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Medical: Mobile IV Service

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Idea threads

MJ DeMarco

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So I've been sick in bed for the last 5 days (non COVID, likely the flu) and it was probably the worst I felt in my life. First, I rarely get sick. Second, I vomited several times which for me is unusual -- in my 52 years of life on this planet, I've only vomited 2 times due to sickness. Now it is 3.

As my 4th day of sickness continued, followed by the worst night of my life with zero sleep, I was thinking about going to the ER as I clearly needed an IV infusion. However I was hesitant as I was extremely weak with dizziness, didn't feel like waiting X hours, and I didn't want to expose myself to a high-Covid risk environment. I was extremely dehydrated with an insatiable thirst. Problem was, I was nauseous and could not keep any water down ... in other words, the more water I drank, the worse I felt. The less water I had, the more thirsty I got, and quite frankly, I think I started getting delirious.

Anyhow, I feel pretty good today and I feel it is thanks to a relative new business that probably isn't available in your area: The Medical Mobile IV service.

Instead of going to the ER, I was able to find a mobile IV service that got to my house in under an hour. (Serendipity: When I called, they were already doing an IV in my town).

A nurse visited my home, needled me into an IV and gave me a variety of infusions, from vitamins to anti-nausea and anti-inflammatory meds. Within an hour, I felt better. Better, I was able to get a full night of sleep.

Today, I feel better. Not normal, but better.

Anyhow, the young lady who did my IV said the business was pretty new (started in April) and that she now works there full time due to the growth. She said the growth has been all word of mouth (productocracy anyone??) and it was started by an ER doctor who knew people always went to the ER for IVs for non-emergency situations (like mine). She also said that many of their customers are not fighting illness, but athletes and people who just do it for preventative measures. (Repeat customers anyone??)

While this isn't a *new* business and I haven't really examined any potential value skewing opportunities, this clearly is a business with a STRONG VALUE PROPOSITION. And strong value props have productocracy potential.

My infusion cost about $200. To me, it was worth thousands. And it SAVED me thousands and a trip to the ER. (Which would have cost me $3K anyway).

If you're in the medical field (doctor, nurse, etc.) and are looking for a potential opportunity, a mobile IV service might be something to examine. It would also be a good franchising model as I'm sure a few already exist.

Also, if you're not feeling well or need an edge in athletics, it might be worth your investigation to try an IV service, either mobile or brick and mortar (there are locations you can go to as well).

I hope this thread/post helps someone, in business, or health, or better, both!
~MJ
 
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doster.zach

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My infusion cost about $200. To me, it was worth thousands. And it SAVED me thousands and a trip to the ER. (Which would have cost me $3K anyway).

Anywhere you can find value skew against hospitals / established healthcare the margins will exist!

If you're in the medical field (doctor, nurse, etc.) and are looking for a potential opportunity, a mobile IV service might be something to examine. It would also be a good franchising model as I'm sure a few already exist.

Not sure, but would you need to be a registered nurse to do something like this?
 
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MJ DeMarco

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Not sure, but would you need to be a registered nurse to do something like this?

Yes, not sure of the lady's credentials, but yes, some medical credentials will be needed. Perhaps a RN, or an MA.
 

ValueSystems

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Nice story, it reminds me of the same business in the tv series Billions, in which hedge funds got their traders on IVs for performance enhancement haha

Hope you get better soon, glad it wasn't covid!
 

eramart

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The idea is certainly nice, but being from a medical family, I think that there are a lot of things that can go wrong with this, especially with inexperienced/cheaper staff. Maybe someone with medical background can comment on this?
 

eramart

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FWIW, besides mobile IV, you can do mobile services for elderly/immobile - x-ray, ultrasound, blood/urine sampling, wound care, etc. My only concern is that the people doing this kind of service would be more like the cheapest clinic, not the best one.
 

Lyinx

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addon services: make sure to use related services (above is mentioned elderly care, with blood/urine sampling and other things that they would like to have done, or the "hangover cure vehicle" where you add on things like pickle juice as a hangover cure...
 
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GTMS

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So I've been sick in bed for the last 5 days (non COVID, likely the flu) and it was probably the worst I felt in my life. First, I rarely get sick. Second, I vomited several times which for me is unusual -- in my 52 years of life on this planet, I've only vomited 2 times due to sickness. Now it is 3.

As my 4th day of sickness continued, followed by the worst night of my life with zero sleep, I was thinking about going to the ER as I clearly needed an IV infusion. However I was hesitant as I was extremely weak with dizziness, didn't feel like waiting X hours, and I didn't want to expose myself to a high-Covid risk environment. I was extremely dehydrated with an insatiable thirst. Problem was, I was nauseous and could not keep any water down ... in other words, the more water I drank, the worse I felt. The less water I had, the more thirsty I got, and quite frankly, I think I started getting delirious.

