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NOTABLE! Lex DeVille's 2019 Step-By-Step Upwork Tutorial for Brokeass Bootstrap Beginners Who Need Cash Now!

Discussion in 'Hustles, Freelancing, Bootstrapping' started by Lex DeVille, Mar 11, 2019.

  1. Timmy1990
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    Timmy1990 I Will Not Stop! Read Millionaire Fastlane I've Read UNSCRIPTED FASTLANE INSIDER Speedway Pass

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    My last profile was sales dominant skill wise, with business development and customer service listed also.

    This time i zoned right in and made my profile 100% customer service and got that message.

    Next time around should i switch it up do you think and list another skill?
     
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  2. Lex DeVille
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    Lex DeVille Sweeping Shadows from Dreams Read Millionaire Fastlane I've Read UNSCRIPTED FASTLANE INSIDER Speedway Pass LEGENDARY CONTRIBUTOR

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    Yeah, based on that message I think trying a different skill would be worth it. See the skills index link I posted yesterday above. Maybe try for one of those. A skill I recently saw from the old index that I don't think was listed on the one above is "Lesson Planning" which has to do with planning lessons for online courses or for other kinds of instructors. Even though it's not listed on the index, it's still an in-demand skill that wouldn't require a lot of technical knowledge to write a good profile around. Might be worth a shot.
     
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  3. MyNameIsMarcel
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    MyNameIsMarcel New Contributor Read Millionaire Fastlane

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    Thank you so much for this post. I will get from it as much as I can. I closed my eyes and answered the questions, so thats the homework.
    1.Why are you doing this?
    Because I am a young 18 years old guy, I want to learn myself new things and do as much as I can.

    2.Describe your endgame
    Use my experience, look at fails and good things that I have done.

    3.How much money is needed
    I need to be able to make about 3000 dollars per month to come back to my home country and have a enough good life for me. 100 dollars per day.

    4.Who are you failing if you don't succeed?
    I am the one who takes a risk.
     
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    Hi Lex Deville, how are you? My name is Matheus and I wanted to join UpWork, but I live in Brazil, and I do not get on so well with the English. Would that be a drag on me to follow in this business?
     
  5. Lex DeVille
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    Lex DeVille Sweeping Shadows from Dreams Read Millionaire Fastlane I've Read UNSCRIPTED FASTLANE INSIDER Speedway Pass LEGENDARY CONTRIBUTOR

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    Only if you think it will be.

    I understood what you were saying well enough. You may want to consider a skill that doesn't require strong English. Anything you can build, design or create. Websites, logos, illustrations, music, landing pages, email funnels, anything that doesn't require writing basically.

    As long as you can communicate clearly enough to understand the client and deliver what they need then clients won't have a problem working with you.
     
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  6. kanunay
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    kanunay Contributor Read Millionaire Fastlane I've Read UNSCRIPTED FASTLANE INSIDER

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    My profile was approved immediately, but I've got to figure out what my niche is going to be. I've been jack-of-all-trades for many years, except in one area (legacy systems migration) but there doesn't seem to be much demand for that specialty on Upwork.
     
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  7. Lex DeVille
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    Lex DeVille Sweeping Shadows from Dreams Read Millionaire Fastlane I've Read UNSCRIPTED FASTLANE INSIDER Speedway Pass LEGENDARY CONTRIBUTOR

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    Upwork Tutorial Day 4 - How to Build Your Upwork
    Portfolio Even Without Paid Client Work



    Right after clients look at your overview, they scroll down and check out your portfolio. While your overview tends to tell them what you can do, your portfolio shows them. If your portfolio sucks or doesn't exist at all, then you'll probably get passed over for the next person. So today I'll show you how to build one even if you don't have any paid jobs to use as examples.

