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OFF-TOPIC Sleeping problems

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GerryFolt

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For two weeks already I have sleeping problems. I can't fall asleep for hours, and then it's impossible to wake up. I've been to doctor and he couldn't find the problem. Maybe, someone has had similar problem and can advise me something?
 

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Ismails

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A Human Body sleeps in 1.5 hour cycles.
Scientists find ideally you should get 35 cycles a week which is roughly 7.5 hours a night.
If anything is less than 5 cycles, it would create a health problem in future.

Its just not sleeping problem but your lifestyle like your physical body, eating right habits, movement patterns aka fitness level etc.
If you align all these in your life, you will have a better sleep after your work.
 

Primeperiwinkle

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Study diaphragmatic breathing and practice it all day long and then try to do it for about ten minutes straight right after you get in bed.

Just FYI: I can get ppl who have chronic insomnia and PTSD to fall asleep with this stuff. It’s worth learning.
 

MattR82

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My problem is definitely with phone and laptop in bed. Got rid of that bs and a lot of the issues were gone.
 

MattR82

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Study diaphragmatic breathing and practice it all day long and then try to do it for about ten minutes straight right after you get in bed.

Just FYI: I can get ppl who have chronic insomnia and PTSD to fall asleep with this stuff. It’s worth learning.
Is that like the box breathing method? Breathe in for 4 hold for x and breathe out for x etc. That works for me. Kinda like basic beginning to meditation isn't it. I really suck at meditation but can always spend a few mins doing this.
 

Primeperiwinkle

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Is that like the box breathing method? Breathe in for 4 hold for x and breathe out for x etc. That works for me. Kinda like basic beginning to meditation isn't it. I really suck at meditation but can always spend a few mins doing this.
Most ppl who are fast-talking, shallow breathing, can’t-turn-their-brain-off people that I work on are not primarily using their diaphragms to breathe. In some cases their diaphragm, which should be the primary muscle for exhalation, is so incredibly weak that their upper chest muscles and anterior neck muscles are doing a large majority of the work to lift their rib cage up for every. single. inhale.

These ppl cannot exhale for very long either. Even a 3 second exhale becomes difficult for them OR if they manage that they quickly revert back to holding their breath or breathing shallowly. So a simple exercise.. like saying “focus on your exhale and make it a little bit longer than the last one” is very challenging for them both physically AND mentally.

Shallow breathing directly correlates to the fight or flight mechanism in your nervous system. Basically if you’re breathing shallowly you are teaching your own brain that there is a real danger nearby, constantly. So your brain FORCES you to stay alert and awake.

This exercise of focusing on making the exhale longer and longer can be physically and emotionally draining for certain types of ppl because they quite literally do not know how to relax. They are in fight or flight all the time.. so it’s their normal. I’ve watched as countless clients will, without even knowing it, stop the exercise after two attempts and then resume talking my ear off.

Relaxation is foreign to them. Sleep is something they only do when they’ve pushed themselves well past exhaustion.

I don’t recommend box breathing to these types of individuals because they are holding their breath already. They desperately need to learn how to engage their diaphragm properly AND exercise it so it can function with ease. The single fastest way to do that is to practice long deliberate exhales.

The OP has only been having insomnia for two weeks. It could be anything. Diet.. stress.. anything. But I know about this one aspect so I suggested an exercise that I knew. At the very least it won’t hurt him.

HTH
 

socaldude

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Well...you can look into THC and CBD. it helps me sleep...
 

S.Y.

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For two weeks already I have sleeping problems. I can't fall asleep for hours, and then it's impossible to wake up. I've been to doctor and he couldn't find the problem. Maybe, someone has had similar problem and can advise me something?
Why is it that you can't sleep? Let's begin with that.

- do you have a constant chatter n ur head?
- are you worrying about something?
- are you not tired?
- are you so excited about something that you can sleep?

Giving more details about what is happening when you try to sleep will help a lot in people giving feedbacks. Your question is too general.

As for pointers, the low hanging fruits in no particular order:
- lack of routine
- lack of exercise
- blue light (aka screens before bed)
- lack of movement
- room not cold enough
- room dark enough
- not talking the time to wind down
- lack of sunlight during the day (and not near bed time)
- bad nutrition
- dehydration
- stress

Hope it helps.
 

