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Would you hire me?

Would you hire me?

  • Yes.

    Votes: 4 26.7%
  • No.

    Votes: 3 20.0%
  • With more information maybe.

    Votes: 8 53.3%

  • Total voters
    15

LMRM

Contributor
Hello,

I would like to ask the question "would you hire me?" and pose it to the denizens of this forum. I am curious as to the responses that people avidly involved in the business world will give and how much they can vary. I ask that you look at my posts on this website before you make your decision as it will also help with the decision. I will be giving somewhat limited information as to not reveal so much about myself personally but I hope it will be sufficient in being able to give you enough information to make a decision.

Education:
  • High school graduate.
  • Current university student.
Work Experience:
  • None.
Achievements:
  • A's for Business Studies and Information Technology, B's in Mathematics and English in final high school exam.
  • First team Squash and Tennis regular.
Skills:
  • Advanced java programming.
  • Advanced SQL database programming.
  • Beginner C++ programming.
  • Level 2 first aid experience.
  • Debating.
Personal Traits:
  • Introverted.
  • Quiet.
  • Avid thinker.
  • Ambitious.
  • Eager.
  • Very difficult to get emotional.
  • Creative.
  • Unusual.
I will open a pole for the choices.

Thank you for reading.
 

Xeon

All Cars Kneel Before Pagani.
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
I voted for the 3rd choice, because you didn't mention what kind of job you're looking to be hired for, so there's infinite possibilities to your question.

Would I hire you to sew for me? No.
Would I hire you to write software? Maybe.
Would I hire you to teach me how to play tennis so that I'll at least have one more skill? Yes.
Would I hire you to do social media marketing? No.
 

404profound

Platinum Contributor
Speedway Pass
Hello,

I would like to ask the question "would you hire me?" and pose it to the denizens of this forum. I am curious as to the responses that people avidly involved in the business world will give and how much they can vary. I ask that you look at my posts on this website before you make your decision as it will also help with the decision. I will be giving somewhat limited information as to not reveal so much about myself personally but I hope it will be sufficient in being able to give you enough information to make a decision.

Education:
  • High school graduate.
  • Current university student.
Work Experience:
  • None.
Achievements:
  • A's for Business Studies and Information Technology, B's in Mathematics and English in final high school exam.
  • First team Squash and Tennis regular.
Skills:
  • Advanced java programming.
  • Advanced SQL database programming.
  • Beginner C++ programming.
  • Level 2 first aid experience.
  • Debating.
Personal Traits:
  • Introverted.
  • Quiet.
  • Avid thinker.
  • Ambitious.
  • Eager.
  • Very difficult to get emotional.
  • Creative.
  • Unusual.
I will open a pole for the choices.

Thank you for reading.
You have good skills. You haven't told me what can be accomplished with them. Most audiences are laymen when it comes to programming languages, they may know what a database is, or that C++ is a software development language. But They won't know that SQL saves a lot of money by making it easier to analyze huge amounts of data, or that C++ is extremely fast because it works close to the metal. You can never assume your audience will infer value from your skills. You have to tell them why your skills matter compared to, say, javascript.
 

NC Bidniss

Bronze Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
FASTLANE INSIDER
At all? Maybe. Today? No. I have no need for you. I think you should be a bit more specific. Rather than ask "would you hire me?", ask "would you hire me for ______ job?". You may be a good candidate for an entry level coding job, but not for a lower management position.

Also, if you're building a resume, leave the personality traits out. Adding "very difficult to get emotional", "avid thinker", and "unusual" are a bit off-putting. Also, stating you are quiet and introverted could disqualify you from a job where you would be required to work with/manage a team.
 

jpn

Bronze Contributor
Speedway Pass
FASTLANE INSIDER
I voted no.

For menial jobs like flipping burgers or working in retail, I’d consider you, depending on you personality.

For any non-menial job, no. I usually don’t hire people without any experience. There are always some exceptions, but your profile does not communicate any exceptions to me.

Exceptions I have in 2 classes:
Technical knowledge: I needed to hire a chemical engineer once. I hired someone who just finished his Masters degree and had done a few relevant internships. The chemistry side of our business was too complex for me, but not in the grand scheme of things. A junior with the right technical aptitude was fine.

Demonstratively smart and hungry: I don’t hire inexperienced people because I don’t want to have to train them and take them by the hand or overburden the team they will be a member of. But if they’re cheap enough, very smart and very driven, to the extent that I’m confident they will solve any minor roadblocks themselves. I might give it a shot.

I don’t see these two exceptions apply to you based on what you posted.
 

LMRM

Contributor
I voted no.

