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Lex DeVille

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UPWORK TUTORIAL (1).jpg

Upwork is one of the fastest ways to get your feet wet with online business. You probably won't get rich on Upwork (though it's not impossible), and that isn't the purpose of this guide. This multi-post guide is an Upwork Tutorial for those who:

  • Need to get moving on something...ANYTHING
  • Need a way to bootstrap cash...FOR FREE

It doesn't matter where you're from or what your situation is. If you have semi-stable internet and a computer to work from, then you can make money on Upwork at no cost to you but your time.

In the posts that follow I will share a series of Upwork Tutorials to get you started even if you don't know what the f*ck you're doing, and even if you don't have any skills or experience right now. This step-by-step guide will give you a clear path from $0 to your first $1,000 or more on Upwork.

If you follow my posts and do as I say, you will make money...

Possibly this week.

However, you should know that your success here requires a difficult mindset shift. You will have to change how you do things. Employees do NOT make good freelancers. So here are some things you should know right now:

  • You can take your 20 year work history and light it on fire
  • Tuck your college degrees away on some shelf
  • Tear that entitled victim attitude to shreds because...

Freelance clients don't give a shit about your education and experience unless it backs up your ability to get the job done. Also, nobody owes you anything. In the freelance world, you rise to your own level based on how much you help people, and on how clearly you demonstrate that you can help people.


Also... I'm developing a corresponding tutorial for my YouTube channel, and as such will be posting videos related to each post topic. You can watch them or not. You do not have to watch them to get the information because I will also post it in text here.

Consider this DAY ZERO.

Each day I will walk you through one piece of the Upwork puzzle. Step-by-step I will guide you to get approved on Upwork, get started, and make money. At the end of each post you will find a homework assignment.

Do the homework each day.


I would encourage you to share your progress and results either here, on my channel, or both since it will encourage engagement that will send traffic to the Fastlane Forum (each video links to the forum), and to my channel which is valuable for M.J. and for myself and also promotes future comprehensive tutorials such as this one, which is valuable for you.

SET OFF AT SUNRISE TO GET THERE BY DARK

There's only one way this thread won't become another action-faking, analysis paralysis knowledge feast for you. To make anything useful happen, you will have to take MASSIVE action and get started. You will have to stop telling yourself every silly excuse. Stop being afraid. Don't let phantoms of fantasy futures destroy your dreams.

Action is the only way.

So start today. Right now. Make a commitment. Commit to do this. Commit to act and to get started. You will start this today. You will take your first step now. And that first step is to determine WHY you are doing this. What do you want to come of this? To do that, your first homework is physically to answer all of the following questions:

  1. Why are you doing this?
  2. Describe your endgame in specific detail...
  3. How much money do you need to earn to make this worth it?
  4. Who are you failing if you give up or don't succeed?

It's important to know WHY you are doing this. You can't be vague about it. "I want to be a highly paid freelancer who creates value" is not a good response for your "why."

You are doing this because you need to pay bills or debt. Because you want to quit your shitty job. Because you need money for your ecommerce business. Because you want to travel and earn money from anywhere. Because you want to support your family. Because you want to earn full-time pay with part-time work from home.

You are trying to escape something (bad job, bad boss, debt, poverty, feeling like a loser). You desire some kind of change (travel, money, freedom, skills, to get started). You are selfish and you want things in life and THAT IS OKAY.

But you need to define those things. The things you want. The things you don't want. Because it is those things that will help remind you why you set off down this path in the first place, especially when there's nothing but miles and miles of bumpy road ahead.

That is your homework today.

Do the homework. Post your response. In the next post I will teach you how to give yourself the best possible chance to get approved on Upwork. As of 2019, getting approved on Upwork is probably the single biggest barrier to entry for new freelancers.

Lucky for you, you're not a freelancer. You're an entrepreneur, and you have me as your guide. So follow this Upwork Tutorial and commit to continue even when the long road makes you weary. If you do, you may discover the distance between sunrise and sunset isn't so far apart as it seems.

By the way...

This is the only mindset post.

Get your mind right now. In the days that follow, we've got work to do.
 

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Lex DeVille

Lex DeVille

Sweeping Shadows from Dreams
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
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Day 1: How to Get Approved on Upwork 2019

The best way to get approved on Upwork is to make it happen on your first try. That isn't to say all hope is lost if you don't get it on your first try. Only that your first try is the best chance you've got. After that your chances drop.

Today's guide is based on it being your first try. The idea is to give you the best possible chance to get approved. Do NOT try to get approved before reading this post or watching the video.

To get approved on Upwork you have to give them what they want.

Here's all the stuff NOT to do:

  • Do NOT list more than one skill in your title
  • Do NOT pick unrelated skill tags
  • Do NOT use a YOU Focused bio
  • Do NOT leave your education and work history blank
  • Do NOT leave any area blank
  • Do NOT price yourself outside of Upwork's suggested ranges
  • Do NOT submit your profile before you spell check it
Those are the main things that I've seen get people rejected.

Now let's talk about what you SHOULD do.

  • Add a clear, smiling, front-facing head shot image
  • Pick ONE skill and build your profile around that skill
  • Pick a NICHE of that skill to show you're a professional
  • Write your bio to support your abilities with that skill
  • Write your education to support your abilities with that skill
  • Write your employment history to support your abilities with that skill

Basically you want to build your entire profile around a single niche skill. It doesn't matter what industry it is in. It could be copywriting, web design, article writing, customer service, whatever.

Your title should reflect that one skill.

Bad Title: Copywriting, blog writer, ebook writer, social media expert

Good Title: Conversion Copywriter

Your overview should back up your ability to do that skill.

Bad Bio:


Hi there! You need a conversion copywriter who can help you get results. You need someone with fast turnaround and quik response. You want to get better goals and get to the next level and that's what I can help you do.

Good Bio:

Hi there!

I'm a conversion copywriter with a B.A. in Psychology and four years experience. I've worked with companies like Eggland's Best, and Circuit City. As a copywriter I've helped clients grow their profits from the thousands into the millions.

I've trained as a copywriter in several courses and online workshops, and I work with clients who need direct-response copywriting that gets results. My goal is to help clients improve conversions by working closely together with them and creating value.

If any of that is what you need, message me!

Kind Regards,
Lex DeVille


OVERVIEW TEMPLATE:

Hi there!

I’m a [what are you] with a [degree or diploma] and [years of experience]. I’ve worked with [who can you name?]. As a [skill you do] I’ve helped [who you have helped] [how you have helped them].

I have [special training you have] and I work with [who you help]. My goal is to help [describe how you will help clients on Upwork].

If any of that is what you need, contact me!

Kind Regards,
[Your Name]

---

Your bio should be ME Focused. DO talk about your skills and education. Do talk about past clients you've worked with and how you've helped. You want to show Upwork that you are a credible freelancer who can get the job done right.

Be sure to spell check your overview. Check it for grammar as well. Spelling mistakes are a quick way to get rejected.

Don't talk about what you want. Don't use a YOU Focused overview either because that isn't what Upwork wants from you. They want you to look like a traditional employee and a hard worker.

---

Education and Work History

Add something to each of these sections, even if it's a high school diploma or even a GED. Add something to your work history even if you worked at McDonalds. First write it in the title, then give yourself a relevant title.

For education, write a description that supports your ability to do the skill you choose. For example:

B.A. Psychology
As a student of Psychology I have learned to craft conversion-optimized copy infused with psychological techniques and tactics. This helps me move people to action and get them to make decisions fast which helps my clients earn money and get results.

McDonalds Customer Communications Specialist
Working at McDonalds taught me the power of clarity in human communications. Over the last four years I've used what I learned while working at McDonalds to transition into the field of conversion copywriting where I applied the same techniques used to sell McGriddles and Apple Turnovers to get my clients results.

---

Rates
The next part is your rates. Set your rates within the guidelines provided by Upwork. They will tell you the range you should be within. For instance, the rates for an Intermediate level freelancer are suggested as between:

$28.00 and $65.50

So pick something within that range. Something like $35.50.

---

Skill Tags
Be sure all of your skill tags support your skill. If I listed "Conversion Copywriter" then I would want to pick 3-5 skill tags such as:

Bad: Copywriter, SEO, Social Media, Customer Service
Good: Copywriter, Conversion Copywriter, Sales Copywriter, Creative Copywriter

---

Other Notes:

Your main goal is to create a WHOLE PERSON concept for Upwork. When Upwork's algorithms or employees see your profile, it should scream I AM A COMPETENT PROFESSIONAL IN THIS SPECIFIC SKILL!

Upwork isn't looking for Jacks-of-all-trades.

They want people who will get in, get work, get 'er done, and get paid. Because people who can't get work and don't get paid are just freeloaders taking up space on their platform. Remember, Upwork needs you to make money so they make money.

So your job is to show them that you are the kind of person who can do one specific skill, and to prove you can do that skill well.

Beyond that, just be honest. Don't try to lie or fake your account. Don't use fake information. Upwork may ask you to verify your identity or other info later on.

If you do shady things, you will likely get rejected. So just be honest, do your best to give them what they want, and if you have questions, reach out.

If you get rejected...

Don't immediately try again. Wait a few days. Give it some time. You don't want to appear to be a spammer. So give it one or two days, and then try again with a new profile, a new skill, a new overview etc.

HOMEWORK
Your homework today is to create your Upwork account following the guidance in this post. Create your account and submit it for approval. Then report back and let us know how it went or if you have any trouble. Do this now!
 
