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Needs to be said... sell the DAMN motorcycle.

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A post of a ranting nature...

sparechange

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heh, I just came back from a bicycle ride bombing down some massive hills. Sometimes a bit spooky when cars fly by in the same lane rather than just moving other.
 
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Roli

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Wife just saw another guy laid out on the pavement after crashing his bike, not moving at all. Not sure who was at fault, but fault won't change the outcome which is either a big life change, or a loss of life.:(
She's your wife now? Congratulations! :)
 

Jadus

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I've been on both sides of this decision. I grew up riding mini-bikes and rode a dirt bike as a teenager. Later, I bought a street bike but didn't keep it very long. I was riding it too fast, taking too many chances and figured I'd eventually kill myself on it, so I sold it.

Fast forward to my later years; I've been riding a motorbike on some of the most dangerous roads in the world for the past 7 years and I won't quit anytime soon. I use it for local transportation and once took a 3000km trip around Thailand. It's one of the reasons I love living here.

The trick is that I'm hyper-aware of my surroundings while riding. I'm constantly looking for vehicles pulling out from side roads (they often don't even look), thinking about what the guy in front (or back) of me is going to do and anything else that could affect my safety. I wear a full face helmet at all times (even if I'm just going down to the local 7-11). I think I'm more likely to get killed from my road-rage signaling to the crazy drivers (I'm still working on stopping that).

That being said, I realize my methods are not foolproof. If I get old enough that my reflexes aren't what they should be, I'll probably stop. But in the end, I'd rather die doing what I love than waste away in bed from cancer or something like that, having regrets.

Everyone has different outlooks on life and the dangers that go along with it. You have to decide for yourself what's best for your life.
 

moird

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Figure I could add a bit to this. I use to have a motorcyle but sold it like some others. The end of the time that I had it was my only vehicle in south bay area. So I was commuting on it, and daily errands, everything. It was a relatively tough time mentally and the motorcycle helped a little bit I think. It also saved me a lot of time during my commute back then which was pretty horrific really. Basically in a car it would take 2+hrs to go 19 miles from where I lived to where I was working at the time. On the motorcycle it was like 35-45min pretty reliably due to being able to filter through traffic that was usually at a walking pace. Think the intro to office space aggravatingly slow traffic. I always approached riding as supper defensive as well (arguments can easily be made both ways for lane splitting and filtering). Usually treated my entire time on the bike as being absolutely invisible to everyone else on the road, always wore helmet plus protective gear no matter how close or far I was going. Or even the weather, if it was 100+, I still had all my gear on.

Specifically about the lane splitting and filtering which are a bit different. There was a study done at some point that basically stated that in countries where that was common had generally fewer motorcycle fatalities or accidents. Although that might be confusing correlation with causation as well. The better argument specifically with filtering makes a lot of sense though. Basically most motorcycle accidents happen at intersections, and filtering allows motorcycles to move to the front of the intersection. This takes them out of the getting rear ended side of things. Another aspect mentioned that even if a fairly small percentage of people lane split it would reduce all congestion by an immense amount. Not to get too off onto this as it is only kind of relevant.

There are places where it is a lot more common to see motorcycles and to ride them, some even as primary sources of transportation. I think that those places might be ok as people are generally going to be looking more for them. In the US though even places where they might be more common year around, california/arizona/florida. They still don't make up the numbers to have a sort of critical large number of riders to make the general populance more constantly aware of them. Like that gorilla video, if you are not looking for it, a lot of times will miss them.

I myself had maybe 3 relatively close calls, one was extremely close. Guy ran the red light turning right as my light turned green I was all the way out in the intersection pretty quickly and he nearly T boned me. The other two were people that were very angry that a motorcycle would be lane splitting and were actively trying to come at me/block me yell and carry on. Also there was the time that I personally overheated on the motorcyle sitting in traffic in the sun when it was 110 on an air cooled bike and had to pull off and sit in the shade of a tree for 30 min. Shortly after I sold my bike I watched a guy get T boned on his bike in an intersection. I rendered aid, the guy's right leg was broken, both the tibia and fibula and had punctured the skin. He really was lucky to be alive and that was the worse of his injuries which is pretty life changing one as it was. Also a lesson in response times, we were in the middle of a large city and it still took over 45min for a policeman to show up then another 30 min for an ambulance to arrive. Would have been faster to have driven the guy to the hospital honestly. This was all 7-8 years ago. Then I moved and my backyard neighbor who liked to ride dirt bikes, he went off a jump and landed wrong taking the handlebars to his chest passed away just a few months ago.

