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INTRO Graduating Soon - Bullshit Degree - My Thoughts, and My Plan

bibbysoka

Contributor
Jul 5, 2019
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21
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Hey everyone. I'm about to graduate college in December with a bachelors degree in IT. While many might call it a good degree, it was a bullshit program. We skimmed through a few programming languages, professors were terrible, and overall, everyone I met in the field could not wait to just graduate already. Not to sound pessimistic about my school, I'm being honest about the reality of studying something that you can learn on your own. The problem: most companies won't hire you unless you have a degree in the field.

I love to learn on my own. I've learned much more about programming and software development on my own time than I did in 4 years of school. I got inspired after reading TMF a few years back - it completely rewired my thinking and started a flame that has remained lit for the past 3 years.

Here's the deal. Once I graduate here in December, I really, really want to move out of my college town. It smells like poop in the air once a week because of all the farmers. I want to move to Denver, or somewhere in Colorado. I started applying for jobs that start in January and the process is sucking the soul out of me. I'm currently working an internship right now, which is good for my resume and experience, but I don't have the 3-5 years of experience that most companies are looking for. I only qualify for basic entry level jobs.

If I'm going to move, I need to transform. This post will be something to look back on when I accomplish my goals.

By 2020:
I want to move to Colorado and have an online business making $500 in sales each month. I can work an entry level help desk job if I need to, even if it sucks it will bring money in to pay for my apartment and bills. I want to be in my best shape possible. I want a really nice apartment. I want to have $2k in my savings in case of emergencies.

I will be reading through threads here and learning to the best of my ability. Thank you all for the value you provide me.
 

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drpeppehr

Contributor
Jun 10, 2017
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50
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USA
I wouldn't say your degree is bullshit. Even if they only gave you a basic overview of a few programming languages, at least you have a base level understanding of how code works. Plus, you must've gained something from being in college, like friends, girls, etc.

Rooting for you man. Segment your goal into daily steps like MJ says, get specific as possible and you will win.
 

Mattie

Platinum Contributor
Speedway Pass
May 28, 2014
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I agree. Your degree laid down the foundation for certain habits of studying, writing, communications, presentation, etc. You just can take it further now on your own . Welcome to the forum.
 

Tourmaline

Bronze Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
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Jun 4, 2019
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Texas
Welcome!

Yeah the whole entry level positions want 3 years experience is a bit of a headfuck.

If you're looking for a coding job and haven't yet gotten any coding experience by working on projects or something more tangible outside of school, I'd do that asap. Lots of volunteers are needed for many different open source projects and it'll go a long way to getting a job.
 

happiness2go

Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Jul 21, 2018
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116
Germany
I like what I read.

You seem to be taking the right steps. Go for the entry level jobs and build your business slowly and steadily.

Quit your job once it covers the bills.

There is a big trend now towards making drastic changes like quitting your job and moving to Thailand while only having enough cash for a couple of months.

I think that this is dangerous as it comes from a mentality of: "I hate my work. I hate being an employee. My current life is sh*t".

Following this path will only make you miserable.

Work towards your dreams while remaining grounded in your current reality.

Your degree wasn't bullsh*t either. Even if you have learned nothing in class, it nonetheless MADE you learn (on your own).

Everything has a purpose.
 
Last edited:

Real Deal Denver

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Jan 13, 2018
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Congratulations brother. Seriously.

Your degree wasn't bullsh*t either. Even if you have learned nothing in class, it nonetheless MADE you learn (on your own).
Your degree will open doors. Nobody expects a new college grad to be an expert at anything - so lower your expectations a bit. Look at the bright side - you will graduate with a very advanced degree. You will have proven you can stick with something and finish it. You have taken yourself further than the degree. All I see is a LOT to be happy about!

One of my sons has a BS in computer science. He is doing well. When he first started in his current position he didn't know anything of value to his employer. Now, however, he is extremely valuable and is very successful however you want to measure success. He loves what he does. But it didn't happen in a few months.

It's worth the time and effort.

Look at my name. PM me if you want to know something about Denver from an insiders viewpoint. You can find almost anything you want to know on the internet anyway, so have at it.

The advice I gave my Son was this; pick where you really want to live. Congrats - you already have that figured out. Then find the top 20 companies you think you would like to work for. Research each company in depth. Find out who's in charge of hiring. Find out as much as you can about each company. Use resources like indeed to see employee reviews - or linked in to find people in the company. Call the company. Go beyond what 99% of everyone else will be doing. Then. Write a very personal letter to that person or persons. Send it in an 8 x 10 manilla envelope. Do NOT send it folded up in a standard envelope. Ideally, having had an introductory conversation with this person beforehand through email, and notify them that you will be sending the letter - then send the letter - then follow up to make sure they received the letter. Triple exposure.

Or, follow the herd, and fill out their online job openings. And get on a list. A very long list. And wait.

Out of 20 high-quality companies, 4 or 5 WILL notice you. Keep follow up communications open with them.

Play the game your way. Play to win. Stand out. Most companies NEVER have enough of their high-quality key employee positions filled. They PAY recruitment agencies to find them exceptional people.

Be exceptional. Prove it. Show them.

Doors will open for you.
 
OP
OP
bibbysoka

bibbysoka

Contributor
Jul 5, 2019
29
21
14
Thank you DrP, Mattie, and Tourmaline for the advice, it helps more than you know.

How much did it cost
I went to a state university, it was $28k. Extremely blessed and thankful my degree was paid for by my father.

Congratulations brother. Seriously.



Your degree will open doors. Nobody expects a new college grad to be an expert at anything - so lower your expectations a bit. Look at the bright side - you will graduate with a very advanced degree. You will have proven you can stick with something and finish it. You have taken yourself further than the degree. All I see is a LOT to be happy about!

One of my sons has a BS in computer science. He is doing well. When he first started in his current position he didn't know anything of value to his employer. Now, however, he is extremely valuable and is very successful however you want to measure success. He loves what he does. But it didn't happen in a few months.

It's worth the time and effort.

Look at my name. PM me if you want to know something about Denver from an insiders viewpoint. You can find almost anything you want to know on the internet anyway, so have at it.

The advice I gave my Son was this; pick where you really want to live. Congrats - you already have that figured out. Then find the top 20 companies you think you would like to work for. Research each company in depth. Find out who's in charge of hiring. Find out as much as you can about each company. Use resources like indeed to see employee reviews - or linked in to find people in the company. Call the company. Go beyond what 99% of everyone else will be doing. Then. Write a very personal letter to that person or persons. Send it in an 8 x 10 manilla envelope. Do NOT send it folded up in a standard envelope. Ideally, having had an introductory conversation with this person beforehand through email, and notify them that you will be sending the letter - then send the letter - then follow up to make sure they received the letter. Triple exposure.

Or, follow the herd, and fill out their online job openings. And get on a list. A very long list. And wait.

Out of 20 high-quality companies, 4 or 5 WILL notice you. Keep follow up communications open with them.

Play the game your way. Play to win. Stand out. Most companies NEVER have enough of their high-quality key employee positions filled. They PAY recruitment agencies to find them exceptional people.

Be exceptional. Prove it. Show them.

Doors will open for you.
Thank you so much for your advice and guidance, I appreciate it more than you know. I will PM you about learning more about the city. Perhaps living in Denver might not be ideal, I could work in Denver and live in city close by if it's cheaper. I need to do more research.
 

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