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Lex DeVille

Lex DeVille

Sweeping Shadows from Dreams
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
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Read Millionaire Fastlane
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So posts like this arent clssified as free forum ad? If I make Youtube video and big post about branding than it will be ok to post?
No, it's not a free forum ad. I've paid in approximately 12 hours of value-adding content creation in this thread alone and shared my processes that have helped me grow an ACTUAL freelance business. Additionally, my other GOLD and NOTABLE posts have helped others grow full-time freelance businesses.

I've shared STEP-BY-STEP instructions on how to do this.

Where have you shared anything on this forum that taught people how you built ANY business? Where have you shared ACTUAL steps that grew your own business? Because all I've seen are bullshit vague posts with vague statistics kind of like the one you threw out in your post here.

Upwork, Freelancer, Fiverr and any similar websites are waste of time for 90% of people.
Please stop spewing your vague nonsense around the forum. If you can back that 90% up with proven data, do so. Otherwise, get lost.

Those sites are race to the bottom. You cant compete with India or Pakistan.
No. This is the same dumbass statement made by every bottom-dwelling action-faker who doesn't know what they're talking about.

Clients who are looking for a freelancers there, often looking for “everything” for paying almost nothing.
Wrong again. You are repeating the same crap nonsense, but your nonsense has already been disproven many times over on this forum.

For instance, in this GOLD post:
GOLD! - Lex DeVille's: How to Make $1,000 a Week with no Degree, no Feedback, & no Portfolio.

And in this NOTABLE post:
NOTABLE! - Lex DeVille's - I Deleted My Upwork Account...

I also tried to hire few people, and the work they delivered was so bad I had to do it all by myself in the end.
This tells me you not only suck as a freelancer, you also suck as a client.

I repeat, you can make some money in a looooooong run but its not worth it at all.
I closed nearly $3,000 in gigs on Upwork last week so...yeah...

I didn't need to write all of this out though. The forum has already seen the "value" you provide. They've already judged you, and instead of trying to fix it by striving to create value, you think a better idea is to passively attack someone who called you out on your bullshit.

Smart move. Good luck.
 
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Lex DeVille

Lex DeVille

Sweeping Shadows from Dreams
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Read Millionaire Fastlane
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I just had a quick look at Upwork out of curiosity, searched for "Flutter" (a framework to make mobile apps, quite niche), and had a look at a couple of examples:

1) A $100 (fixed-price) post asking to add a bunch of features to a custom plugin. This obviously takes a good amount of hours.

2) Website + customer app + merchant app + admin app + of course ordering online, all for $1.500 (fixed-price), which is ridiculous.

3) Android app to order good with admin panel (so 2 apps really, plus a backend), estimation arrival time and other advanced features. $200 (fixed-price). This even beats the previous example.

Most of other examples at a quick glance were similar.

Given that there's been some talk about prices, I got a question (maybe they'll be answered on future posts, sorry if that's is the case): is it common for clients to set an unrealistic price? I mean, is it common to ignore the price, apply and renegotiate with them?
I'll address these concerns in a future post. But we can chat about it now too.

To put this in perspective, let's reframe the situation. Imagine your fuel pump goes out on your car today. You need it fixed, but you don't know how much it costs. But you definitely have to get it fixed because it's your only transportation. So you post an ad in a Facebook Group and offer $50 for someone to fix it. You don't offer $500 or $5,000. Why is that? Because you'd be a fool!

But unless you're a mechanic or you've worked on cars, you don't know what actually goes into fixing a fuel pump. You don't know the hours, the parts, or even the difference between someone who will do a good job or a bad job. All you can judge others on is your first impressions.

So you post your ad and let's say 3 people respond. Out of those 3 people, 2 are willing to do the work at your price. But one of them doesn't speak your language. You have no idea if he even understands what you need, and therefore he's out.

Another one of those people is fresh out of the school house. He has a month or so of training and has never fixed an actual customer's car before. He doesn't know what questions to ask, or if he'll even be capable of helping you. He won't even know that a fuel pump might cost more than $50 by itself, forget the labor. His goal is just to work on your car so he can get money and tell people he's worked on cars...

The third guy is a mechanic. He's new to the industry, but he's already worked on customer cars, and has even fixed a few fuel pumps. He talks with you about your car, asks what it's doing because he knows the fuel pump may not even be the real or only problem.

You explain the sounds your car is making and he walks you through it asking more and more questions to get a better feel for your situation, and to determine if he can help you. Along the way he learns all about you. What your car's been doing, its history, and even why this is so important for you to get fixed. He also asks about your budget, and helps you research the cost of fuel pumps to find one that's a fit for you.

By the end of your conversation you've had an hour long chat with this guy that was hugely valuable. You discovered that your fuel pump will cost a couple hundred dollars by itself. Based on the amount of help this guy has offered in terms of time alone, you know he's a true professional that cares about your situation. For that reason you KNOW he's the right guy to do this.

But to have him do it, the cost will be $1,000 total. That's the price of the fuel pump plus what he values his time at.

Now, you can scoff at his price. You can call him crazy. But you won't do that. Why? Because he wouldn't have offered his price unless it was within a budget you could afford which was already established by his earlier questions. Instead, you will accept HIS price because you've already seen "what else is out there" and this guy has proven he's the ONE.

So you whip out your card, fire off a $1,000 bucks, get a new fuel pump plus a seal it needed that the other guys didn't even ask about...and you're on your way again in a day.

This is my sales process in a story...
 
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Lex DeVille

Lex DeVille

Sweeping Shadows from Dreams
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
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DAY 3 - How to Write Your Profile Title and Tags

Once you get approved on Upwork, one of the first things you want to do is update your title and tags, unless you plan to perform the skill you got approved with. So that's what today is about.

Your Title - Keep It Short and Don't Get Cute...

Do a quick search for most skills and you'll find endless lists of freelancers who either use some cutesy, long-winded title, or who list every skill under the sun because they're afraid to miss any opportunity.

The thing is, your title is your first chance to let people know your area of specialty. While you might get work in a variety of areas with a title that lists 20 skills, you won't get paid highly for any of them, and you won't get found for the highest-paying skills in search results.

When it comes to titles avoid:

- Cute, clever, and creative titles.
- Listing a bunch of skills

Your goal if you want to make high pay for less work is to look like a specialist, an expert. Experts get paid well. But what does an expert look like?

- They do a single skill very well
- They show up when people search for them

How clients search...

Client's don't search for "Web Design Ninja Wordpress Elite Plugin Maester."

They search for, "Web Designer"

Or "Copywriter"

Or "Social Media Manager"

Or "Virtual Assistant"

And when that turns out to be too vague, they search a second time but this time they make it more niche so they find specialized experts. So now they search for:

"Wordpress Web Designer"

"Direct Response Copywriter"

"Instagram Manager"

"Financial Virtual Assistant"

So it starts with the high level industry, then it gets niche because it's hard to decipher who knows there shit in the industry itself. Since we know clients search this way, we can take advantage of it by crafting a title that speaks directly to those search results.

Also, the more niche you go, the less people there are to compete against for search rank.

Look at this screenshot from my latest title update:

Screenshot 2019-03-13 at 5.35.56 AM.png

It took a couple of days, but I'm ranking for NLP Copywriter. I'm not in the first position yet, but it doesn't matter, because based ONLY on my title, clients will skip the other people.

They searched for "NLP Copywriting" and my profile shows "NLP Copywriting."

It's crystal clear I'm the one...

In fact, it's so clear, clients won't even look at the other profiles even though they claim the #1 and #2 spots. It's like how I could tell you to find as many red items as you can in the room. You can easily look around and pick out red items from all the other colors.

Same thing with your profile.

If you have the exact title the client is searching for, then you will stand out, and you will get clicked, and that means you're one step closer to an interview.

By the way, this goes for proposals too. Clients will notice a freelancer's proposal over others when it very closely relates to the skill the client is asking for.

How to Pick Your Upwork Profile Title

  • Keep it 4 words or less
  • Mention the industry (copywriter, web designer, video producer, narrator)
  • Mention the niche (creative copywriter, wordpress web designer, YouTube Video Producer, Audiobook Narrator

Research Your Niche

Niching down will help you rise to the top of search results, but you'll want to do some research on your niche to make sure people are searching for it. What good is being at the top of search results if nobody is searching for the thing you offer?

Two Ways to Research Your Niche


1) Use Google's Keyword tool in Adwords to check out monthly search volume
2) Search for your title and see how many gigs are available (and the time between each gig's posting)

Both of these will help you get a feel for whether or not people want the skill you offer. If you find there's low volume, then consider another title.


Your Tags - Relevant/Related Not Scattered/Deflated

Your tags are under the SKILLS section.

Pick tags that are very closely related to your title. Make sure all of your tags are closely related to one another. This will make them relevant. The more relevant your tags are, the easier it is to rise in search results.

Even if you plan to offer more than one skill, ONLY target your tags to your title. Have a look at the tags I used to help rank my NLP Copywriter bio:

Screenshot 2019-03-13 at 6.02.22 AM.png

At first glance they might look separate, like they target unique skills. But all of the tags except one are related to COPYWRITING and the only one that is different is related to NLP. What this does is help Upwork's algorithms figure out what you do so they can put you in the right place.

So pick tags that are closely related and are relevant to your title.

That's it for today.

Tomorrow I'll show you how to write a basic bio that stands out from everyone else.

HOMEWORK
Your homework today is to determine your high level industry (copywriter, blogger, web designer) and then to research niches within that industry to find one that might be worth pursuing. Once you've done that, set your tags around the title you create and make sure the tags are closely related to one another.

P.S.

The video above talks about the same topic, but I also mentioned some stuff about specialized profiles and how they are affecting my results.
 