I think that at this point it would be unlikely that I would ride any significant of a motorcycle again. Although I had been seriously contemplating those off-road mini bikes, they don't go real fast and have big tires and probably be alright. Or a trail riding bike. I won't ride on the road again though unless it is an enclosed track. It would be nice to do the UTV at some point, lots of places all around where I am that would be a lot of fun to explore with one. I been taking my full size truck though into a lot of those areas and have a blast.
 
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RussRussman18

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Out of the 3 people in my family who drove motorcycles, 2 of them had crashes that could have been fatal. Both of them were also not their fault, hit by a car. I will never get on one, let alone own one
 

Jadus

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Figure I could add a bit to this. I use to have a motorcyle but sold it like some others. The end of the time that I had it was my only vehicle in south bay area. So I was commuting on it, and daily errands, everything. It was a relatively tough time mentally and the motorcycle helped a little bit I think. It also saved me a lot of time during my commute back then which was pretty horrific really. Basically in a car it would take 2+hrs to go 19 miles from where I lived to where I was working at the time. On the motorcycle it was like 35-45min pretty reliably due to being able to filter through traffic that was usually at a walking pace. Think the intro to office space aggravatingly slow traffic. I always approached riding as supper defensive as well (arguments can easily be made both ways for lane splitting and filtering). Usually treated my entire time on the bike as being absolutely invisible to everyone else on the road, always wore helmet plus protective gear no matter how close or far I was going. Or even the weather, if it was 100+, I still had all my gear on.

Specifically about the lane splitting and filtering which are a bit different. There was a study done at some point that basically stated that in countries where that was common had generally fewer motorcycle fatalities or accidents. Although that might be confusing correlation with causation as well. The better argument specifically with filtering makes a lot of sense though. Basically most motorcycle accidents happen at intersections, and filtering allows motorcycles to move to the front of the intersection. This takes them out of the getting rear ended side of things. Another aspect mentioned that even if a fairly small percentage of people lane split it would reduce all congestion by an immense amount. Not to get too off onto this as it is only kind of relevant.

There are places where it is a lot more common to see motorcycles and to ride them, some even as primary sources of transportation. I think that those places might be ok as people are generally going to be looking more for them. In the US though even places where they might be more common year around, california/arizona/florida. They still don't make up the numbers to have a sort of critical large number of riders to make the general populance more constantly aware of them. Like that gorilla video, if you are not looking for it, a lot of times will miss them.

I myself had maybe 3 relatively close calls, one was extremely close. Guy ran the red light turning right as my light turned green I was all the way out in the intersection pretty quickly and he nearly T boned me. The other two were people that were very angry that a motorcycle would be lane splitting and were actively trying to come at me/block me yell and carry on. Also there was the time that I personally overheated on the motorcyle sitting in traffic in the sun when it was 110 on an air cooled bike and had to pull off and sit in the shade of a tree for 30 min. Shortly after I sold my bike I watched a guy get T boned on his bike in an intersection. I rendered aid, the guy's right leg was broken, both the tibia and fibula and had punctured the skin. He really was lucky to be alive and that was the worse of his injuries which is pretty life changing one as it was. Also a lesson in response times, we were in the middle of a large city and it still took over 45min for a policeman to show up then another 30 min for an ambulance to arrive. Would have been faster to have driven the guy to the hospital honestly. This was all 7-8 years ago. Then I moved and my backyard neighbor who liked to ride dirt bikes, he went off a jump and landed wrong taking the handlebars to his chest passed away just a few months ago.

I think that at this point it would be unlikely that I would ride any significant of a motorcycle again. Although I had been seriously contemplating those off-road mini bikes, they don't go real fast and have big tires and probably be alright. Or a trail riding bike. I won't ride on the road again though unless it is an enclosed track. It would be nice to do the UTV at some point, lots of places all around where I am that would be a lot of fun to explore with one. I been taking my full size truck though into a lot of those areas and have a blast.
You make a lot of good points here. The lane splitting is definitely a benefit to traffic flow and speeding up commutes. We have motorbike lanes here in Thailand on the side of the road, but it's not always the best place to ride. Cars and trucks use them as left-turn lanes and sometimes park in it. I have to continuously look to see where the safest path is. Often, it's in the faster lanes, getting around the congestion.

