The Entrepreneur Forum | Startups | Entrepreneurship | Starting a Business | Motivation | Success

I Don't Think Fastlane Success will Fulfill What I Want.

Fightrepreneur

Contributor
May 5, 2018
35
49
99
Hello TFLF,

I am posting this so that some more experienced guys may be able to pick apart my ideas/notions and/or give me no BS feedback. This is a rather long-ish story so I thank you if you make it through.

TLDR: The only attractive thing to me about TFL is having time/money to train martial arts and take shooting courses to fulfill a "warrior fantasy," however that will always remain unfulfilling because I won't actually be using the skills in a real world scenario/job. I know law enforcement isn't about hurting people/being a tough guy, but I am shooting for a career in it because I feel, after discussing with many people who know me and know law enforcement, that it would fulfill my calling.

My whole life I have always wanted to be a warrior. I know it sounds cliche, but I loved guns from a young age. I was obsessed with WW2 History, I loved building forts. I also liked picking fights, not to hurt the other guy per se, but just because I loved facing the threat of another individual (I did not go around beating people up, and by 6th grade my "picking fights" phase was over).

I came from a family that didn't support this kind of behavior (anti-military etc), but they did let me have airsoft. In retrospect I think I should have been put in a wrestling program but oh well.

At 20 Years old I attempted to join the Marines, but was not allowed in the military because I am diagnosed as Bipolar 2. Sucks, but I understand the concern (I should add that I have never once harmed myself or others or committed any sort of crime).

I instead got into studying the Middle East and Arabic and had fantasies of perhaps working in intelligence. I graduated Magna Cum Laude and started in graduate school for Counter Terrorism. It soon became clear to me that studying CT and fighting terrorists are two very different things. I had combat veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan in my program and I envied their training, knowledge, and overall bad-assery, knowing that would never be me.

While in grad school I studied abroad in the Middle East. I F*cking hated it, for the most part. However I discovered Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, and quickly realized that studying martial arts was far more fulfilling than studying Arabic and Counter Terror.

I ended up quitting grad school and working odd jobs so I could train martial arts, while living with my girlfriend and then parents. At this point I was age 23. I then decided that I wanted to cage fight, so I started training MMA along with BJJ.

I soon fell into a job doing heating which supported my training, but the shitty part was that the best MMA school was an hour from where I got off work. F*ck it, I said. I made the commute for a year.

I put loads of work in for MMA, and ended up winning an amateur fight. It was an experience like no other, and something money absolutely cannot buy. But I over time realized/began considering, getting hit in the head is F*cking horrible for you, and these guys who go far in MMA most likely have permanent damage to their brains. With the rising concern in CTE in contact athletes, I decided (this week actually) to hang up the gloves. I will be training BJJ still very regularly, but will not be participating in activity involving contact to the head.

I am applying for a corrections officer job, with the goal of having a career in law enforcement (I found out that my bipolar 2 condition is waivable, especially given clean record). My father in law and friends worked in corrections for years, and they said the combination of my martial arts skills, type-A personality, and my strong sense of duty, right, and wrong make me a very good personality match.

I don't care about working my whole life. For me, there's not point to being "retired," I want a challenging job where I stand between good guys and bad guys, and have to think under pressure and physical threat.

Very open to criticism, like I said, I have an interview for corrections lined up and I am absolutely open to the idea that it will be a mundane, boring, day-to-day existence, but it will still require me to be on my toes and physically alert, and I will benefit from having martial arts skills. I see it as a stepping stone to a career in law enforcement.
 

Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum. Subscribe.

Will-v-the-World

Bronze Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
May 10, 2018
86
155
147
US
In my mind, business is the ultimate war. It is the race to solve problems for humanity. Many businesses want to solve a given problem, but only the best business will capitalize. If you want to make a big impact on humanity and fight against other businesses to fill needs, entrepreneurship is for you. However, there won’t be much physical fighting involved unless you get so big that you gain enemies like Elon Musk did.
 
OP
OP
F

Fightrepreneur

Contributor
May 5, 2018
35
49
99
In my mind, business is the ultimate war. It is the race to solve problems for humanity. Many businesses want to solve a given problem, but only the best business will capitalize. If you want to make a big impact on humanity and fight against other businesses to fill needs, entrepreneurship is for you. However, there won’t be much physical fighting involved unless you get so big that you gain enemies like Elon Musk did.
I definitely agree that the same principles that allow for winning wars, winning mma fights, etc are what make for a successful entrepreneur.