Anyhow, I feel pretty good today and I feel it is thanks to a relative new business that probably isn't available in your area: The Medical Mobile IV service.

Instead of going to the ER, I was able to find a mobile IV service that got to my house in under an hour. (Serendipity: When I called, they were already doing an IV in my town).

A nurse visited my home, needled me into an IV and gave me a variety of infusions, from vitamins to anti-nausea and anti-inflammatory meds. Within an hour, I felt better. Better, I was able to get a full night of sleep.

Today, I feel better. Not normal, but better.

Anyhow, the young lady who did my IV said the business was pretty new (started in April) and that she now works there full time due to the growth. She said the growth has been all word of mouth (productocracy anyone??) and it was started by an ER doctor who knew people always went to the ER for IVs for non-emergency situations (like mine). She also said that many of their customers are not fighting illness, but athletes and people who just do it for preventative measures. (Repeat customers anyone??)

While this isn't a *new* business and I haven't really examined any potential value skewing opportunities, this clearly is a business with a STRONG VALUE PROPOSITION. And strong value props have productocracy potential.

My infusion cost about $200. To me, it was worth thousands. And it SAVED me thousands and a trip to the ER. (Which would have cost me $3K anyway).

If you're in the medical field (doctor, nurse, etc.) and are looking for a potential opportunity, a mobile IV service might be something to examine. It would also be a good franchising model as I'm sure a few already exist.

Also, if you're not feeling well or need an edge in athletics, it might be worth your investigation to try an IV service, either mobile or brick and mortar (there are locations you can go to as well).

I hope this thread/post helps someone, in business, or health, or better, both!
~MJ

This is awesome! Thank you for sharing! So glad you’re feeling better!
 

Jessica Reid

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So I've been sick in bed for the last 5 days (non COVID, likely the flu) and it was probably the worst I felt in my life. First, I rarely get sick. Second, I vomited several times which for me is unusual -- in my 52 years of life on this planet, I've only vomited 2 times due to sickness. Now it is 3.

As my 4th day of sickness continued, followed by the worst night of my life with zero sleep, I was thinking about going to the ER as I clearly needed an IV infusion. However I was hesitant as I was extremely weak with dizziness, didn't feel like waiting X hours, and I didn't want to expose myself to a high-Covid risk environment. I was extremely dehydrated with an insatiable thirst. Problem was, I was nauseous and could not keep any water down ... in other words, the more water I drank, the worse I felt. The less water I had, the more thirsty I got, and quite frankly, I think I started getting delirious.

Anyhow, I feel pretty good today and I feel it is thanks to a relative new business that probably isn't available in your area: The Medical Mobile IV service.

Instead of going to the ER, I was able to find a mobile IV service that got to my house in under an hour. (Serendipity: When I called, they were already doing an IV in my town).

A nurse visited my home, needled me into an IV and gave me a variety of infusions, from vitamins to anti-nausea and anti-inflammatory meds. Within an hour, I felt better. Better, I was able to get a full night of sleep.

Today, I feel better. Not normal, but better.

Anyhow, the young lady who did my IV said the business was pretty new (started in April) and that she now works there full time due to the growth. She said the growth has been all word of mouth (productocracy anyone??) and it was started by an ER doctor who knew people always went to the ER for IVs for non-emergency situations (like mine). She also said that many of their customers are not fighting illness, but athletes and people who just do it for preventative measures. (Repeat customers anyone??)

While this isn't a *new* business and I haven't really examined any potential value skewing opportunities, this clearly is a business with a STRONG VALUE PROPOSITION. And strong value props have productocracy potential.

My infusion cost about $200. To me, it was worth thousands. And it SAVED me thousands and a trip to the ER. (Which would have cost me $3K anyway).

If you're in the medical field (doctor, nurse, etc.) and are looking for a potential opportunity, a mobile IV service might be something to examine. It would also be a good franchising model as I'm sure a few already exist.

Also, if you're not feeling well or need an edge in athletics, it might be worth your investigation to try an IV service, either mobile or brick and mortar (there are locations you can go to as well).

I hope this thread/post helps someone, in business, or health, or better, both!
~MJ
My husband is a Physician... I'm definitely going to share this with him. Very interesting!
 

Iwokeup

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So I've been sick in bed for the last 5 days (non COVID, likely the flu) and it was probably the worst I felt in my life. First, I rarely get sick. Second, I vomited several times which for me is unusual -- in my 52 years of life on this planet, I've only vomited 2 times due to sickness. Now it is 3.

As my 4th day of sickness continued, followed by the worst night of my life with zero sleep, I was thinking about going to the ER as I clearly needed an IV infusion. However I was hesitant as I was extremely weak with dizziness, didn't feel like waiting X hours, and I didn't want to expose myself to a high-Covid risk environment. I was extremely dehydrated with an insatiable thirst. Problem was, I was nauseous and could not keep any water down ... in other words, the more water I drank, the worse I felt. The less water I had, the more thirsty I got, and quite frankly, I think I started getting delirious.