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Lex DeVille

Lex DeVille

Sweeping Shadows from Dreams
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Jan 14, 2013
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18,442
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The Underground
Upwork Tutorial Day 5 - How to Write YOU Focused
Proposals that Get Clients to Respond


When you send proposals (AKA cover letters) to clients on Upwork, you will often be one of 10 to 20 or even 50 people or more applying to that job. So let's start with a look at my hiring process so you have an idea of how a client might make a decision about who to interview.

1. Is there ANYTHING that is an instant disqualifier?
This is the first thing I look for. Is the freelancer from a country I want to work with? Do they offer the skill I asked for? Did they upload attachments if I asked for them? Is their proposal full of spelling and grammar errors? Do those errors matter for this project? Did they answer my question that shows they paid attention? Did they address my needs?

Basically I look for any indicator that this person ISN'T the one. When I see those signs, I archive them immediately because I know there is 0 chance we will work together. Please note that this has NOTHING to do with their rate (although that might be the case for some clients). Usually rates won't stop clients from responding. Here's an example from just last week...

ezgif.com-gif-maker (8).png

What's important about this is that even though the client technically disqualified me based on my rates, she responded. At $135/hr she responded. Why is that important? Because it gave me a second chance to communicate with her and let her know that I only offer fixed rates, what they are, and why that actually benefits her over paying hourly freelancers even when their rate is set much lower.

2. Can this freelancer get the job done?
The second thing I try to identify is whether or not this freelancer is competent enough to do the job. Based on their proposal, do I believe they are skilled enough to deliver what I want? If not, do I believe they are smart enough to figure out how to get it done? If the answer isn't "yes" and if it isn't clear to me that you are a competent freelancer, and if I don't feel confident in your abilities, then I won't feel comfortable going forward with you.

For that reason, Upwork proposals must meet those 3 criteria:

  • Establish you competence
  • So the client feels confident
  • Which makes them feel comfortable
When those 3 keys are set in place, THEN you are very likely to get the interview.

3. Is this freelancer the BEST person for the job?
Beyond the 3 C's there's one last thing I look for. Out of those 2-3 freelancer who made me feel comfortable, which one seems to be the best fit?

To answer this question I look at several things. First, is it clear from their proposal that they care about me and that they put in effort? Do they WANT to do this job? What does their bio say about them? Are they an expert in this field? Do they have the skills to back it up? Are they clearly the kind of person I would want to work with? Finally, I look at their portfolio. Are their samples relevant? Are they in the style I need? Are they good enough for the amount I'm willing to pay?

It's a WHOLE PERSON concept.

That's what clients are looking for. Instant DQ, do you meet the 3 C's, are you the best person for the job? It's NOT based on your rates. Now that we've established that, and we've built you a powerful bio and portfolio, it's time to improve your proposals for better results.

YOU Focused Proposals
YOU Focus is the art of showing clients you care about them, want to help them, can get the job done, and are the BEST fit for the gig. It is NOT simply using the word "you."

Steps to a YOU Focused Proposal

  1. Never start with the word "I"
  2. Use some variation of "you" before "I" or "me" or "my"
  3. Use "you" 10x as much as you use "I" or "me" or "my"
  4. Repeat the client's own words back to them
  5. Connect your skills with their needs
  6. Establish credibility fast
  7. Prove your competence
  8. Call them to Action
  9. Show them little details that set you apart

Getting Hired Happens in Steps
As with any kind of marketing, we move clients one step at a time. The first step is to get a response. The second step is to get interviewed. The third step is to get hired. Just because you get a response doesn't mean you've been interviewed. Technically you've secured the interview, but you haven't done it until you've done it.

Knowing this, we can now work on a YOU Focused proposal that has a single intent...getting a response. NOT getting you hired. That happens later. So let's look at a YOU Focused Proposal...

YOU Focused Proposal

First the original job post...
Screenshot 2019-03-17 at 6.09.11 AM.png

Now the proposal (written live in the video)...

Screenshot 2019-03-17 at 6.09.56 AM.png

Cover Letter Intro
For this proposal you can see that it does NOT start with "I" or "me" or "my." Instead, it starts with a headline that identifies this as "Copywriting for Roofing Contractors" which is what they are...targeting.

First Line Starts with "You"
Next I give a simple greeting followed by the word "You."

Second Line Mirrors Them
Now I repeat their own words back to them about what they need...copywriting for their roofing business.

Demonstrate Competence
Then I start to prove competence by DEMONSTRATING that I can help them stand out. Instead of just telling them "I can help you stand out," I used a metaphor to SHOW them something different by talking about a "sea of sameness." If I wasn't doing this on video and distracted by that, I would spend even more time forming a more relevant idea for this particular client.

Establish Crediblity and Connect it with Their Job
In the next sentence I bridge the gap between us. I let them know that I'm the exact thing they need, and then I drop several relevant credibility markers that will likely stand out to them. For instance, "industrial companies" targets BLUE COLLAR companies which is what a roofing company also is. If you don't find RELEVANT credibility markers then your credibility will appear weak and won't support your competence very well.

Ask Good Questions
You don't have to ask questions, but they can help establish competence. If your questions make the client think or have an "aha" moment, then you are golden. Don't just ask questions for the sake of asking questions. Ask GOOD questions. Targeted questions. Questions about their business. Questions that prove you care and want to help them.

Prove You're a Professional
One of the biggest impressions a freelancer ever made on me was when she directly stated exactly what she'd deliver and how much it would cost. While others were blasting me with hourly rates, this person said "here's what you get and here's how much it is." No guessing games. I love that, and so do a lot of business owners because they don't have time to keep track of you. So the next section of my proposal clearly states what I'll do and how much it will cost. You don't have to add your prices here, but it's a good way to filter through clients if you don't want to work with anyone for less than X amount.

Call them to Action
The last line of the proposal is a simple call to action that gives them next steps. Since the very next step is to get them to contact me or to message me, then that's what I use. If I've applied with a proper YOU Focus, then all of the above IS what they need, so they SHOULD message me.

Your Signature
Kind regards is fine for most gigs, but when you write for creative jobs you should use something more interesting. Keep that in mind.

P.S. Statement
This is just one last chance to catch the client with something they might value. You could add your phone number in here (I do this regularly). You could let them know you're standing by to help in case others fail. You could offer a discount for your first project. You could offer a satisfaction guarantee etc. Just something to give them one last reason to want to talk to you.

Attachments and Samples
I don't always add attachments. In fact, I don't ever add them unless I really think it's an opportunity to stand out OR if the client specifically asks for them. Otherwise I just direct the client to my profile because I already spent 20+ hours honing it in to a sharpened spear for harpooning whales! Why would I waste that? The more times they come into contact with me the more likely it is I'll get contacted.


HOMEWORK
Use what you've learned in this lesson to go out and find at least 3 potential clients. Spend time thinking about what THEY actually need to read from your proposal before they will respond. Once you've done that, go ahead and craft a YOU Focused proposal. Remember to read over it and spell check it to make sure it's good to go. Then send it!
 

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Some great stuff for hustlers needing to make bread and the transition to self-funded income, moved to NOTABLE.
 
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Upwork Tutorial Day 6 - How to Sell Yourself in Upwork Interviews and Calls

We've pretty much covered everything you need to know to land interviews and get gigs. But there's one last core area to cover before you make Upwork worth your time. That area is the interview.

For obvious reasons, most people get stuck on getting responses from their cover letters. They never make it to the interview, so they're not prepared for that part at all. Unfortunately, getting the interview doesn't mean you get the job. You probably aren't the only person who got interviewed, and you still have to prove yourself.

That's what today is about...

Two Kinds of Interviews
The first thing you need to know about interviews on Upwork is there are 2 kinds. The kind where you talk through text chat and the kind where you get on a live call.

Text Chat Interviews
Most freelancers opt for text-only interviews. You get a response from a client and you talk to them through Upwork's chat system or maybe through Skype chat, but not on a live call. There's nothing wrong with interviewing this way if you are okay with making small sales.

Text chat is not conducive to high-ticket sales. You will not make $3,000, $5,000 or $10,000+ sales through text chat unless your client is a complete fool, or you are a master persuader, and even then it's a challenge.

Assuming you really are a master persuader, then you would have no reason to interview through text chat because getting on a live call would be nothing to you. So if you're doing text chat interviews, we must operate on the assumption that you are NOT a master persuader, but an amateur at best.

I'm telling you this because not only do I know it, and you know it, clients know it too. And they're smart enough to know that you don't hand over thousands of dollars to amateur freelancers who are too scared to get on a live call because you either aren't confident enough in your skills or you aren't confident enough in your communication abilities. Both are a recipe for disaster.

So if you only do text-chat, you can expect to earn $1,000 or less per client, unless you bill hourly rates and it builds up over time. Now, if your goal is only to pick up some extra side cash, then maybe that's enough. But if you want to turn this into something more legitimate that can build serious cash to get you off the ground, then you need to take live calls...

Live Call Interviews
Live calls can either be phone, Upwork video, Skype, Zoom, or any other platform that offers voice to voice or face to face interaction. With a live call you will meet the client directly, and you'll both have a chance to get to know each other.

Live calls usually lead to much higher priced sales because of what you discover on the call, and also what clients are willing to pay for once you've proven you're an expert. The cool thing is, you don't even have to be an expert to make high-priced sales, and you also don't have to use any swoopy high-pressure tactics to get people to buy.

By nature of being willing to get on a phone call, you INSTANTLY set yourself apart as someone who has a high probability of being an expert. Just like clients know you're not an expert if you won't get on a call, they also EXPECT that you are an expert if you will get on calls.

