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O/T: HEALTH My at-home workout: 72lbs down in 8 months (March 2020-Nov 2020)

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Hams

New Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Nov 5, 2020
7
13
16
Salutations, fellow earthlings!

*Let me begin with a simple disclaimer: I'm not special, I have no formal training, so take my advice with a grain of salt. What I can tell you, with absolute certainty, is no matter what program/routine you choose, it's going to require 100% dedication.*

This journey for me began around March of 2017. I was at the heaviest I've ever been at in my life (I'm 5'9" and at the time, I weighed about 343 lbs). I've been in boxing and Muay Thai for most of my life (currently 31), however I became lazy over the years and flat-out stopped trying/caring. Granted, being diagnosed with Epilepsy and a motorcycle accident didn't help my cause, but I've realized those are mere excuses.

I've never been a "let's go to the gym" kind of guy, nor did I ever control what I ate. Anyway, upon seeing that awful number of 343 on the scale, I decided to begin. From March 2017 to about May of 2018, all I changed was my diet. During this time, I dropped to approximately 254 lbs. I went cold-turkey from soda (my biggest issue), sweets, fast food, etc. I maintained this weight until about February of 2020. I had a new motivation: an insanely attractive wife and two stepchildren I wanted to set a good example for. I also wanted to ensure I was able to spend as much time with them as humanly possible. That said, around the time Covid-19 hit, I figured it was a great time to amp-up my activity. This lead me to my routine. It requires nothing outside of a decent amount of room. I started my routine, as I said, around March of 2020. I began slowly: 3 days/week for the first 2 weeks, then extended it to 6 days/week.

Note 1: With my warm-up, I do various stretches/basic yoga poses. This will entirely depend on what you can/cannot do, based on your body type. However, as a jump-off point, repeat what you've learned in your High School PE class. Whatever you do, MAKE SURE YOU STRETCH! Each stretch/pose is held for 10 seconds (or until failure, if you're heavier). If you're unsure of how to do an exercise/stretch, a simple Google search will yield fantastic results (I was on Google A LOT when I first started). Finally, please ensure you learn PROPER FORM.

Note 2: Use your best judgment to edit the routine as you go. If you're unable to do a certain exercise, it's fine to skip it. Pacing yourself (while progressing) is key. Lastly, my times are based on where I'm personally at, so once again, feel free to edit it as you go (e.g. if you're unable to do Jumping Jacks for a minute straight, feel free to do 30 seconds instead).

Seriously, PROPER FORM IS KEY!

Warm-up (3 sets, rest for 15 seconds between exercises)


* Jumping Jacks (1 minute, nonstop)
* Plank (hold to failure)
* Inchworm Walk to Shoulder Tap (45 seconds nonstop)
* Squats (90 seconds, nonstop)

The Core Circuit (3 sets, rest for 15 seconds between exercises)

* Blast-off Push-up (1 minute)
* Mountain Climber Twist (90 seconds)
* Pause Squat (45 seconds)
* Touchdown Jack (45 seconds)
* Pendulum Lunge (45 seconds)
* Calf Raises (1 minute)
* Superman (45 seconds)
* Crunches (1 minute)
* Tricep Dip (1 minute)

Torture Round (1 set)

* Burpees (to failure; if you aren't begging for a swift death by the time you're done with Burpees, you didn't do them right)

Cardio

* For cardio, since I tend to exercise in my basement, I usually just mimic the old pacer test (my age is really showing). Other options are, yah know, just going out for a walk/light jog/whatever. How much time you spend on cardio is entirely up to you. Personally, I do about 45min of HIIT cardio.

That's my routine, friends!

I'd like to add one more thing. As I said, it's going to be hard, frustrating (especially at first), gruesome, etc. However, I can tell you from experience, it is worth it! Please keep in mind that your dedication and commitment will mean more than anything. For instance, my family knew I was doing this, however I didn't want them to stop whatever they were doing. The point of mentioning this? I run to McDonalds, Burger King, pizza places, etc. for my family rather frequently, but I've never gotten anything for myself since I started my routine.

Self-discipline is one of the greatest things you can ever teach yourself.

For my diet, I'm rather basic, but I should mention I'm not the type of person that's bothered by repeatedly eating the same shit. I'm sure most of you have an idea of what/how to eat, but I'll give you a general outline.

Diet

* Water/Tea: Keep your tea clean/fresh. Feel free to use something to give your water taste, but be sure to check the nutritional side before doing so, as some of the water sweetener has sugar/carbs in it. You don't want to mistakenly sabotage yourself here.