The problem is, I don’t know what need to fill, ie, what war to fight.

I know the stance on “following your passion”... but I honestly don’t care if I never retire with millions.

I want to be the physical barrier between violence happening to good people by bad people. I suppose I could start a private security firm down the line, but I really lack the knowledge and experience to do that now, and would not be taken seriously.
 

Will-v-the-World

Bronze Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
May 10, 2018
86
155
147
US
The problem is, I don’t know what need to fill, ie, what war to fight.
That’s what’s you have to find. Do some forum research on finding needs or finding ideas (same thing).
I know the stance on “following your passion”... but I honestly don’t care if I never retire with millions.
Having money doesn’t mean you have to buy lambos and live in a mansion. Money just means freedom. Freedom from work every day, freedom to buy what you want, freedom to pursue what you want, etc.
 

Will-v-the-World

Bronze Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
May 10, 2018
86
155
147
US
I want to be the physical barrier between violence happening to good people by bad people. I suppose I could start a private security firm down the line, but I really lack the knowledge and experience to do that now, and would not be taken seriously.
Having money will allow you to do whatever you want, freely. Also, who knows, your goals might change once you’ve been here a while or once you’ve started a successful business.
 
OP
OP
F

Fightrepreneur

Contributor
May 5, 2018
35
49
99
That’s what’s you have to find. Do some forum research on finding needs or finding ideas (same thing).

Having money doesn’t mean you have to buy lambos and live in a mansion. Money just means freedom. Freedom from work every day, freedom to buy what you want, freedom to pursue what you want, etc.
Yeah I was spending a lot of time around the forum a month ago but every time I’d look into something it seemed saturated/I had no way to add value.

Eventually I felt like it was action faking. I tried to set up Upwork but my skills are so saturated on their that they wouldn’t even let me make the account (although I I know freelance is not fast lane).

I guess I do have the mindset now of looking for needs in the market, but I’ll have to be working in the meantime of course, and every idea I’ve played with is generally being done already once I dig around.

The thrill of physical combat is definitely hard to replace, again, winning a fight is an experience money cannot buy, as I’m sure successfully providing value in the marketplace can be.

All that being said, I’m a voracious reader and I finish books like a madman, so I’m definitely exposing myself to ideas.
 
Last edited:

Will-v-the-World

Bronze Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
May 10, 2018
86
155
147
US
Yeah I was spending a lot of time around the forum a month ago but every time I’d look into something it seemed saturated/I had no way to add value.

Eventually I felt like it was action faking. I tried to set up Upwork but my skills are so saturated on their that they wouldn’t even let me make the account (although I I know freelance is not fast lane).

I guess I do have the mindset now of looking for needs in the market, but I’ll have to be working in the meantime of course, and every idea I’ve played with is generally being done already once I dig around.

The thrill of physical combat is definitely hard to replace, again, winning a fight is an experience money cannot buy, as I’m sure successfully providing value in the marketplace can be.
Just look for gaps in the market that you can fill.

I found my business idea by adding the extension “Keywords Everywhere” to google chrome. It basically shows the monthly search volume for all searches and related searches, it’s amazing for finding unfilled demands in the market.

If you want a biz idea, I recommend adding that extension and reading the other threads on the forum about finding ideas.
 

MJ DeMarco

Administrator
Staff member
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Jul 23, 2007
29,473
102,626
3,751
Fountain Hills, AZ
I guess I do have the mindset now of looking for needs in the market
Read Unscripted. This isn't rocket science. But you're making it such.

"Needs in the market" isn't something grandiose and never seen before.

It's exposing the value array and skewing 2 or 3 value attributes.

That's it.

Boom.

You're in business.

No need to reinvent the wheel.
 

MJ DeMarco

Administrator
Staff member
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Jul 23, 2007
29,473
102,626
3,751
Fountain Hills, AZ
These will help...


 

Mattie

Platinum Contributor
Speedway Pass
May 28, 2014
2,929
3,913
916
Netherlands
Hello TFLF,

I am posting this so that some more experienced guys may be able to pick apart my ideas/notions and/or give me no BS feedback. This is a rather long-ish story so I thank you if you make it through.