So you go into the interview with an expectation that you are an expert. For that reason alone you will often win the gig just by getting on a call. If you are willing to offer a high price on that call, then you will also often make a lot more money than if you hold yourself back because you're afraid the other person can't pay or that your price is too high.

Okay, But how do I actually win the gig and prove I'm an expert?
Whether you do text chat or live calls the interview process is largely the same. Before we get into it, we need to reframe the situation...

You are not an employee or a regular job seeker. You applied to this gig as a problem solver, someone who can help this client get something done. Problem solvers are people we turn to when we need help with something. Problem solvers also tend to be in-demand by nature of their abilities. You are a problem solver, and therefore...

The client does not interview you.

You interview them.

So you can reframe this situation. It isn't an opportunity for the client to decide if they want to work with you. It's an opportunity for YOU to decide if it's worth your time for you to work with them.

When you think about it like this, then it's easy to adjust your approach from a passive, reaction-based response system, to an active, interviewer's role. You interviewing them. But how do you do this?

You can simplify it into a single powerful concept:

Just ask questions.

When you are the one asking questions it means others are NOT asking questions. Therefore, you are in control of the interview. You are the interviewer. You are judging them.

What questions?

Questions about their business.

Imagine you're an employee and it's your first day on the job? Do you jump in and get to work instantly? No. There is a week or so of ease-in period. It's a time when you're new, and you have to learn the ropes. So what do you spend your time doing? Asking questions.

You ask about the job. The software they use. How to handle various situations. Sure, you might relate the current situation back to past situations or past processes you applied at other jobs, but ultimately you will spend time asking questions about the current position. You do this because you have to learn how things work with this employer.

It's exactly the same when you interview with a client. You are going to ask the same sort of questions...

  • What is your current approach?
  • What isn't working now?
  • What else do you need help with?
  • What problems are you trying to solve?
  • What software systems do you use?
  • Who do you currently work with?
  • How do you handle X situation?
  • What is your goal?
  • What do you want from me as a freelancer?
  • What hasn't worked for you in the past...

These questions are things that you will naturally need answered whether it's on a call, in text chat, or after you start working. At some point you need to know about their business to deliver what they want, so you might as well ask in the interview phase and look like an expert rather than waiting until things go wrong and saying, "oh, I probably should've asked about that."

What if the client asks me questions?
Answer their question briefly, and then ask another question to take back control of the call. There's nothing wrong with answering their questions, but if you give them the opportunity, they will keep asking and they will regain control.

If you respond then ask you will keep control.

How do I know I'm asking the right questions?
The client will say, "aha, I never really thought about it like that" or "ah! I hadn't considered that..." or "hmm...that's a great question!"

If all else fails, just ask something, ANYTHING.

But try to keep it business-centered (preferably on their business).

What happens after you ask questions?
Eventually the client will feel like you've spent enough time talking together. 15 minutes. 30 minutes. 1.5 hours... In reality you will have spent very little time talking. Mostly you've just kept quiet and listened (because who does that these days...) and if you've asked enough questions the client will eventually say something like...

"So, where do we go from here?"

That's your cue to do the following:

  1. Recap what you've covered so far
  2. Describe how you can help with that
  3. Offer a price or get off the call (if you're on one)

Recapping what you've covered...

You: "Alright Tom, so far you told me you need help with email copywriting, sales funnel automation, and Facebook Ad copy as well as copy for your website home page, right?"

Tom: "Yes, that's right."

You: "Great, and I can help you with all of that. To start I'll craft an email series that we can turn into an automated sales funnel and then we can run Facebook ads to a landing page for opt-ins to build your list and put your sales on autopilot."

Tom: "Sounds great!"

You: "Great! I can get started immediately and can finish the email series in 1 week. To have me do this for you it's $5,000."

Pause.
Pause.
Pause.

Tom: "Umm...do I have to pay it all at once?"

You: "I offer split payments for some clients. You would need to fund AND release the first milestone for half and the other half will be due on delivery. Sound good?"

Tom: "Okay, I can do that."

The end.

Or if you choose to get off the call you will just let Tom know that you want to take some time to consider his needs, and will draft a proposal for him outlining how you can help and giving him options customized for him. Also be sure to let him know WHEN you will send the proposal by.

In Summary:

  • You do not need to use high-pressure sales tactics
  • You do not need to be an expert to appear an expert
  • Text Chat = Low Pay Gigs
  • Live Call = High Pay Gigs
  • Ask questions (even if you forget everything else)
  • Better questions = better results
  • You know the client is ready to be sold when he says "where do we go from here."
  • You can offer your price on the call or off
  • If it's on the call, you better be prepared to say the price out loud and stfu afterward
  • Throughout all of this you are interviewing them
  • If your voice waivers because you doubt your prices, you will lose the sale

There's a lot that goes into sales even though it's relatively simple. I'm short on time and trying to sum all of this up in a single post and it's not easy to do. I don't have time to go back and cut it down to size properly SO...

If you have questions about sales or any other part of the Upwork process up to this point, please feel free to post them in a response to this post. I will follow up.

HOMEWORK
Prepare yourself mentally to get on live calls if your goal is to make big sales, or if you're just doing this as a side hustle, practice what you will say in text chat to move clients forward toward the sale.

PRO TIP
Everything you say to the client PRE-SALE should be focused on moving them toward that sale. If sales were a 5k you would kick off at the starting line and run toward the finish line. The finish line is where the sale happens. In between the start and finish line you put all your effort into getting to the finish line. If you quit too early, or don't push hard enough, or break your ankle, you won't reach the finish line.

Pace the client. Run with them. Always stay focused on the next finish line.

  • "When you work with me X will happen"
  • "Once we get started you can expect X"
  • "After you send the contract I will do X"
  • "Once you've released the payment I will do X"
  • "Once you leave feedback, I will do X"
  • "When you send referrals, you will get X"

This works on calls and in text. Set a goal, go toward that goal, run at the client's pace, and cross the finish line when you get there.

Ask questions.
 

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Kruiser

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Had something of a win on Upwork a few days ago and wanted to share it on this thread in case it can benefit anyone else who has struggled. The point is that things can change quickly. I still have a long way to go. But a win is a win. Massive thanks to Lex for this and his other threads.

A week ago today (Saturday) I applied to an Upwork email writing job. Guy needed a single email, priced at $200. I did a you focused proposal. Said I was building my portfolio and would do it for $25.

Monday morning guy gets back to me. Still want to do this?

Me: Sure.

Guy: Ok. Do it for free. If I like it, you can do more for me.

Me: Nah, man. I think you're probably a scammer.

Guy: Ok. Do it for $15.

Me: (Sigh.) Ok.

2 days later:

Guy: Hey, that was pretty good. I need two more emails.

Me: No problem. $100.

Guy: No. $70.

Me: (Sigh.) Fine.

2 days later:

Guy: Hey, I need help with this email series.

Me: No problem. $1,200.

Guy: $600.

Me: $1,000 is best I can do.

Guy: (Sigh.) Fine.
 
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Lex DeVille

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Things to Avoid that Will Get You
Suspended or Banned
All of the actions below will get your account suspended or banned. Some suspensions are temporary, and there are things you can do to solve the problem. If you get a permanent ban, you are likely done forever. There are more suspension worthy actions than what are listed here, but these are the absolute most common things I see pretty much every day:

Saying the Word "Pay Through PayPal" or "Work outside of Upwork"
*edited because it's okay to say "PayPal" when discussing accounting work. Context is important. Don't ever ask to be paid by PayPal though.
If you say either of these inside Upwork, you are asking for a permanent ban. Do not say it in your bio. Do not say it in your proposals. Don't even think about talking about it in client chat. If your client says either of these, tell them to delete it and not mention it again because Upwork isn't great with discrimination and will likely suspend you both. Asking for payment by PayPal is grounds for permanent suspension instantly.

Sending too Many Proposals
Upwork has realized a problem with people sending tons of proposals per month and not getting hired. They've recognized that the people who do this also tend to suck as freelancers in general. As a result, Upwork is quick to suspend or permanently ban those who send a lot of proposals in a short time period without getting any responses. If you send YOU Focused proposals, then this shouldn't be a problem. Don't send 30 proposals in a month if you're not getting responses.

Having More than One Account
It is okay to have a freelance and a client account. It is NOT okay to have multiple freelance accounts. If Upwork finds out they will quickly suspend you. You may or may not get a chance to let them delete your second account. I got a second chance, and in a minute I'll show you how I got unsuspended...

Not Doing Work in Over a Month
If you don't do any work in a month your profile will be set to private. It's not exactly a suspension, but it might as well be. Once your profile gets set to private, clients can't find you in search results. You can fix this by contacting Upwork or making a post about it in Upwork's community forums. Alternatively, you can also just apply to gigs and pick up a new client, get an old client to give you new work, or pay Upwork $10 for their membership option. All of those will also move you back to public status.


If You Get Suspended or Banned

1. Stay calm.
2. Walk away from your computer.
3. Do not destroy your computer.
4. Contact Upwork's chat support.
5. Be very friendly with them.
6. Explain the problem without attitude or emotion.
7. Because you were nice they will escalate the ticket to advanced support for review.
8. Advanced support will contact you.
9. Be nice to advanced support.
10. Let advanced support know that you want to comply with them and you are sorry if you broke a rule and you only want to make it right and follow Upwork's terms.
11. It also doesn't hurt to mention you want to do what it takes to resolve this so you can get back to delivering your client work and can release the next milestone for your freelancers (if you have them). It's all just a dog and pony show to remind Upwork you are someone who makes them money (only works if it's true though).
12. Comply with whatever Upwork asks you to do.
13. Cross your fingers. Pray. Rub a bald man's head...hope for the best.
Last Resort... Pick up the phone and call Upwork directly.