* Lean meat: Admittedly, I really only eat chicken.

* Fruits/Veggies/Nuts: I primarily eat Spinach, Broccoli, Apples, Pears, Grapes, Blueberries, and an occasional Mango. In terms of nuts, I primarily eat Almonds.

* Rice: I just love rice, honestly. White or brown is fine.

Biggest thing with your diet (in my experience, at least) would be eat slower and moderate your portions.

I've never been the type of person to "meal prep." That said, I've slowly started doing it as of late, primarily because my schedule is filling up rather quickly. It's far easier to spend 1-2 hours cooking every Sunday then it is to make meals on the fly. I've noticed one major benefit from meal prepping, however, and that is something I've realized should've been obvious: when you know you have a meal prepared already, you're less likely to stop somewhere and get a burger.

That's all I have, friends. I hope this helps someone out there. Feel free to PM me/post here if you ever have a question about getting started. Keep in mind though, like I said, I'm not a trained professional at all. I'm just committed to helping others lose weight! Since dropping my weight and hitting my target goal (I'm currently at a stocky 181 lbs), I've been able to return to Muay Thai/Boxing, my confidence is through the roof, my sex drive is higher than it's ever been (it was intense while I was fat though, so idk), and my ambition has dramatically improved. I don't have abs, but I have far more lean muscle and overall muscle definition.

You CAN do it, don't ever tell yourself anything different.

I'm going to say this one more time for the people in the back: self-discipline is one of the greatest things you can ever teach yourself.

P.S. When you inevitably plateau, the easiest thing to do is change something. Exercise with more intensity, edit your diet, etc.
Your goal here is to simply "shock" your body.
 

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kelvinfernandezm

Some Profound Quote Goes Here
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Jan 26, 2016
631
1,234
381
28
Fort Worth, Texas
Salutations, fellow earthlings!

*Let me begin with a simple disclaimer: I'm not special, I have no formal training, so take my advice with a grain of salt. What I can tell you, with absolute certainty, is no matter what program/routine you choose, it's going to require 100% dedication.*

This journey for me began around March of 2017. I was at the heaviest I've ever been at in my life (I'm 5'9" and at the time, I weighed about 343 lbs). I've been in boxing and Muay Thai for most of my life (currently 31), however I became lazy over the years and flat-out stopped trying/caring. Granted, being diagnosed with Epilepsy and a motorcycle accident didn't help my cause, but I've realized those are mere excuses.

I've never been a "let's go to the gym" kind of guy, nor did I ever control what I ate. Anyway, upon seeing that awful number of 343 on the scale, I decided to begin. From March 2017 to about May of 2018, all I changed was my diet. During this time, I dropped to approximately 254 lbs. I went cold-turkey from soda (my biggest issue), sweets, fast food, etc. I maintained this weight until about February of 2020. I had a new motivation: an insanely attractive wife and two stepchildren I wanted to set a good example for. I also wanted to ensure I was able to spend as much time with them as humanly possible. That said, around the time Covid-19 hit, I figured it was a great time to amp-up my activity. This lead me to my routine. It requires nothing outside of a decent amount of room. I started my routine, as I said, around March of 2020. I began slowly: 3 days/week for the first 2 weeks, then extended it to 6 days/week.

Note 1: With my warm-up, I do various stretches/basic yoga poses. This will entirely depend on what you can/cannot do, based on your body type. However, as a jump-off point, repeat what you've learned in your High School PE class. Whatever you do, MAKE SURE YOU STRETCH! Each stretch/pose is held for 10 seconds (or until failure, if you're heavier). If you're unsure of how to do an exercise/stretch, a simple Google search will yield fantastic results (I was on Google A LOT when I first started). Finally, please ensure you learn PROPER FORM.

Note 2: Use your best judgment to edit the routine as you go. If you're unable to do a certain exercise, it's fine to skip it. Pacing yourself (while progressing) is key. Lastly, my times are based on where I'm personally at, so once again, feel free to edit it as you go (e.g. if you're unable to do Jumping Jacks for a minute straight, feel free to do 30 seconds instead).

Seriously, PROPER FORM IS KEY!