Intersections are definitely a high-risk area. You have to be on hight alert there, even if you aren't moving. I saw CCTV footage of an intersection that I've been through hundreds of times. Some guy in a truck was trying to run the yellow light while turning, on a rainy day. Lost control and took out several motorbikes that were waiting for the light.

There are around 60-70 road deaths per day here; mostly in Bangkok. The majority are motorbike riders. Thais are not the best at risk assessment. They will dutifully wear their covid masks but hate wearing a helmet.

I always wear a helmet but I admit that most of the time I'm in shorts and sandals. I see the big-bike riders in their full riding gear and wonder how that's going to protect them in a high-speed crash. It may save them from road rash but not broken bones. I'd just suffocate from the heat wearing all that gear.
 

• nikita •

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My dad gave it up for the same reason. Back then I was very young and he didn't want to have an accident and leave us behind. Probably why he refused to teach me too haha, though he does reminisce about the bike a lot.

Also seemingly everyone who has a motorbike has had a bad accident or knows someone who has.

I once got on a motorbike with a friend going like... 60 mph and we had no protective gear or helmet. I was young. It was so stupid and I still shudder at the thought.
 
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Woosah

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I've been riding for about 2 years now, had some close calls—none of which were my fault. Luckily, I've never had any accidents. BUT I have seen MANY... pretty bad ones too. Anyway, listed my bike for sale a few weeks ago. I got what I wanted out of the ride, and it was fun. Now I'm just over it and haven't been riding much.
 

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loop101

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Saw this just moments ago and came to post it here, but you beat me to it. I know exactly where this happened. NUTS to be going that fast on those streets.

There is another video on Twitter but I wont post it. It shows the guy hit the car and land in front of the camera. His pants are ripped off by the impact. It is extremely graphic. I doubt MJ wants a million crash videos posted here, but here is a thumbnail from the video posted by "STREET PEOPLE OF LOS ANGELES":

1642760050218.png
 
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Phikey

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I was considering buying a bike for a long time, even started getting my license by going through the knowledge test and 2 day safety course (the process in Australia). After hearing about the horrific accidents and reading the crazy statistics, I think I'll pass for now.
 

Devilery

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Damn, buying my "childhood dream" motorcycle is high up my materialistic stuff bucket list. I agree with points made about street bikes and public road riding, but considering that money is not or will not be a factor for most of us, how do you feel riding on a track, either on-road or dirt? Most people ride in the streets because they can't afford fees related to track-riding/racing.

Sure, bones can still be broken, but there are no cars.
 
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loop101

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Damn, buying my "childhood dream" motorcycle is high up my materialistic stuff bucket list. I agree with points made about street bikes and public road riding, but considering that money is not or will not be a factor for most of us, how do you feel riding on a track, either on-road or dirt? Most people ride in the streets because they can't afford fees related to track-riding/racing.

Sure, bones can still be broken, but there are no cars.

It's cars that kill you. Bad road conditions can get you at high-speed. I would think riding a dirt-bike off-road is very safe if you are just exploring.
 

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It's cars that kill you. Bad road conditions can get you at high-speed. I would think riding a dirt-bike off-road is very safe if you are just exploring.
After watching an oblivious old lady blow through a red light, my husband sold the street bike & doubled-down on dirt. I ended up selling my bike a few years later, as I wasn't riding it due to the anxiety out-weighing the enjoyment due to distracted drivers.

I miss the concept of that bike. The reality of it though.... hard pass. Which is sad. Because it didn't use to be this way. :/
 

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I would think riding a dirt-bike off-road is very safe

I'm going to guess any activity AWAY from other idiots would be much safer.

This really isn't about motorcycle riding, but about other people who make motorcycle riding dangerous.

You're probably safer jumping off a cliff in a windsuit than riding a motorcycle in Friday rush hour traffic.

Riding a dirt bike in the middle of nowhere = safer.

Being away from distracted Tiktok fools = safer.
 
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Woosah

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This really isn't about motorcycle riding, but about other people who make motorcycle riding dangerous.
This.

Even when you take the test to get your motorcycle riding license, there's a question in there about the percentage of accidents motorcycle riders experience that is NOT the rider's fault. It's something like 97% (or somewhere around that number) if I remember correctly.

If for some reason you do decide to ride after hearing all this, there's a bit of advice that I believe saved my life quite a few times: Ride like EVERYONE on the road is trying to kill you and NO ONE on the road can see you.
 

Jadus

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Damn, buying my "childhood dream" motorcycle is high up my materialistic stuff bucket list. I agree with points made about street bikes and public road riding, but considering that money is not or will not be a factor for most of us, how do you feel riding on a track, either on-road or dirt? Most people ride in the streets because they can't afford fees related to track-riding/racing.