TLDR: The only attractive thing to me about TFL is having time/money to train martial arts and take shooting courses to fulfill a "warrior fantasy," however that will always remain unfulfilling because I won't actually be using the skills in a real world scenario/job. I know law enforcement isn't about hurting people/being a tough guy, but I am shooting for a career in it because I feel, after discussing with many people who know me and know law enforcement, that it would fulfill my calling.

My whole life I have always wanted to be a warrior. I know it sounds cliche, but I loved guns from a young age. I was obsessed with WW2 History, I loved building forts. I also liked picking fights, not to hurt the other guy per se, but just because I loved facing the threat of another individual (I did not go around beating people up, and by 6th grade my "picking fights" phase was over).

I came from a family that didn't support this kind of behavior (anti-military etc), but they did let me have airsoft. In retrospect I think I should have been put in a wrestling program but oh well.

At 20 Years old I attempted to join the Marines, but was not allowed in the military because I am diagnosed as Bipolar 2. Sucks, but I understand the concern (I should add that I have never once harmed myself or others or committed any sort of crime).

I instead got into studying the Middle East and Arabic and had fantasies of perhaps working in intelligence. I graduated Magna Cum Laude and started in graduate school for Counter Terrorism. It soon became clear to me that studying CT and fighting terrorists are two very different things. I had combat veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan in my program and I envied their training, knowledge, and overall bad-assery, knowing that would never be me.

While in grad school I studied abroad in the Middle East. I f*cking hated it, for the most part. However I discovered Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, and quickly realized that studying martial arts was far more fulfilling than studying Arabic and Counter Terror.

I ended up quitting grad school and working odd jobs so I could train martial arts, while living with my girlfriend and then parents. At this point I was age 23. I then decided that I wanted to cage fight, so I started training MMA along with BJJ.

I soon fell into a job doing heating which supported my training, but the shitty part was that the best MMA school was an hour from where I got off work. f*ck it, I said. I made the commute for a year.

I put loads of work in for MMA, and ended up winning an amateur fight. It was an experience like no other, and something money absolutely cannot buy. But I over time realized/began considering, getting hit in the head is f*cking horrible for you, and these guys who go far in MMA most likely have permanent damage to their brains. With the rising concern in CTE in contact athletes, I decided (this week actually) to hang up the gloves. I will be training BJJ still very regularly, but will not be participating in activity involving contact to the head.

I am applying for a corrections officer job, with the goal of having a career in law enforcement (I found out that my bipolar 2 condition is waivable, especially given clean record). My father in law and friends worked in corrections for years, and they said the combination of my martial arts skills, type-A personality, and my strong sense of duty, right, and wrong make me a very good personality match.

I don't care about working my whole life. For me, there's not point to being "retired," I want a challenging job where I stand between good guys and bad guys, and have to think under pressure and physical threat.

Very open to criticism, like I said, I have an interview for corrections lined up and I am absolutely open to the idea that it will be a mundane, boring, day-to-day existence, but it will still require me to be on my toes and physically alert, and I will benefit from having martial arts skills. I see it as a stepping stone to a career in law enforcement.
Hmm...I have a similar story. In 1989 I wanted to join the Airforce and fly. I studied a lot of WWII, Vietnam, and come for a long line of Warriors who fought in many different wars. I am always surrounded by warriors, even dated them. I watch military videos, and never joined the Airforce, because back in 1989 women weren't allowed to fly on the front lines so they told me back then. About 1995 when I had a child, they started allowing women to be on the front lines, but I had a child, and couldn't imagine leaving baby behind. Now Entrepreneurship kind of feeds that warrior spirit.

I study just about everything military/spiritual. Even watch flying videos. Now I'll never be that kind of warrior. I believe I just found other ways to use the energy. Entrepreneurship is the art of war. Life is actually. Survival of the fittest. There's lots of ways to use that fantasy/fiction in writing, painting, drawing, various types of literature. There are survival camps for youth you coach, and I'm sure a lot of other outdoor adventure parks, sports, recreational activities. I think everyone in here has this warrior spirit. Not anything new. Most of us have read the book "The Art of War". If you really love the challenge, you can mountain climb, river water rafting, and other extreme adventures. I suppose it's just how you use your energy, and what desire to experience in life.
 