Warm-up (3 sets, rest for 15 seconds between exercises)


* Jumping Jacks (1 minute, nonstop)
* Plank (hold to failure)
* Inchworm Walk to Shoulder Tap (45 seconds nonstop)
* Squats (90 seconds, nonstop)

The Core Circuit (3 sets, rest for 15 seconds between exercises)

* Blast-off Push-up (1 minute)
* Mountain Climber Twist (90 seconds)
* Pause Squat (45 seconds)
* Touchdown Jack (45 seconds)
* Pendulum Lunge (45 seconds)
* Calf Raises (1 minute)
* Superman (45 seconds)
* Crunches (1 minute)
* Tricep Dip (1 minute)

Torture Round (1 set)

* Burpees (to failure; if you aren't begging for a swift death by the time you're done with Burpees, you didn't do them right)

Cardio

* For cardio, since I tend to exercise in my basement, I usually just mimic the old pacer test (my age is really showing). Other options are, yah know, just going out for a walk/light jog/whatever. How much time you spend on cardio is entirely up to you. Personally, I do about 45min of HIIT cardio.

That's my routine, friends!

I'd like to add one more thing. As I said, it's going to be hard, frustrating (especially at first), gruesome, etc. However, I can tell you from experience, it is worth it! Please keep in mind that your dedication and commitment will mean more than anything. For instance, my family knew I was doing this, however I didn't want them to stop whatever they were doing. The point of mentioning this? I run to McDonalds, Burger King, pizza places, etc. for my family rather frequently, but I've never gotten anything for myself since I started my routine.

Self-discipline is one of the greatest things you can ever teach yourself.

For my diet, I'm rather basic, but I should mention I'm not the type of person that's bothered by repeatedly eating the same shit. I'm sure most of you have an idea of what/how to eat, but I'll give you a general outline.

Diet

* Water/Tea: Keep your tea clean/fresh. Feel free to use something to give your water taste, but be sure to check the nutritional side before doing so, as some of the water sweetener has sugar/carbs in it. You don't want to mistakenly sabotage yourself here.

* Lean meat: Admittedly, I really only eat chicken.

* Fruits/Veggies/Nuts: I primarily eat Spinach, Broccoli, Apples, Pears, Grapes, Blueberries, and an occasional Mango. In terms of nuts, I primarily eat Almonds.

* Rice: I just love rice, honestly. White or brown is fine.

Biggest thing with your diet (in my experience, at least) would be eat slower and moderate your portions.

I've never been the type of person to "meal prep." That said, I've slowly started doing it as of late, primarily because my schedule is filling up rather quickly. It's far easier to spend 1-2 hours cooking every Sunday then it is to make meals on the fly. I've noticed one major benefit from meal prepping, however, and that is something I've realized should've been obvious: when you know you have a meal prepared already, you're less likely to stop somewhere and get a burger.

That's all I have, friends. I hope this helps someone out there. Feel free to PM me/post here if you ever have a question about getting started. Keep in mind though, like I said, I'm not a trained professional at all. I'm just committed to helping others lose weight! Since dropping my weight and hitting my target goal (I'm currently at a stocky 181 lbs), I've been able to return to Muay Thai/Boxing, my confidence is through the roof, my sex drive is higher than it's ever been (it was intense while I was fat though, so idk), and my ambition has dramatically improved. I don't have abs, but I have far more lean muscle and overall muscle definition.

You CAN do it, don't ever tell yourself anything different.

I'm going to say this one more time for the people in the back: self-discipline is one of the greatest things you can ever teach yourself.

P.S. When you inevitably plateau, the easiest thing to do is change something. Exercise with more intensity, edit your diet, etc.
Your goal here is to simply "shock" your body.
Congrats! Do you have any loose skin?
 

Hams

New Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Nov 5, 2020
7
13
16
Congrats! Do you have any loose skin?
Not at all, actually. My doctor told me slow-rolling the initial weight loss helped prevent having a lot of excess skin.

Edit: I will say, however, that some of the stretch marks are still somewhat visible, as you can imagine.
 

Hams

New Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Nov 5, 2020
7
13
16
Not bad, how old are you?
I'm 31. The doctor essentially told me losing weight fast increases the odds of having excess skin (obviously), however your starting weight matters a lot. I definitely would've had excess skin if I rapidly dropped weight at my starting weight, vs rapidly losing it at the weight I was when I started.

Shedding the extra ~90 lbs prior to starting helped tremendously. As I said, it's mostly the stretch marks you need to worry about. They're not as defined as they once were, and they're hardly noticeable until you're standing next to/in front of me, but I don't believe the stretch marks will ever fully go away. I'm okay with it. My stretch marks are a constant reminder of "never let this happen again."
 

kelvinfernandezm

Some Profound Quote Goes Here
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Jan 26, 2016
631
1,234
381
28
Fort Worth, Texas
I'm 31. The doctor essentially told me losing weight fast increases the odds of having excess skin (obviously), however your starting weight matters a lot. I definitely would've had excess skin if I rapidly dropped weight at my starting weight, vs rapidly losing it at the weight I was when I started.