    General Portfolio Rules:

    1. ANY portfolio pieces are better than none
    2. One full page is the bare minimum (4 portfolio pieces)
    3. Two full pages is the minimum I recommend to establish credibility
    4. Portfolio pieces with an image are better than without an image
    5. Demonstrate your best work even if it is unpaid work
    6. Make the first 2 pages look consistent
    What Image Should I Use for My Portfolio Pieces?
    There are three kinds of images I use for my portfolio pieces. Before I share them, you should know that you should use whatever makes the most sense based on the skill you offer.

    For example:

    • Web Designer = Screenshot from the homepage of the website
    • Logo Designer = Images of the logos you've designed
    • Brand Designer = Images with consistent colors and style
    • Copywriter = Screenshot of website homepage copy or free stock photo image
    • Illustrator = Images of illustrations
    • Musician / Audio = Stock photo
    • Customer Service = Screenshot of website homepage (preferably with smiling face)
    • Virtual Assistant = Same as customer service
    • Sales = Image with the color red in it
    • AI / ML / Anything tech = Screenshot of app, software, or website

    The 3 Kinds of Images I use
    :

    What Goes in Your Portfolio?

    As a copywriter my portfolio pieces usually have samples of my copy. Most portfolio pieces can be made in a Google Doc for free. Either add text, images, or text AND images to create a sort of case study. However, you don't have to do this if the copy/design is already visible on the website. You can just link to it in the portfolio piece.

    As for specific pieces, give clients what they want. What kind of clients do you want to attract? If it's Real Estate clients, you'd better have Real Estate samples. Think about what your clients are specifically looking for. Does a client looking for a direct response sales page want to see creative poetry? NO! They want to see sales pages and landing pages using direct response style. Give them that!

    What if I Don't Have Past Clients?
    If you don't have past clients, then you need to make sample portfolio pieces. Here's how...

    • Copywriters = Write sample copy in the skill style you want to do. For example, if it's email marketing, write some cold and warm emails. For direct response, write a sales page.

    • Web Designers = Build a website or several one-page websites in Wordpress. If you need a free option do it in Wix to get started.

    • Logo Designers = Make several logos in Inkscape for free or in your program of choice.

    Basically just make some samples. There's no requirement that they be paid work. A lot of people get hung up on this for some reason. Don't let not having clients stop you. Create something to showcase what you can do and then load it up.

    Once you create your portfolio pieces in Google Docs, then download them as a PDF because it looks nicer in your portfolio.


    How Should I Title My Portfolio Pieces?
    Use something relatively short that clearly describes the piece. If it's a creative piece, then it's okay to use a creative title. You will also want to use your skill keyword in some of your titles to help rank for SEO.

    NOTE: You can sort your portfolio pieces so you can put the best stuff on the front page even if it's buried 10 pages deep right now. Click the opposite direction arrows for this option on any portfolio piece.

    Screenshot 2019-03-16 at 6.39.22 AM.png


    What Goes In the Description?

    Obviously this is the place to describe the work. Be sure to add something in there. I use my description space to write full-length copy. You only need around a paragraph for other types of gigs and skills. Be sure to use your keyword if you can to help rank for SEO.

    Screenshot 2019-03-16 at 6.41.28 AM.png


    What Tags Should I Use?
    I use a wider range of skill tags than in my profile tags. At the very least you'll want to use your keyword tag in your tags area. As long as you have that, you can put whatever else you want in here. I recommend keeping them relevant. If you're a copywriter, use copywriting tags.


    Thoughts on Consistency
    This is a minor thing, but consistency is important if you want to create a professional look. Make sure your first 2 pages of pieces use a consistent image. It doesn't need to be the exact same image, but it should look similar in terms of style to the other images. For instance, my images all use my brand colors. It shows the client that you have your shit together. You're not all over the place.

    Screenshot 2019-03-16 at 6.42.54 AM.png


    Linking Out to Your Website

    Inside each portfolio piece there is a place where you can add a link to the piece of work. You can link to a client's website or your own. Either is fine. If you want to go a step beyond to get clients to click the link, you can use your description to lead them in that direction.