Things I've Never Seen Someone Get Banned For
(doesn't mean it won't happen at some point)

1. Mentioning Skype
2. Mentioning Zoom
3. Mentioning Your Email
4. Mentioning Your Phone Number
5. Adding a link without https:// in your bio
6. Sending a link to your website through chat
7. Cancelling a contract before delivering work
 
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Lex DeVille

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What u accept a job that turns out more difficult than ur skill level and you have to return it.
Would that destroy ur reputation?
No, there's a million clients out there. That particular client might not work with you again, but they just move on and get someone else. They don't have time to spend ruining your reputation, and it doesn't show up anywhere on your profile as far as I'm aware.

I've done this several times when a client turned out to be too much of a pain in the a$$ to work with. I do believe they have a chance to leave feedback either public or private, so it's worth it to cancel in as nice a way as possible.

If you charge high enough you could always hire out the work to an expert to help out and just pay them less and split the difference.
 
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Lex DeVille

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Lex, you're a rockstar!
Thank you for taking your FREE TIME to help us!!!
Thanks for the comment Hijena. To be fair, it's not my free time. I'm being paid by indirect growth of my YouTube channel in exchange for *what I believe are* high-value posts.

YouTube of course runs back to my website for discount coupons on my other training programs, so some people may make their way back there too.

Ultimately, I'd like those who consider my other courses to know it's worth their time before they invest that $10 and enroll. But I really do hope the posts here help you too!
 

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This is awesome, I've been thinking about this for a while. Thanks Lex!

Here's what I've come up with:
Why are you doing this?
I need to raise capital to fund a business I'm starting, and eliminate some debt to lower my living expenses.

Describe your endgame:
Use the capital, experience I gain, and work portfolio to start my company.

How much money is needed:
$120,000

Who are you failing if you don't succeed?
Myself, and my family.
 

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No, it's not a free forum ad. I've paid in approximately 12 hours of value-adding content creation in this thread alone and shared my processes that have helped me grow an ACTUAL freelance business. Additionally, my other GOLD and NOTABLE posts have helped others grow full-time freelance businesses.

I've shared STEP-BY-STEP instructions on how to do this.

Where have you shared anything on this forum that taught people how you built ANY business? Where have you shared ACTUAL steps that grew your own business? Because all I've seen are bullshit vague posts with vague statistics kind of like the one you threw out in your post here.



Please stop spewing your vague nonsense around the forum. If you can back that 90% up with proven data, do so. Otherwise, get lost.



No. This is the same dumbass statement made by every bottom-dwelling action-faker who doesn't know what they're talking about.



Wrong again. You are repeating the same crap nonsense, but your nonsense has already been disproven many times over on this forum.

For instance, in this GOLD post:
GOLD! - Lex DeVille's: How to Make $1,000 a Week with no Degree, no Feedback, & no Portfolio.

And in this NOTABLE post:
NOTABLE! - Lex DeVille's - I Deleted My Upwork Account...



This tells me you not only suck as a freelancer, you also suck as a client.



I closed nearly $3,000 in gigs on Upwork last week so...yeah...

I didn't need to write all of this out though. The forum has already seen the "value" you provide. They've already judged you, and instead of trying to fix it by striving to create value, you think a better idea is to passively attack someone who called you out on your bullshit.

Smart move. Good luck.
Not again....

Welp, this means this thread is going to be a lot more dramatic:rofl:

I've just gotten an invite for an email job with a starter pay of $400.

$400!

If there's recurring jobs, it'll go up to $700. Very close to the thousand-mark.

When converted to my local currency, its like a few hundred bucks more than my monthly allowance.
Crazy!

What's even better is that my client is:
-Singaporean. My first client was ALSO Singaporean. So I have an advantage. I've worked with his kind of people before.

-My first gig (data entry) was for an educational company. THIS new gig is ALSO for education.

Effing crazy!

Will send in my reply and see how. It's like 2/3 hours since he sent me the invite. I had better fire my reply fast!

Thanks Lex! Those threads are simply life-changing!
 
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Upwork Tutorial Day 4 - How to Build Your Upwork
Portfolio Even Without Paid Client Work



Right after clients look at your overview, they scroll down and check out your portfolio. While your overview tends to tell them what you can do, your portfolio shows them. If your portfolio sucks or doesn't exist at all, then you'll probably get passed over for the next person. So today I'll show you how to build one even if you don't have any paid jobs to use as examples.

General Portfolio Rules:

  1. ANY portfolio pieces are better than none
  2. One full page is the bare minimum (4 portfolio pieces)
  3. Two full pages is the minimum I recommend to establish credibility
  4. Portfolio pieces with an image are better than without an image
  5. Demonstrate your best work even if it is unpaid work
  6. Make the first 2 pages look consistent
What Image Should I Use for My Portfolio Pieces?
There are three kinds of images I use for my portfolio pieces. Before I share them, you should know that you should use whatever makes the most sense based on the skill you offer.

For example:

  • Web Designer = Screenshot from the homepage of the website
  • Logo Designer = Images of the logos you've designed
  • Brand Designer = Images with consistent colors and style
  • Copywriter = Screenshot of website homepage copy or free stock photo image
  • Illustrator = Images of illustrations
  • Musician / Audio = Stock photo
  • Customer Service = Screenshot of website homepage (preferably with smiling face)
  • Virtual Assistant = Same as customer service
  • Sales = Image with the color red in it
  • AI / ML / Anything tech = Screenshot of app, software, or website

The 3 Kinds of Images I use
:

What Goes in Your Portfolio?

As a copywriter my portfolio pieces usually have samples of my copy. Most portfolio pieces can be made in a Google Doc for free. Either add text, images, or text AND images to create a sort of case study. However, you don't have to do this if the copy/design is already visible on the website. You can just link to it in the portfolio piece.

As for specific pieces, give clients what they want. What kind of clients do you want to attract? If it's Real Estate clients, you'd better have Real Estate samples. Think about what your clients are specifically looking for. Does a client looking for a direct response sales page want to see creative poetry? NO! They want to see sales pages and landing pages using direct response style. Give them that!

What if I Don't Have Past Clients?
If you don't have past clients, then you need to make sample portfolio pieces. Here's how...

  • Copywriters = Write sample copy in the skill style you want to do. For example, if it's email marketing, write some cold and warm emails. For direct response, write a sales page.

  • Web Designers = Build a website or several one-page websites in Wordpress. If you need a free option do it in Wix to get started.

  • Logo Designers = Make several logos in Inkscape for free or in your program of choice.

Basically just make some samples. There's no requirement that they be paid work. A lot of people get hung up on this for some reason. Don't let not having clients stop you. Create something to showcase what you can do and then load it up.

Once you create your portfolio pieces in Google Docs, then download them as a PDF because it looks nicer in your portfolio.


How Should I Title My Portfolio Pieces?
Use something relatively short that clearly describes the piece. If it's a creative piece, then it's okay to use a creative title. You will also want to use your skill keyword in some of your titles to help rank for SEO.

NOTE: You can sort your portfolio pieces so you can put the best stuff on the front page even if it's buried 10 pages deep right now. Click the opposite direction arrows for this option on any portfolio piece.

Screenshot 2019-03-16 at 6.39.22 AM.png


What Goes In the Description?

Obviously this is the place to describe the work. Be sure to add something in there. I use my description space to write full-length copy. You only need around a paragraph for other types of gigs and skills. Be sure to use your keyword if you can to help rank for SEO.

Screenshot 2019-03-16 at 6.41.28 AM.png


What Tags Should I Use?
I use a wider range of skill tags than in my profile tags. At the very least you'll want to use your keyword tag in your tags area. As long as you have that, you can put whatever else you want in here. I recommend keeping them relevant. If you're a copywriter, use copywriting tags.


Thoughts on Consistency
This is a minor thing, but consistency is important if you want to create a professional look. Make sure your first 2 pages of pieces use a consistent image. It doesn't need to be the exact same image, but it should look similar in terms of style to the other images. For instance, my images all use my brand colors. It shows the client that you have your shit together. You're not all over the place.

Screenshot 2019-03-16 at 6.42.54 AM.png


Linking Out to Your Website

Inside each portfolio piece there is a place where you can add a link to the piece of work. You can link to a client's website or your own. Either is fine. If you want to go a step beyond to get clients to click the link, you can use your description to lead them in that direction.

For instance, some of my portfolio pieces tell a story, but then it ends abruptly on a cliffhanger and says something like, "...continue reading on my website at lexdeville.com"

This will trigger clients to click to your website. If you were so inclined, you could then deliver the content, and maybe have a contact form on the bottom of the page, or possibly an email opt-in. Either of these could help you connect with the client beyond the usual means if you catch my drift...

Screenshot 2019-03-16 at 6.44.09 AM.png


Final Thoughts
Poor Upwork portfolios lead to poor results. This is one of the biggest missed opportunities most freelancers make. Not only is your portfolio a chance to establish credibility and authority, when done right it helps you rank for SEO so you show up higher in search results. So spend some time on this, but NOT TOO MUCH TIME! If you're just getting started, get at least one page of portfolio pieces done and loaded in. Even if they're not your best work, it's better than nothing.