Mattie

Platinum Contributor
Speedway Pass
May 28, 2014
2,929
3,913
916
Netherlands
The problem is, I don’t know what need to fill, ie, what war to fight.
There is no war to fight in actuality. Usually we war with ourselves. When the war is over, and you've surrendered the urge to fight, you reach beyond another place of being a true warrior. The warrior only fights when necessary, last resort. The win-lose mentality is where you feel you need to fight everyone in your path. Win-win you the war is won for everyone.
 

Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum. Subscribe.

OP
OP
F

Fightrepreneur

Contributor
May 5, 2018
35
49
99
Read Unscripted. This isn't rocket science. But you're making it such.

"Needs in the market" isn't something grandiose and never seen before.

It's exposing the value array and skewing 2 or 3 value attributes.

That's it.

Boom.

You're in business.

No need to reinvent the wheel.
Hey MJ thanks for dropping in.

I’ve read both your books but it’s been several months so I plan to re read.

I’ve also seen those videos but will re watch as well. Always worth refreshing.
 

Merging Left

Silver Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
Jul 20, 2014
393
700
279
29
Have you participated in, or considered participating in the extreme obstacle course races? Like Tough Mudder.

It's not a war/battle in the classic sense since you don't have a physical opponent, but you are essentially competing against yourself and against the obstacles (which are much less likely to leave you with a concussion).

Plus, there are opportunities as this type of race continues to grow in global popularity. People literally travel around the globe to attend these races.
 

TheOrchestrator

Freedom Fighter
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Feb 8, 2018
59
200
155
36
Houston, TX
Welcome to the forum! Thank you for opening yourself to criticism and being willing to accept some "no BS" feedback. Being open to other perspectives is one of the first steps to growth. I believe that you came here for guidance, so I'll do my best to help.

I wouldn't consider myself a successful entrepreneur (yet), but I know enough about people to be able to perceive what might be your issue here. What I've gotten from this post is that you have a significant problem with setting limitations on who you are and what you could be. Sure, you like the art of combat and studying war, and that's cool (I personally love martial arts and did it for many years. I prefer to study martial arts that are actually practical in real life scenarios, which leaves out probably 95% of what is taught in most martial arts schools today, lol.).

However, there's this implicit assumption that a "warrior" or "fighter" is all that you are, and it's all that you could ever be satisfied with doing. Are you really sure about that? One of the most important developments of modern psychology is the revelation of how little we actually know about ourselves, including what we're good at, what we'd enjoy, and what hidden potential we have. Let's hope that psychology is right, because if psychology is wrong, then from an economic standpoint, you really aren't that valuable to the world at all. Value comes down to the simple principle of supply and demand. In an era where the "warrior" archetype is rarely needed anymore, where are you going to fit in? Do you know how many people in the world "can fight"? A lot, I'm sure. So high supply and low demand...I think you know where I'm going here.

If the only thing you are useful for is being an overseas-stationed-pawn in some global conflict that you don't fully understand, nor have any real say-so in (soldier), or as a prison guard who just stands around all day and hauls inmates around, how is this contributing to anything other than someone else's interests? That "sense of justice" and strong "feeling of right and wrong" that you have? Yeah, that's going to be very useful for someone who's just looking for another naïve-yet-noble brute to make some money off of.

But you know what? Something tells me that there is more to you than you may think, and that you are just afraid to try to find out. I don't know why, perhaps it's out of fear of failing or losing the identity that you've grown so comfortable with. There's probably 100s of ways that you can contribute to the world and generate value (focus on that word, because that's where the money comes from) for others, and perhaps this may include an integration of your combat knowledge with something else (perhaps some stay-at-home moms in your community would be willing to pay for some self-defense training classes? Is someone already doing this? Are they doing it well? What about designing your own unique fighting system that you think would benefit local law enforcement?). OR you could end up learning and applying skills that you never thought you were capable of learning, skills that are high demand, and see where it takes you.

You're so focused on this one, ultra-narrow path that you haven't allowed yourself to grow and learn more about what else you might be capable of. Instead, you want the world to bend itself into wanting the only thing that you are willing to provide, regardless of whether it's even needed. Unless you are planning on signing up as some street vigilante, then you've seriously painted yourself into a corner, and it's time to expand your thinking.