    For instance, some of my portfolio pieces tell a story, but then it ends abruptly on a cliffhanger and says something like, "...continue reading on my website at lexdeville.com"

    This will trigger clients to click to your website. If you were so inclined, you could then deliver the content, and maybe have a contact form on the bottom of the page, or possibly an email opt-in. Either of these could help you connect with the client beyond the usual means if you catch my drift...

    Screenshot 2019-03-16 at 6.44.09 AM.png


    Final Thoughts
    Poor Upwork portfolios lead to poor results. This is one of the biggest missed opportunities most freelancers make. Not only is your portfolio a chance to establish credibility and authority, when done right it helps you rank for SEO so you show up higher in search results. So spend some time on this, but NOT TOO MUCH TIME! If you're just getting started, get at least one page of portfolio pieces done and loaded in. Even if they're not your best work, it's better than nothing.


    HOMEWORK
    Your homework today is to create 4 portfolio pieces. If possible use work you've done in the past to create these. Doesn't matter if it was paid work or not. We want speed and momentum, not to waste time on creating new pieces if you don't have to. So create at least 4 portfolio pieces and load them into your profile. Add at least a 1 paragraph description and relevant tags and a title with your keyword in it. Do this now!
     
  8. Lex DeVille
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    Lex DeVille Sweeping Shadows from Dreams Read Millionaire Fastlane I've Read UNSCRIPTED FASTLANE INSIDER Speedway Pass LEGENDARY CONTRIBUTOR

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    Upwork Tutorial Day 5 - How to Write YOU Focused
    Proposals that Get Clients to Respond



    When you send proposals (AKA cover letters) to clients on Upwork, you will often be one of 10 to 20 or even 50 people or more applying to that job. So let's start with a look at my hiring process so you have an idea of how a client might make a decision about who to interview.

    1. Is there ANYTHING that is an instant disqualifier?
    This is the first thing I look for. Is the freelancer from a country I want to work with? Do they offer the skill I asked for? Did they upload attachments if I asked for them? Is their proposal full of spelling and grammar errors? Do those errors matter for this project? Did they answer my question that shows they paid attention? Did they address my needs?

    Basically I look for any indicator that this person ISN'T the one. When I see those signs, I archive them immediately because I know there is 0 chance we will work together. Please note that this has NOTHING to do with their rate (although that might be the case for some clients). Usually rates won't stop clients from responding. Here's an example from just last week...

    ezgif.com-gif-maker (8).png

    What's important about this is that even though the client technically disqualified me based on my rates, she responded. At $135/hr she responded. Why is that important? Because it gave me a second chance to communicate with her and let her know that I only offer fixed rates, what they are, and why that actually benefits her over paying hourly freelancers even when their rate is set much lower.

    2. Can this freelancer get the job done?
    The second thing I try to identify is whether or not this freelancer is competent enough to do the job. Based on their proposal, do I believe they are skilled enough to deliver what I want? If not, do I believe they are smart enough to figure out how to get it done? If the answer isn't "yes" and if it isn't clear to me that you are a competent freelancer, and if I don't feel confident in your abilities, then I won't feel comfortable going forward with you.

    For that reason, Upwork proposals must meet those 3 criteria:

    • Establish you competence
    • So the client feels confident
    • Which makes them feel comfortable
    When those 3 keys are set in place, THEN you are very likely to get the interview.

    3. Is this freelancer the BEST person for the job?
    Beyond the 3 C's there's one last thing I look for. Out of those 2-3 freelancer who made me feel comfortable, which one seems to be the best fit?

    To answer this question I look at several things. First, is it clear from their proposal that they care about me and that they put in effort? Do they WANT to do this job? What does their bio say about them? Are they an expert in this field? Do they have the skills to back it up? Are they clearly the kind of person I would want to work with? Finally, I look at their portfolio. Are their samples relevant? Are they in the style I need? Are they good enough for the amount I'm willing to pay?

    It's a WHOLE PERSON concept.