Sure, bones can still be broken, but there are no cars.
I would agree with you. I had a dirt bike when I was a teen. You can still get hurt. I fractured my wrist trying to climb a steep hill. But yeah, no cars to watch out for.
 

AmazingLarry

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I have a street legal dirtbike. Riding off road is definitely much safer than on road. There are obviously things always out of your control, but for the most part with off road riding you can decide how much risk you want to take by choosing what trails to ride and how hard you want to push it. Dirtbiking is way more fun anyway.

Riding on the street is still enjoyable though, but I don't do it much because I've seen too many idiots in their cars with no self awareness like everyone else has said.
 
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I had 3 different motorcycles, one after another, traded or sold when I upgraded.

My last one was a ZX-10R.

In retrospect, it was a ton of bike that wasn't justified for my skill level, but I wanted it so I got it. Extremely quick. I didn't have many oopsies and had never ever crashed a bike, or even accidentally dropped it.

But, one day, with less than 1500 miles on my brand new bike, I was headed out to ride it. Geared up in leathers, putting my helmet on, gloves, about to hop on.

And it was GONE.

I was really upset about it at the time, but I have to admit I was relieved. Yes, it was my dream bike. I liked taking it out, had taken my girlfriend on a few rides out around the Olympic peninsula with it, and I just liked the tech and aesthetics of the whole thing.

But, now coming up to 6 years later, I do think that bike thief may have kept me alive a bit longer. Maybe I would have been fine, maybe not. I still love looking at them, hearing them, watching them ride by, make space for them. I still do other risky things, but probably not as dangerous? I'm not sure.
 

p0stscript

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Damn, buying my "childhood dream" motorcycle is high up my materialistic stuff bucket list. I agree with points made about street bikes and public road riding, but considering that money is not or will not be a factor for most of us, how do you feel riding on a track, either on-road or dirt? Most people ride in the streets because they can't afford fees related to track-riding/racing.

Sure, bones can still be broken, but there are no cars.
Race tracks are excellent places to continue getting the thrill of riding without the downside of cars etc. crossing your path. Taking a further track licence or race licence opens up new opportunities whilst teaching new and useful skills and developing those you already have.
Here in the UK I live close to some very good race tracks and enjoy a day racing. Accidents still happen (even with everyone going the same way and hopefully familiar with the race lines) but once you move from novice races/ track days accidents become less frequent. It still hurts when you come off ( I've discovered I don't bounce as well in my sixties) but the safety crews are on the ball and even a ride in an ambulance doesn't indicate serious injuries.
I will point out it can have a down side - it can become a money pit with extra engines (one spare, one for repair) frames, fairings, transport van, generator, tire warmers, tool kits......ad infinitum)
 

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And here I am wanting a motorbike again! I miss riding my old one.

I am in Mexico, in a small town, and I'd just like one for booting around the town and along the boulevard. Cars drive super slow here, and probably 20% of vehicles are bikes or scooters.

Probably won't ever get one, but if I do it isn't going on the highways or anywhere serious with it. So many idiots driving around with their faces in their phones.
 
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I had a dirt bike when I was a teen. You can still get hurt.

I crashed a dirt bike when I was 17, broke my wrist, thumb, and screwed up my knee and my neck which still gives me problems today. It was so long ago that I forgot I escaped a much tragic outcome other than a few broken bones.

Looking back now at how stupid and "bold" I was, I cringe.
 

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And here I am wanting a motorbike again! I miss riding my old one.

I am in Mexico, in a small town, and I'd just like one for booting around the town and along the boulevard. Cars drive super slow here, and probably 20% of vehicles are bikes or scooters.

Probably won't ever get one, but if I do it isn't going on the highways or anywhere serious with it. So many idiots driving around with their faces in their phones.
I've been thinking about it too...not to go on the highway, but just to get around town. It's so convenient and it's nice to ride around in warm weather.
BUT, people are SO DUMB on the roads here that I just don't think I can do it.

There's a roundabout a couple hundred feet down the road from my house. Almost every time I go through there, someone does something dumb. The cops here also most of the time don't do traffic stops unless you are excessively speeding. So it's a double edged sword, I can drive as fast as I want on the highway, but people are gonna do dumb things and there are pretty much no consequences from the authorities.

I think in Asia it's easier to get away with it. They have designated scooter lanes on the highways, a lot more people drive scooters/bikes so people in cars don't drive as fast and they're always looking out for them.

