if there are any "wastage" in your facility? are you lean or how are your manufacturing methods/costs?
I didn't express really well.

Besides my industry, I have a shop, a store.
So 75% of what I sell in my own shop, comes from what I produce.
My problem, when I say worst periods, comes from sales.
 

Arun Siva

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My problem, when I say worst periods, comes from sales.
then sell more; you can go about targeting universities, companies im sure there are a ton of companies in your city (if you have targeted all of them) then go to the next city and then the next.
 
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gallagher99

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Feb 18, 2015
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I was wondering if there was a guideline that I should follow.

For instance, first I send the letter, than I send a brochure/flyer/folder with a face to face conversation, than follow with a phone call.
Or I should forget everything and focus on phone call and if positive go for a face to face.
Or even e-mail for like thousands of companies, from those thousands, maybe 5 will buy from me and that would be enough to help me now.

I know that selling uniform WILL help me, I know with the right approach and right message I CAN SELL. I just wonder what would be the optimal approach order.
I can't afford F*cking up and losing.
 

Real Deal Denver

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I would call first to get a contact name. Who is in charge of the uniforms? Then you can contact that person and send them a PERSONAL email. After that, you have a lead in to another call - did you get my earlier email yesterday? We want to work with your company to provide uniforms. Then a lead in QUESTION - wherever you buy your uniforms now, are you happy with the quality? Do you think the price is too high? How many uniforms do you buy a year? And then - TRIAL CLOSE - what could I do to earn your business and introduce my uniforms to you?

From these probing questions you should be able to figure out if they're happy with their current uniform supplier. Look for something that you can exploit - price - quality - delivery time. Very rarely is anyone going to say they are totally happy, unless they're trying to get rid of you. And if they do THAT - TRIAL CLOSE again! For example - I could arrange our biggest discount for you, even if you don't buy on that scale. I'm sure once you see our uniforms you will agree we are the best in the business, because...

Always be probing - always look for a trial close - a reason for them to do business with you. Always FOLLOW UP later - never END a conversation at a dead end. You don't want them saying - didn't we already discuss that? NO - you have to have SOMETHING ELSE to offer them - which is your reason to call them back.

The larger accounts, if they show any interest at all, should be followed up more closely. Visit them in person. Send them a sample. Send them a hand written thank you note for their time. There are many things you can do to STAY IN THE PICTURE with them.

For my business, I offer to give my bigger customers a free consultation in their office, for their entire staff. First, this gets them thinking - why do I NEED a consultation - what is it that I don't know? I plant doubt in their mind - I STOP them thinking they know everything there is to know. Most don't take it. Fine - that's my plan. But THEN I follow up with emails, explaining a point or two a time - and then the emails are followed up with a phone call, to DISCUSS the email. One feeds off the other.

During this whole time I am becoming a trusted and respected adviser to them. I am no longer a stranger that they are too busy to deal with. Eventually, I pry open their pre-formed opinions and then they appreciate who I am and WHAT I CAN DO FOR THEM. Benefits! What can I do for THEM!

Think benefits all the time. Mass pricing - custom work - low prices for your economy line, and you DO have a deluxe line as well, for not much more money. Fast delivery. Something to PUSH their buttons.

Good luck.
 

WJK

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Interesting move. I think the main image that uniforms have is -- very Plain Jane. But, I bet you can create a steady cash cow. I see it as a background type of venture that can float you through hard times and give you a good base for your more trendy creations.

Take it very seriously. Like Real Deal Denver said, make a marketing program where you contact the decision makers. Ask a lot of questions. Make wonderful proposals.

I'd make your swatches with their logo or company name in their company colors -- but, go one better. Make one to hand them. Frame another of the swatches in a standard wall frame to give your prospect as a gift. Frames are cheap, but your swatch is a lot more valuable as a wall hanging. It's a daily reminder. I've seen people hang things like that with pride. You can put your sticker on the back with your contact information.

Also make the decision maker a cap with his name, title and his company name, in his company colors. A lot of that data can come from their "gate keeper" -- and most important people have a gate keeper. While you're at it, make the gate keeper a cap too.

When you get there, have a great presentation. This would be fun. If it's a pitch to guys, find some good looking women to do some uniform modeling. If it small setting, have you attractive assistant dressed in a uniform similiar to what you want to sell to them.

You can wear a modified uniform type of shirt and pants iwith your personal logo, as long as your not meeting with a guy in a suit. You should mirror your potential client's garb.

To start, try to get the normal day-to-day uniform business. Then a bonus area could be uniforms and items for special occasions. Most companies have special promotions, favored holidays and campaigns. Think of all of the items that can be given out for group indentity. They also have reward programs where they hand out special jackets for the winners. This is especially true among blue collar workers for safety programs.
Good luck!
 

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