    That's what clients are looking for. Instant DQ, do you meet the 3 C's, are you the best person for the job? It's NOT based on your rates. Now that we've established that, and we've built you a powerful bio and portfolio, it's time to improve your proposals for better results.

    YOU Focused Proposals
    YOU Focus is the art of showing clients you care about them, want to help them, can get the job done, and are the BEST fit for the gig. It is NOT simply using the word "you."

    Steps to a YOU Focused Proposal

    1. Never start with the word "I"
    2. Use some variation of "you" before "I" or "me" or "my"
    3. Use "you" 10x as much as you use "I" or "me" or "my"
    4. Repeat the client's own words back to them
    5. Connect your skills with their needs
    6. Establish credibility fast
    7. Prove your competence
    8. Call them to Action
    9. Show them little details that set you apart

    Getting Hired Happens in Steps
    As with any kind of marketing, we move clients one step at a time. The first step is to get a response. The second step is to get interviewed. The third step is to get hired. Just because you get a response doesn't mean you've been interviewed. Technically you've secured the interview, but you haven't done it until you've done it.

    Knowing this, we can now work on a YOU Focused proposal that has a single intent...getting a response. NOT getting you hired. That happens later. So let's look at a YOU Focused Proposal...

    YOU Focused Proposal

    First the original job post...
    Screenshot 2019-03-17 at 6.09.11 AM.png

    Now the proposal (written live in the video)...

    Screenshot 2019-03-17 at 6.09.56 AM.png

    Cover Letter Intro
    For this proposal you can see that it does NOT start with "I" or "me" or "my." Instead, it starts with a headline that identifies this as "Copywriting for Roofing Contractors" which is what they are...targeting.

    First Line Starts with "You"
    Next I give a simple greeting followed by the word "You."

    Second Line Mirrors Them
    Now I repeat their own words back to them about what they need...copywriting for their roofing business.

    Demonstrate Competence
    Then I start to prove competence by DEMONSTRATING that I can help them stand out. Instead of just telling them "I can help you stand out," I used a metaphor to SHOW them something different by talking about a "sea of sameness." If I wasn't doing this on video and distracted by that, I would spend even more time forming a more relevant idea for this particular client.

    Establish Crediblity and Connect it with Their Job
    In the next sentence I bridge the gap between us. I let them know that I'm the exact thing they need, and then I drop several relevant credibility markers that will likely stand out to them. For instance, "industrial companies" targets BLUE COLLAR companies which is what a roofing company also is. If you don't find RELEVANT credibility markers then your credibility will appear weak and won't support your competence very well.

    Ask Good Questions
    You don't have to ask questions, but they can help establish competence. If your questions make the client think or have an "aha" moment, then you are golden. Don't just ask questions for the sake of asking questions. Ask GOOD questions. Targeted questions. Questions about their business. Questions that prove you care and want to help them.

    Prove You're a Professional
    One of the biggest impressions a freelancer ever made on me was when she directly stated exactly what she'd deliver and how much it would cost. While others were blasting me with hourly rates, this person said "here's what you get and here's how much it is." No guessing games. I love that, and so do a lot of business owners because they don't have time to keep track of you. So the next section of my proposal clearly states what I'll do and how much it will cost. You don't have to add your prices here, but it's a good way to filter through clients if you don't want to work with anyone for less than X amount.

    Call them to Action
    The last line of the proposal is a simple call to action that gives them next steps. Since the very next step is to get them to contact me or to message me, then that's what I use. If I've applied with a proper YOU Focus, then all of the above IS what they need, so they SHOULD message me.

    Your Signature
    Kind regards is fine for most gigs, but when you write for creative jobs you should use something more interesting. Keep that in mind.

    P.S. Statement
    This is just one last chance to catch the client with something they might value. You could add your phone number in here (I do this regularly). You could let them know you're standing by to help in case others fail. You could offer a discount for your first project. You could offer a satisfaction guarantee etc. Just something to give them one last reason to want to talk to you.