Roli

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For two weeks already I have sleeping problems. I can't fall asleep for hours, and then it's impossible to wake up. I've been to doctor and he couldn't find the problem. Maybe, someone has had similar problem and can advise me something?
There are a couple of techniques that I've given to people, and tried myself which seem to work really well. You can do one or all of the following:

1. Shutting Down -
Sleep problems often come down to an overworked and overactive brain which gets so used to activity, it finds it hard to switch off.

So at the end of each day, go through the tasks that you have to do for the next one. Check emails, make phone calls, do whatever it is you have to do, and at the end of that sequence, say to yourself shutdown. Then turn off your computer and relax.

It's okay to even turn it on again, as long as it's for leisure, watch a stream, play chess, do whatever it is you do to relax online.

2. Install F.lux
This simple desktop app will control the colour temperature of your screen. The standard colour temp for a laptop is very similar to daylight, therefore it is beneficial to use f.lux to slowly lower the temperature making your screen more yellow and closer to candlelight temperature, this will trigger sleep cues in your brain.

3. Reading (Book)
After shutting down your computer, read a bit of a book, it doesn't have to be much, you can do as little as a few pages, or as much as an entire chapter. The idea is to just focus on a fixed set of words on a page and let your brain slowly relax.

4. Box Breathing
I tried this out after hearing about it, and couldn't believe at how effective it was. Quite simply, when you get into bed draw a virtual "box" with your breathing.

Step 1 - Draw in your breath for an amount of seconds that feels comfortable to you, for example 4s.
Step 2 - Hold breath for 4s
Step 3 - Let breath out for 4s
Step 4 - Hold breath for 4s
Repeat x5

The first few times you do it, you may feel a bit out of breath, that's fine, after the 5th go (if you make it that far, you may just fall asleep), just relax and breath normally, focusing on getting your breathing even. You will find that you drift off before you even realise what's going on.

5. Compartmentalising Problems
Another way to deal with your overactive brain, is to deliberately go to a problem your having and think about it for 10-30 seconds, and then say to yourself; "I promise to come back to this problem, and I will do it at exactly _____"

Then the next day at 9 a.m. or whenever you've said you'd return to the problem, do so. This will get you into the habit of dealing with problems when you're fully awake and ready to go.

-
So remember, you can do all of the above, or just chose which one(s) you feel work for you.

Good luck, and get some sleep!
 

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gryfny

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When I went to the doctor with my sleeping problems I was reffered to a sleeping coach. I had a few sessions and she helped me solve it real quick. Maybe something similar is available to you?

From the top of my head the important things I've learned are:
1.No screens 1 hour before bed, no coffee after 14.00, limit alcohol to glasses. These are the quick fixes, very easy to do.
2. Have a fixed times to go to sleep and get up. Max 1 hour of sleeping in when absolutely needed (after a big night).
3. Your bed needs to be associated with sleeping, so no netflix, tv, reading or anything else. Only use it for sleeping and sex. Also try to not have big discussions/arguments with your significant other in the bed. Having the phone in another room also helps a lot.
4. Track sleep time (self reported!). I use the digital sleep diary from their website, where I block half hour time units as 'up', 'sleeping' or 'in bed and awake'. The aim is to have a sleep efficiency (time sleeping / time in bed) of 90%. Based on the initial first week(s), I reduce my time in bed to my sleeping time + 1 hour (absolute minimum of 6 hours in bed is recommended). After my efficiency improves, I can increase my time in bed by 15-30 minutes per week until I'm back to a normal sleeping schedule. For each day also track other stuff like:
- Rating of sleep 1-10
- Rating of energy during day 1-10 (report at end of day)
- Amount of coffee, alcohol, stress etc.

Especially the tracking of sleep time helps me a lot. I notice that it's not as bad as I felt it was. By decreasing the time in bed, I also decreased my awake in bed time.
 

Benji90

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Most ppl who are fast-talking, shallow breathing, can’t-turn-their-brain-off people that I work on are not primarily using their diaphragms to breathe. In some cases their diaphragm, which should be the primary muscle for exhalation, is so incredibly weak that their upper chest muscles and anterior neck muscles are doing a large majority of the work to lift their rib cage up for every. single. inhale.

These ppl cannot exhale for very long either. Even a 3 second exhale becomes difficult for them OR if they manage that they quickly revert back to holding their breath or breathing shallowly. So a simple exercise.. like saying “focus on your exhale and make it a little bit longer than the last one” is very challenging for them both physically AND mentally.