Shedding the extra ~90 lbs prior to starting helped tremendously. As I said, it's mostly the stretch marks you need to worry about. They're not as defined as they once were, and they're hardly noticeable until you're standing next to/in front of me, but I don't believe the stretch marks will ever fully go away. I'm okay with it. My stretch marks are a constant reminder of "never let this happen again."
Any chance you can post before and after pics. I have a few pounds to lose and the loose skin scares me the most. How long were you over 100 lbs. I heard the longer you have the extra pounds on you the more damage it does to your skin. I think this is something people that gain weight don't think about until their overweight. I honestly didn't know about lose skin until I began to research weight loss. If someone showed me pictures of people with lose skin after losing weight I would had never allowed my self to gain weight.
 

WillHurtDontCare

Gold Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
May 28, 2017
546
1,289
425
29
USA
Salutations, fellow earthlings!

*Let me begin with a simple disclaimer: I'm not special, I have no formal training, so take my advice with a grain of salt. What I can tell you, with absolute certainty, is no matter what program/routine you choose, it's going to require 100% dedication.*

This journey for me began around March of 2017. I was at the heaviest I've ever been at in my life (I'm 5'9" and at the time, I weighed about 343 lbs). I've been in boxing and Muay Thai for most of my life (currently 31), however I became lazy over the years and flat-out stopped trying/caring. Granted, being diagnosed with Epilepsy and a motorcycle accident didn't help my cause, but I've realized those are mere excuses.

I've never been a "let's go to the gym" kind of guy, nor did I ever control what I ate. Anyway, upon seeing that awful number of 343 on the scale, I decided to begin. From March 2017 to about May of 2018, all I changed was my diet. During this time, I dropped to approximately 254 lbs. I went cold-turkey from soda (my biggest issue), sweets, fast food, etc. I maintained this weight until about February of 2020. I had a new motivation: an insanely attractive wife and two stepchildren I wanted to set a good example for. I also wanted to ensure I was able to spend as much time with them as humanly possible. That said, around the time Covid-19 hit, I figured it was a great time to amp-up my activity. This lead me to my routine. It requires nothing outside of a decent amount of room. I started my routine, as I said, around March of 2020. I began slowly: 3 days/week for the first 2 weeks, then extended it to 6 days/week.

Note 1: With my warm-up, I do various stretches/basic yoga poses. This will entirely depend on what you can/cannot do, based on your body type. However, as a jump-off point, repeat what you've learned in your High School PE class. Whatever you do, MAKE SURE YOU STRETCH! Each stretch/pose is held for 10 seconds (or until failure, if you're heavier). If you're unsure of how to do an exercise/stretch, a simple Google search will yield fantastic results (I was on Google A LOT when I first started). Finally, please ensure you learn PROPER FORM.

Note 2: Use your best judgment to edit the routine as you go. If you're unable to do a certain exercise, it's fine to skip it. Pacing yourself (while progressing) is key. Lastly, my times are based on where I'm personally at, so once again, feel free to edit it as you go (e.g. if you're unable to do Jumping Jacks for a minute straight, feel free to do 30 seconds instead).

Seriously, PROPER FORM IS KEY!

Warm-up (3 sets, rest for 15 seconds between exercises)


* Jumping Jacks (1 minute, nonstop)
* Plank (hold to failure)
* Inchworm Walk to Shoulder Tap (45 seconds nonstop)
* Squats (90 seconds, nonstop)

The Core Circuit (3 sets, rest for 15 seconds between exercises)

* Blast-off Push-up (1 minute)
* Mountain Climber Twist (90 seconds)
* Pause Squat (45 seconds)
* Touchdown Jack (45 seconds)
* Pendulum Lunge (45 seconds)
* Calf Raises (1 minute)
* Superman (45 seconds)
* Crunches (1 minute)
* Tricep Dip (1 minute)

Torture Round (1 set)

* Burpees (to failure; if you aren't begging for a swift death by the time you're done with Burpees, you didn't do them right)

Cardio

* For cardio, since I tend to exercise in my basement, I usually just mimic the old pacer test (my age is really showing). Other options are, yah know, just going out for a walk/light jog/whatever. How much time you spend on cardio is entirely up to you. Personally, I do about 45min of HIIT cardio.