HOMEWORK
Your homework today is to create 4 portfolio pieces. If possible use work you've done in the past to create these. Doesn't matter if it was paid work or not. We want speed and momentum, not to waste time on creating new pieces if you don't have to. So create at least 4 portfolio pieces and load them into your profile. Add at least a 1 paragraph description and relevant tags and a title with your keyword in it. Do this now!
 
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Lex DeVille

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I want to give this a try...

My Day 0 Homework:

1. Why are you doing this?

I am doing this because I am simply going no where fast. I work two jobs, a full-time and a part-time job, and it is a lot of work, with little pay, and I honestly don't want to be doing them for the rest of my life. I want to make some real money, so I can pay down my debt, save some money, get out of my parents' house and get my own place, and start some kind of business so that my life can go in a better direction.

2. Describe your endgame in specific detail...

I honestly couldn't describe the endgame in detail. I have no way of knowing if I can get there. I want to have my own business, which is either my own videogame company, an online fastlane business, or both. The key is money. The key to everything is money. And you have to work really hard for it. I'm doing whatever I can to make my life better.

3. How much money do you need to earn to make this worth it?

If we are referring to doing the work on Upwork, I'd be content with $1000 or $2000 a week.

4. Who are you failing if you give up or don't succeed?

The only person you're ever failing is yourself. This question is very obvious to me. I don't need to be asked it, because I already know the answer.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I do have a question for the creator of this thread, Lex DeVille, if you don't mind a moment of your time.

I have no skills.

I have an Associates Degree in Computer Information Systems (networking), which was a waste of time because I didn't take college as seriously as I should have.

I have two certificates of completion in a trade school, Plumbing 1 & 2.

And I know how to do ROM hacking (which is reverse-engineer old Nintendo games).

I know some C++ programming, but the plumbing and networking, I don't have enough experience in them what-so-ever to be of any use to anybody.

My work experience is all retail. Not much skills needed there.

I am good with customer service, and stocking shelves, because of my 14 years of retail experience, but nobody is going to pay me more for doing that.

I read ahead to Day 1 assignment, in creating an Upwork profile, but I wouldn't know a single skill that I could put on there, to make me be of any use to anybody.

I do have some copywriting books that I bought a year or two ago. I only read a couple of them, and I didn't finish one (I read the Boron's letters, and the Marketing/Sales psychology part of copywriting).

Do you have any advice for someone like me, who's only skillset is in retail? Would you recommend that I go back into those copywriting books?

I've been currently reading my CompTIA A+ book (to get the A+ computer tech certification), but the last two weeks it has been put on the backburner because of all of the hours I've been working at my two jobs.

I am so lost and frustrated.

I want to do the Day 1 homework assignment, but it says to post a specific skill, but I wouldn't know what to put, which is why I'm hesitating to do it.

Any advice?

Thank you for your time.
Yes I have advice. You need to work on your mindset not your skillset.

You've got an excuse at every turn. Limiting beliefs in practically every sentence.

If you don't know what to list as your skill you have to figure out how to solve that.

I have no skills.
You disproved yourself in just a few lines down.

I have an Associates Degree in Computer Information Systems (networking), which was a waste of time because I didn't take college as seriously as I should have.
Actually, this is a useful credibility marker than can help you land gigs.

I have two certificates of completion in a trade school, Plumbing 1 & 2.

And I know how to do ROM hacking (which is reverse-engineer old Nintendo games).

I know some C++ programming, but the plumbing and networking, I don't have enough experience in them what-so-ever to be of any use to anybody.
You don't need experience to plunge a toilet, although nobody will hire you to do that online. There are apprenticeship programs to help you get experience. There are also people who hire people straight out of school for jobs like plumbing and are willing to teach them the ropes. But would you hire someone who walked through the door with an attitude of "I can't because all of these excuses..."?

My work experience is all retail. Not much skills needed there.
Sales
Customer Service
Answer Questions
Answering Phones
Decision Making
Promotional Marketing

I am good with customer service, and stocking shelves, because of my 14 years of retail experience, but nobody is going to pay me more for doing that.
Nobody is going to pay you more for sure. They would pay me a lot more even without experience because I would just use that skill, sell myself, and make it happen.

I read ahead to Day 1 assignment, in creating an Upwork profile, but I wouldn't know a single skill that I could put on there, to make me be of any use to anybody.
I'm not going to tell you what to put in there. You need to develop resources for problem solving because you will need them for freelancing.

Ask yourself questions:

I wouldn't know a single skill that I could put on there.
- How can you go about finding a skill to list?
- What skills do I already have?
- What skills could I possibly learn?
- What skills are even allowed?
- How can I find out what skills are allowed on Upwork?
- What ways could I figure out what clients might need on Upwork?
- What am I most interested in doing?
- How can I best help people online?

But don't just ask yourself questions...find answers. This is the single biggest determining factor between someone who makes it as a freelancer and someone who is just wasting their time. If you can't ask questions and answer them on your own, you can't win at freelancing. You can't win at business. You can't win at anything until you start to learn how to solve problems.
 

pashka

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So posts like this arent clssified as free forum ad? If I make Youtube video and big post about branding than it will be ok to post?

Anyway...

Upwork, Freelancer, Fiverr and any similar websites are waste of time for 90% of people.

Sure, you can make money. I used Fiverr when I was younger and I made $1k......in 1 year. Paying 20% (a bit more or less) to a website and paying tax to your country.

Those sites are race to the bottom. You cant compete with India or Pakistan.

Clients who are looking for a freelancers there, often looking for “everything” for paying almost nothing.

I also tried to hire few people, and the work they delivered was so bad I had to do it all by myself in the end.

I repeat, you can make some money in a looooooong run but its not worth it at all.

Wrong, wrong, wrong...

I had upwork (odesk) as my main (and only) source of income for 6 years. I started working for $4hr and when I left my highest paying project was at $80hr. Right before quitting working for nom more than 4hrs a day and making $3-4k which is close to top salaries in in IT in my home country. In the past couple of years I've been part of a team of 2 people, and my partner was making $100-120 hr. Never we had an issue with competition.

My biggest breakthrough was when after a long time I increased my rate from $20 to ~$35-40. I was impressed how the quality of clients got so much better instantly. So race to the bottom only exists in the bottom slice of the market on upwork.


P.S. Interesting how I see you being wrong about upwork but at the same time I realized how I myself fall the victim of this mentality when it comes to other marketplaces (e.g. Amazon) when I'm thinking about eCommerce... Something to think about
 

Paladin

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As someone who hires for lots of gigs on UpWork, I can tell you that this thread is SOLID GOLD.

Often the person I hire bids way over my initial estimate. Sometimes I hire for jobs and I don't know what I'm doing. Last year I started my first comic book. Initially, I thought it was a single job, but then I realized that the writer and artist were two very different skillsets.

When posting my "budget" I had no idea what was appropriate as it was a new market for me. The guy I hired bid about 30% over my estimate and I'm his first job. He was able to close the deal with his proposal.

A strong portfolio and proposal can overcome being new to UpWork quite easily. I am shocked at how many applicants I see with no portfolio or a link to an external website. This is lazy and a big turnoff. The only thing worse than a link to Dribbble is a link to an Instagram profile that has a mix of your work and selfies.

I can understand driving someone to your personal website strategically, but a clean portfolio makes it much easier for someone making a hiring decision. I've also seen make website developers post a big list of links to all their past projects...including dead websites.

I'm really excited to see where this thread goes!
 

juicemania

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Just wanted chime in and say @Lex DeVille has given some really awesome advice!

I've been using UpWork for about 3-4 years now (full stack dev) for various dev related side jobs. When I first started out I chose a skill level similar to where I thought I was, as Lex mentioned, but quickly raised both my hourly and skill level to expert after I got a few good reviews.

What worked for me to land jobs in the beginning was to record a short video, using something like screencast-o-matic, introducing myself and going over a few details about the job and why I'm a good fit. I'd do a PiP video with the job description page in the background. Then I'd throw it on Youtube (unlisted) and drop a link in the cover letter. These videos were no longer than 1-2 minutes and was a good way to stand out. After you do a few of these you can crank them out pretty quick.

Also, in my cover letters I generally didn't start out with the whole "Hi my name is ...." line. I typically would begin the cover letter by asking specific questions related to the job or maybe some suggestion that could improve the project. Using that strategy worked pretty well for me. I think the quicker you can show value the better chance you'll have at landing the job.

I'll still do the video intros here and there if I think its a big job ($$) and I'm a good fit but I don't use the platform much any more.

Once you land a few good clients they will typically come back to you for more work and at that point I always handle invoicing and communication outside of UpWork.

Anyhow, just my 2 cents. Thanks for the great info @Lex DeVille !
 

ZF Lee

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Upwork is one of the fastest ways to get your feet wet with online business. You probably won't get rich on Upwork (though it's not impossible), and that isn't the purpose of this guide. This multi-post guide is an Upwork Tutorial for those who:

  • Need to get moving on something...ANYTHING
  • Need a way to bootstrap cash...FOR FREE

It doesn't matter where you're from or what your situation is. If you have semi-stable internet and a computer to work from, then you can make money on Upwork at no cost to you but your time.

In the posts that follow I will share a series of Upwork Tutorials to get you started even if you don't know what the f*ck you're doing, and even if you don't have any skills or experience right now. This step-by-step guide will give you a clear path from $0 to your first $1,000 or more on Upwork.

If you follow my posts and do as I say, you will make money...

Possibly this week.

However, you should know that your success here requires a difficult mindset shift. You will have to change how you do things. Employees do NOT make good freelancers. So here are some things you should know right now:

  • You can take your 20 year work history and light it on fire
  • Tuck your college degrees away on some shelf
  • Tear that entitled victim attitude to shreds because...