I'm glad I stumbled on this thread, it reminded me vividly of my accident a few years ago...
 

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I've been thinking about it too...not to go on the highway, but just to get around town. It's so convenient and it's nice to ride around in warm weather.
BUT, people are SO DUMB on the roads here that I just don't think I can do it.

There's a roundabout a couple hundred feet down the road from my house. Almost every time I go through there, someone does something dumb. The cops here also most of the time don't do traffic stops unless you are excessively speeding. So it's a double edged sword, I can drive as fast as I want on the highway, but people are gonna do dumb things and there are pretty much no consequences from the authorities.

I think in Asia it's easier to get away with it. They have designated scooter lanes on the highways, a lot more people drive scooters/bikes so people in cars don't drive as fast and they're always looking out for them.

I'm glad I stumbled on this thread, it reminded me vividly of my accident a few years ago...
Thats still Playa del Carmen right? Significantly different style of city than where I am! Progresso area is 90% locals just going about their business, and 9% super old retired people who walk or take taxis. Roads are in good condition here, and speed bumps everywhere to keep speed down. The town is like 500m "deep" and like 15km long. A single main road going north, a single going south, the rest are super small roads that have to stop when entering the main streets. It is a surprisingly good set-up.

My in-laws are all in Toluca. That place is a death trap, I wouldn't even drive a regular car there. Absolutely bonkers that way!

I am big into mounting biking, but @Red saying her hubby got a dirt bike is making me want to see if there are any dirt biking trails here. The terrain is about as flat as I have ever seen, so "mountain" biking is completely out of the question. Might be some cool jungle trails though
 
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Mammoth

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Thats still Playa del Carmen right? Significantly different style of city than where I am! Progresso area is 90% locals just going about their business, and 9% super old retired people who walk or take taxis. Roads are in good condition here, and speed bumps everywhere to keep speed down. The town is like 500m "deep" and like 15km long. A single main road going north, a single going south, the rest are super small roads that have to stop when entering the main streets. It is a surprisingly good set-up.

My in-laws are all in Toluca. That place is a death trap, I wouldn't even drive a regular car there. Absolutely bonkers that way!

I am big into mounting biking, but @Red saying her hubby got a dirt bike is making me want to see if there are any dirt biking trails here. The terrain is about as flat as I have ever seen, so "mountain" biking is completely out of the question. Might be some cool jungle trails though
Yeah in Playa. I use my horn and my brights a lot :happy:
There are definitely other places where it's easier. When I go to Cozumel I rent a scooter. Lots of people ride them there and it's not as crazy.
Tons of trails out here I'd love to explore, but yeah no elevation gain whatsoever. Probably some really cool cenotes barely anyone ever sees.
 

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So much can go wrong so easily. I found it not worth it. I had a dirt bike when I was a kid and thought about getting a motorcycle for the road.

I've considered that many times over the years, but the risk isn't worth it to me. I have too many personal experiences and the accidents of friends and acquaintances. Many more than I'll mention here. Plus people are more distracted than ever. I had take my mom to the hospital and that clinched it for me. My nephew's best friend's brother showed up in intensive care while we were there. He was a lump of meat with blood squirting out after being thown about 30 feet up in the air from the momentum of the Harley when a car cut in front of him. He survived after a long time in the hospital but is busted up and has a brain injury. Having to have someone spend years taking care of me and wiping my a$$ is not for me.

I have a friend who races dirt bikes on tracks. Plenty of danger there too. But not as many fatalities. Some though. He had told me about a guy going over one of the hills they set up to jump around the track. It was the largest hill. He went way up, missed the downslope and didn't survive the landing. My friend just retired from the senior circuit a couple of years ago. I think his last injury was a broken leg. I was just talking to his nephew who also raced and who collided with his brother on the dirt. They were on a home track or something though where direction wasn't enforced. Everyone should always be going the same direction. He spent a month and a half in the hospital. He is still riding dirt bikes but just quit road bikes.

Some people think they'll get away with it with the 3 wheelers and 4 wheelers. I ran into a guy who lost his sister and her husband on a 3 wheeler. They had a blowout at speed and the three wheeler just summersaulted down the road. 4 wheelers crush people all the time. I almost killed my son and myself on a 4 wheeler. Never again unless it has a roll cage. And even then probably not.

I'd never want to have someone taking care of me for the rest of my life. It doesn't sound Fastlane to me. I'll take the steel cage of a car.
 

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