That's my routine, friends!

I'd like to add one more thing. As I said, it's going to be hard, frustrating (especially at first), gruesome, etc. However, I can tell you from experience, it is worth it! Please keep in mind that your dedication and commitment will mean more than anything. For instance, my family knew I was doing this, however I didn't want them to stop whatever they were doing. The point of mentioning this? I run to McDonalds, Burger King, pizza places, etc. for my family rather frequently, but I've never gotten anything for myself since I started my routine.

Self-discipline is one of the greatest things you can ever teach yourself.

For my diet, I'm rather basic, but I should mention I'm not the type of person that's bothered by repeatedly eating the same shit. I'm sure most of you have an idea of what/how to eat, but I'll give you a general outline.

Diet

* Water/Tea: Keep your tea clean/fresh. Feel free to use something to give your water taste, but be sure to check the nutritional side before doing so, as some of the water sweetener has sugar/carbs in it. You don't want to mistakenly sabotage yourself here.

* Lean meat: Admittedly, I really only eat chicken.

* Fruits/Veggies/Nuts: I primarily eat Spinach, Broccoli, Apples, Pears, Grapes, Blueberries, and an occasional Mango. In terms of nuts, I primarily eat Almonds.

* Rice: I just love rice, honestly. White or brown is fine.

Biggest thing with your diet (in my experience, at least) would be eat slower and moderate your portions.

I've never been the type of person to "meal prep." That said, I've slowly started doing it as of late, primarily because my schedule is filling up rather quickly. It's far easier to spend 1-2 hours cooking every Sunday then it is to make meals on the fly. I've noticed one major benefit from meal prepping, however, and that is something I've realized should've been obvious: when you know you have a meal prepared already, you're less likely to stop somewhere and get a burger.

That's all I have, friends. I hope this helps someone out there. Feel free to PM me/post here if you ever have a question about getting started. Keep in mind though, like I said, I'm not a trained professional at all. I'm just committed to helping others lose weight! Since dropping my weight and hitting my target goal (I'm currently at a stocky 181 lbs), I've been able to return to Muay Thai/Boxing, my confidence is through the roof, my sex drive is higher than it's ever been (it was intense while I was fat though, so idk), and my ambition has dramatically improved. I don't have abs, but I have far more lean muscle and overall muscle definition.

You CAN do it, don't ever tell yourself anything different.

I'm going to say this one more time for the people in the back: self-discipline is one of the greatest things you can ever teach yourself.

P.S. When you inevitably plateau, the easiest thing to do is change something. Exercise with more intensity, edit your diet, etc.
Your goal here is to simply "shock" your body.

Just dropping in to say that I respect your dedication. I look forward to reading "6 pack achieved" post this time next year.
 

Hams

New Contributor
FASTLANE INSIDER
Nov 5, 2020
7
13
16
Any chance you can post before and after pics. I have a few pounds to lose and the loose skin scares me the most. How long were you over 100 lbs. I heard the longer you have the extra pounds on you the more damage it does to your skin. I think this is something people that gain weight don't think about until their overweight. I honestly didn't know about lose skin until I began to research weight loss. If someone showed me pictures of people with lose skin after losing weight I would had never allowed my self to gain weight.
I'll definitely consider it. Not sure how I feel about the idea of posting shirtless pics online (mostly because I'm covered in tattoos, hence I'm easily identifiable). Honestly man, your best bet is 100% pace yourself. The two biggest contributing factors (based on my personal research, due to excess skin being a major concern of mine as well) are your starting weight and how fast/slow your lose it.

I've been overweight for most of my life, even when I was in boxing/Muay Thai. However, throughout my entire life, my body has gotten used to dramatic ups and downs. I'm the guy that goes from "he's a bit chubby" to "you can definitely tell he loves McDonald's breakfast and soda." Again, my biggest piece of advice with this is lose the weight slowly as it gives your skin time to adapt and "reform" itself, in a sense.
Just dropping in to say that I respect your dedication. I look forward to reading "6 pack achieved" post this time next year.
I truly appreciate your comment. It was easily the most difficult thing I've ever done in my life, and there were plenty of times I wanted to give up. The thought that kept propelling me forward is rather simple:

"There's no point in stopping now, otherwise all of the effort you've put into this up to this point was for nothing."

I'd also say being in competition with yourself is a great thing. When you find yourself saying, "I can't do this," you should immediately tell yourself "yes I can and I'll prove it."
 

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