Freelance clients don't give a shit about your education and experience unless it backs up your ability to get the job done. Also, nobody owes you anything. In the freelance world, you rise to your own level based on how much you help people, and on how clearly you demonstrate that you can help people.


Also... I'm developing a corresponding tutorial for my YouTube channel, and as such will be posting videos related to each post topic. You can watch them or not. You do not have to watch them to get the information because I will also post it in text here.

Consider this DAY ZERO.

Each day I will walk you through one piece of the Upwork puzzle. Step-by-step I will guide you to get approved on Upwork, get started, and make money. At the end of each post you will find a homework assignment.

Do the homework each day.


I would encourage you to share your progress and results either here, on my channel, or both since it will encourage engagement that will send traffic to the Fastlane Forum (each video links to the forum), and to my channel which is valuable for M.J. and for myself and also promotes future comprehensive tutorials such as this one, which is valuable for you.

SET OFF AT SUNRISE TO GET THERE BY DARK

There's only one way this thread won't become another action-faking, analysis paralysis knowledge feast for you. To make anything useful happen, you will have to take MASSIVE action and get started. You will have to stop telling yourself every silly excuse. Stop being afraid. Don't let phantoms of fantasy futures destroy your dreams.

Action is the only way.

So start today. Right now. Make a commitment. Commit to do this. Commit to act and to get started. You will start this today. You will take your first step now. And that first step is to determine WHY you are doing this. What do you want to come of this? To do that, your first homework is physically to answer all of the following questions:

  1. Why are you doing this?
  2. Describe your endgame in specific detail...
  3. How much money do you need to earn to make this worth it?
  4. Who are you failing if you give up or don't succeed?

It's important to know WHY you are doing this. You can't be vague about it. "I want to be a highly paid freelancer who creates value" is not a good response for your "why."

You are doing this because you need to pay bills or debt. Because you want to quit your shitty job. Because you need money for your ecommerce business. Because you want to travel and earn money from anywhere. Because you want to support your family. Because you want to earn full-time pay with part-time work from home.

You are trying to escape something (bad job, bad boss, debt, poverty, feeling like a loser). You desire some kind of change (travel, money, freedom, skills, to get started). You are selfish and you want things in life and THAT IS OKAY.

But you need to define those things. The things you want. The things you don't want. Because it is those things that will help remind you why you set off down this path in the first place, especially when there's nothing but miles and miles of bumpy road ahead.

That is your homework today.

Do the homework. Post your response. In the next post I will teach you how to give yourself the best possible chance to get approved on Upwork. As of 2019, getting approved on Upwork is probably the single biggest barrier to entry for new freelancers.

Lucky for you, you're not a freelancer. You're an entrepreneur, and you have me as your guide. So follow this Upwork Tutorial and commit to continue even when the long road makes you weary. If you do, you may discover the distance between sunrise and sunset isn't so far apart as it seems.

By the way...

This is the only mindset post.

Get your mind right now. In the days that follow, we've got work to do.
Thanks, Lex!

I'm not starting from Day 0, but perhaps I could learn a new tip or two to make my processes a lot more quicker and effective.

This chronological formatting of things would be a lot more neater than the last two threads, which needed some filtering and copious minutes of reading.

I myself have had quite an interesting brood of clients. Some of which I did at lower prices, but the insights I got from them are simply life-changing! You get to see how they do their jobs, what they know about their industry, and most importantly, what they DO NOT know (and sometimes you help them there).


OK, I see you've got homework. I'll jump in. :)
  1. Why are you doing this?
To get a steady flow of cash that at least covers living expenses, plus some dough for Fastlane prototyping and tests, until the time I can stabilise enough to find an investor

2. Describe your endgame in specific detail...

I wouldn't mine having client invites come regularly to my profile with at most, a modest five-figures assignments, with the lowest, around few hundred.

I foresee that I would of course have developed and mastered a niche, plus, if possible, a niche that is quite close to what I might do for my real Fastlane biz.

3. How much money do you need to earn to make this worth it?

I'm not sure...haven't really thought about that. For now, I just set a target of hitting my monthly expenses, which is around the thousand mark. After I hit it, then we'll see.

Firing up the UNSCRIPTED feedback mechanism loop can expand one's mind and goals.


4.Who are you failing if you give up or don't succeed?
There's a lot of people who will pay the price if I don't succeed, but all I can think of now are my clients on Upwork...

Maybe that's why I didn't really think of a grand goal to aim for, and only set them modestly.

I just finished a gig with a business adviser. Polishing up an article for him.

He didn't know how to tell a story that would push the weariness off his clients. Clients who had lost millions of capital in failed market entries. Clients who probably were wondering how long their business would survive, to pay for their families and children to live well.

If I didn't help him write the article that delivered his message that said, 'Here I am! I can help you!', let's just say the business failure rate will have more victims.

I wrote a short story on Paul Coelho for another client.

He wanted to provide it as a gift to struggling people.

Could it have been a friend? A family member? What happened to them?

If I didn't write the short story, would they hurt themselves in depression? Would they make silly moves in their sadness and dismay?

I think that beyond the money we receive as business folks, there's an invisible currency of value that exists beyond the veil. This surrounds empathy, kindness and growth.
 

Dark Water

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What u accept a job that turns out more difficult than ur skill level and you have to return it.
Would that destroy ur reputation?
(edit: not to hijack, looks like Lex already answered but I figured I might as well not delete it)

There is public profile feedback after every job as well as a total, cumulative job satisfaction rating - which you need to hit 90%+ over time to become a top rated freelancer, which can help out quite a bit in visibility and offers sent your way. Which means ideally you are only accepting projects which you have thoroughly discussed with a client if there are any doubts prior to accepting to ensure you can add value.

However, if you can't complete a job you would take the same approach as you would anywhere else. Just talk to your client. Let them know you are in over your head. There might be other solutions, like you completing part of the project, having them adjust the deadline, or them bringing in another freelancer for help. Really, it's not the end of the world if you find yourself in a project you can't complete - as long as you communicate it well and in a timely manner.
 
OP
OP
Lex DeVille

Lex DeVille

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Day 3 - How to Write Your Upwork Overview to
Stand Out and Get Noticed


Yesterday we covered your title and tags and before that we helped you get approved and set the stage for a positive mindset. Today we're digging into your Upwork Overview so you can stand out and get noticed even if you're brand new.

Despite what many people say, your overview is EXTREMELY important. YOU Focused Proposals (which we'll cover in an upcoming lesson) are also important, but you should know that every client who looks at your proposal will also check out your bio.

Beyond that, your bio is one of the first things clients see in Upwork search results. So if it looks like every other freelancer's bio, or if it looks worse, then you'll get skipped for sure.

But before we get into how to write a bio, let's look at how NOT to write a bio.

Avoid the following instant-death mistakes:

  • NEVER start with the word "I" or "me" or "my"
  • NEVER start by talking about your education or degree
  • NEVER start by talking about your years of experience
  • NEVER start by talking about what you want
  • NEVER start by describing your passions...

All of those trigger a hazy glaze over client's eyes and they won't even see you. So avoid those mistakes unless you want to look just like every other boring, lame, self-focused freelancer on the planet!

What is important in your overview?

  • To let clients know they're in the right place
  • To let clients know you have the right skills
  • To show clients you care about them
  • To make it clear you operate as a professional
  • To establish credibility
  • To describe their pains and problems clearly
  • To set ground rules and expectations
  • To give them an action to take
  • To give them a peek at the kind of person you are
  • To answer their questions

All of these will help you stand out and get noticed, and the more of them you add, the better off your overview will be.

Okay, but what do you actually say?

Below we'll work through a sample bio so you can see what goes where. Hopefully this will give you a sense of structure in case you struggle with this. First we'll look at a full example, then I'll break it down to explain each piece.

---

Dental Web Designer

Do you need help with dental web design? Are you a dentist short on time losing clients to competitors with modern, mobile-friendly sites? If so, you're in the right place!

Hi there!

I'm Lex DeVille, a Wordpress Web Designer who helps dental businesses overhaul your website for a modern, mobile-friendly look that helps you attract more customers. I've built websites for more than 10 dental clients and helped them to:

- Instantly rank higher on Google search results
- Earn new clients almost instantly
- Look as professional as the services you offer

When you work with me you'll get clear communications, and fast turnaround. First I'll design a mock-up framework, and once you approve it we'll go forward into full production. In the end you'll come away with a sales-optimized, mobile-friendly website!

If any of that is what you need, contact me!

Respectfully,
Lex DeVille

P.S. Your satisfaction is 100% guaranteed and I'm happy to make revisions so your website works for you!

F.A.Q.

Q - Can you create a contact form for my website?
A - Yes, contact forms are one of my specialties, and I can even design it so it looks really need and is fun for your customers so they want to get in touch.

Q - Can you add a way to sell merchandise?
A - Yes, for an additional small investment I can build an ecommerce system directly into your website so you can easily sell your products and wares.

---

Alright, now let's break this thing down...

Do you need help with web design? Are you a dentist short on time losing clients to competitors with modern, mobile-friendly sites? If so, you're in the right place!

This is about how much shows up in search results. See the screenshot below for reference:

Screenshot 2019-03-14 at 5.38.50 AM.png

What your first paragraph should do is:

  • Get the client's attention
  • Talk about them before yourself
  • Show you do the exact thing they need
  • Target them directly
  • Touch upon their pain
  • Let them know they're in the right place

When I ask if they need help with dental web design, I'm directly stating that I do the exact thing they searched for. Since I asked a question, the reader is engaged. Since I said "you" I have their attention.