So here's a new question: Instead of what you are comfortable with (seriously, who cares?), what would you be WILLING to do that would stretch you outside of your comfort zone, teach you more about yourself and your capabilities, and bring real value to other people's lives?
 
Last edited:

Late Bloomer

Gold Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
Apr 17, 2018
950
1,310
362
Excellent intro, Fight.

Remember in business you don't have to conquer all foes, just get enough of the profits for yourself!

And Will is right on. MJ talks about Lambos because that's what inspired him since he was a kid. Replace it with your own passionate touchstone for living life on your own terms.

At 20 Years old I attempted to join the Marines, but was not allowed in the military because I am diagnosed as Bipolar 2.
Do you know for sure that all the other military service branches would also reject you?

I want a challenging job where I stand between good guys and bad guys, and have to think under pressure and physical threat.
What are the top ten civilian industries/careers where this is what's needed? You mentioned law enforcement. Private security? What else? Are there trade magazines, web sites, people you can do informational interviews with to explore potential career paths?

The other day I was at a local college. A couple of guys on the college staff stopped in the middle of the hallway right by where I was, and had a long conversation. One of them just got back from a convention in DC about security risk management for educational institutions. They conference had government and military people present about cyber-security, terrorism risks, etc. Unfortunately I didn't overhear the name of the convention, but if you could attend something like that you would definitely be among your own people for sure.
 
OP
OP
F

Fightrepreneur

Contributor
May 5, 2018
35
49
99
On a practical note, I do feel there is value in my martial arts skills if I can leverage them properly. Sure, a lot of people train BJJ, and a lot of people fight MMA, but a lot of people do a lot of things.

I've trained with police officers who, quite frankly, wouldn't stand a chance against me or some of the animals I've trained with were they to say, lose their gun/taser etc. The nice thing about BJJ and MMA is it quickly determines what is and isn't effective (I agree that tons of martial arts are as they say "bullshido").

There are a lot of great martial arts programs out there, and a lot of bogus ones as well. A self defense program geared towards a niche population is something that is certainly in the realm of possibilities for me, but I honestly think you are right in that I should branch out and ask more of myself.

I am willing to do branch out my skills and development. I think even in the MMA and martial arts world there is plenty of room to provide value, as the sport and hobby have so many random needs that pop up (think things like Defense Soap, etc, which is really just overpriced tea tree oil, the point being other people are finding these opportunities).

Again, thank you for the feedback. I am capable of doing many things and I do not want to limit myself. Business is a war of its own, and perhaps I need to expand my definition of "warrior."
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
F

Fightrepreneur

Contributor
May 5, 2018
35
49
99
Excellent intro, Fight.

Remember in business you don't have to conquer all foes, just get enough of the profits for yourself!

And Will is right on. MJ talks about Lambos because that's what inspired him since he was a kid. Replace it with your own passionate touchstone for living life on your own terms.



Do you know for sure that all the other military service branches would also reject you?



What are the top ten civilian industries/careers where this is what's needed? You mentioned law enforcement. Private security? What else? Are there trade magazines, web sites, people you can do informational interviews with to explore potential career paths?

The other day I was at a local college. A couple of guys on the college staff stopped in the middle of the hallway right by where I was, and had a long conversation. One of them just got back from a convention in DC about security risk management for educational institutions. They conference had government and military people present about cyber-security, terrorism risks, etc. Unfortunately I didn't overhear the name of the convention, but if you could attend something like that you would definitely be among your own people for sure.
Thanks for the thoughtful reply!

I think cyber security would be an interesting angle for sure, and its obviously huge in today's day and age.

I also have several years of Arabic under my belt, and although I hate traveling (I am a man of routine), and I am years away from fluency, I can read the alphabet and am way ahead of someone who hasn't even started yet, plus I did have a knack for it while studying, and there are plenty of opportunities to leverage this skill that don't involve extensive travel.

Unfortunately a positive Bipolar II diagnosis is, at this point in time, disqualifying for all branches of the military. But I've moved on from that in any case.

For now, I need to be working to support myself, and the corrections job offers decent benefits. As you can imagine, the cost of my medication requires that I take health insurance very seriously. Yes.. slowlane, time for money, etc etc, but without the health benefits I'm more or less screwed until I can afford decent insurance on my own.