    Attachments and Samples
    I don't always add attachments. In fact, I don't ever add them unless I really think it's an opportunity to stand out OR if the client specifically asks for them. Otherwise I just direct the client to my profile because I already spent 20+ hours honing it in to a sharpened spear for harpooning whales! Why would I waste that? The more times they come into contact with me the more likely it is I'll get contacted.


    HOMEWORK
    Use what you've learned in this lesson to go out and find at least 3 potential clients. Spend time thinking about what THEY actually need to read from your proposal before they will respond. Once you've done that, go ahead and craft a YOU Focused proposal. Remember to read over it and spell check it to make sure it's good to go. Then send it!
     
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  9. banjoa
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    @Lex DeVille thanks for all the valuebomb.

    Lex, it's a bit difficult wrapping my head around this:

    '...I used a metaphor to SHOW them something different by talking about a "sea of sameness." If I wasn't doing this on video and distracted by that, I would spend even more time forming a more relevant idea for this particular client.'

    -Is the utility here the METAPHOR?
     
  10. Lex DeVille
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    Lex DeVille Sweeping Shadows from Dreams Read Millionaire Fastlane I've Read UNSCRIPTED FASTLANE INSIDER Speedway Pass LEGENDARY CONTRIBUTOR

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    Only for this particular client. You need to show clients why you are the right person for the job. If I were applying for a web design gig then using a metaphor isn't going to demonstrate what I know about design or that I can help put together a website. In this case it would only serve to help communicate an idea.
     
  11. Lex DeVille
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    Lex DeVille Sweeping Shadows from Dreams Read Millionaire Fastlane I've Read UNSCRIPTED FASTLANE INSIDER Speedway Pass LEGENDARY CONTRIBUTOR

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    Upwork Tutorial Day 6 - How to Sell Yourself in Upwork Interviews and Calls


    We've pretty much covered everything you need to know to land interviews and get gigs. But there's one last core area to cover before you make Upwork worth your time. That area is the interview.

    For obvious reasons, most people get stuck on getting responses from their cover letters. They never make it to the interview, so they're not prepared for that part at all. Unfortunately, getting the interview doesn't mean you get the job. You probably aren't the only person who got interviewed, and you still have to prove yourself.

    That's what today is about...

    Two Kinds of Interviews
    The first thing you need to know about interviews on Upwork is there are 2 kinds. The kind where you talk through text chat and the kind where you get on a live call.

    Text Chat Interviews
    Most freelancers opt for text-only interviews. You get a response from a client and you talk to them through Upwork's chat system or maybe through Skype chat, but not on a live call. There's nothing wrong with interviewing this way if you are okay with making small sales.

    Text chat is not conducive to high-ticket sales. You will not make $3,000, $5,000 or $10,000+ sales through text chat unless your client is a complete fool, or you are a master persuader, and even then it's a challenge.

    Assuming you really are a master persuader, then you would have no reason to interview through text chat because getting on a live call would be nothing to you. So if you're doing text chat interviews, we must operate on the assumption that you are NOT a master persuader, but an amateur at best.

    I'm telling you this because not only do I know it, and you know it, clients know it too. And they're smart enough to know that you don't hand over thousands of dollars to amateur freelancers who are too scared to get on a live call because you either aren't confident enough in your skills or you aren't confident enough in your communication abilities. Both are a recipe for disaster.

    So if you only do text-chat, you can expect to earn $1,000 or less per client, unless you bill hourly rates and it builds up over time. Now, if your goal is only to pick up some extra side cash, then maybe that's enough. But if you want to turn this into something more legitimate that can build serious cash to get you off the ground, then you need to take live calls...

    Live Call Interviews
    Live calls can either be phone, Upwork video, Skype, Zoom, or any other platform that offers voice to voice or face to face interaction. With a live call you will meet the client directly, and you'll both have a chance to get to know each other.

