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Clarification about Entry and how it DOESN’T apply to college

Generic_Username

Contributor
Dec 22, 2018
14
21
14
I’ll quote Unscripted since this has been posted before by MJ (see 5 commandements thread):
“Starting a business, or entry, isn’t an event, but a process reflecting the execution time needed to solve the problem. Much of this time is composed of a learning curve. Entrification building a moat which keeps easified entrepreneurs OUT of your space.”
Does this explain why the traditional “go to college after high school to get a “good” job” is bad advice (at least partially: STEM, legal, healthcare, maybe finance need certifications which is a good thing for competency)? While college is a process, it’s not an unknown, new process. If it can be written in a textbook, and is offered all over the country with millions having the same degree, do you really think there’s a learning curve (not just learning).
Thanks to the government allowing anyone to get a student loan for anything (even anything ending in “studies” or “literature” or “history”), there’s no entry barrier to getting in college (if you can pass high school, you can probably get admission to a college). Just a thought, appreciate comments.
 

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Andreas Thiel

Bronze Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Aug 27, 2018
149
130
86
38
Karlsruhe, Germany
Probably you can use college to make the commandment of entry work for you.

When you look at the concept of the adjacent possible (see "So Good They Can't Ignore You" or "Where Good Ideas Come From") you can make sure you can operate at the cutting edge with the knowledge you gain.
However, you cannot be on autopilot and approach college the way most people do it. The commandment of control is key there. You need to make sure you understand and can control what you need to learn at college and escape if you do not like the trajectory. Problem is - you cannot satisfy the commandment of control 100%.

You also have to consider the opportunity costs. You could alternatively be reading books about the field that you would study or solve easier problems with a MVP in the field you want to conquer after a few interviews with people in the industry. That way you could gain relevant business experience earlier and be in a position where you could hire experts to solve more sophisticated problems.
 

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