Shallow breathing directly correlates to the fight or flight mechanism in your nervous system. Basically if you’re breathing shallowly you are teaching your own brain that there is a real danger nearby, constantly. So your brain FORCES you to stay alert and awake.

This exercise of focusing on making the exhale longer and longer can be physically and emotionally draining for certain types of ppl because they quite literally do not know how to relax. They are in fight or flight all the time.. so it’s their normal. I’ve watched as countless clients will, without even knowing it, stop the exercise after two attempts and then resume talking my ear off.

Relaxation is foreign to them. Sleep is something they only do when they’ve pushed themselves well past exhaustion.

I don’t recommend box breathing to these types of individuals because they are holding their breath already. They desperately need to learn how to engage their diaphragm properly AND exercise it so it can function with ease. The single fastest way to do that is to practice long deliberate exhales.

The OP has only been having insomnia for two weeks. It could be anything. Diet.. stress.. anything. But I know about this one aspect so I suggested an exercise that I knew. At the very least it won’t hurt him.

HTH
Damn! I think I've stumbled across my problem.

Does this help with speech too? I talk fast, sometimes so fast I mumble which as you can imagine, is a problem.

I also suffer with sleep, some nights only get about an hour, I dont use my phone or laptop so they're ruled out, I've always put my fast speech down to confidence issues, but reading this has given me a slap, you've described me.

I'll try exhaling for longer and researching this technique - thank you.
 

Yzn

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I think it's better to go to another doctor until you find what really is the problem.
No one on the forum will be able to give a real diagnosis like a doctor whose physically in front of you with his specialised tools.
 

.B.

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For two weeks already I have sleeping problems. I can't fall asleep for hours, and then it's impossible to wake up. I've been to doctor and he couldn't find the problem. Maybe, someone has had similar problem and can advise me something?
My mind never stops in the evening, it used to prevent me to sleep.

What works great for me: sleep next to an open window.
The oxygen falling on my face puts me to sleep straight.
The noise of cars in the morning wakes me up
 

Xeon

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If I have anxiety and need to calm down, I just need to breathe in through nose and exhale through mouth. That's all right?

Would that be considered breathing through the diaphragm?

When I do that, I find myself out of breath after a while (altogether it does calm me down) and my upper nose area feels a bit numb.
 

Xeon

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I used to have sleeping problems for an extended period and tried almost everything. Luckily, one day, I accidentally came across an article about the benefits of weighted blankets and thought, why not try something else. The next morning I ordered it, and now I sleep like a baby. Of course, once or twice a month, I can have insomnia or other troubles, but not it happens, not every day. If you have never head about this type of blanket, this article How Are Weighted Blankets Made? will give you more info about it. Also, you can look for more info online and, maybe, it'll help you to improve your sleeping quality.
How do you use weighted blankets? Do you wrap it around your ears when you sleep ? How much decibels can they reduce?
 

Primeperiwinkle

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If I have anxiety and need to calm down, I just need to breathe in through nose and exhale through mouth. That's all right?

Would that be considered breathing through the diaphragm?

When I do that, I find myself out of breath after a while (altogether it does calm me down) and my upper nose area feels a bit numb.
It’s a decent start.. but ideally you would be breathing through just your nose and using your belly (diaphragm is under your ribs) to contract on every exhale instead of using your upper chest muscles. Making your exhale around 8-12 seconds long is also a good goal.
 

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Hey OP if you have never read “why we sleep” by Mathew walker then I would start there. It is my Christmas gift of choice this year as you can learn a lot from it.

I had similar problems as you for years especially when the hour changes. What I took away from the book I implemented in steps. There is much more to try but this was enough for me:

Absolutely No Screens, no blue light sources 45 mins before bed. I have found this 45 mins a life changer as before I worked until bed and then lay in bed for 2 hours trying.... good old clock anxiety and all that.

in the 45 mins I tend to read a book under a reddend light source.Do my washing, tidy up, sketching etc. I can sleep now within 15 mins which is a life changer.

I always use audiobooks in bed to switch my mind off. DO NOT do this with Unscripted (or factual based books) as it kept my mind working til 06.00. What works for me is some mindless sci-fi, or fiction. (Actually atalas shrugged is knocking me out in 5 mins )

this is what I implemented and it works real good with a solid 8 hours every night.

further things to read up on are melatonin supplements, blue light therapy in the morning (especially in these dark mornings)
this is all described in the book, so please read ;)
 

Athena

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Good suggestions above.
The oura ring helped me stay ontop of my sleep.
 

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