The second sentence gets even more targeted. If they're a dentist, then it's quickly becoming extremely clear that I'm someone who can help them. If you wanted to capture others, you could also state, "Are you a dental professional?" That way your question would also apply to their office staff.

When I mention them being short on time and losing clients to competitors I'm reminding them why they can't do this on their own, and how it's hurting them. After that I describe the outcome they want and let them know that's what this is.

---

Hi there!

I'm Lex DeVille, a Wordpress Web Designer who helps dental businesses overhaul your website for a modern, mobile-friendly look that helps you attract more customers. I've built websites for more than 10 dental clients and helped them to:

- Instantly rank higher on Google search results
- Earn new clients almost instantly
- Look as professional as the services you offer


Once you've targeted your audience, spoke directly to them, addressed their problem, and agitated their pain, NOW it is okay to talk about yourself.

Start with a greeting.

It mentally prepares the client to shift from talking about their problems to describing how you can help. We're creating a bridge for them to cross between the problem they have and the solution you will offer.

Connect yourself to their problem.

After your greeting you want to connect yourself as the solution to their problem. So introduce yourself, and describe yourself as a [whatever service they need]. Then describe how you help people exactly like them to get similar outcomes to what they want.

Add credibility to establish authority.

When I mention helping 10 dental clients I'm throwing out a number that says "I'm credible." You could also name big dental clients you've worked with, or mention how much sales increased for other clients after getting your help. All of this builds you up as an authority and a professional.

Alternatively, you could also mention your degree or experience IF you can show how they back up your ability to solve the client's problem.

Examples of credibility:

  • Increased sales by $1,500 in one day
  • Helped 3 dental clients to rank 1st on Google
  • Worked with Dental Depot, a Fortune 500 Company
  • Bachelor's Degree in Modern Web Design Concepts
  • Built 20 dental websites in the last year
  • Built a website for the dentist who cleans Kim Kardashian's teeth

Use bullet points to describe positive outcomes.

The final part of this section is bullets. These bullets are a chance to describe the outcomes the client wants. You may not know which one is most important to them. By describing several outcomes (3 to 5) you have a chance to say exactly what they need/want to hear before they act.

It's kind of like offering a child a new toy, an ice cream cone, and a video game if they clean their room. You may not know what's most important to them, but one of those 3 will probably get their attention, and getting all 3 is definitely worth the effort to pick up their bedroom!

---

When you work with me you'll get clear communications, and fast turnaround. First I'll design a mock-up framework, and once you approve it we'll go forward into full production. In the end you'll come away with a sales-optimized, mobile-friendly website!

Set expectations and overcome simple objections.

In this part I start with an NLP presupposition which assumes the sale, "when you work with me." More importantly, I set expectations that show I'm a professional and make it clear what will happen once we go forward together.

Clients have a lot of fears about working with freelancers. They've often had bad experiences. So address some of those things. Fast communication. Fast turnaround. A clear picture of next steps and what the client will come away with at the end.

---

If any of that is what you need, contact me!

Respectfully,
Lex DeVille

P.S. Your satisfaction is 100% guaranteed and I'm happy to make revisions so your website works for you!

Give the client a next action to take and sign off.

Always close out your bio with a call to action. It should be a CTA to contact you in some way shape or form. Nothing else. The next step is to contact you, period.
  • Contact me
  • Message me
  • Reply and let's chat
  • Reach out to me
  • Hit me back
  • Talk with me
  • Speak with me
  • Schedule a quick chat
  • Let's have a quick call
  • Shoot me a message
After that you'll want to sign off with your signature. There is no WRONG way to do this. Only more or less creative ways.

More professional:
  • Sincerely,
  • Kind Regards,
  • Warmly,
  • Respectfully,
  • Warm Regards
More Creative
  • Friendly,
  • Lethal Weapon,
  • Creatively,
  • With Sugar,
  • Stars & Hearts,
  • Hired Gun,
  • From My Couch with Love,
Use something that makes sense for the kind of person you are speaking to. Don't use a creative signature for the sake of being funny or creative unless that's what your audience expects to see.

Add a P.S. statement.

The P.S. section is optional, but I like to use it as a last-ditch effort to grab client attention and say one more thing that might be the weight that tips the scale.

Here are some things you could write there:

  • Satisfaction guarantee
  • Keep my info in case you need me later
  • Did I mention I offer fixed-rates?
  • Happy to make revisions until it's right for you

---

F.A.Q.

Q - Can you create a contact form for my website?
A - Yes, contact forms are one of my specialties, and I can even design it so it looks really need and is fun for your customers so they want to get in touch.

Q - Can you add a way to sell merchandise?
A - Yes, for an additional small investment I can build an ecommerce system directly into your website so you can easily sell your products and wares.


Easily extend the length of your bio WHILE adding value with a F.A.Q. section.

This last piece is optional but I really like to have it because:

  1. It's an easy way to make sure your overview is long enough for SEO
  2. It gives you a chance to address OTHER services you can offer
  3. It answers common questions clients might have about working with you
  4. It gives you one more chance to catch their attention
  5. It gives you one more chance to overcome objections

Think about what questions your clients will likely have. What limiting beliefs do they have that would stop them from contacting you? Try to answer those in your FAQ.

Alright...

That pretty much wraps it up for your bio.

There's a free template you can download here if you want something to fill in the blank, or to see another example bio I wrote.

HOMEWORK
Your homework today is to research your audience and then craft your bio using a YOU Focus. Remember to target their problems early on. Bridge them over to your solution. Offer them the outcomes they want, and finally...call them to action. Get on it. Do this now!
 

Raoul Duke

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Thanks Lex!

Doing my profie up today and making it sexy as hell.

This will be great for an additional revenue stream and inject some cash for my main Business.

Thanks alot for everything.
Why bother? You're competing against, India and Pakistan. You will not win!!! Stay AWAY!!!
 

cwalto12

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Just wanted to add to Lex's ego a little bit.

I followed his last thread and signed up for his emails last year when I was experimenting with Upwork. The only skill I had was growing an Instagram account for a home decor page (one of my failed first businesses). I leveraged that page to get jobs on Upwork because the Instagram page was decently successful.

I ended up working with a great guy that had a business on the other side of the country. We became internet friends and he referred me to 3 of his friends.

I started at $5 an hour...worked my way up to $20 an hour and got the "rising talent" badge in 2 weeks.

Then I landed a real world job (using my actual degree) that gave me a great raise, so I stopped Upwork.

Follow Lex's instructions guys. He is brilliant at this game.
 

Schwarz

Half Man ; Half Goat
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My first 2 proposals were ignored and that's because I have no portfolio work to back up my skills.
That's a belief.
I believed it until last week when I got my first job without having any portfolio work or education to back up my skills!

A lot of it is about finding a specific client that clicks with you, that has the same interests as you. For example, this guy needed help on the Self Help niche, I had a lot of knowledge on the subject, so I could actually call him out on it in the proposal.

Do not let those beliefs hold you back from sending more proposals! That's the mistake I've been making over the past weeks.
 

1step

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We were hiring a copywriter a year or so ago and Lex was one of the people who applied. We got tons of applications but it was quite interesting to see Lex's in comparison to everyone else. His was far and away the best of the bunch, I obviously recognized Lex's name and picture when I was going through the process but I took a step back to evaluate all the profiles and cover letters just to see what everyone was doing and I can't imagine anyone in my shoes wouldn't have hired Lex for the job. If you do what he does I can only imagine you will have lots of success on Upwork, despite what some may think there are people spending real money on Upwork and NOT just looking to hire the cheapest person from India or Pakistan.

Would you suggest using vpn to appear from U.S/U.K? :D
As someone who hires often on Upwork I see this often, when I notice it I instantly decline them. I think for most people it doesn't matter where you are from and would be best to just be honest.

I got accepted using your video, but how do you get jobs with no feedback? No one is going to hire someone with no history.
As someone who hires on upwork I will say I would often pass over someone with no work history but it depends on the type of job. I think in some areas a new profile wouldn't be as important, for instance I can recognize good copy, if I am hiring for copywriting and your cover letter is on point then it doesn't matter about past history because clearly I can see you can get the job done. Same with design or article writing. If you are going for an area where past feedback is important I think the best bet would be to find a client who is looking for consistent work do the first job at a discount then you can impress them with your skills and get a review to start building your portfolio. Be personable and human, be upfront about the need to build your profile and promise lots of value.

Can I use my middle name and surname to register on upwork? Or should the name correspond exactly with my credit card?
I go by my middle name and my Upwork profile is under my middle name.

Got insta-accepted for article writing, optimized overview, took three tests, came out top 20% on two and "above average" on the third. Now to some portfolio pieces and submit my first proposals. Fingers crossed.
Congrats! We might be in need of a writer in the coming months, message me your upwork profile if you are interested.
 

Timmy C

I Will Not Stop!
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So posts like this arent clssified as free forum ad? If I make Youtube video and big post about branding than it will be ok to post?

Anyway...

Upwork, Freelancer, Fiverr and any similar websites are waste of time for 90% of people.

Sure, you can make money. I used Fiverr when I was younger and I made $1k......in 1 year. Paying 20% (a bit more or less) to a website and paying tax to your country.

Those sites are race to the bottom. You cant compete with India or Pakistan.

Clients who are looking for a freelancers there, often looking for “everything” for paying almost nothing.

I also tried to hire few people, and the work they delivered was so bad I had to do it all by myself in the end.

I repeat, you can make some money in a looooooong run but its not worth it at all.

Because you believe that you are right.
 

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