Still, plenty of time for entrepreneurship when I'm off work, and like I said, I am not someone who is afraid of hard work.

As I said before, I think expanding my definition of "warrior" and applying the same mindset that helped me in MMA will be huge in figuring out what I need to do.
 

Late Bloomer

Gold Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
Apr 17, 2018
950
1,310
362
As I said before, I think expanding my definition of "warrior" and applying the same mindset that helped me in MMA will be huge in figuring out what I need to do.
This may take you a while. I hope you continue to share your discoveries, ideas, journey with the forum. Even if all you have is "I'm still trying to figure it out!" It would be great to see you land an ideal day job and also have some business venture that totally inspires you, that makes you feel great about being an a$$-kicking good guy!
 

TheOrchestrator

Freedom Fighter
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Feb 8, 2018
59
200
155
36
Houston, TX
As I said before, I think expanding my definition of "warrior" and applying the same mindset that helped me in MMA will be huge in figuring out what I need to do.
One thing I'm beginning to learn is that as you explore different avenues outside of your comfort zone, you begin to find that your background experiences can sometimes give you an angle or perspective on things that others may not have. So no knowledge gets wasted here, man. Take the warrior with you (Yeah, I actually cringed when I typed it, lol).
 

sparechange

Gold Contributor
Speedway Pass
Nov 11, 2016
1,205
1,396
435
Canada (Vancouver/Calgary)
you sound like a person that is more suited towards a career in police work.

cops down here in Canada get paid around 50-60k to start and you can move up to 100k+ year, i assume its similar in the US.

pretty easy job, sit in your car all day and write tickets (depending on where you are)

if you are in the USA maybe a career in the DEA/ATF or bounty hunter work would interest you.
 

TKDTyler

Gold Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Aug 25, 2014
424
1,362
424
28
Hey man, let me offer some prespective.

I identify with being a fighter more than most people. I’ve done taekwondo for 25 years, represented the US internationally since 2006, and if I’m being honest, had a good shot at being an Olympian for 2020 if I continued.

So you could say that fighting is my first passion and true passion. I retired from competing last year and it has been a journey since.

Here’s some realizations through my experience:

1. At the end of your life, you have to be happy with how you lived your life. Being a fighter and a competitor is inherently a selfish pursuit, and as such, nobody will care about the achievements except for yourself. There really is no legacy in fighting.

2. Martial arts as a profession is the exact opposite. But it is not about fighting - it is about character development and it can be fast lane given the right system. Many of my friends own multiple successful schools and they eventually can meet CENTS if structured correctly.

Additionally, you get to directly affect the lives of children which is rewarding in and of itself. Create impact on a bigger scale than yourself. It’s not easy, but it’s possible. (Please don’t make a McDojo)

3. Great martial artists make great entrepreneurs. Great athletes make great entrepreneurs. I don’t need to go into the details, but the combination of the two is dealt in the world of business.

4. As someone said earlier, you are heavily invested in limiting beliefs. I would go as far to say you’re using your bipolar disorder as a limiting belief (I mean this in the most non-offensive way possible. Bipolar disorder is a real thing and I take mental health very seriously).

I would really advocate to learn to meditate and center yourself. Quiet down that inner voice and change your limiting beliefs by actively addressing any negative thoughts toward your goals.

It is amazing what mindset can do in the world where most do not present.

5. Success is momentary. You want to be a “warrior” but to what end? Yes you are fulfilling this need to live a certain life, and that’s your blueprint. There is nothing wrong with it. But again, at the end of your life, will you regret not making a bigger impact?

That path can be filled with loneliness, or it can be filled with fulfillment depending on what you do with it. But you need to figure out what you are trying to get out of it.

For me, fighting was my escape. It was my zen. There was no other place, to this day, that I could find a purer happiness than when I am in the moment, competing with the best in the world.

Success was a byproduct, but the process is what I fell in love with. That mindset will go with me anywhere I go and in everything I do.

I believe we as humans can become passionate about anything given the right environment and time. It’s really only about how you view what you have in front of your eyes.
 

Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum. Subscribe.

OP
OP
F

Fightrepreneur

Contributor
May 5, 2018
35
49
99
Hey man, let me offer some prespective.

I identify with being a fighter more than most people. I’ve done taekwondo for 25 years, represented the US internationally since 2006, and if I’m being honest, had a good shot at being an Olympian for 2020 if I continued.