For menial jobs like flipping burgers or working in retail, I’d consider you, depending on you personality.

For any non-menial job, no. I usually don’t hire people without any experience. There are always some exceptions, but your profile does not communicate any exceptions to me.

Exceptions I have in 2 classes:
Technical knowledge: I needed to hire a chemical engineer once. I hired someone who just finished his Masters degree and had done a few relevant internships. The chemistry side of our business was too complex for me, but not in the grand scheme of things. A junior with the right technical aptitude was fine.

Demonstratively smart and hungry: I don’t hire inexperienced people because I don’t want to have to train them and take them by the hand or overburden the team they will be a member of. But if they’re cheap enough, very smart and very driven, to the extent that I’m confident they will solve any minor roadblocks themselves. I might give it a shot.

I don’t see these two exceptions apply to you based on what you posted.
So how would you see these 2 exceptions in someone? I know you used the chemical engineer one but do you have a more general module of assessment for it? What would also show that someone is smart and hungry?
 

jpn

Bronze Contributor
Speedway Pass
FASTLANE INSIDER
So how would you see these 2 exceptions in someone? I know you used the chemical engineer one but do you have a more general module of assessment for it? What would also show that someone is smart and hungry?
I'm afraid I cannot make it more general.

A warm introduction from someone whose opinion I value would get you a conversation. Then you'd have to demonstrate that you have the right stuff by coming into the conversation prepared and ready to add value. You can be wrong, but as long as its clear that you're smart and have done your homework I may be inclined to give it a shot.

Again though, I'm very biased against inexperienced employees. Probably because I'm most experienced in small/early-stage high-knowledge businesses. It just takes too long to get a junior person up to speed and productive.
 

COSenior

Gold Contributor
Speedway Pass
I don't see a poll either, but let me give you a tip. Everyone is right that you must specify what kind of job you're looking for. Then you also need to add benefits to your 'features'. For those 'features' that aren't your top skills, don't mention them. Put your best foot forward. I agree with leaving out the personality traits. People looking to hire will ferret out those they want. If you happen to have a conversation with a hiring manager and they ask if you're a team player, the answer is always yes unless you just can't stand people. Just because you're an introvert doesn't mean you can't be a team player, but if you say it up front, people will make assumptions.

Good luck.

PS, I'm not hiring, so no. :smile2:
 

Lee H

Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Don't ask yourself what your employer can do for you, ask what you can do for your employer.

Think of the answer to this for any opportunity you go for and research and prepare your answer.

That will impress your potential employer and show you have a good attitude and can potentially add value to a business.
 

AfterWind

Bronze Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
I picked the third option as this post reminds me of myself in the past.

A video maybe?

Grades are worth nothing.

I'll skip over skills as I want to see examples. What did you do to get those skills?
This might tell me how much you actually know not just what you say you know.
What is "advanced"? As it's very subjective and needs clarification.

Going over personal traits:
  • Introverted. - How is this helping anybody?
  • Quiet. - Again, how is this helping anybody? (Maybe for the future employer to not hire you)
  • Avid thinker. - I doubt you'd be here if you weren't thinking.
  • Ambitious. - Ok... but everyone without experience says that. next!
  • Eager. - Ok, build on that
  • Very difficult to get emotional. - Ok, that's a skill needed in software development.
  • Creative. - I don't want creative solutions. Just solutions.
  • Unusual. - How does that have to do with anything?
This is not a game about telling everyone how you think about yourself and how good you are with software. That's not how you should approach this. You are here to convince me to hire you on a position that says "Full time x developer".
 

MJ DeMarco

Raving Lunatic
Staff member
Speedway Pass
FASTLANE INSIDER
LEGENDARY CONTRIBUTOR
Summit Attendee
I vote YES, but obviously, really depends on the job.

I see no poll.
Probably because Tapatalk isn't a native forum app.
 

splok

Gold Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
FASTLANE INSIDER
Summit Attendee
Skills:
  • Advanced java programming.
  • Advanced SQL database programming.
I assume that these are the things that you'd like to get hired to do. None of the other info would matter to me. But even these points don't really matter because you've just told me what you can do. You haven't shown me that you can actually do them though. If you had posted a link to a portfolio that showcased and discussed a number of projects that you've completed, then I would be able to make a useful decision.

If you want someone to hire you, you need to make it as easy as possible for the person doing the hiring. Also recognize that hiring you is a risk to that person, and the more you can do to mitigate that risk, the easier things will get. If you can definitively prove to them that you're currently capable of doing the exact job they need done (via your portfolio), then all that's left is personality fit and hoop jumping (not that those are always insignificant, but step 1 is prove you can do the job).
 
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