    Live calls usually lead to much higher priced sales because of what you discover on the call, and also what clients are willing to pay for once you've proven you're an expert. The cool thing is, you don't even have to be an expert to make high-priced sales, and you also don't have to use any swoopy high-pressure tactics to get people to buy.

    By nature of being willing to get on a phone call, you INSTANTLY set yourself apart as someone who has a high probability of being an expert. Just like clients know you're not an expert if you won't get on a call, they also EXPECT that you are an expert if you will get on calls.

    So you go into the interview with an expectation that you are an expert. For that reason alone you will often win the gig just by getting on a call. If you are willing to offer a high price on that call, then you will also often make a lot more money than if you hold yourself back because you're afraid the other person can't pay or that your price is too high.

    Okay, But how do I actually win the gig and prove I'm an expert?
    Whether you do text chat or live calls the interview process is largely the same. Before we get into it, we need to reframe the situation...

    You are not an employee or a regular job seeker. You applied to this gig as a problem solver, someone who can help this client get something done. Problem solvers are people we turn to when we need help with something. Problem solvers also tend to be in-demand by nature of their abilities. You are a problem solver, and therefore...

    The client does not interview you.

    You interview them.

    So you can reframe this situation. It isn't an opportunity for the client to decide if they want to work with you. It's an opportunity for YOU to decide if it's worth your time for you to work with them.

    When you think about it like this, then it's easy to adjust your approach from a passive, reaction-based response system, to an active, interviewer's role. You interviewing them. But how do you do this?

    You can simplify it into a single powerful concept:

    Just ask questions.

    When you are the one asking questions it means others are NOT asking questions. Therefore, you are in control of the interview. You are the interviewer. You are judging them.

    What questions?

    Questions about their business.

    Imagine you're an employee and it's your first day on the job? Do you jump in and get to work instantly? No. There is a week or so of ease-in period. It's a time when you're new, and you have to learn the ropes. So what do you spend your time doing? Asking questions.

    You ask about the job. The software they use. How to handle various situations. Sure, you might relate the current situation back to past situations or past processes you applied at other jobs, but ultimately you will spend time asking questions about the current position. You do this because you have to learn how things work with this employer.

    It's exactly the same when you interview with a client. You are going to ask the same sort of questions...

    • What is your current approach?
    • What isn't working now?
    • What else do you need help with?
    • What problems are you trying to solve?
    • What software systems do you use?
    • Who do you currently work with?
    • How do you handle X situation?
    • What is your goal?
    • What do you want from me as a freelancer?
    • What hasn't worked for you in the past...

    These questions are things that you will naturally need answered whether it's on a call, in text chat, or after you start working. At some point you need to know about their business to deliver what they want, so you might as well ask in the interview phase and look like an expert rather than waiting until things go wrong and saying, "oh, I probably should've asked about that."

    What if the client asks me questions?
    Answer their question briefly, and then ask another question to take back control of the call. There's nothing wrong with answering their questions, but if you give them the opportunity, they will keep asking and they will regain control.

    If you respond then ask you will keep control.

    How do I know I'm asking the right questions?
    The client will say, "aha, I never really thought about it like that" or "ah! I hadn't considered that..." or "hmm...that's a great question!"

    If all else fails, just ask something, ANYTHING.

    But try to keep it business-centered (preferably on their business).

    What happens after you ask questions?
    Eventually the client will feel like you've spent enough time talking together. 15 minutes. 30 minutes. 1.5 hours... In reality you will have spent very little time talking. Mostly you've just kept quiet and listened (because who does that these days...) and if you've asked enough questions the client will eventually say something like...

    "So, where do we go from here?"

    That's your cue to do the following:

    1. Recap what you've covered so far
    2. Describe how you can help with that
    3. Offer a price or get off the call (if you're on one)

    Recapping what you've covered...

    You: "Alright Tom, so far you told me you need help with email copywriting, sales funnel automation, and Facebook Ad copy as well as copy for your website home page, right?"

    Tom: "Yes, that's right."