So you could say that fighting is my first passion and true passion. I retired from competing last year and it has been a journey since.

Here’s some realizations through my experience:

1. At the end of your life, you have to be happy with how you lived your life. Being a fighter and a competitor is inherently a selfish pursuit, and as such, nobody will care about the achievements except for yourself. There really is no legacy in fighting.

2. Martial arts as a profession is the exact opposite. But it is not about fighting - it is about character development and it can be fast lane given the right system. Many of my friends own multiple successful schools and they eventually can meet CENTS if structured correctly.

Additionally, you get to directly affect the lives of children which is rewarding in and of itself. Create impact on a bigger scale than yourself. It’s not easy, but it’s possible. (Please don’t make a McDojo)

3. Great martial artists make great entrepreneurs. Great athletes make great entrepreneurs. I don’t need to go into the details, but the combination of the two is dealt in the world of business.

4. As someone said earlier, you are heavily invested in limiting beliefs. I would go as far to say you’re using your bipolar disorder as a limiting belief (I mean this in the most non-offensive way possible. Bipolar disorder is a real thing and I take mental health very seriously).

I would really advocate to learn to meditate and center yourself. Quiet down that inner voice and change your limiting beliefs by actively addressing any negative thoughts toward your goals.

It is amazing what mindset can do in the world where most do not present.

5. Success is momentary. You want to be a “warrior” but to what end? Yes you are fulfilling this need to live a certain life, and that’s your blueprint. There is nothing wrong with it. But again, at the end of your life, will you regret not making a bigger impact?

That path can be filled with loneliness, or it can be filled with fulfillment depending on what you do with it. But you need to figure out what you are trying to get out of it.

For me, fighting was my escape. It was my zen. There was no other place, to this day, that I could find a purer happiness than when I am in the moment, competing with the best in the world.

Success was a byproduct, but the process is what I fell in love with. That mindset will go with me anywhere I go and in everything I do.

I believe we as humans can become passionate about anything given the right environment and time. It’s really only about how you view what you have in front of your eyes.
Great perspective from a world class martial artist! Thanks man.

I’ll address the limiting beliefs - I agree. I have used my bipolar disorder as a limiting belief... but that has changed recently.

I’ve talked to some people and I’m reading a book that frame bipolar 2 as a potential advantage, when properly managed.

Meditation is definitely something I’m looking into as well - any recommendations on getting started?

Again, great perspective
 

TKDTyler

Gold Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Aug 25, 2014
424
1,362
424
28
Great perspective from a world class martial artist! Thanks man.

I’ll address the limiting beliefs - I agree. I have used my bipolar disorder as a limiting belief... but that has changed recently.

I’ve talked to some people and I’m reading a book that frame bipolar 2 as a potential advantage, when properly managed.

Meditation is definitely something I’m looking into as well - any recommendations on getting started?

Again, great perspective
Kanye West believes his bipolar ness is his superpower. It’s his enabler for his artistry. Aside from his antics, he makes beautiful art and has changed/infku fed more than just the music industry. Framing is everything!

Shoot me a PM and we can talk about the meditation stuff
 

HackVenture

Digital Marketer
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Mar 11, 2011
341
481
236
Planet Earth
So you want to be a warrior.

How about a rich warrior?

Money gives you freedom to do stuff, it doesn't restrict you to stuff.

A rich warrior at the very least never needs to worry about mortgages and groceries money etc.

At best, a rich warrior could sponsor mentees, fighting tournaments for good, sponsor outreach activities that spread the good word of your craft.

So back to the question of whether fastlane success will fulfill what you want.

Think a more accurate question would be to ask..

Would you rather be a rich warrior or a poor/not-rich warrior?
 

MTF

Never give up
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
May 1, 2011
2,786
13,525
2,804

TonyStark

I'm not dead yet
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Jul 20, 2015
2,118
4,031
1,025
26
Austin, Texas
I was in the MMA business since 14, and while it is fun, it doesn’t bring in money.

I know so many guys that still work bartender and bouncer jobs late into their 30’s.

Does it make them badass?

No.

Succeeding at life makes you badass.

Do that.

Don’t be like them.

Most of them are meatheads anyways. Lol

It’s still cool to do it on the side, as a hobby, but it’s not a way to support yourself.