Anyhow, I feel pretty good today and I feel it is thanks to a relative new business that probably isn't available in your area: The Medical Mobile IV service.

Instead of going to the ER, I was able to find a mobile IV service that got to my house in under an hour. (Serendipity: When I called, they were already doing an IV in my town).

A nurse visited my home, needled me into an IV and gave me a variety of infusions, from vitamins to anti-nausea and anti-inflammatory meds. Within an hour, I felt better. Better, I was able to get a full night of sleep.

Today, I feel better. Not normal, but better.

Anyhow, the young lady who did my IV said the business was pretty new (started in April) and that she now works there full time due to the growth. She said the growth has been all word of mouth (productocracy anyone??) and it was started by an ER doctor who knew people always went to the ER for IVs for non-emergency situations (like mine). She also said that many of their customers are not fighting illness, but athletes and people who just do it for preventative measures. (Repeat customers anyone??)

While this isn't a *new* business and I haven't really examined any potential value skewing opportunities, this clearly is a business with a STRONG VALUE PROPOSITION. And strong value props have productocracy potential.

My infusion cost about $200. To me, it was worth thousands. And it SAVED me thousands and a trip to the ER. (Which would have cost me $3K anyway).

If you're in the medical field (doctor, nurse, etc.) and are looking for a potential opportunity, a mobile IV service might be something to examine. It would also be a good franchising model as I'm sure a few already exist.

Also, if you're not feeling well or need an edge in athletics, it might be worth your investigation to try an IV service, either mobile or brick and mortar (there are locations you can go to as well).

I hope this thread/post helps someone, in business, or health, or better, both!
~MJ
This exact service is part of the business model that’s launching in the next 2 to 3 weeks from my clinic
 
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Marzook

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this can be scale-able albeit with a steady stream of good cheap labour force. I believe there are certain groups of individuals that have made their peoples proud by contributing to many a western societies through nursing and rna type work. In scandinavia its a lot of filipino nurses and nurses aides etc that have been a tremendous help during covid etc, and have worked for meager wages and are willing to as it is considerably many rungs above what they would get paid back home. Just a thought...
 

woken

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Really useful in the US. However, I don’t see much potential in other countries where free healthcare exists.

Glad you’re feeling better.
 

Private Witt

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I went to an outside event this summer in Oklahoma where it was 102 degrees the whole weekend and by the mid-Sunday the booth with nurses doing this were cranking it in.
 
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MJ DeMarco

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In my town, where are the corpo's exists, the mobile bus operates with hangover injection. You can drink whole weekend, call to they in Monday morning - they'll come to you, gives you the 30min shot and you are like new;)

Yup, totally forgot about that "market segment" -- instant hangover relief!

My only concern is that the people doing this kind of service would be more like the cheapest clinic, not the best one.

I don't think so... for a nurse, this is a great job that would have a high demand over say, a job at a hospital, a hospice, an oncology operation, or a prison infirmary. And they earn tips.

My nurse even said she loves the job over the one she just left which was a cancer clinic. Also my wife (a nurse) even said it was the type of job she would like to have over everything she has done in the past.
 

Daniel.

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Yes, not sure of the lady's credentials, but yes, some medical credentials will be needed. Perhaps a RN, or an MA.
You must be an RN (Registered Nurse) you can also be an LVN (Licensed Vocational Nurse) with an IV-Certification but they're only limited to starting, hanging the fluids, but not certified to actually give the medication, so an RN would still need to be present.

My Wife has been an LVN for years and is actually scheduled to graduate as an RN in a few weeks (excited!)
 
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woken

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Does free equal good/ convenient?
It cannot have the same impact as in the US and you know it.
There’s an audience everywhere but not the same as in the US where it makes sense financially for people to pay $200 rather than $3000.
 
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SteveO

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It cannot have the same impact as in the US and you know it.
There’s an audience everywhere but not the same as in the US where it makes sense financially for people to pay $200 rather than $3000.
I did not say that it would have the same impact. I did imply that it still may be valid and posed questions that you did not answer. Money is not the only reason that someone may wish to use this service.
 

MJ DeMarco

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It cannot have the same impact as in the US and you know it.
There’s an audience everywhere but not the same as in the US where it makes sense financially for people to pay $200 rather than $3000.
Having a private nurse come to your home, versus climbing into a car and going to a overcrowded hospital where the "healthcare" is free? I'll take the former.
 
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Xav243

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Having a private nurse come to your home, versus climbing into a car and going to a overcrowded hospital where the "healthcare" is free? I'll take the former.
This kind of service, private nurse going to your home is very common where I come from (France) and live now (Belgium)
You can also have doctors coming to your home.
And it is cheap also because you get reimbursed by social services
 

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