    You: "Great, and I can help you with all of that. To start I'll craft an email series that we can turn into an automated sales funnel and then we can run Facebook ads to a landing page for opt-ins to build your list and put your sales on autopilot."

    Tom: "Sounds great!"

    You: "Great! I can get started immediately and can finish the email series in 1 week. To have me do this for you it's $5,000."

    Pause.
    Pause.
    Pause.

    Tom: "Umm...do I have to pay it all at once?"

    You: "I offer split payments for some clients. You would need to fund AND release the first milestone for half and the other half will be due on delivery. Sound good?"

    Tom: "Okay, I can do that."

    The end.

    Or if you choose to get off the call you will just let Tom know that you want to take some time to consider his needs, and will draft a proposal for him outlining how you can help and giving him options customized for him. Also be sure to let him know WHEN you will send the proposal by.

    In Summary:

    • You do not need to use high-pressure sales tactics
    • You do not need to be an expert to appear an expert
    • Text Chat = Low Pay Gigs
    • Live Call = High Pay Gigs
    • Ask questions (even if you forget everything else)
    • Better questions = better results
    • You know the client is ready to be sold when he says "where do we go from here."
    • You can offer your price on the call or off
    • If it's on the call, you better be prepared to say the price out loud and stfu afterward
    • Throughout all of this you are interviewing them
    • If your voice waivers because you doubt your prices, you will lose the sale

    There's a lot that goes into sales even though it's relatively simple. I'm short on time and trying to sum all of this up in a single post and it's not easy to do. I don't have time to go back and cut it down to size properly SO...

    If you have questions about sales or any other part of the Upwork process up to this point, please feel free to post them in a response to this post. I will follow up.

    HOMEWORK
    Prepare yourself mentally to get on live calls if your goal is to make big sales, or if you're just doing this as a side hustle, practice what you will say in text chat to move clients forward toward the sale.

    PRO TIP
    Everything you say to the client PRE-SALE should be focused on moving them toward that sale. If sales were a 5k you would kick off at the starting line and run toward the finish line. The finish line is where the sale happens. In between the start and finish line you put all your effort into getting to the finish line. If you quit too early, or don't push hard enough, or break your ankle, you won't reach the finish line.

    Pace the client. Run with them. Always stay focused on the next finish line.

    • "When you work with me X will happen"
    • "Once we get started you can expect X"
    • "After you send the contract I will do X"
    • "Once you've released the payment I will do X"
    • "Once you leave feedback, I will do X"
    • "When you send referrals, you will get X"

    This works on calls and in text. Set a goal, go toward that goal, run at the client's pace, and cross the finish line when you get there.

    Ask questions.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2019 at 10:09 AM
  12. Lex DeVille
    Offline

    Lex DeVille Sweeping Shadows from Dreams Read Millionaire Fastlane I've Read UNSCRIPTED FASTLANE INSIDER Speedway Pass LEGENDARY CONTRIBUTOR

    Messages:
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    Jan 14, 2013
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    Location:
    Oklahoma
    Rep Bank:
    $47,689
    Proof YOU Focused Proposals Get Results and Clients Don't
    Care What You Set for Rates...
    This post is a follow up to the proposal post from yesterday. In the video for that post I wrote a proposal live while recording. It was half-assed because it only had half my attention. Doesn't matter though. Results speak for themselves...

    Screenshot 2019-03-18 at 12.12.46 PM.png

    Screenshot 2019-03-18 at 12.11.34 PM.png

    ezgif.com-gif-maker (9).png

    A couple things worth noting:

    1. The client's rates are set at $$ (intermediate)
    2. The gig is set at hourly and I have 0 hours billed on my account
    3. There were 17 proposals in all
    4. There are 2 interviews (out of which only one will be chosen)
    5. I applied with $135/hr with a YOU Focused proposal and landed the interview
    6. The client felt compelled to respond my questions
    7. It took 1 day to get a response because I applied on a weekend

     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2019 at 2:16 PM
    sinj, ZF Lee and rogue synthetic like this.

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