But maybe if you found a product to sell/need in the market?
 

Danny Sullivan

Bronze Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Jul 2, 2018
201
392
187
Germany
Hey Fightrepreneur,

as i was reading your thread, some ideas came to mind.

1. I can't recommend the book "King, Warrior, Magician, Lover" from Robert Moore enough. It makes you stand back and look at yourself from a different perspective that's really unique (imo) and might help you.

2. I recognized security business and police as job recommendations - have you considered becoming a Firefighter? I can only speak about the "job training" here in germany and it's very tough. One needs to be very fit, sturdy, agile and enduring.

3. If fighting itself is hard for you to not include in your daily routine - maybe redirect the energy and effort towards training others and / or youtube training guidance videos?

Maybe this helps a bit.
 

Dunkafelics

Silver Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Jun 12, 2015
318
713
299
Vancouver, Canada
@Fightrepreneur

Welcome to the forum and interesting to see that you've applied as a Correctional Officer. Here are some things that you need to think about over the next few days:

I've trained with police officers who, quite frankly, wouldn't stand a chance against me or some of the animals I've trained with were they to say, lose their gun/taser etc. The nice thing about BJJ and MMA is it quickly determines what is and isn't effective (I agree that tons of martial arts are as they say "bullshido").
No one in the law enforcement community will give a **** about your training in MMA/BJJ. It is a good asset to have, but you will be trained in their use of force standards and practices. In a Correctional environment, you will be outnumbered and inmates will most likely attack you from behind. Start developing your conflict resolution and communication skills in preparation for training scenarios.

Take it from someone who has worked in the field for a few years. A career as a Correctional officer will provide a reliable paycheque and benefits and if that is what you need, then you are set. You will have great friendships with co-workers and will be able to tell good stories at events as well.

However, in my opinion, the pursuit of the entrepreneurship and being able to connect and help others grow outside of prison walls is far more satisfying than any experience I have had on the inside.
 
Last edited:

Late Bloomer

Gold Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
Apr 17, 2018
950
1,310
362
Does it make them badass?

No.

Succeeding at life makes you badass.

Do that.
AWESOME post, Jason. That would make a really cool motivational poster. Very inspiring!

I don't self-identify as a fighter/warrior type. But, it's been great to see the warrior mentality at work in this thread. Lots of good mindset and motivation material for everyone.
 
OP
OP
F

Fightrepreneur

Contributor
May 5, 2018
35
49
99
@Fightrepreneur

Welcome to the forum and interesting to see that you've applied as a Correctional Officer. Here are some things that you need to think about over the next few days:



2. No one in the law enforcement community will give a **** about your training in MMA/BJJ. It is a good asset to have, but you will be trained in their use of force standards and practices. In a Correctional environment, you will be outnumbered and inmates will most likely attack you from behind. Start developing your conflict resolution and communication skills in preparation for training scenarios.

Take it from someone who has worked in the field for a few years. A career as a Correctional officer will provide a reliable paycheque and benefits and if that is what you need, then you are set. You will have great friendships with co-workers and will be able to tell good stories at events as well.

However, in my opinion, the pursuit of the entrepreneurship and being able to connect and help others grow outside of prison walls is far more satisfying than any experience I have had on the inside.


I agree, I want to pursue entrepreneurship, but as I said, in the time being I do need a reliable paycheck with benefits.

I will continue to look for value skew etc, I see a lot of my friends trying to be entrepreneurs half-assing shit that's basically been done over and over again (drop shipping, FBA, etc). For now, I don't know what to add value to. I know once I find it I can work my a$$ off, but for now I'm reading and trying to work on personal growth.

Short term now I know what I need to do. Definitely appreciate your input, especially from someone who's worked in a prison. And I agree, long term providing better value to society is 100% my goal. I started looking at what you're up to, very inspiring.
 
Last edited:

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.


Fastlane Insiders

View the forum AD FREE.
Private, unindexed content
Detailed process/execution threads
Monthly conference calls with doers
Ideas needing execution, more!

Join Fastlane Insiders.

Sponsored Offers

Lex DeVille's - Advanced Freelance Udemy Courses!
-- HALLOWEEN SPECIAL STARTS TODAY! Get any of my courses at Udemy's current best price through Friday! Use code: HALLOWEEN Use any of the links...
Top Bottom